Admiral
- Built in Tacoma in 1940 for Eberg Andersen, Tacoma. 15 gross tons. 36 feet #239457. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 100.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 683 tons and 900 M capacity, was built in 1899 at North Bend, Ore., for the Pacific Shipping Co., San Francisco. She was wrecked with no loss of life on the Columbia River Bar, January 13, 1912. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral
(Schooner) - American schooner, 605 tons, was driven into the south jetty of the Columbia bar, January 13, 1912. The crew was rescued but the vessel drifted across the river mouth and capsized, becoming a total loss. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 683 tons and 900 M capacity, was built in 1899 at North Bend, Ore., for the Pacific Shipping Co., San Francisco. She was wrecked with no loss of life on the Columbia River Bar, January 13, 1912. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral (1)
The ADMIRAL was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing vessel, built in New York by the celebrated shipbuilder William H. Webb, and launched in 1846. 929 tons; 160 ft 2 in x 35 ft 8 in x 25 ft 4 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 decks; draft 19 feet. The ship ran in the Union Line of sailing packets between New York and Havre from 1846 until the line was dissolved as a consequence of the Civil War in 1863, during which time her westbound voyages averaged 33 days, her shortest passage being 22 days, her longest 46 days. She was sold British in 1863; I have been unable to find any reference to her in the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping, but it should be possible to trace her later history through the annual volumes of the Mercantile Navy List, the official list of British-registered vessels [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 284-285. 298].-
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 October 1998]
Admiral (2)
The Bremen ship ADMIRAL, Carl Wieting, master, arrived at New York on 6 December 1852, 50 days from Rotterdam, with 255 passengers. This vessel was built by the shipbuilder Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 23 September 1848. 320 Commerzlasten/744 tons; 39,8 x 9,8 x 6 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Original owners were the Bremen firms of Hermann Fr. Weinhagen (1/3) and Julius Schaer & Co (2/3--in 1851, 1/3 transferred to Georg Heinr. Wilh. Schaer); the vessel was managed by H. F. Weinhagen. 20 October 1848, maiden voyage, Carl Wieting, master, to New Orleans. The ADMIRAL was engaged in the transport of emigrants to North America and was commanded by Carl Wieting until the early 1860's, when he was succeeded by Johann Friedrich Haeslop. In the early 1870's, the Bremen firm of Anton Fr. Ad. Schaer became managers of the ship, being succeeded in 1878 by Reck & Boyes, who installed H. N. Lauer, from Vegesack, as the last master of the vessel under the German flag. In the mid-1880's, the ship was sold to Westergaard & Hannevig (later Westergaard & Co.), of Christiania, Norway. On 1 April 1891, bound in ballast from Rio de Janeiro to Halifax, the ADMIRAL, now rigged as a bark, was stranded in the vicinity of Ocean City, Maryland, not far from Philadelphia, and became a total loss [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 215, no. 200, and 216 (oil painting by Oltmann Jaburg, 1872)]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 September 1998]
Admiral (3)
See HUNGARIA.
Citation:
Admiral Benso
- Admiral Line. Built in 1918 formerly called Tipton and Esther Wees; launched at Wilmington, Delaare. Purchased by the Admiral Line in 1927 from the Baltimore and Caroline Steamship company. Operated betwen Portland and California until February 15, 1930 when she stranded on Peacock Spit near the mouth of the Columbia River. Brown, Gilbert. Ships that sail no more. Jime Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Benso
(Steamer) - American steamship, 3,049 tons, stranded off Buoy No. 6, near Peacock Spit, at the mouth of the Columbia, February 15, 1930. Passengers and crew were saved but the vessel was totally wrecked. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Benso
(Steamer) - The Admiral Benson had a tonnage of 2,962 and dimensions of 299.4 x 45 x 22.8. Both were single-screw, single-stack vessels with reciprocating engines of 1,700 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 387.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Chase
(Freighter) - The Admiral Chase (ex-Sutransco) was sold by Stralla to the American Trading Co. of San Francisco, passing within a few months to W. R. Carpenter of Sydney, Australia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Day
- The Admiral Day (ex-Suterrnco) was sold in 1940 to the American Trading Co. and resold almost immediately to W. R. Carpenter of Sydney, Australia. En route to that port her cargo shifted off Diamond Head on September 2 and she put in at Honolulu listing badly. She departed after restowing and was wrecked on Canton Island September 11. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Day
(Steamer) - In 1932 four of the steamships recently purchased from the defunct Transmarine Corporation of the Submarine Boat Co. were refitted for coastwise freight service by the Admiral Line and renamed as follows: Sulermco to Admiral Day, Sugillenco to Admiral Wood, Surico to Admiral Gove and Sulaiderco to Admiral Senn. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Evans
(Steamer) - As a result of this merger, the Admiral Line, with the departure of the steamer Admiral Evans from Puget Sound on July 25, extended its Alaska service to include Skagway, having formerly made its northern termini at Seward and Knik on Cook Inlet. The extension of service was made to enable the company to compete for its share of the greatly increased passenger and freight business going through Skagway to the interior since the purchase of the Northern Navigation Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.239.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Goodr
(Schooner) - The steam schooner Admiral Goodrich was sold by the Admiral Line to the National Steamship Co. of California and was renamed Noyo.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Gove
- Four of the former Submarine Boat Co. vessels purchased from the Dollar Steamship Co. by the Portland-California subsidiary of the Admiral Line were disposed of in 1939, the Admiral Gove (ex -Surico) and Admiral Wood (ex - Sugillenco) passing to A. C. Stralla of San Francisco. The latter vessel was resold a few months later to the government of Thailand, being renamed Sisunthon Nawa. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Knigh
(Steamer) - Wood steamer; 1 deck, 2 masts; 630 tons; 142.2 x 35.7 x 12.3 feet; 24 crew; freighter. Built in 1916 at Seattle as the Portland. Purchased by the Admiral Line in 1919 and renamed Admiral Knight. Burned in the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, July 27, 1919. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Mayo
(Motorship) - The wooden motorship Admiral Mayo was sold to Capt. Harry W. Crosby for the Alaska cannery trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Nicho
(Steam schooner) - The steam schooner Admiral Nicholson, originally the Northland of the former Northland Steamship Co., while attempting to assist the Lindaner, stranded at almost the same point on the same day. The wreck was purchased by the C. K. West Transportation Co., who scrapped the vessel, replacing her on the Oregon coastal route with the motorship Patterson. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 356.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Peopl
(Steamer) - Steel steamer; I deck, 2 masts; 3,133 tons; 299.4 x 45 x 22.8 feet; 28 crew; 200 passengers; 11.3 knots. Built in 1918 at Elizabeth, New jersey. Formerly was the Plainfield and Mary Weems. Purchased by the Portland California Steamship Company in 1927 from the Baltimore and Carolina Steamship Company. Operated by Admiral Line on Portland to California route between 1927 and 1933. Sold to Northland Transportation Company ill 1934 and renamed North Sea Stranded on British Columbia coast, 1947. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Rodma
(Steam schooner) - The wooden steam schooner Admiral Rodman built at Fairhaven, California in 1899 and operated in Northwest waters by the Border Line Transportation Co. under her original name, Despatch, and later by the Admiral Line, was scrapped at Seattle following a long layup and a fire which damaged her considerably. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Rodnf
(Steamer) - Wood steainer; 1 deck, 2 masts; 1,101 tons; 175 x 36 x 14 feet; 19 cre\%,; 75 passengers; 8 knots. Built in 1899 at Fairhaveii, California, as Despatch. Purchased by Admiral Line in 1919. Operated between 1919 and 1930 in Alaskan trade. Burned at Seattle in 1937. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Roger
- The Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company of Seattle scrapped the veteran coastal liner Admiral Rogers (ex-Spokane), which had proved unprofitable in her last role as a San Juan Island resort hotel. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 557.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Samps
- Admiral Sampson of the Alaska-Pacific Steamship Company on Puget Sound to California Route. 1910. Tacoma Daily Ledger, p. 31. Gibbs, James A. Sentinels of the North Pacific. Pacific Coast Lighthouses, p. 151-152.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Sims
(Motor schooner) - The wooden motor schooners Admiral Sims and Admiral Mayo, newly built as part of the wartime construction program of the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co., were also taken over prior to completion and assigned to this service, Admiral Sims having been launched a month before as the Samuel H. Hedges. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1917, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966., p. 289.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Wainw
(Freighter) - 1927 Steamer, steel, freighter, two-decked, two masts, 1,783 tons, 221.5'x 40'x 22.5', built at Long Beach, California in 1913. Aka as Grace Dollar. She and her crew of 27 became stranded on the Coquille River bar. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Watso
(Steamer) - The Pacific Alaska navigation Company refitted and renamed the steamer Admiral Watson in 1913. The newly fitted-out Admiral Watson joined the recently formed Admiral Line. In 1915 the steamer sank at the dock but was subsequently raised and continued her career in the Admiral Line (Newell 1966:216, 345, 378, Argonauts 1988, Gibbs 1955:293).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Wiley
(Freighter) - The Admiral Wiley (ex - Surichco), having passed to the American Trading Co. of San Francisco in 1939, departed Port Moresby, New Guinea for San Francisco on June 11, 1940, and two days later stranded on the coast of New Guinea. There were no casualties in either accident, but both vessels and their cargoes were total losses.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Wood
(Freighter) - The Admiral Wood (ex-Sugillenco), having been purchased by A. C. Stralla in 1939 for $75,000 was resold early in 1940 to P. E. Soto of Seattle for $117,000 and renamed Martin Sivertsen. Later in the year she also passed to Thailand at another large increase in price and was renamed Sisunthon Nawa. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiralty
- Built in Tacoma in 1930 for Coaswise Fisheries. 62 gross tons. 64.7 feet. # 22905. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 100.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Admiral
December 6, 1906 Fully rigged ship, built at Boston in 1869. En route under Captain E. R. Sterling, Mukilteo-San Francisco with a cargo of lumber. The ship went under. Three days later the British ship Barcore, sailing some 200 miles off the mouth of the Columbia, came across some wreckage, including the roof of the cabin; clinging to it-were a portion of the crew, two of whom were dead, and Mrs. Catherine Martin, wife of the 1st mate. The backboard of the captain's gig, with the name Great Admiral carved into it, was found some years later tacked to a native hen-house in Hawaii. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Admiral (full Rigged Ship)
The American full rigged ship Great Admiral, Captain E. R. Sterling, Boston built in 1869 and for several years engaged in the Puget Sound lumber trade departed from Mukilteo for San Pedro on December 1, 1906. Offshore she was beset by heavy gales and began leaking badly, and by December 6 she was completely under water, being kept from going to the bottom only by the bouyancy of her lumber cargo. The crew, with Mrs. Catherine Martin, the wife of the first mate, huddled on top of the main cabin, the only area above water. The ship's cook and cabin boy died of exposure during the night, but the following morning the British square-rigger Barcore, outward bound from Puget Sound for Australia, sighted the wreckage and removed the survivors, transferring them on Christmas Eve to the inward bound Andrew Welch, which landed them at San Francisco. xxxx, p. 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Port Admiral (schooner)
The well-known San Juan Island schooner Port Admiral, carrying a full cargo of lumber and in charge of Capt. Harry Barlow, was wrecked 20 miles south of Wrangell during a blinding snowstorm on the morning of February 9. Capt. Barlow sold the wreck, which was towed to Wrangell and the cargo salvaged, and returned to Puget Sound, where he obtained the little passenger steam launch Mocking Bird and took her north for Skagway - Dyea ferry service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 42
Citation: Tacoma Public Library