Abby Palmer
- Originally named Blackmore. which capsized and sank in Mission Bay, San Francisco April 8, 1896. Raised and refurbished and became Star of England. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969. p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ada Iredale
(Bark) - William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, William L. Cargoes. Matson's first century in the Pacific, p. 9, 18, 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Adalia
The screw steamer ADALIA was built in 1864 in Sunderland by William Doxford & Sons. 1,270 tons; 231.6 feet long x 32 feet broad x 17.7 feet depth of hold; iron construction. 29 November 1869, made a single round-trip voyage from Liverpool to Charleston, SC, chartered by the Liverpool & Charleston Steamship Line. 24 June 1872, bound from London for Quebec with 120 passengers and a general cargo, wrecked on the south side of St. Paul's Island, Cape Breton [New York Herald, 27 June 1872, 20e; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 727-728]. The Quebec newspapers from 26 June onwards should contain accounts of the wreck.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 July 1997]
Adelaide Metcalf
The ship ADELAIDE METCALF, 673 tons, was built in Damariscotta, Maine, in 1849, and registered at New York on 7 May 1850 [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 17]. There is no reference to her in either Fairburn's Merchant Sail or Cutler's Queens of the Western Ocean, so I know nothing about her other than the following 2 voyages to New York: 1852 Apr 29 - Ship ADELAIDE METCALF, of Boston, Scott, master, arrives at New York, 27 days from Antwerp, with 337 passengers to R. W. Trundy. 1855 Mar 27 - Ship ADELAIDE METCALF, Hanson, master, arrives at New York, from Havre 14 Feb 1855, with 136 passengers to Metcalf & Lovejoy. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]
Admiral
- Built in Tacoma in 1940 for Eberg Andersen, Tacoma. 15 gross tons. 36 feet #239457. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 100.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 683 tons and 900 M capacity, was built in 1899 at North Bend, Ore., for the Pacific Shipping Co., San Francisco. She was wrecked with no loss of life on the Columbia River Bar, January 13, 1912. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral
(Schooner) - American schooner, 605 tons, was driven into the south jetty of the Columbia bar, January 13, 1912. The crew was rescued but the vessel drifted across the river mouth and capsized, becoming a total loss. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 683 tons and 900 M capacity, was built in 1899 at North Bend, Ore., for the Pacific Shipping Co., San Francisco. She was wrecked with no loss of life on the Columbia River Bar, January 13, 1912. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral (1)
The ADMIRAL was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing vessel, built in New York by the celebrated shipbuilder William H. Webb, and launched in 1846. 929 tons; 160 ft 2 in x 35 ft 8 in x 25 ft 4 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 decks; draft 19 feet. The ship ran in the Union Line of sailing packets between New York and Havre from 1846 until the line was dissolved as a consequence of the Civil War in 1863, during which time her westbound voyages averaged 33 days, her shortest passage being 22 days, her longest 46 days. She was sold British in 1863; I have been unable to find any reference to her in the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping, but it should be possible to trace her later history through the annual volumes of the Mercantile Navy List, the official list of British-registered vessels [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 284-285. 298].-
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 October 1998]
Admiral (2)
The Bremen ship ADMIRAL, Carl Wieting, master, arrived at New York on 6 December 1852, 50 days from Rotterdam, with 255 passengers. This vessel was built by the shipbuilder Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 23 September 1848. 320 Commerzlasten/744 tons; 39,8 x 9,8 x 6 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Original owners were the Bremen firms of Hermann Fr. Weinhagen (1/3) and Julius Schaer & Co (2/3--in 1851, 1/3 transferred to Georg Heinr. Wilh. Schaer); the vessel was managed by H. F. Weinhagen. 20 October 1848, maiden voyage, Carl Wieting, master, to New Orleans. The ADMIRAL was engaged in the transport of emigrants to North America and was commanded by Carl Wieting until the early 1860's, when he was succeeded by Johann Friedrich Haeslop. In the early 1870's, the Bremen firm of Anton Fr. Ad. Schaer became managers of the ship, being succeeded in 1878 by Reck & Boyes, who installed H. N. Lauer, from Vegesack, as the last master of the vessel under the German flag. In the mid-1880's, the ship was sold to Westergaard & Hannevig (later Westergaard & Co.), of Christiania, Norway. On 1 April 1891, bound in ballast from Rio de Janeiro to Halifax, the ADMIRAL, now rigged as a bark, was stranded in the vicinity of Ocean City, Maryland, not far from Philadelphia, and became a total loss [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 215, no. 200, and 216 (oil painting by Oltmann Jaburg, 1872)]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 September 1998]
Admiral (3)
See HUNGARIA.
Citation:
Admiral Benso
- Admiral Line. Built in 1918 formerly called Tipton and Esther Wees; launched at Wilmington, Delaare. Purchased by the Admiral Line in 1927 from the Baltimore and Caroline Steamship company. Operated betwen Portland and California until February 15, 1930 when she stranded on Peacock Spit near the mouth of the Columbia River. Brown, Gilbert. Ships that sail no more. Jime Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Benso
(Steamer) - American steamship, 3,049 tons, stranded off Buoy No. 6, near Peacock Spit, at the mouth of the Columbia, February 15, 1930. Passengers and crew were saved but the vessel was totally wrecked. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Benso
(Steamer) - The Admiral Benson had a tonnage of 2,962 and dimensions of 299.4 x 45 x 22.8. Both were single-screw, single-stack vessels with reciprocating engines of 1,700 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 387.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Chase
(Freighter) - The Admiral Chase (ex-Sutransco) was sold by Stralla to the American Trading Co. of San Francisco, passing within a few months to W. R. Carpenter of Sydney, Australia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Day
- The Admiral Day (ex-Suterrnco) was sold in 1940 to the American Trading Co. and resold almost immediately to W. R. Carpenter of Sydney, Australia. En route to that port her cargo shifted off Diamond Head on September 2 and she put in at Honolulu listing badly. She departed after restowing and was wrecked on Canton Island September 11. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Day
(Steamer) - In 1932 four of the steamships recently purchased from the defunct Transmarine Corporation of the Submarine Boat Co. were refitted for coastwise freight service by the Admiral Line and renamed as follows: Sulermco to Admiral Day, Sugillenco to Admiral Wood, Surico to Admiral Gove and Sulaiderco to Admiral Senn. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Evans
(Steamer) - As a result of this merger, the Admiral Line, with the departure of the steamer Admiral Evans from Puget Sound on July 25, extended its Alaska service to include Skagway, having formerly made its northern termini at Seward and Knik on Cook Inlet. The extension of service was made to enable the company to compete for its share of the greatly increased passenger and freight business going through Skagway to the interior since the purchase of the Northern Navigation Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.239.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Goodr
(Schooner) - The steam schooner Admiral Goodrich was sold by the Admiral Line to the National Steamship Co. of California and was renamed Noyo.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Gove
- Four of the former Submarine Boat Co. vessels purchased from the Dollar Steamship Co. by the Portland-California subsidiary of the Admiral Line were disposed of in 1939, the Admiral Gove (ex -Surico) and Admiral Wood (ex - Sugillenco) passing to A. C. Stralla of San Francisco. The latter vessel was resold a few months later to the government of Thailand, being renamed Sisunthon Nawa. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Knigh
(Steamer) - Wood steamer; 1 deck, 2 masts; 630 tons; 142.2 x 35.7 x 12.3 feet; 24 crew; freighter. Built in 1916 at Seattle as the Portland. Purchased by the Admiral Line in 1919 and renamed Admiral Knight. Burned in the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, July 27, 1919. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Mayo
(Motorship) - The wooden motorship Admiral Mayo was sold to Capt. Harry W. Crosby for the Alaska cannery trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Nicho
(Steam schooner) - The steam schooner Admiral Nicholson, originally the Northland of the former Northland Steamship Co., while attempting to assist the Lindaner, stranded at almost the same point on the same day. The wreck was purchased by the C. K. West Transportation Co., who scrapped the vessel, replacing her on the Oregon coastal route with the motorship Patterson. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 356.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Peopl
(Steamer) - Steel steamer; I deck, 2 masts; 3,133 tons; 299.4 x 45 x 22.8 feet; 28 crew; 200 passengers; 11.3 knots. Built in 1918 at Elizabeth, New jersey. Formerly was the Plainfield and Mary Weems. Purchased by the Portland California Steamship Company in 1927 from the Baltimore and Carolina Steamship Company. Operated by Admiral Line on Portland to California route between 1927 and 1933. Sold to Northland Transportation Company ill 1934 and renamed North Sea Stranded on British Columbia coast, 1947. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Rodma
(Steam schooner) - The wooden steam schooner Admiral Rodman built at Fairhaven, California in 1899 and operated in Northwest waters by the Border Line Transportation Co. under her original name, Despatch, and later by the Admiral Line, was scrapped at Seattle following a long layup and a fire which damaged her considerably. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Rodnf
(Steamer) - Wood steainer; 1 deck, 2 masts; 1,101 tons; 175 x 36 x 14 feet; 19 cre\%,; 75 passengers; 8 knots. Built in 1899 at Fairhaveii, California, as Despatch. Purchased by Admiral Line in 1919. Operated between 1919 and 1930 in Alaskan trade. Burned at Seattle in 1937. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Roger
- The Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company of Seattle scrapped the veteran coastal liner Admiral Rogers (ex-Spokane), which had proved unprofitable in her last role as a San Juan Island resort hotel. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 557.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Samps
- Admiral Sampson of the Alaska-Pacific Steamship Company on Puget Sound to California Route. 1910. Tacoma Daily Ledger, p. 31. Gibbs, James A. Sentinels of the North Pacific. Pacific Coast Lighthouses, p. 151-152.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Sims
(Motor schooner) - The wooden motor schooners Admiral Sims and Admiral Mayo, newly built as part of the wartime construction program of the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co., were also taken over prior to completion and assigned to this service, Admiral Sims having been launched a month before as the Samuel H. Hedges. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1917, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966., p. 289.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Wainw
(Freighter) - 1927 Steamer, steel, freighter, two-decked, two masts, 1,783 tons, 221.5'x 40'x 22.5', built at Long Beach, California in 1913. Aka as Grace Dollar. She and her crew of 27 became stranded on the Coquille River bar. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Watso
(Steamer) - The Pacific Alaska navigation Company refitted and renamed the steamer Admiral Watson in 1913. The newly fitted-out Admiral Watson joined the recently formed Admiral Line. In 1915 the steamer sank at the dock but was subsequently raised and continued her career in the Admiral Line (Newell 1966:216, 345, 378, Argonauts 1988, Gibbs 1955:293).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Wiley
(Freighter) - The Admiral Wiley (ex - Surichco), having passed to the American Trading Co. of San Francisco in 1939, departed Port Moresby, New Guinea for San Francisco on June 11, 1940, and two days later stranded on the coast of New Guinea. There were no casualties in either accident, but both vessels and their cargoes were total losses.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Wood
(Freighter) - The Admiral Wood (ex-Sugillenco), having been purchased by A. C. Stralla in 1939 for $75,000 was resold early in 1940 to P. E. Soto of Seattle for $117,000 and renamed Martin Sivertsen. Later in the year she also passed to Thailand at another large increase in price and was renamed Sisunthon Nawa. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiralty
- Built in Tacoma in 1930 for Coaswise Fisheries. 62 gross tons. 64.7 feet. # 22905. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 100.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Agnes Mcdonal
- A boat's crew consisting of Charles Williams, Samuel Lewis and one other, from the Agnes McDonald, disappeared about the same time, but were less fortunate, as no tidings of them were ever heard. Their boat was found several days afterward full of water, with the gulls lashed to the seats. Lewis and Williams were popular and well known members of the sealing fraternity and were experienced sealers. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Agnes Mcdonal
(Ship) - Schooner Agnes McDonald Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 440.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Airdale
(Motor ship) - 1917. 55 gross tons. 70.6 feet. Copper River Packing Company, Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945. p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Al
(Motorship) - Gig Harbor Boatbuilding. 1944. 14 gross tons. 46.4 feet. #246318. Harluck Transporation Company, Seattle. Merchant Vessels of the United States. 1945. p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Al Ki
(Steamer) - Al Ki, length seventy-two feet four inches, beam seventeen feet four inches, depth four feet three inches, at Utsalady. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alabama
See STATE OF ALABAMA.
Citation:
Alabama
- Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, Barry M. The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alain L.d
- Containership\bulk carrier. Gearbulk starts container service in Seattle, Marine Digest. July 27, 1895. p. 11-14. One of fourteen new vessels was built in Ulsan Korea, April 1985, 615 feet long. 27,924 metric tons.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaksa
- The Alaska line today, Northwest Magazine. XLIII(January-February, 1969), p. 3-5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alameda
- Edward Hungerford. Wells Fargo. p. 228. Maritime Memories; the Alameda pictured in Cordova, Alaska in 1919. Marine Digest. (September 20, 1986), p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alameda
(Liner) - There were no major marine disasters in Northwest waters during 1931, although a number of well-known vessels were lost in other areas. The famous old Oceanic Line and Alaska Steamship Co. liner Alameda was destroyed by fire at Seattle early in December. The fire broke out while she was lying at Pier 2 during the early morning hours and gained headway so rapidly that it was necessary to tow her into the bay and beach her at the entrance to the East Waterway, where she burned herself out. Capt. C. A. Glasscock, her master, took charge of the Victoria to replace her on the Alaskan run. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1931, H.W. McCurdy Maine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 412.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alameda
(Motorship) - Built in 1917. 45 gross tons. 59.1 feet. # 215146. Joe Burdette. Ketchikan, Alaska. Merchant Vessels of the United States 1945, p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alameda Numbe
(Iron Ship) - William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, William L. Cargoes. Matson's first century in the Pacific, p. 12, 19, 20, 23, 34-35, 42, 167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alarm
(Steamer) - Capt. E. W. Spencer constructed the steamer Alarm at Portland [in 1887] for use as a ferry between the city and the suburbs on the eastern bank. He operated her successfully until 1889 and then disposed of her to Foster & Sales. She was afterward sold to Vincent Cook, the Clifton canner man, and handled by Capt. Wilbur Babbidge. The Alarm was sixty-nine feet eight inches long, thirteen feet beam, and five feet hold, with ten by twelve inch double engines. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.347.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
- Built in Tacoma in 1923 for the Alaska Steamship Company. 4,514 gross tons. 350.4 feet in length. #222966 Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945,p.8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Iron steamer) - Three decks, two masts 3,709 tons 327 x 45 x 18.8 feet. 45 crew, 281 passengers; 15 knots. Built in 1889 in Chester, Pennsylvania as Kansas City. Chartered in September 1920 by the Big Three from the Alaska Steamship Company which had changed her name to Alaska. She was placed opposite Rose City, serving Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. She stranded off Blunts Reef, California. August 6, 1921. Out of 220 on board, 42 persons lost their lives.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Liner) - The substitution of turbo -electric drive for the reciprocating engines of the Alaska Steamship Company's liner Alaska, provided for in the original plans of the vessel, was completed in 1931, increasing her speed from 15 to 16 knots. The Alaska became the only electrically-driven vessel in the coastwise trade on the Pacific Coast, the first having been the ill-fated Cuba on the Portland - California route. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931 The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Schooner) - A two-masted schooner of 138 tons, was built by Calhoun Bros. at Port Townsend, Wash., 1867, for their own account. She was wrecked on Coos Bay Bar in December, 1869, lumber-laden for Hawaii under command of Capt. Rufus Calhoun; but was later salvaged and repaired. In 1876-9, Alaska was operated in the Bering Sea cod fishery by James Laflin, the famous boarding-house keeper of San Francisco. She was lost in Bering Sea about 1885, bringing down a company of Alameda mining men from Golovin Bay, her last owner being listed as John Lowrie, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Schooner) - December 1869 140 ton schooner owned by Rufus Calhoun. Under Captain Godfrey, the three-yearold ship put out from Coquille with a cargo of lumber for Hawaii and ran afoul of the bar. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Schooner) - A two-masted schooner of 138 tons, was built by Calhoun Bros. at Port Townsend, Wash., 1867, for their own account. She was wrecked on Coos Bay Bar in December, 1869, lumber-laden for Hawaii under command of Capt. Rufus Calhoun; but was later salvaged and repaired. In 1876-9, Alaska was operated in the Bering Sea cod fishery by James Laflin, the famous boarding-house keeper of San Francisco. She was lost in Bering Sea about 1885, bringing down a company of Alameda mining men from Golovin Bay, her last owner being listed as John Lowrie, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Schooner) - The mystery surrounding the disappearance of the schooner Alaska, while en route from China to Burrard's Inlet, and which had been missing for several years, was cleared up in 1879 by the confession of a sailor in Yokohama, who stated that while off the coast of Japan the crew mutinied, murdered the captain, two mates and the supercargo, and, after burning the ship, escaped in a small boat. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.273.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Schooner) - The schooner Alaska was completed at Port Townsend in 1866 and made her first trip to Portland in December. She was a well built vessel of 140 tons register, constructed and operated by the Calhouns of Port Townsend. Capt. Rufus Calhoun had command for a few years and made several trips with her to the Sandwich Islands. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Steamer) - Passenger steamer, American, stranded off Blunts Reef, California, August 6, 1921 with the loss of 42 lives.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Steamer) - Launched at Todd Shipyard in Tacoma on June 2, 1923. 4,514 gross tons. 350.4 feet. Alaska Steamship Company, #222966. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 8. Maritime Memories, Alaska traveled between Alaska and Seattle. In 1954 she was renamed Mazatlan and sailed as a cruise ship. Scrapped when the venture failed. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Steamer) - The two Seattle-built river steamers Alaska and Yukon were built for the purpose of operating on the Fairbanks-Dawson run under American registry in an effort to force Northern Navigation to cease handling freight for Dawson via St. Michael. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.238.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Stern-wheel Steamer) - An outstanding job of shipbuilding, reminiscent of the Moran-built stern-wheel fleet of gold rush days, was accomplished by three Seattle firms in 1913. On March 1 the White Pass & Yukon Railroad completed plans to build two large stern-wheel steamers of 1,067 tons, 166.8 x 35, for the summer trade to Fairbanks from Whitehorse. On March 2 a contract for hull construction was signed with Nilson & Kelez, for machinery with the Seattle Machine Works, and for boilers with the Commercial Boiler Works. Although not a stick of timber had been cut at the time the contract was awarded, and the steel had to be shipped from Pennsylvania, the two steamers were assembled and launched with steam up on the Yukon at Whitehorse in less than the 102 days provided for in the contracts. The Alaska entered service late in May and the Yukon early in June, 17 and seven days ahead of contract requirements respectively. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska
(Trainship) - The usual early fall fog conditions in the area contributed to collisions in late August and September. The first of these involved the trainship Alaska and Northland Navigation Company's freight and passenger coaster The Northland Prince, which collided during a heavy fog in Queen Charlotte Strait in late August. The smaller vessel sustained a 20-foot gash in her bow and six of the 90 passengers aboard received minor injuries. The Alaska received lesser damage, also above the waterline, and both vessels were able to proceed to repair yards under their own power. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LIV.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska (1)
Built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1881, the "Alaska" belonged to the British owned Guion Line. She was a 6,932 gross ton ship, length 500ft x beam 50ft, straight stem, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. Launched on 15/7/1881, she started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 30/10/1881. In April 1882 she made a record passage from Queenstown to New York in 6 days, 23 hours, 48 mins. She continued on this service until starting her last voyage on 28/4/1894 and was then laid up in Gareloch. In 1897 she was chartered to the Spanish owned Cia Trasatlantica, renamed "Magallanes" and used for transport work in the Cuban rebellion. Laid up in the River Clyde in 1898, she was sold for scrap in 1899, but was resold and used as an accommodation ship at Barrow. She was eventually scrapped at Preston in 1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.710] -
Citation: [Email from Ted Finch to Judy Anderson - Submitted by Ted Finch - 28 April 1998]
Alaska (2)
The ALASKA: SS -liner, built by Delaware River Co. in 1889. The owner was Alaska SS Co She was stranded in fog, abandoned and sank Aug 6, 1921 at Blunts Reef (Cp Mendocino) CA. She carried passengers and freight The Capt. Harry Hobey. The loss of life was 42 --> 211 ?? Rescuer was SS ANYOX.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Sue Swiggum - 18 September 1997]
Alaska Cedar
- Marine Digest. (May 24, 1975), p. 23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska Husky
(Tug) - Alaska Husky, a larger and more powerful version of the Foss Launch & Tug Company icebreakers-supply vessels Alaska Constructor and Alaska Roughneck of 1962. Unlike the earlier vessels, which were converted from surplus Navy landing craft, Alaska Husky was built from the keel up by Todd Shipyards Corporation's Houston yard. The 176 x 36-foot vessel, with two 1,530-horsepower engines driving twin screws, were placed under two-year charter to Pan American Oil Company and was dispatched to Cook Inlet in charge of Captain Don Gordon. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska Marine
(Tugboat) - Most powerful Seattle built tug launched May 2 by Western Towboat Company, Marine Digest. (May 11, 1985), p. 11. The company claims it not only to be the most powerful but the largest tug built in Seattle since World War II. (Marine Digest also reported on the vessel in an editorial on page 2 of the same issue.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska Queen
(Tug) - The Alaskan Queen, Capt. A. Leppaluoto, salvage tug under charter to Alaska Towing & Salvage Co., burned near False Pass in the Aleutians, Capt. Leppaluoto injured in efforts to save the vessel. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska Spruce
(Motorship) - A near marine tragedy occurred off the Southern Oregon coast on December 1 when the deckload of the coastal motorship Alaska Spruce shifted in heavy seas off Cape Arago after her departure from Coos Bay with a full cargo of lumber. The vessel nearly capsized before the lumber could be cut loose, after which she was forced to lay off Coos Bay until the next day because of 25-foot breakers on the bar.* *Capt. Fred Klebingat, a veteran of the vanished coastwise steam schooner fleet, who was then in his late 70's and serving as chief mate on the Alaska Spruce, discussed this experience with Editorial Board member Victor West of North Bend: When asked (by me) what it was like to be nearly capsized he replied 'It was just all in the day's work to out on deck and cut the deck load loose...just like old times'. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LVII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaska Yukon
(CONCORDIA) - Steamer. The former Tacoma - Quartermaster Harbor steamer Corcordia, fitted with a 90-horsepower diesel, was added to the Harbor Island Ferries fleet of Joe Boles and Irving Frank, transporting shipyard workers across Elliott Bay from downtown Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 509.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaskan
- Largest boat on the Columbia River, North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, Washington and PN, Volume II, p. 103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaskan
(Freighter) - Canadian coastal freighter, wrecked on Seabird Islets between Cape Beale and Pachena Point, B.C., January 2, 1923. All hands, 11 Victoria men, were lost. The vessel sailed January 1, from Victoria with a cargo of salt for the herring salteries at Barkley Sound. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaskan
(Steamer) - This sidewheel passenger steamer, American foundered off Cape Blanco, Oregon May 12, 1889 with the loss of well over 30 souls. She broke up in heavy seas 18 miles offshore.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaskan
(Steamer) - Gibbs, James A. Sentinels of the North Pacific. Pacific Coast Lighthouses, p. 65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaskan
(Steamer) - The most expensive and at the same time the most useless steamers yet appearing in the Northwest were added to the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company's fleet in 1884. They were the Olympian and Alaskan, a pair of fine iron sidewheelers built in the East for the Puget Sound and Columbia River trade. The Olympian sister ship, the Alaskan, arrived at San Francisco, March I7, 1884, and was brought to the Columbia a short time afterward. A collapse of the boom, which was at its height when the two steamers were ordered, left them without a profitable route, and the Alaskan was retired to the boneyard in an unfinished condition. When Captain Troup took charge be put the 41askan in good running order and operated her on the Ilwaco route, Archie Pease serving as pilot, Thomas Smith, engineer. Captain Scott's first Tlephone was in the height of her glory at that time, and, whenever she encountered the big sidewheeler, passengers were treated to the finest steamboat races ever witnessed on the Columbia River. The Telephone, which was in charge of Capt. W. H. Whitcomb and Chief Engineer Newton Scott, was too speedy for the Eastern prod
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alaskan Mail
(Cargo liners) - United States flag steamship companies trading from West Coast ports were also embarked on construction programs aimed at replacing older tonnage with larger, faster and more sophisticated vessels. The first two of five C5 Mailiner class cargo liners were launched in 1968 at the yards of Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry dock Co. for American Mail Line of Seattle. The first, Alaskan Mail, was christened April 16 by Mrs. E. L. Bartlett, wife of the senator from Alaska. The Indian Mail was launched on July 27, with Mrs. Warren G. Magnuson, wife of the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee Chairman, as sponsor. These ships, among the largest general cargo vessels in the world, are 605 feet in length, with a beam of 82 feet and 22,208 deadweight tons cargo capacity. Their two General Electric geared turbines provide 21,600 shaft horsepower and a service speed of 21 knots. Luxurious passenger accommodations are provided for twelve passengers. Practically all modern ship design features were incorporated, including automated boilers, pilot house controls and bowthrusters for better maneuverability. As originally built they were extreme
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alava
(Motorship) - 1929. 22 gross tons. 41.2 feet # 228676. Pacific American Fisheries. Merchant Vessels of the United States 1945, p. 192.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alba (of 1920)
See SIERRA VENTANA (1) .
Citation:
Albania (1)
See CITTA DI MILANO.
Citation:
Albania (2)
See CAIRNRONA.
Citation:
Albany
See MEGANTIC.
Citation:
Albany
- Built in Tacoma in 1920. 44 gross tons. 59.9 feet. #220056. Robert Gentili owner. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945,p. 102.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albany
(Motorship) - 1920. 44 gross tons. 59.9 feet # 220056. Robert Gentili. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p . 102.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albany
(Steamer) - The Peoples' Transportation Co. launched the second Columbia River steamer Albany at Portland. Although virtually a new boat, she inherited a number of parts from the Oregon Development Company's N. S. Bentley of 1886. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albany
(Sternwheeler) - January 6, 1875 Sternwheel, 328 tons, 126'x 27'x 3.6'. A total loss at the mouth of the Long Tom at Willamette. The ship was built at Canemah in 1868. Her captain, Mr. Vickers, thoroughly soaked when his ship went down, died February 13th from the effects of exposure. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
- Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Indians of the Pacific Northwest, p. 30.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
- Winther, Oscar O. Old Oregon Country, P. 81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
(Chittenden, p. 220) - Visit in 1810 of Boston Ship under Jonathan Winship to the Columbia River. Murray C. Morgan. The Columbia , p. 272. also North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, Washington and PN I, p. 74. William Smith, first mate of the Albatross kept a journal Horace Lyman. History of Oregon., p. 221, 289, 291. also North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, Washington and PN I, p 79. Built fort at Oak Point. First American Settlement in the Oregon Country. Edgar Stewart. Washington Northwest Frontier. I, p. 164-165, 175, 180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
(Schooner) - Sea Scouts Schooner, The Tacoma News Tribune. September 24, 1962.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
(Schooner) - Albatross, Seattle auxiliary fishing schooner, sunk after stranding on the rocks of Midge Reef, Seaforth Channel, B. C. September 17, 1937. Capt. John Satra and the eight fishermen aboard being picked up and brought to Seattle by the steamship Northwestern. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
(Ship) - Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, Philip H. Before the Covered Wagon,, p. 169, 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albatross
(Steamship) - McDonald, Swan, p. 201-216.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alberni
(Lighthouse tender) - The 157 -foot steam lighthouse tender Alberni was placed in B. C. coast service by the Ministry of Transport, the vessel having been originally built on the St. Lawrence as a coal barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albert
(Bark) - Mr. James W. Hall also recalls that the bark Albert, also given in the first installment of the Lyman list, had an unusual distinction. For a time she had two masters, the Captains Winding. They were brothers. One owned the vessel but he was not a mariner, though he appeared in the role of master. His brother was the real master, a kind of skipper incognito. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 15, 1941. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albert
(Bark) - Mr. James W. Hall also recalls that the bark Albert, also given in the first installment of the Lyman list, had an unusual distinction. For a time she had two masters, the Captains Winding. They were brothers. One owned the vessel but he was not a mariner, though he appeared in the role of master. His brother was the real master, a kind of skipper incognito. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 15, 1941. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albert
(Bark) - The bark Albert, built at Port Blakeley in 1890 and engaged since in the sugar and lumber trade to Honolulu, was sold in October by H. Hackfeld & Co. of San Francisco to Charles Nelson for the foreign lumber trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p226.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albert Ballin
The "Albert Ballin" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1922 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 20,815 gross ton ship, length 602.4ft x beam 78.7ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation was provided for 250-1st, 340-2nd and 1,060-3rd class passengers. Launched on 16/12/1922, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 5/7/1923. In Feb.1928 she was refitted to carry 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class passengers and on 11/9/1929 commenced her last Hamburg to Boulogne, Southampton and New York voyage before being re-engined to give a speed of 19 knots. On 21/3/1930 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York service, carrying 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On 21/12/1933 she commenced her last voyage on this route and on 12/5/1934 she rammed and sank the North Germen Lloyd vessel "Merkur" with the loss of 7 lives. Later the same year she was rebuilt to 21,131 tons, length 645.8ft,speed 20 knots and renamed "Hansa" under the direction of the Nazi government.(Albert Ballin was Jewish.) On 31/10/1935 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York run and in March 1936 was refitted to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last New York voyage on 27/7/1939 and then became a naval accommodation ship at Gotenhafen. On 6/3/1945 she was sunk by a mine off Warnemunde, initially taken in tow, but failed to reach port. In 1949 she was raised by the Russians, rebuilt at Warnemunde and Antwerp to 23,009 tons and one funnel and in 1953(?) renamed "Sovetsky Sojus". She was damaged by fire prior to her entry into service but was repaired and used on the Vladivostok - Kamchatka route. Still in service in 1979. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.417] [ Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 December 1997]
Albert Meyer
(Schooner) - A three-masted schooner of 459 tons and 600 M capacity, was built at Fairhaven in 1896 by Bendixsen for J. H. Baxter, San Francisco. She was sold to a firm in Prince Rupert, B. C., about 1912, but came ba@k to U. S. registry in 1916 under the ownership first of G. E. Billings, San Francisco, and then J. E. Shields' Deep-Sea Shipping Co., Seattle. Resold in 1919 to L. A. Scott, Mobile, she was wrecked on the Florida Keys on December 31, 1927. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905 The Marine Digest. Feb 1, 1941., p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albert Meyer
(Schooner) - Albert Meyer, three-masted schooner of 1896, formerly owned by Capt. Shields, wrecked in the Florida keys December 31, 1927. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 390.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albert Meyer
(Schooner) - The three-master schooner Albert Meyer, long familiar in the coastwise lumber trade and last operated in that service by J. H. Baxter of San Francisco, was sold in February to shipbrokers and in June to the Atlin Construction Co. of Vancouver and was registered under the British flag at that port operating as a codfisher for two seasons. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p225.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alberta
See LAURENTIC (1).
Citation:
Alberta
- The gasoline engine further proved its mettle against the swift waters of the Snake River with the placing in service of the powerful supply boat Alberta by the Snake River Mining & Smelting Co. of Asotin. Although under 50 feet in length, she was equipped with four 25 -horsepower Ferro gas engines. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alberta
(Schooner) - Also in November the gas schooner Alberta was driven ashore near the mouth of the Quillayute, becoming a total loss with her cargo of fish, but all hands being saved. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.258-259.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albion
- Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American , Clinton. History of Washington II, p. 447-48. Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American , Clinton. History of WashingtonW III, p. 83-87. Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American , Clinton. History of WashingtonW IV, p. 350. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, Barry M. The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 97. Morgan, Murray C. Last Wilderness, P. 30-33. Seized and sold at auction, Carey, Charles H. General History of Oregon., II, p. 484. Three deserters settled at Steilacoom. Edgar Stewart. Washington Northwest Frontier. II, p. 44. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albion
(Schooner) - A schooner of 202 tons (old 1 measurement), was built at San Francisco in 1861 by J. C. Cousins. Nothing further can be found about this vessel. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albion
(Steamer) - The Albion was built at Coupeville, Washington, in 1898, 101 net tons, 94.2 feet long, 97 horse power, and was captained by a Captain Lovejoy- She had an open bow, designed for passengers and freight. Shortly after leaving the Canal run she was badly damaged in an accident with the steamer Chippewa, and converted to a fish trap tender.Leslie Stevens, Boats on Hood Canal, memories of Leslie Stevens, Kitsap County History. Silverdale: Kitsap County Historical Society, 1977, Book One p. 30-31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Albion
(Steamer) - The gasoline tender Albion of the Bremerton Towboat Co. caught fire from an overheated exhaust pipe and was destroyed on Puget Sound in September, Capt. Edward Meagher and Walter G. McKay, the only persons aboard. narrowly escaping with their lives. The Albion built at Coupeville in 1897 by Capt. H. B. Lovejoy, was originally powered by a small compound engine of unique construction designed by R. D. Ross. She was the first steamer on the Seattle- Everett- Whidbey Island route. In 1903 she was sold to J. B. Treadwell, making a voyage to Cook Inlet and return. In 1906 she was sold to the Merchants' Transportation Co., and in 1907 to the Angeles Brewing & Malting Co., carrying cargoes of beer from Port Angeles to Seattle. With the coming of prohibition she was laid up for several years and was then purchased by W. A. Lowman who reengined her, the original compound going into the tug Sound. In 1923 she passed to Capt. Martin Heiner of the Bremerton Towboat Co., who installed a 100-horsepower gas engine and used her as a supply boat for the fishing fleet off the Cape, in which service she was employed at the time of her loss. Gor
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alboni
The ALBONI was a "medium clipper" ship, designed and built by Mason C. Hill, at Mystic, Connecticut, and launched in October 1852. She was named after Marietta Alboni (1826-1894, the celebrated Italian contralto, who was then in the middle of a tour of America. 917/837 tons (old/new measurement); 156/182 x 37.5 x 21 feet (length between perpendiculars/ overall length x beam x depth of hold). Her figurehead was the image of a dove with an orange branch in its beak. She was originally owned by Charles Mallory, but was purchased shortly after launching by James Bishop & Co of New York for a reported $55,000. The ALBONI was originally employed in the Cape Horn trade, for which she made 4 voyages: 1. Maiden voyage, N. R. Littlefield, master, New York 11/21/1852 - San Francisco 3/31/1853 (130 days); 65 days to the Horn, 99 days to the equator in the Pacific; when 113 days out was within 300 miles of the Golden Gate, being close to the coast in a dense fog for the final 7 days. Return: San Francisco - Callao (51 days) - New York (85 days), with a cargo of guano. 2. Littlefield, master, New York 4/8/1854 - San Francisco 9/1/1854 (146 days); had a very hard time off Cape Horn, being driven back 700 miles and forced to go round the Falkland Islands twice; hove to on one occasion for 9 days; carried skysails for 60 days after passing Cape Horn. Return: San Francisco - Shanghai (52 days); Shanghai 12/1854 - New York in 98 days. 3. Barnaby, master, New York 5/5/1855 - San Francisco 10/21/1855 (169 days elapsed, 165 days net claimed). Return: San Francisco - Shanghai (59 days); Shanghai 1/28/1856 - NY 5/19/1857 (111 days, 93 days from Anjier). 4. Barnaby, master, New York 6/8/1858 - San Francisco 11/8/1858 (153 days elapsed, 150 days net claimed). Return: San Francisco - Shanghai (53 days) - Singapore - Foochow; Foochow 12/24/1859 - Anjier 1/8/1860 - Start Point 4/12/1860 - London 4/16/1860 - New York 1/12/1861 (61 days). The ALBONI was then engaged in trade between New York, Bremen, and Antwerp, the voyage on which Eduard Kohlmann arrived being her first in this new service. After the voyage, Captain Blanke was replaced by Captain Hoyer. About January 1863, the ALBONI was sold to Theodore Ruger, renamed the ELSIE RUGER, and transferred to the Hannoverian flag. She was engaged principally in the trans-Atlantic trade, but made at least one more voyage (in 1864) to the Orient (New York - Hong Kong). In 1868, she was listed as still owned by Ruger, but hailing from Geestemunde. Her name does not appear in ship registers for 1874 [Octavius T. Howe and Frederick C. Matthews, American Clipper Ships, 1833-1858, vol. 1 (Salem, MA: Marine Research Society, 1926), pp. 4-6; Carl C. Cutler, Greyhounds of the Sea; The Story of the American Clipper Ship (New York: Halcyon House, c1930), pp. 237, 357, 419, 473, 486, 494, 500, 512; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55], II.1508, 1526; III.1659, 1888, 1940, 1963, 1966, 1969, 2018, 2024, 2029, 2030, 2043, 2044, 2045, 2060, 2065, 2097; IV.2231, 2266, 2269 V.2853, 2855, 3072; VI.3629, 3659, 3661, 3747, 3920, 3937, 3942].
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 25 October 1997]
Alcalde
(Schooner) - A three-masted schooner of 321 tons, was built at Port Blakely by Hall Brothers in 1882. She was owned by Albert Rowe, San Francisco, and commanded by Capt. Peter Crack, who later was lost in the ship George F. Manson in 1898. In 1900 the Alcalde was registered at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, being then under the ownership of a corporation of that state; but as to her ultimate fate there is no information.John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,. p. 2. Mr. Lyman later reported that the Alcalde was wrecked at Grays Harbor on Februrary 14, 1904.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alcatraz
(Sailboat) - It is a noteworthy fact that in spite of the many thousands of people carried on overcrowded steamers and sailing vessels in 1858, not a single life was lost except in an accident to a cranky sailboat on the Fraser. The small plunger Alcatraz, in charge of Capt. H. Taylor, started up that river June 21st with thirty-two passengers who had just arrived from San Francisco on the steamship Cortez. One of the number lost a rocker overboard and asked the captain to jibe and enable him to recover it. The captain started to comply with his request despite the remonstrances of the others, and in coming round the overloaded boat was caught in a tide rip and capsized, drowning James McQuart, Messrs. Giron, Vachon, Ferre, Barrages, Fessier, Galliard, Eoisean, wife and child, and two others. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.78.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alco
(Cannery tender) - The 65-foot cannery tender Alco, fitted with a 140-horseower Frisco-Standard diesel, was completed at Houghton and taken north by Capt. Llovd Halverson for service out of Ketchikan. Gordon Newell,Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 352.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alcoa Banner
See SUNDANCE.
Citation:
Alden Besse
(Bark) - It was reported in 1912 that the old Downeast bark Alden Besse, prominent in the coastwise and offshore lumber trade from the Northwest in previous years, but laid up for some time following the shipping depression after 1907, had found a new career at San Pedro, serving as a floating set for motion pictures, a development certainly never envisioned by her Bath, Maine builders of 1871. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aldenham
See NINEVAH.
Citation:
Aleppo
The "Aleppo" was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1864 for Cunard Line's Mediterranean service. She was a 2,057 gross ton ship, length 292.5ft x beam 38.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Launched on 1/11/1864, she started her first North Atlantic voyage on 15/9/1865 when she sailed from Liverpool for Halifax and New York. Between 1865 and 1871 she sailed mostly between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York, but made many voyages via Boston. Her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyage started on 9/5/1871 and on 20/6/1871 she commenced the first of four Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston voyages. From 1872 she sailed mostly between Liverpool and Mediterranean ports, but between 1877 - 1892 made at least 16 North Atlantic sailings. Fitted with compound engines in 1880 by J.Jack & Co, Liverpool and fitted with triple-expansion engines by J.Howden & Co, Glasgow in 1890. She started her last North Atlantic voyage on 24/3/1892 when she left Liverpool for Boston and was eventually scrapped at Preston in 1909. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.148-9] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 July 1998]
Alert
- Hubert Bancroft. History of the Northwest Coast, 1543-1800, I, 306,308,311,318. Hult, Ruby El Steamboats in the Timber, P. 53. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, Barry M. The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alert
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 623 tons and carrying 800 M feet, was built at Hoquiam in 1902 by Hitchings & Joyce for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co. In October, 1922, she arrived at San Francisco after a 111-day passage from Samoa with copra, reporting damage to sails, jibboom and rudder-head; but was repaired and went back to the Fijis with lumber from Chemainus. On the return passage she got ashore on Niuafou in the Tongas on June 10, 1923, and was a total loss, the crew of 8 being saved. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alert
(Steamer) - The Coquille River stern-wheel steamer Alert 96 tons, 69 feet in length, built at Bandon in 1890, and taken down to San Francisco Bay in 1919, foundered near Rio Vista, Calif. on September 26, also without loss of life. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919- 1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 311.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alert
(Tug) - The tug Alert, a propeller of about forty-five tons register, was launched at Victoria in 1889 and run for several years by Captain Clarke. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 365.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alesandria
See TWEED.
Citation:
Alesia (1)
The "Alesia" belonged to the French owned Fabre Line. She was a 2,790 gross ton ship, length 328ft x beam 40.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 18-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool, she was launched in June 1882 and started her maiden voyage on 15th Oct.1883 when she left Marseilles for Leghorn, Tarragona, Bone, Almeria, Malaga and New York. She started her last round voyage between Marseilles, Naples and New York on 17th Mar.1899 and was then sold and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1132] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 September 1998] .

Alesia (2)
(Of 1917) See PRINZ ADALBERT.
Citation:
Alesia (3)
(Of 1919) See LA BRETAGNE.
Citation:
Alette
(Bark) - The Norwegian bark Alette, Vancouver, British Columbia for Yokohama, was totally wrecked on September 9, 1898 at Nishiska. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aleutian
(Liner) - Marine losses of 1929 included the Alaska Steamship Co. liner Aleutian, ortly recently purchased on the East Coast, which struck a rock in Uyak Bay, Kodiak Island and sank on May 26. Passengers and crew, numbering 115 persons, took to the boats and were picked up a short time later by the U. S. Coast & Geodetic Survey steamer Surueyor. One member of the crew was lost when he insisted on return ing to the sinking vessel to get a lucky horseshoe. The Surveyor later determined by dragging operations that the Aleutian had struck and shattered a charted rock, but no trace of the sunken vessel could be found. Capt. J. G. Nord was held responsible by Capt. Donald S. Ames and Thomas Short, composing the Seattle local board of the Steamboat Inspection Service, and his license was suspended for 60 days, although this was the first accident for which he was respon - sible in more than 30 years as a master mariner in Alaska waters. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 403.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aleutian Nati
(Motor vessel) - The motor vessel Aleutian Native was purchased by the recently formed Petrols Navigation Co., formed by Mayor Frank Edwards of Seattle and others, and was subsequently converted to a tanker.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aleutian Quee
(Trawler) - Canadian vessel sank after a collision with a 150 foot steel Russian trawler in tow of the tug Besstrashny in Queen Charlotte Sound in December. The trawlers cook Odd Gronlund was killed. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aleutian. I
- Austen D. Hemion, Letter to the editor, The Marine Digest. (February 2, 1985), p. 27. Identifies, gives background on vessel picture in Marine Digest of January 26, 1985. Austen D. Hemion, Aleutian I, Aleutian II, or Yukon? The Marine Digest.(February 23, 1985), p. 9. Further discussion or identification of vessel. Case made for its being the Aleutian I. A survivor tells of Aleutian's sinking in Alaskan waters, Marine Digest. (March 30, 1985), p. 20-21. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aleutian.s.s
- Sinks and passengers saved, Tacoma News Tribune. (May 28, 1929), p. 13.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alex Stephens
See GENERAL R. M. BLATCHFORD .
Citation:
Alex T. Brown
(Schooner) - A four masted schooner of 788 tons and 950 M capacity was built at Ballard, Wash., by Thomas C. Reed in 1903, one of five large schooners built by him for the Globe Navigation Company, an organization of Great Lakes capitalists with headquarters in Seattle. The entire fleet passed to the Port Blakely Mill Company in 1915. The Brown was wrecked on May 29, 1917 while leaving Freemantle, Australia for Manila. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander
- Steam sealer Alexander. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 443.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander
(Brig) - Peter Corney. Voyages in the Northern Pacific...1813-1818., Peter. Voyages in the Northern Pacific. Honolulu, Thrum, 1896., p. 76.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander
(Steamer) - Capt. Alex McLean made an experiment in 1893 with the steamer Alexander, but the cost of operating her was so great that the result was unprofitable. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.442.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander
(Tug) - British Tug Alexander. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander
(Tug) - The big tug Alexander, constructed on the Skeena in 1876, was this year sold to T. P. H. Whitelaw of San Francisco, who converted her into a whaler. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.377.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander Bar
(Liberty Ship (Russian)) - A strange accident befell the Russian Liberty ship Alexander Baranoff off the Aleutians in November. In this case the forward section broke off, drifted in a half circle and rammed the after part, inflicting considerable damage. Both halves of this vessel, built by the Permanente Shipyards at San Francisco, remained afloat and were later towed to Vancouver, B. C., where they were welded back together and the reunited ship, one of the few in maritime history which had collided with itself, was reassigned to the American Mail Line for operation. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 519.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander Dun
(Steamer) - The old steamer Alex Duncan, a 300-ton wooden vessel rifted with twin-screws, was reduced to a coal barge, after having served the Pacific Coast Steamship Co. and other owners on local coastal routes since 1875. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander Dun
(Steamer) - The steamer Alexander Duncan, from Hueneme for San Francisco, was wrecked at Fort Point, September 9, 1885. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1886, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 333.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander Gri
(Sternwheeler) - 1905 Sternwheeler, built at Wenatchee in 1903 by George Cotterell, owned by Columbia & Okanogan Steamboat Co. Wrecked at Entiat Rapids in 1905. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexander Mac
(Lighthouse tender) - Burrard Dry Dock Co. at North Vancouver completed the Alexander Mackenzie, a 150-foot steel sea-going lighthouse tender for the Canadian government. Powered by two 500-horsepower Vivian diesels, the tender had a service speed of 13.5 knots. Electric hoisting gear to 1 0 -ton capacity was included in her deck equipment. The hull was fitted with stabilizers welded along each side below the waterlip-e, a feature which has proved most useful in checking heavy rolling during her arduous B. C. coastal service. The Mackenzie was stationed at Prince Rupert. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950- 51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 572.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexandra
(Schooner) - The small schooner Alexandra of Kodiak stranded December 22 on Goose Island. Although her value was only $ 800, all ten of the men aboard were drowned. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexandra (1)
see MENOMINEE.
Citation:
Alexandra (2)
See MANCHESTER IMPORTER.
Citation:
Alexandre Smyers
See STEINMANN.
Citation:
Alexandria
(Steamer) - Several new steamers appeared on the waters of Puget Sound and British Columbia, the most important of them a big sternwheeler, the Alexandria, built at Victoria by William Moore. The Alexandria was the most unfortunate venture that Moore had yet engaged in, and while she was a fine boat with good power, she was a poor speculation for all who were in any way connected with her. She cost $50,000 and ruined her builder before she performed any work. Being unable to make a satisfactory settlement with his creditors, Moore ran her over to the American side until he could arrange his affairs; but the Victorians followed and took her back to Victoria, and put her on the route between that port and the Fraser River as an independent steamer. She was first commanded by Captain Coffin, who was succeeded by Doane and Insley. After a few trips she collided with and sank the Fidelater off Clover Point, for which the owners of the latter vessel recovered heavy damages. The unlucky steamer was then sold to T. Pritchard for $5,000, and after having been refitted, started out in command of Captain Swanson. She was, however, never much of a s
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexandria
(Steamer) - The big steamer Alexandria was also refitted this year by T. Pritchard, who purchased her in February 1866 for $5,000 for the Hudson's Bay Company, and after repairs she began her labors iii command of Captain Swanson. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.148.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alexandria (1)
The"ALEXANDRIA" of 1881 was an iron steamship built in 1870 by Robert Duncan & Co. of Port Glasgow. She belonged to Henderson Bros. which later became the Anchor Line. Her dimensions were 1630 tons gross, length 300.5ft x beam 33.2ft. one funnel, three masts single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Accommodation for 70 1st and 600 3rd class passengers. She made her maiden voyage from Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow. In 1871-2 she made two round voyages between Glasgow - Liverpool - St John NB and then four round voyages Glasgow - NY. Between 1870 and 1892 she made 64 trips Glasgow - Mediterranean - NY - Glasgow. In 1892 her tonnage was increased to 2017 tons and in 1892 made her last voyage Denia - Malaga - NY. She was scrapped in 1895. In 1880, she was involved with the saving of 53 passengers and crew in mid-Atlantic from the Wilson Liner "Hindoo" which foundered in hurricane conditions.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 23 July 1997]
Alexandria (2)
In the 1905-06 Lloyd's Register of Shipping, I found the following information :ALEXANDRIA Official registration # : 85768 Rigging : wood paddle steamer. Tonnage : 863 tons gross and 507 tons net. Dimensions : 173.7 feet long, 30.6 foot beam and holds 8.4 feet deep. Built : in 1883 by A. Cantin in Montreal. Owners : A.W. Hepburn Port of registration : Montreal Flag : British. Her owner was Arthur W. Hepburn of Picton, Ontario. He sailed the Alexandria under the corporate name of Lake Ontario Navigation Co. Ltd..-
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 8 October 1998]
Alf, P. 113
-
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alfa
(Gas screw) - American gas screw, 36 tons, wrecked near Ocean Park, Washington, September 19, 1924. The craft was wrecked while trying to land an illegal cargo of liquor on Klipsan Beach. The crew narrowly escaped with their lives and the vessel was leveled by the surf. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alfonso Xii
See HAVEL.
Citation:
Alfonso Xiii
See OCEANA.
Citation:
Alfred
The ALFRED, variously described as a ship or a bark, was built in Lulea, Sweden, in 1842, and was originally named AUSTRALIA. On 30 November 1844, she was purchased from Liliewalch of Stockholm by the Hamburg firm of Joh. Ces. Godeffroy & Sohn, who renamed her ALFRED, despite the fact that the firm already owned another vessel of this name. 225 Commerzlasten; 133.5 x 32.8 x 19.11 Hamburg Fusse (1 Hamburg Fuss =3D .2=86 meters) length x beam x depth of hold, "zwischen den Steven".. Masters: 1847-1847 - J. Lafrenz; 1847-1851 - H. E. Decker; 1851-1854 - H. Bruhns. Voyages: 1845 - New Orleans; 1845-1846 - Valparaiso/Lima; 1846-1847 - Havre/intermediate ports/New York; 1847-1848 - Arracan/London; 1848-1849 - Adelaide/Callao; 1849-1850 - Adelaide/intermediate ports/London; 1851-1852 - New York/Valparaiso; 1852-1853 - Valdivia/Valparaiso/Iquique; 1853-1854 - Melbourne/intermediate ports/Antwerp. The ALFRED was sold to Norwegian interests in 1855, renamed RHEA, and placed under the command of Capt. Eckersberg. I have no information on her later history or ultimate fate [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 165].-
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration=Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 August 1998]
Alfred Adams
(Schooner) - The Alfred Adams, Capt. W. H. Dyer, was captured and ordered to Sitka, but the Indian crew, having a suspicion of the experience of some of their companions, mutinied, and compelled the captain to go to Victoria, keeping a close watch on the compass to make sure that he went there. The officers of the schooner seized were detained in Sitka for six weeks and then released. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.431-2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alfred I. Bea
(Built in Tacoma in 1898) - Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Algeria (2)
The vessel ALGERIA, built by D & W Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, for the Anchor Line's Indian service, and launched on 6 October 1891. 4,510 tons; 114,29 x 14,11 meters (375 x 46.3 feet, length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; passenger accommodation: 26 1st- and 1,100 steerage-class. 1892, maiden voyage, Glasgow- Liverpool (departed 4 March)-Calcutta. 1892-1895, Indian service. 21 May 1896, first voyage, Naples-Gibraltar-New York. 19 July 1896, last voyage, Marseilles-Leghorn-Naples-Gibraltar-New York (2 voyages). 1896-1901, Glasgow-Liverpool-Bombay or Calcutta. 28 February 1902, first voyage, Leghorn-Naples-New York. 12 November 1908, last voyage, Leghorn-Naples-New York (34 roundtrip voyages). 12 August 1912, purchased by a German firm and renamed CYRILL. 1914, purchased by an Italian firm and renamed VIRGINIA. 1923, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 465. For a photograph of this vessel, contact the Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201.
Citation: [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]
Algeria (1)
The vessel scrapped in 1903 was built in 1870 as the ALGERIA for Cunard, and sailed on her Liverpool-Queenstown-New York service. She was purchased in 1882 by the Red Star Line, and renamed PENNLAND, under which name she spent the rest of her career. She never sailed in Mediterranean waters.
Citation: [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]
Algerie
See ORLANDO.
Citation:
Algerine
- Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, Barry M. The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, P. 239.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Algoa
(Freighter) - The Pacific Mail freighter Algoa ran aground on the lower end of Henriel's Bar, 23 miles downriver from Portland in September, remaining ashore for four days while Port of Portland dredges and tugs worked to free her. The Hamburg-American Liner Brisgavia, attempting to pass the stranded Algoa on September 13, herself went aground on the upper end of the bar, the two large steamers lying opposite each other and practically blocking the river. Both vessels were freed the following day. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Algonquin
(Cutter) - The former Coast Guard cutter Algonquin was chartered by Siems-Drake-Puget Sound and towed to Kodiak by the Patricia Foss following installation of a 1,200 kilowatt generator by the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Company serving as a generating plant there in connection with Air base construction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alibi
- Built in Tacoma in 1941 for Frank T. Walters. 9 gross tons. 28.9 feet. #244495. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1045,p. 103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
See ASIA.
Citation:
Alice
- French Ship wrecked near Ocean Park, Washington. January 15, 1909. Quarterdeck Review. Winter, 1977. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
- French vessel. Being sucked into the sands of North Beach Peninsula near Oysterville, Washington. January 15, 1909. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969. p.20. Wrecked on North Beach Peninsula. 1909 Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 134. French vessel of 2,509 tons driven ashore north of Ocean Park in 1909. The ship was a total loss. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
- The French ship, Alice, 2509 tons, Captain Aubert, one of the largest of the French bounty earners plying to the Pacific Northwest was driven ashore near Ocean Park on January 15, 1909 in a gale. The crew was rescued by the ship became a total loss. She was carrying 3,000 tons of cement consigned to Portland for Hind, Rolph & Co., and as the big square-rigger settled in the sands the cement hardened in her holds, holding one of her masts upright, rising from the sand or surf, depending on'the stage of the tide, until 1930 and providing a picturesque landmark for the popular resort beach area. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Freigther) - The stern-wheel passenger and freight steamer Alice, 262 tons, Ill feet, with 100-horsepower engines was built at Seattle for the Northern Navigation Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Schooner) - A. two-masted schooner of 232 tons and 300 M capacity, was built at Bean's Point, Bainbridge Island, opposite Seattle, in 1874, by C. Saunders. Her first owner was J. A. Hooper of San Francisco, and she was in the lumber trade for 30 years. In 1901 Alice was rebuilt at a cost of $14,000; in 1904 she was sold to the Robinson Fisheries Co., Anacortes, Wash., for a Bering Sea codfisher. Her last trip in this industry was made in 1925, after which she was laid up. In 1929 she came to Los Angeles to appear moving pictures, and her hull finally found its way to a mud bank in the West Basin, San Pedro, where it could still be seen a few years ago. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Schooner) - The Schooner Alice, The Sea Chest. (March, 1983), p. 82-84. The schooner Alacie was launched in the spring of 1874 at Port Blakely. She was in the lumber trade until 1903. In 1904 she was converted into a cod fisher. Retired in 1927. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Schooner) - This Alice was a schooner, probably two masted, of 146 tons, was built by Sebastian Ligouri in 1863 at Eden Landing, a spot on San Francisco Bay not far from the eastern approach of the San Mateo Bridge. She was last listed about 1878. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Sloop) - Percival R. Jeffcott, Blanket Bill Jarman, p. 25,61, 85.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Steamer) - The stern -wheeler Alice was built at Ballard (now a part of Seattle) for the Northem Navigation Co., made maritime history of a sort at her launching from the yards of Cook & Lake. A 100 x 30 foot scow was built and placed under the steamer, both beingg launched together on March 24, the Alice riding down the ways atop the scow, upon which she was towed to Alaska by the tug Pioneer, together with a smaller 65 -foot scow, for use with the steamer and larger scow on the Susitna River, where the Alice was placed in charge of Capt. Malmquist. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Sternwheeler) - Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Tug) - A remarkable example of the longevity of the wooden workboats built of carefully selected Douglas fir by 19th century West Coast shipyards was the return to service of the 65-foot tug Alice, built at the Crawford & Haskell yard, Tacoma, in 1897, and on the beach near Olympia for the past 10 years, following two years in layup at the Foss Tacoma moorings. The 77-year-old tug was purchased by Capt. Miles Hargitt of Anacortes, owner of the smaller tugs Salmon Bay and Lil Louie, formerly of Knappton Towboat Co. After having the accumulation of gravel removed from around her hull, the Alice was pulled off the beach on a high evening tide by the Lil Louie and towed to Bellingham for drydocking. In the shipyard it was found that holes had to be drilled in the ribs for each spike when new planking was put in, since the heavy spikes bent when efforts were made to drive them in. At this writing, (1976) the Alice is at Anacortes for installation of a 550-horsepower super-charged engine and modern electronic and hydraulic equipment, and the beginning of a new career on Pacific Northwest waters. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice
(Tugboat) - Maritime memories, the Alice which became Foss 18, Marine Digest. (October 5, 1985), p. 6. (il). Hull still afloat at an Anacortes marine, Marine Digest. (October 12, 1986, p. 6. Built at Alameda in 1892. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Blancha
(Steamer) - The Alice Blanchard, one hundred and thirty-five feet two inches long, twenty-eight feet two inches beam, and eleven feet nine inches hold, was built at Tacoma in 1890, and was first commanded by Captain Coffin. She was on the sands at Yaquina for three days in 1893, but was towed off comparatively uninjured, and has recently been engaged between Portland and San Francisco in charge of Captain Dunham. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.379.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Cooke
(Lumber Schooner) - Robert B. Hope,Fog and Salt Beef, tales from the last Puget Sound to Honolulu lumber schooners, The Marine Digest. (September 27, 1986),p. 11+ Robert B. Hope who is now a medical doctor spent his school vacations on the Alice Cooke and the Commodore.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Cooke
(Schooner) - An American schooner, four-masted, 782 tons, was picked up in 1926 by the tug Angeles off Cape Flattery. The schooner was waterlogged and severely damaged off the entrance to Juan de Fuca Strait. She was towed in and repaired. The vessel was built in 1891, and served 34 years In the Pacific Coast-Hawaii service. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Dean
(Steamboat) - Louis C. Hunter. . Steamboats on the western rivers. Cambridge: Harvard University, p. 611.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Gertrud
(Steamer) - An American passenger steamer, 413 tons, wrecked in gale on rocks in Clallam Bay, Washington, January 11, 1917. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice H.
- September 23,1950 61 tons, foundered off Port Orford. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Haake
(Schooner) - A two-masted topsail schooner of 244 tons, was built by John C. Haake at Port Blakely in 1867 for his own account. After several years in the Portland-San Francisco trade, she was chartered to take two knocked-down steamboats, built at Stockton at a cost of $30,000 for the Russian Government, to Siberia. She was lost off the Amur River in the spring of 1875, and although the wreck came ashore on Sakhalin Island nothing much was salvaged. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Haake
(Schooner) - The schooner Alice Haake, formerly in the San Francisco and Portland trade, was lost in the spring of 1875 in a simoon off the Amoor River. She carried as cargo two steamers built at Stockton for the Russian Government at a cost of $40,000. The wreck came ashore on Sakhalin Island, but nothing was saved from it. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Kimball
(Schooner) - A two-masted schooner of 107 tons, was built at Little River, California on the Mendocino coast, by Capt. Thomas H. Peterson, in 1874. She was owned by John S. Kimball and B. H. Madison of San Francisco, who continued as owners at least 20 years. Alice Kimball was afloat in 1900 but no record can be found of her ultimate fate. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2. Mr. Lyman later reported that the Alice Kimball was wrecked at Siuslaw, Wahsingotn, October 16, 1904.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Kimball
(Schooner) - A two-masted schooner of 107 tons, was built at Little River, California on the Mendocino coast, by Capt. Thomas H. Peterson, in 1874. She was owned by John S. Kimball and B. H. Madison of San Francisco, who continued as owners at least 20 years. Alice Kimball was afloat in 1900 but no record can be found of her ultimate fate. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2. Mr. Lyman later reported that the Alice Kimball was wrecked at Siuslaw, Wahsingotn, October 16, 1904.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Knowles
(Bark) - 302.78 tons. 115. length 28.0 beam. Built 1879 as the Weymouth. Church, Albert Cook. Whale Ships and Whaling, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Mcdonal
- Aground near Point Loma, California in 1910. Later salvaged. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Stofen
(Schooner) - A remarkable voyage from San Francisco to Point Barrow was completed in August by H. C. Slate, an old Arctic trader, who purchased the 1 7 -ton bay scow schooner Alice Stofen, a venerable craft of 46 years, loaded her with trading goods, and took her from the Golden Gate to the Arctic. Peter Peterson was mate, cook and crew, and the ancient Alice Stofen with her tiller lashed, was said to have sailed herself a good portion of the voyage. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Tebb
(Steam schooner) - The wooden steam schooner Alice Tebb, well-known in Northwest ports as the Forest King, sank in a storm off the Florida coast on September 29. Capt. Alex J. Zugehoer and his crew took to the boats and were picked up by the steamship Samuel Q. Brown. The Alice Tebb was owned at the time of her loss by the M. A. Wyman Lumber Co. of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alida
(Steamer) - The steamer Alida, which appeared in 1869, commenced running on the Victoria route in July, 1870. She made but few trips to Victoria, as she was rather frail for crossing the Straits, and in September the steamer Isabel was operated in connection with her, the Alida going no farther than Port Townsend. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.185-6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alida
(Steamer) - The Olympia's first antagonist, the Alida, was never a success, and was laid up in Olympia in 1871 after a year's work, but came out again in 1872 and ran between Olympia and Seattle in command of Capt. J. G. Parker. In 1873 she took the first passengers from old Tacoma to the new town to connect with the first railroad train to run in the Puget Sound country. Captain Starr was succeeded in command by Captains Clancey, Browner, Wilson, Grant, Parker, Morrison, and others, and James Griffiths was chief engineer of the craft longer than any other man. John Robertson also filled that position for a few months. She was out of commission the greater portion of the time after 1879, and in August, 1890, while laid up at Gig Harbor, was burned to the water's edge by a brush fire which swept down from the forest. Her engines were saved in a damaged condition and are now lying in Lake's shipyard, in Ballard, Wash. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.172.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Al-ind-esk-a-
(Freighter) - In 1982 the freighter Al-Ind-Esk-A-Sea caught fire and sank at coordinates 47 59' North/l 22 14' West (Barnard 1984).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aliquis
According to Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs; a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to 1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication No. 41 (Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]), p. 16, papers concerning two voyages of the ALIQUIS (Liverpool 23 May 1855 - Adelaide 12 August 1855, and Plymouth 4 June 1856 - Adelaide 26 August 1856) are held in the Public Record Office of South Australia, Adelaide, GRG 35/48/1855. The ALAQUIS was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing ship, built under special survey by John Munn, Quebec, in 1854. 1150/1247 tons (1875: 1125/1125/1032 tons, net/gross/under deck); measurements given variously 185.9 x 36.3 x 22.9 [Lloyd's Register, 1863]/184.9 x 35.7 x 22.9 [Lloyd's Register, 1875]/181 x 32.30 x 22.90 [Wallace]/182 x 32 x 23 [Marcil] feet (length x breadth x depth of hold). Originally registered at Quebec, but re-registered at Liverpool 29 August 1854 [National Archives of Canada, RG 42 Volume 1409, Original References, Vol.# 198 Reel # C-2062]. Official number: 535; signal code: HDGQ. The following is taken from the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1855/56-1880/81: Master: 1855/56-1860/61 - T. Pain; 1861/62-1864/65 - Scancroft [1861/62-1862/63 "Scowcroft"]; 1864/65-1867/68 - J. Davidson; 1867/68-1879/80 - F. Marshall; 1880/81 - [not given]. Owner: 1855/56-1878/79 - G. Marshall [1855/56-1857/58 "Marshall &"]; 1879/80 - G. Marshall [lined out]; 1880/81 - [not given]. Port of Registry: 1855/56-1878/79 - London; 1879/80-1880/81 - Amsterdam. Port of Survey: 1855/56-1857/58 - Liverpool; 1858/59-1868/69 - London; 1868/69-1869/70 - Liverpool; 1869/70-1870/71 - Liverpool [lined out] / Clydeside; 1871/72 - Clydeside; 1873/74-1874/75 - London / Liverpool; 1875/76-1876/77 - London; 1877/78 - Clydeside [last survey in Great Britain, 6/1877]. Destined Voyage [-1873/74]: 1855/56-1857/58 - Adelaide; 1858/59 - India; 1859/60-1860/61 - [not given]; 1861/62-1864/65 - India; 1865/66 - India [lined out]; 1866/67 - [not given]; 1868/69-1872/73 - India; 1873/74 - Guatemala. From the entries in Lloyd's Register for 1879/80 and 1880/81, it appears that the ALIQUIS was "sold Dutch" in approximately 1879/80, and re-registered, under the Dutch flag, at Amsterdam. For her later history you shall therefore need to consult the annual volumes of the Registre Veritas, the publication of the Bureau Veritas, the Continental classification society; these volumes are available, on microfilm, at the Australian National Maritime Museum library, in Sydney, which is also your best source for a picture of the ALIQUIS (see the ANMM subject guide Pathfinder No.2: Immigration Sailing Ships). Since the ALIQUIS was built under special survey, the records of this survey survive among the Lloyd's Register of Shipping survey reports deposited in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London SE10 9NF; there is a microfilm copy of these records in the Canadian National Archives, Reel # A-434 Survey # 102. Additional sources: Canadian Ship Information Database; Frederick William Wallace, Record of Canadian shipping; a list of squarerigged vessels, mainly 500 tons and over, built in the Eastern Provinces of British North America from the year 1786 to 1920 (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1929), also aaccessible online ; Eileen Marcil, The Charley-Man: a history of wooden shipbuilding at Quebec, 1763-1893 (Kingston, Ontario: Quarry Press, 1993). -
Citation: [Posted to the Australia Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 21 January 1998]
Aliya
See JERUSALEM.
Citation:
Alki
(Fireboat) - A third fireboat for the city of Seattle, the Alki, was launched in November at Oakland, California by the Pacific Coast Engineering Co. This vessel, still in service, is a steel construction, 123.6 x 26 x 11.6, and was originally propelled by triple-screws and seven 350-horsepower Winton gasoline engines, six of which were connected with centrifugal fire pumps. The seventh engine, centrally located, was for propulsion only. Her equipment included a hydraulically operated elevator monitor tower and pumps capable of throwing 17,000 gallons of water a minute. The pioneer fireboat Snoqualade was extensively overhauled and transferred to Lake Union upon the arrival of the Alki. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 384.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alki
(Steamer) - Gibbs, James A. Sentinels of the North Pacific. Pacific Coast Lighthouses, p. 95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alki
(WHSC, p. 289) -
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Al-ki
(Steamer) - Late in January the steamer Al-Ki which had recently passed to independent ownership, departed Puget Sound inaugurating direct passenger service to Sitka and thence to Prince of Wales Island points and other southeastern Alaska points which had been without such Puget Sound connections for many years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 201.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Allan
(WOOD, P. 163) -
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Allegiance
- October 18, 1879 Ship was wrecked on Old Sand Island. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984. p. 163-65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Allegiance
- October 18, 1879 Ship was wrecked on Old Sand Island. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 163-166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Allegiance
(Ship) - British vessel stranded on Sand Island in May of 1879, but refloated. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Allemania
The steamship ALLEMANNIA (I) was built by C. A. Day & Co, Southampton (Ship No. 23), for the Hamburg American Line, and launched on 11 May 1865. 2,695 tons; 96 x 12,5 meters/315 x 41 feet (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 60 passengers in 1st class, 100 in 2nd class, and 600 in steerage; crew of 90. 17 September 1865, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 1872, compound engines by Reiherstiegweft, Hamburg. 5 October 1872, last voyage, Hamburg-New York. Hamburg-New Orleans, then Hamburg-West Indies service. 11 April-11 September 1880, resumed Hamburg-New York service (3 roundtrip voyages). 1880, purchased by W. Hunter & Co, Liverpool, and renamed OXENHOLME. 1894, sold to A. Chapman, Liverpool. 6 June 1894, bound to South America, stranded near Santa Catharina, Brazil, with no loss of life [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika- Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 26 (photograph, the earliest known of any Hamburg American Line vessel); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 388]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 5, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 February 1998]
Allen A
(Schooner) - The three masted schooner Allen A of 342 tons, built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven in 1888 for Charles Nelson & Company was acquired by the Tyee Whaling Company in 1912. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aller
SS ALLER, built in 1885 by Fairfield Co. Ltd., Glasgow. 4,966 tons; 133,53 meters (438.1 feet) long x 14,56 meters (47.8 feet) broad; straight bow, 2 funnels, 4 masts; screw propulsion, service speed 17 knots. 18 February 1886, launched. 24 April 1886, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1897 masts reduced to two. 18 September 1897, last voyage, Bremen- Southampton-New York. 21 October 1897, first voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York. 16 November 1902, last voyage, Genoa- Naples-New York. 1902 sold; 1904 scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 552-553. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 5, courtesy of Mystic Seaport Museum, 50 Greenmanville Ave., Mystic, CT 06355-0990
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 July 1997]
Alletta B
(Cannery tender) - The Aletta B. was an 85 -foot diesel cannery tender of 300-horsepower, built at Seattle for the Alaska-Pacific Salmon Co. of Ketchikan. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alliance
The S.S. Alliance was operated by the Panama Railroad Steamship Line.And was the first commerical Passenger Ship to transit the Gatun Locks.She was used as a TEST to see how the Gatun Locks would operate. (Gatun Locks is the first set of Locks on the Atlantic Ocean side of the Panama Canal) This test was made June 8,1909. The only other info I have on this ship is that she was 3905 Gross tons and was built in 1886. She operated from New York to the Panama Canal, under the U.S. flag. This shipping company is no longer in operation.They stopped operating in 1981. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 5 July 1998]
Alliance
(Bark) - 1886 Bark, British, rolled onto steamer Ocklahama at Portland. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alliance
(Steamer) - April 25, 1889 Steamer sunk in collision with Danube at Post Office bar in the Willamette River. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alliance
(Steamer) - The steamer Alliance was sunk by the Danube near Postoffice Bar on the Willamette, April 25th. The disaster was caused by a misunderstanding of signals when four steamers were bunched at that point. The Alliance was afterward hauled out and repaired. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alliance No.
(Schooner) - The power schooner Alliance No. 2, formerly the well-known New England fishing vessel Charles Levi Woodbury, piled up on Malpass Rock, six miles north of Point Arena, California shortly after midnight on October 18. A thick fog which hung over the coast throughout the early morning was responsible for the disaster, which claimed eight lives, only two of the crew being saved by the Point Arena lifesaving crew. The Alliance No. 2 had sailed from Victoria on October 9 in charge of Capt. Delouchry, well-known sealing master for Guaymas, Mexico, having been purchased by Jean Abila, a Mexican citizen who had been a resident of Vancouver for several years. Mrs. Abila and a companion, Miss Lena Miller, as well as the new owner, were lost in the wreck. As the Charles Levi Woodbury, the schooner had first operated from Puget Sound following her transfer from the East Coast. She was captured by the Canadian govemment steamer Kestrel charged with poaching, and was ordered sold by the Admiralty court. A Victoria concern bid her in at the auction, operating her for a season on the halibut banks, but she was not a commercial success and ha
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Allunga
(Cargo vessel) - Still another type of revolutionary new cargo vessels began calling at Pacific Northwest ports when the Pacific Australian Direct Line (PAD) placed its three new 653-foot Swedish-built RO/RO (Roll On - Roll Off) vessels in service between the Columbia River, Puget Sound and British Columbia ports and the Antipodes. The three RO/ROs replaced six conventional PAD cargo vessels, providing the same frequency of sailing and twice the cargo-carrying capacity. The outstanding feature of the three ships, Allunga, Dilkara and Paralla, is the stern ramp which lowers from the starboard side -onto any standard ocean pier for unloading by forklift trucks, thus doing away with the need for expensive shoreside facilities such as gantry cranes. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.97.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alma
(Steamer) - The 13 -ton screw steamer Alma was built at Marshfield for passenger service on Coos Bay, in later years as the Jauniata.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Almara
(Cannery Tender) - The 97-ton steam cannery tender and tug Almara, 76.4 x 18.5 x 7.3, was built at Tacoma for Marani Products Co. of Anacortes, passing to Canadian operation from White Rock (later becoming the Victoria-based Island Dispatcher). The 73-ton vessel was fitted with 145-horsepower compound (8,20 x 14) engine. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Almatia
(Bark) - The bark Almatia was built in Boston in 1857 for the Mediterranean trade, but was afterward sent to China and from there came to this coast. She was registered at the Astoria custom-house in 1862 as owned by B. F. Smith of Portland, Thomas M. Cutter of Boston, and J. W. and J. C. Van Vorhis of Walden, Mass. Abel Richardson, her first master, was succeeded by J. J. Noyes, and Captains Winsor and J. W. Miller also ran her in the coasting trade. In 1871 she was dismasted in a gale off Cape Flattery, towed into Victoria and refitted at an expense of several thousand dollars, after which she loaded lumber at Burrard's Inlet for Australia. On the way out, in tow of the steamer Maude, she ran aground at the entrance to Plumper's Pass, and was so badly damaged that the wreck was sold for $1,300. The cargo consisted of 330,000 feet of lumber, most of which was saved. The vessel was afterward released by the Cariboo Fly and again repaired and set afloat. In 1880 she again came to grief on the coast of China, going ashore while en route from Foo Chow to Shanghai. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Almeriana
See CATANIA (2) .
Citation:
Almira
(Brig) - January 9, 1852 Brig. Captain Gibbs. Ship went ashore one mile above Umpqua City with a cargo of government supplies and 36 soldiers for Port Orford; all saved. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Almota
(Steamer) - The steamer Almota was added to the Oregon Steam Navigation Company's fleet in 1876. She was launched at Celilo, September 27th, Capt. E. W. Baughman taking charge. He was succeeded by Captains Sampson, W. P. Gray, George Gore and John F. Stump. In 1883 her first master returned and ran her for ten years, and Capt. John Stump took her again in 1894. The Almota has an immense carrying capacity, and during the Nez Perce war is said to have cleared $14,000 on a single trip. Captains Troup, Van Pelt, Spencer and others have also had command of the steamer and all of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company's up-river engineers have served on her, John A. Wilson being last in charge of her machinery. The Almota was one hundred and fifty-seven feet long, thirty-six feet beam, five feet hold, with engines sixteen by seventy-two inches. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.239.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aloha
(Schooner) - Four masted schooner of 814 tons carrying a million feet of lumber was built in 1891 by Hall Brothers at Port Blakely. Owned first by A.H. Paul, San Francisco, she was later taken over by a single-ship company managed by Hind, Rolph and Co. Arriving off Tatoosh waterlogged in December, 1913, from the Fiji Islands to Grays Harbor, she was taken in tow by the tug Tatoosh. The weather rising, she was abandoned by the crew, broke loose from the tow, and foundered. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aloha
(Schooner) - Four masted schooner of 814 tons carrying a million feet of lumber was built in 1891 by Hall Brothers at Port Blakely. Owned first by A.H. Paul, San Francisco, she was later taken over by a single-ship company managed by Hind, Rolph and Co. Arriving off Tatoosh waterlogged in December, 1913, from the Fiji Islands to Grays Harbor, she was taken in tow by the tug Tatoosh. The weather rising, she was abandoned by the crew, broke loose from the tow, and foundered. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpena
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 970 tons and 1200 M capacity, was also built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely, in 1901. Under her first owner, J. H. Baxter, San Francisco, she was described as the most consistent dividend payer on the coast. He sold her for $95,000 to Herbert C. Turner, Mobile, in 1917; not earning so well under the new ownership she was allowed to founder, an abandoned hulk, in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, in December, 1924. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpena
(Schooner) - The four-masted schooner Alpena of 1901 foundered in december, 1924 after being abandoned in Florida waters. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpha
(Schooner) - A schooner of 300 tons probably three-masted, built at North Bend, Oregon, in 1903, by the Simpson Lumber Co.; and although details of her loss are not forthcoming, her life seems to have been a very short one. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpha
(Schooner) - A schooner of 300 tons probably three-masted, built at North Bend, Oregon, in 1903, by the Simpson Lumber Co.; and although details of her loss are not forthcoming, her life seems to have been a very short one. John Lyman.Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1941,. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpha
(Schooner) - Emil Heuckendorff was hired by A. M. Simpson to build the three-masted schooner Alpha of 300 tons at Simpson's Porter mill (now part of North Bend). An air-compressor was used for druling, driving bolts home, etc. in the construction of the Alpha. The first use of such a machine in a shipyard of the region had been in the construction of the steam schooner Aurelia at Prosper the previous year. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpha
(Steamer) - Wallows Lake, one of Oregon's interior waterways, was favored in 1888 with its first and only steamer, the Alpha, a small propeller with a ten horse-power engine. After running a few years the machinery was removed and the hull laid up. F. D. McCully was her owner and Charles B. Turner engineer. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.356.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alpha
(Steamer) - A small propeller named the Alpha was launched at Empire City, and proved a great convenience in carrying passengers and freight and towing on Coos Bay and its tributaries. The Alpha was first in charge of Capt. H. H. Luse, but in 1870 Capt. William A. Luse took command and ran her until 1876. She was sixty-five feet long, with a fourteen by twelve inch engine. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alphacca
See CHANUTE VICTORY.
Citation:
Alrita
(Motor Ship) - 1940. 42 gross tons. 51.7 feet. # 23954. Sverre Jangaard, Seattle. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945 p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alsatia (1)
See FRISIA.
Citation:
Alsatia (2)
The "Alsatia" was built in 1876 by D & W.Henderson, Glasgow for the Anchor Line. She was a 2,810 gross ton ship, length 356.7ft x beam 36.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 156-cabin class and 538-steerage passengers. Launched in January 1876 she sailed from Glasgow on 8th Apr.1876 on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York. She started her ninth and last voyage on this route on 10th Mar.1877 and on 16th Jun.1877 commenced London - New York sailings. She made 39 round voyages on this service, the last starting on 8th Mar.1882 and in Nov.1882 sailed from Glasgow for Marseilles, Naples, Palermo and New York. In Nov.1882 she sailed Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay and in Apr.1883 Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta. Between 1884-1885 she made four Glasgow - New York sailings and in 1886 was fitted with triple expansion engines and her accommodation refitted to carry 156-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Between 1882-1901 she made 57 Mediterranean - New York voyages, her last starting on 11th May 1901 when she left Kalamata for Patras, Palermo and New York (arr.11/6).On 1st Nov.1901 she was sold to Khedivial Mail and renamed "Minieh" and in 1914 was sold to the British Admiralty for use as a blockship. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.460] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 September 1998]
Alsatian
See EMPRESS OF FRANCE (1).
Citation:
Also See Ninevah (1)
The 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping gives the following details : Nineveh. Call sign : VWLS. Official # : 48854 Master : Captain R. Broadfoot, appointed to the ship in 1887. Rigging : Sail Ship made of wood, fastened with copper or yellow metal bolts. Repairs to the hull in 1872, 8 to 12 years old timber used. Tonnage : 1,174 gross, 1,174 net and 1,049 under deck Dimensions : 209.9 feet long, 36.3 foot beam and 22.6 foot draught. Poop deck 61 feet long and Forecastle 42 feet long. Built in 1864 by Hood in Aberdeen. Owners : J.H. Goodlet Port of Registry : Sydney, N.S.W. You will noticed the difference in spelling (i.e. Nineveh vs Ninevah).I am convinced this is the same ship. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 16 September 1998]
Also See Nineveh
The "Ninevah" was a 1,174 ton wooden hulled ship, built in 1864 by Walter Hood, Aberdeen for the Aberdeen White Star Line. This company was renowned for the smartness of their ships, with their green painted hulls, white masts and spars and gilt scroll work at their bows and sterns. The "Ninevah" was considered a lucky ship with her freights and passengers and made a great deal of money for her owners. She made a passage from the UK to Sydney of 79 days in 1873, and was used in the wool trade on the homeward voyages which took about 105 days. Later purchased by Goodlet & Smith, Sydney, she was abandoned in the North Pacific in February 1896.[The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 September 1998]
Alsterberg
(Bark) - The German four-masted bark Alsterberg, one of the largest four-masters afloat, arrived at Port Townsend December 16, having saved her wheat charter (which would have expired on December 31, by making a record passage of 68 days, 12 hours from Montevideo. (This vessel figures in the later marine history of the Northwest as the William Dollar). Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 76.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alsterfee
See ORANASIA .
Citation:
Alsternixe
(Bark) - German bark, 3039 tons, stranded in heavy weather at dusk, February 9, 1903, one and one half miles southwest of Cape Disappointment Light. Complement of the vessel, including Captain Richard Auhagen, were rescued the following morning by the lifesaving crew. Several weeks later the vessel was refloated after earlier having been considered a total loss. The four-masted bark, valued at $90,000, hailed from Hamburg, and ivas one of the few large ships to escape the sands of Peacock Spit. The stranding was attributed to the vessel getting out of the marked channel. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alstrom
The "ALSTROM" plied the east coast and the Atlantic in the 1920's and 1930's. Some history .....built in 1903 for Sir William Garth Waite in Sunderland, England, and registered at Montreal.Registered 1921-22 with Loyds of London.1923-24 owned by the Marine Navigational Co. of Canada, reg Montreal.Sold 1925-26 and name change to "Kenoyene Maru" to a Japanese Co......re Maritime Musuem of Halifax. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Angus Elliott - 8 June 1998]
Alta
- Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alta
(Gas Schooner) - January 1904 Gas schooner lost at sea with all hands. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alta 2
(Barkentine) - 1923 Four masted barkentine, 1385 tons. Missing at sea en route San Pedro-Bellingham. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Altamaho
(USS) - Escort Carrier (CVE 18.). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard converted into CVEs five Maritime Commission type C3 Cargo vessels, on which construction had already begun at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation's Tacoma yard. The first was the USS Copahee arrived February 8, 1942 followed by the USS Nassau and the USS Altahama. Later the yard converted Prince William and Glacier. The main mission of these jeep carriers was to provide air cover for the protection of convoys. Louise M. Reh and Helen Lou Ross. Nipsic to Nimitz., p. 103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Altona
(Steamer) - The original Altona of the Grahams' Yellow Stack Line was completely rebuilt into a new Altona at Portland. The original boat was of 201 tons, 120 feet long. The new vessel was rated at 329 tons with a length of 123 feet. She was placed in service to Corvallis, where she remained until 1907, when she was transferred to Alaska. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Altona
(Sternwheeler) - Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alumna
(Schooner) - The Alumna, four-masted schooner of 696 tons, sold at marhal's auction in Seattle to McGinitie & McDonald. The vessel, built in 1901 by the Simpson Lumber Co. at North Bend, had been owned since 1923 by Capt. D. Ottman, who had died recently, the sale being made to settle his estate. The following year she was converted to a barge and fitted out as a floating brewery for operation at Ketchikan, water front wits observing that the repeal of prohibition was bringing a real schooner of beer to Alaska. The venture was not a success and the Alumna ended her days as a fish reduction plant in Alaska waters. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 423.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alura Aye
(Trimaran) - Built at Republic Washington by Bill and Lee Sanders the Alura Aye is a fourteen by forty foot vessel described as a W bottom trimaran by her builders who will spend the summer at Anacortes completing the craft which has been four years under construction. The boat is Diesel powered and has a maximum speed of six knots. The Sanders brothers hope to use the craft for sightseeing tours in the San Juan Islands. (The Marine Digest XLI (June 8, 1963), p. 36).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alvarado
(Steam schooner) - The steel steam schooner Alvarado of 1914, last in com- mercial operation by the Moore Mill & Lumber Co. of Marshfield on the Coos Bay - San Francisco run, was overwhelmed by a storm and driven ashore eight miles north of the Coos Bay bar March 17. Capt. Harold L. Kildall and all members of the crew were safely removed, but the vessel became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H.W.McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 527.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alvarez Cabrel
See SICILIAN PRINCE.
Citation:
Alvena
(Schooner) - A four-masted schooner of 772 tons and 975 M capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., by Bendixsen in 1901. Joseph Knowland, San Francisco, who was also interested in the Gardiner Mill Co., was her first owner; she was transferred to the mill -in 1917, and they managed to keep her trading between Grays Harbor and Hawaii until 1925. In that year she was sold to owners in Florida, and went out through the Canal with a cargo of lumber for Miami. Her new owners found use for her even after the collapse of the Florida boom, but in 1936 she got in collision with a lightship, and they sold her for $2500 to New York owners. After a year in trade between New York and the Maritime Provinces, she was put under Canadian registry; and when last heard of was a floating restaurant at Moncton, New Brunswick. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 15, 1941. p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alverene
(Passenger vessel) - The Alverene, a 75 - foot passenger boat with 75 - horsepower Buffalo engine, was built by A. J. Goulette at Everett replacing the launch Ruby Marie on the Everett-Oak Harbor run in charge of Captain J. H. Prather. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alyeska
- Built in Tacoma in 1920 for L.J. Low of Seattle. 27 gross tons. 41. 4. feet #21973. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Amalfi
The "Amalfi" was built by M.Pearse & Co, Stockton in 1881 for the Sloman Line of Hamburg. She was a 2,345 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 36.1ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 600-3rd class. Launched on 7/5/1881, she sailed on the Hamburg - Australia service until 1886 when she came under the control of the newly formed Union Line. She commenced her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 19/5/1886 and started her last voyage on this service on 27/7/1898. In 1911 she was sold to Swedish owners and renamed "Ada". On 9/6/1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.61, while 25 miles east of Fair Isle. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1166] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 May 1998]
Andalucia
Built for Blue Star Line by Cammel Laird, Birkenhead as the "Andalucia", she was a 12,846 gross ton ship, length 535ft x beam 68.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. She was one of five sister ships and had spacious accommodation for 180-1st class passengers only. Designed for the refigerated meat trade between London and the River Plate ports, she also called at Madeira, Rio de Janeiro and Santos. Launched on 21st Sept.1926, she was completed on Mar.1st 1927 and commenced service that year. In May 1929 she was renamed "Andalucia Star" and in 1937 was rebuilt to 14,943 tons and a length of 597 feet and her passenger accommodation reduced to 150-1st class. On Oct.7th 1942, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.107, while 400 miles west of Monrovia, with the loss of four lives. All five of these sister ships were torpedoed and sunk during the war, two with heavy loss of life. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.3] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 August 1998]
Andalucia
(Steamer) - Local fishermen and beachcombers reaped another bountiful harvest soon afterward when the steel steamship Andalucia, owned by the Triton Shipping Co. of New York and also under Panamanian registry, stranded on a pinnacle rock four miles east of Neah Bay at the entrance to Juan de Fuca Strait. Originally the World War 1-built American freighter Volunteer, the 7,717-ton vessel was outward bound from Vancouver with a 5,000,000-foot lumber cargo when fire broke out in the engine room. Her officers were attempting to reach shallow wter to ground her when she struck the offshore rock. She standed on November 4, and the fire was extinguished but on November 100 the constant working of the swells caused her to break in two just forward of the funnel. A portion of the cargo was removed to barges before the after section sank and the forward portion was abandoned. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 565.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Andalucia Star
See ANDALUCIA.
Citation:
Andalusia
The 1905-06 Lloyd's Register of Shipping has the following listing: Andalusia - Call sign: RKNC Master: Captain G. Schmidt, appointed to the ship in 1904 Rigging: Steel single screw Schooner; 2 decks with 3 tiers of beams; fitted with electric light and refrigerating machinery.Tonnage: 5,441 tons gross, 4,492 under deck and 3,477 net. Dimensions: 399.3 feet long, 50.1 foot beam and 27.3 foot draught. Poop deck and Bridge Deck 244 feet long; Forecastle 44 feet long. Built in 1896 by Palmers Co. Ltd in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Owners: Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt Aktien Gesellschaft (Hapag) aka. Hamburg-America Line. Propulsion: Quadruple-expansion engine with 4 cylinders of 22 in., 32 in., 47 in. and 68 in. diameter respectively. Stroke 51 inches. 330 nominal horsepower. Forced draught. Engine built by same company as the hull. Port of registry: Hamburg, Flag: German -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 24 September 1998]
Andalusia
(Steamer) - A new name but the veteran longshoremen were not fooled, The Tacoma Times. (January 23, 1940), p. 12.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Anna Salen
The "Anna Salen" was built in 1939 as the "Mormacland" by Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co, Chester for Moore-McCormack Lines. She was a 11,672 gross ton ship, length 494ft x beam 69.2ft, single screw and a with a service speed of 17 knots. In 1940 she was taken over before completion by the US Navy and refitted as an auxiliary aircraft carrier. In 1941 she was commissioned by the British Royal Navy as HMS ARCHER and was used for convoy protection duties. She collided with and sank the American SS Brazos on 13th Jan.1942, was badly damaged and towed stern first to Charleston. In 1945 she was taken over by the Ministry of War Transport, renamed "Archer" and refitted as a cargo ship. Managed by the Blue Funnel Line and renamed "Empire Lagan", she was returned to the US Maritime Commission in 1946. Purchased by Sven Salen of Stockholm and registered under the ownership of Rederi A/S Pulp, she was rebuilt as a passenger ship with accommodation for 600 single class passengers. Used as an emigrant ship on various routes, she started a single round voyage between Bremen and Quebec on 2nd July 1953. Sold to Cia Nav.Tasmania, Piraeus in 1955, she was renamed "Tasmania" and placed on the Piraeus - Melbourne service of the Hellenic Mediterranean Line. In 1958 she was rebuilt to 7,638 gross tons and in 1961 was sold to China Union Lines, Taipeh and renamed "Union Reliance". On 7th Nov.1961 she collided with the Norwegian tanker "Beran" in the Houston Ship Channel and was beached on fire. Towed to Galveston on 11th Nov, she was sold in Jan.1962 to be scrapped at New Orleans. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.4,p.219] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.5, p.1816] There is a photo of this ship in Great Passenger Ships of the World by A.Kludas, vol.4. ISBN 0-85059-253-4 -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 August 1998]
Annie E Smale
(Schooner) - K. V. Kruse, formerly in charge of the Simpson shipyard at North Bend, in 1903 established his own yard about a mile north of what was then Marshfield. His first vessel, completed in 1903, was the four-masted schooner Annie E. Smale of 845 tons, built for a single-ship San Francisco company. S. Danielson built his last vessel, the 281-ton three-masted schooner Advance, at the Coquille Mill & Tug Co. yard at Parkersburg on the Coquille River. The vessel was built for C. P. Doe of San Francisco and was commanded in the coastal lumber trade by Capt. L. L. Ogidinssen. In later years she was fitted with a gasoline auxiliary engine.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Annie E. Smal
(Schooner) - A four masted schooner of 845 tons, was built at Marshfield in 1903 for a singleship company of San Francisco. On July 91 1910, when 100 days out of Newcastle, Australia, for S a n Francisco with 1408 tons of coal, she got ashore off Point Reyes in a heavy fog. The 13 crew on board were taken off by the steamship M. F. Plant. The Smale is stated to have been owned at the time by Swayne & Hoyt, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 15, 1941. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Archibald Mcmillan
The ship ARCHIBALD McMILLAN, built in Dumbarton in 1854, under special survey conducted by Lloyds Register of Shipping. 498 tons; 147.3 x 24.9 x 16.3 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Master: 1854/55-1856/57 - Galloway; 1857/58-1862/63 - M. Lyle; 1861/62-1864/65 - W. Wilson; 1864/65-1865/66 - D. McMillan; 1865/66-1866/67 - M'Arthur. Owner: J. Kerr. Port of Registry: Greenock. Port of Survey: Clydeside. Destined Voyage: 1854/55-1855/56 - West Indies; 1856/57 - Mauritius; 1857/58-1860/61 - West Indies; 1861/62-1862/63 - Ceylon [crossed out]/West Indies; 1863/64-1866/67 - West Indies. A notation in Lloyd's Register for 1866/67 indicates that the ARCHIBALD McMILLAN was wrecked, most probably between 1 July 1866 and 30 June 1867. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 9 August 1998]
Ardeal
See EMIL KIRDORFF.
Citation:
Armadale Castle
I can add the following few details from Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Band 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), p. 38: built by Fairfield, Glasgow (ship #424); 179,9 x 19,6 meters (length x beam); accommodation for 350 1st-, 200 2nd-, and 270 3rd-class passengers; crew of 260. She was launched on 11 August 1903, and began her maiden voyage from Southampton to Cape Town on 5 December 1903. In August 1914, she became an auxiliary cruiser in the 10th Cruiser Squadron; later in the War she served as a troop transport. In 1918, she was returned to passenger service between the UK and South Africa. She was laid up in 1935, and broken up the following year. {Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 November 1997]
Citation:
Atahualpa
- Attacked by Indians in 1985. Carey, Charles H. General History of Oregon., I, p. 83. Hubert Bancroft. History of the Northwest Coast, 1543-1800 I, 310, 312,320,365. Gibbs, James A. Sentinels of the North Pacific. Pacific Coast Lighthouses, p. 187-88.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Atalanta
- Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204. Sinking of the Atalanta, Tacoma Daily Ledger. November 19, 1898, p. 2 and Tacoma Daily Ledger. November 20, 1898. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Atalanta
(Bark) - American bark, wrecked in gale 50 miles off Cape Flattery, December 16, 1890. In command of Captain Frederick Masher and bound for San Francisco from Port Gamble with lumber. Vessel was dismasted and began to break up but was held afloat by her cargo. The ship had reached the latitude of the Columbia River and was blown all the way back to the Juan de Fuca graveyard. Crew stayed with wreck which came ashore near Clayoquot, Vancouver Island. The natives cared for survivors until picked up by the sealing schooner Katherine. The Atalanta was built at Amesbury, Massachusetts, in 1851, and was many years in the Liverpool passenger trade. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Atalanta
(Clipper) - November 17, 1898 Clipper,British, 1753 tons carrying 92,405 bushels of wheat valued at $65,000. It is said this ship was a good sailer and once covered 950 miles in three days. She was reported as having an unusual rig with a main skysail above her double topgallant yards, but I'll be darned if I can figure out that one. Built at Greenock, Scotland in 1886, she sailed 320 and 325 miles in two consecutive days on her trials. Captain McBride made a first-arrival bet with two other ships bound for the same African port. The other ships left two days ahead of McBride and, in order to gain time, he coasted, a deadly game of hugging the shore. The Atalanta struck a reef where the rocks extend some two miles offshore near Seal Rocks, five miles north of Alsea. The captain paid with his life for the error, as did 22 others; only three lived. The ship is also listed as 11/2 miles out from the mouth of Big Creek. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Atalanta
(Cutter) - Constructed at Seattle by the Lake Union Dry Dock & Machine Works under the supervision of Cmdr. W. C. Maglathlin, the 165 foot patrol cruiser Atalanta was launched during the summer [of 1934]. She was the first of three handsome two-stack cutters fitted with twin 670-horsepower Winton diesel engines. She was followed by the Ariadne, assigned to San Francisco, and the Cyane, assigned to Ketchikan. The Atalanta was based at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: :Superior, 1966,. [/ 420/
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Atalanta (1)
The bark (a 3-masted sailing vessel, the 2 forward masts square-rigged, the mizzenmast rigged fore-and-aft) ATALANTA was built by the the shipbuilding firm of Hermann Friedrich Ulrichs, in Vegesack/Fahr (on the eastern bank of the Weser River, northwest of Bremen), and launched on 26 February 1857. 247 Commerzlasten/565 tons; 40,5 x 9,3 x 5,1 meters/ 143 x 30 x 17.5 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); International Signal Code QBHD. Principal owners of the ATALANTA were the Bremen firm of Konitzky & Thiermann, and her masters were, in turn, August Horstmann, Hinrich Gerhard Bulling, Johann von Harten, and Luder Hogemann. In 1880, the ATALANTA was purchased by C. Hartlaub, of Bremen. In July 1882, in the face of Hartlaub's mounting debts, the ATALANTA was forcibly auctioned by order of the Amtsgericht Geestem"unde, and was purchased by the Schiffahrtsgesellschaft "Astra", of Riga. The ATALANTA thus passed into Russian hands, her new master being Capt. Lindemann. In 1883, she made a passage from Swansea to Vera Cruz, returning to Europe by way of Pensacola. On 8 November 1887, the ATALANTA, Capt. Heimann, collided with the Danish bark EMIL (ex Bremen bark NORMA, built in Vegesack/Fahr by Ulrichs in 1859) off Helsingor, but sustained no major damage. On 21 November 1888, during a storm, the ATALANTA, bound from Riga to Antwerp with a cargo of wood, was stranded on the beach at Goeree, in the Netherlands; 6 members of the crew lost their lives, and the vessel was a total loss [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 280, no. 43]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 5 August 1998]
Atalanta (2)
The "Atalanta" was built by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow as the "Ohio", but launched as the "Atalanta" in 1863 for the British owned London & New York Steamship Line. She was a 2,668 gross ton ship, length 339.1ft x beam 34.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 1st, 2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. It was attempted to launch her on 28/11/1863 but she stuck on the slipway, but floated off within a few days. She sailed from London on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 11/5/1864 and started her last voyage on this service on 20/3/1870. In 1870 she was sold to The Hughes Line of Liverpool who used her on their Liverpool - Suez - Bombay service. She was fitted with compound engines in 1874 and in 1880 went to British owners and was renamed "Clifton". In 1888 she became the Swedish owned "Ocean" and in September 1897 was reported in port in a damaged condition, and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.597; vol.3, p.954] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch 15 April 1998]
Austral
The "Austral" was a 5,524 gross ton ship, built by John Elder, Glasgow in 1881 for the Orient Line (which later became part of the P&O group). There was accommodation for 120-1st, 130-2nd and 300-3rd class passengers. She started her maiden voyage from London via Suez to Melbourne and Sydney on 18/1/1882. Her second voyage was a catalogue of misfortunes which started with a series of engine defects while on passage from London to the Cape, where she was detained at Simons Bay for a week due to an epidemic of small-pox ashore. More engine trouble was encountered during her passage from the Cape and at one time she was forced to maintain steerage way by means of sail alone until repairs could be effected. On 11/11/1882 she sank at her coaling berth at Sydney, and on 28/3/1883 was refloated and temporarily repaired at Cockatoo Island. Between 1883-4 she was refitted on the Clyde and in April 1884 was chartered to the Anchor Line and used on their Liverpool - New York route. On 12/11/1884 she resumed London - Sydney sailings and started her last voyage on this service on 21/11/1902. She was then sold to Italian shipbreakers and scrapped at Genoa. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 February 1998]
Austral Glade
See GENERAL A.W.GREELY.
Citation:
Austral Glade
AUSTRALIA (1) See ALFRED.
Citation:
Australasian
See RUAPEHU (2).
Citation:
Australia
(Steamer) - William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, William L. Cargoes. Matson's first century in the Pacific, p. 12, 23-24, 168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Australia (2)
The Anchor Line ship "Australia" was built by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow) in 1870. This was a 2,244 gross ton ship, length 324.6ft x beam 35.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 128-cabin and 600-steerage class. Launched on 20/1/1870, she commenced her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Moville and New York on 11/3/1870. In February 1876 she made a single voyage between Glasgow, Mediterranean ports, New York and London and on 13/5/1876 started London - New York sailings. In 1877 she was fitted with compound engines by D&W.Henderson and started the last of 33 London - New York voyages on 24/3/1881. In 1881 she made 5 London - Halifax - Boston sailings and between 1881-1884 made 8 voyages between Glasgow, Mediterranean, New York and Glasgow. Between 1882-1883 she made 2 sailings from Glasgow to Liverpool and Bombay and in 1883 made a single Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta voyage. From 1884-1885 she was used for 11 round voyages between London, Halifax and Boston and from 1886-1891 made 14 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow voyages. Her last voyage commenced 11/4/1891 when she left Palermo for Naples, New York(arr. 8/5/1891) and Glasgow. On 12/5/1892 she was sold to Furness Withy & Co, West Hartlepool, was laid up in 1893 and scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.455] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 May 1998]
Australia (3)
Built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1875 for Sir William Pearce, she was to have been named "Nova Cambria", but was launched as the "Australia". She was a 2,737 gross ton ship, length 376ft x beam 37ft, one funnel, four masts (barquentine rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 170-1st, 30-2nd and 100-3rd class passengers. She sailed from London in Jan.1876 for Melbourne and was then operated by Pacific Mail Steamship Co. Although Pacific Mail was an American company, the "Australia" and her sister ship "Zealandia" operated under the British flag and with British officers and Chinese crews. She commenced San Francisco to Auckland and Sydney sailings on 17th July 1876 and made calls at Honolulu and Fiji. She made her last voyage under the British flag towards the end of 1885 and was then sold to the Oceanic Steamship Co and transferred to Hawaiian registry. The service was taken over by Oceanic SS Co jointly with the Union SS Co of New Zealand. The "Australia" later became an American transport running to the Philippines. In 1905 she was chartered to the Russian government and used as a transport until captured on 26th Aug.1905 by the Japanese in Petropavlovsk Harbour while carrying supplies from the US to Siberia. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Pacific Steamers by Will Lawson] I don,t have any info on this ship after this date, but there is a photo of her in North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber, published by T.Stephenson & Sons, 1967. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 August 1998]
Australia (4)
The "Australia" of 1882 was built by C.Mitchell & Co. of Walker-on-Tyne, England, in 1881 for the Carr Line of Germany. She was a 2119 gross ton vessel, length 297.9ft x beam 37.1ft, one funnel, two (extremely tall) masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 800-3rd class passengers only. Launched on 16/4/1881, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 9/6/1881 and commenced her last Hamburg - New York run for this company on 9/5/1888. In May 1888, she went to the Hamburg America Line and resumed sailing from Hamburg to New York on 3/7/1888 for three round voyages. Transferred to the Stettin - NY service on 14/6/1889 for one round voyage and commenced her last run from Hamburg to Baltimore on 5/2/1896. On 26/1/1902 she stranded in the River Scheldt near Antwerp and on 27/1/1902 she broke in two.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 September 1997]
Australia.
5. There is also an account of the voyage in the chapter "The Floating Coffin," in Colin Kerr, A exelent coliney; the practical idealists of 1836-1846 (Adelaide: Rigby, 1978). -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 August 1998]
Australis
See AMERICA (5).
Citation:
Avalon
(Ferry) - One hundred sixty foot passenger ferry for the Los Angeles to Catalina run, The Tacoma News Tribune. February 15, 1970, p. B-8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Avalon
(Steam schooner) - The steam schooner Avalon was dashed to pieces on the jetty after striking the Grays Harbor bar as she was clearing for San Francisco late in April 1928. The tugs Tyee and John Cudahy rescued her crew but were unable to save the vessel, which carried a full cargo of lumber. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927- 28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Azalea
(Schooner) - The Azalea, a three -masted schooner of 344 tons, carrying 450 M, was built at Eureka in 1890 by H. D. Bendixsen for Dolbeer & Carson of that port. In 1914 the schooner was sold to the Robinson Fisheries Co., of Anacortes, Wash., and was employed by them as a Bering Sea codfisher until 1919, when she was chartered offshore. From 1921 to 1927 the schooner was operated out of Seattle as a floating cannery in Alaskan waters, and in 1929 she went back into the cod fishery. The Azalea went north in 1940, and we look forward to a successful season for her in 1941. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Azalea
(Schooner) - The three-masted schooner Azalea, a 363-ton vessel 145 feet in length built at Fairhaven, California in 1890, and for years prominent among the fleet of coastal lumber carriers, was towed from Hoquiam to Seattle by the tug Daring in January, 1914 for conversion to a codfishing vessel. The Azalea was purchased by the Matheson Fisheries Co. of Anacortes, the Pacific Coast Codfish Co. having a few months earlier taken over the Charles R. Wilson, a vessel of almost identical tonnage and dimensions, also built at Fairhaven. Conversion work to fit the schooners for the Bering Sea fishery was done by the Seattle Construction & Drydock Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.240.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
B. C. Clipper (halibut Vessel)
The Canadian halibut vessel B. C. Clipper suffered an explosion of liquefied gas off Kodiak in August which took the lives of three of her crew. Toxic fumes made it impossible to fight the resulting fire and the five survivors abandoned ship. They were forced to remain in the frigid water for four hours when their life raft inflated upside down, but all were rescued by the fishboat Peggy Jo. The B. C. Clipper had delivered 100,000 pounds of halibut to Kodiak and was outward bound for the fishing banks when the accident occurred. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baikal
See EDENDALE.
Citation:
Balboa (schooner)
A four master schooner of 777 tons and 850 M capacity was built by Hall Brothers in 1901, for their own and friends' Recount, and was managed by G. E. Billings, San Francisco. On December 1, 1913, she was wrecked at the entrance to Grays Harbor, bound in from Callao. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balboa (schooner)
A four master schooner of 777 tons and 850 M capacity was built by Hall Brothers in 1901, for their own and friends' Recount, and was managed by G. E. Billings, San Francisco. On December 1, 1913, she was wrecked at the entrance to Grays Harbor, bound in from Callao. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balboa (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Balboa, built at Port Blakeley in 1901, from Chile for Grays Harbor in ballast, was driven ashore and wrecked on the north beach at Grays Harbor entrance December 1. After being driven north of the harbor entrance, Capt. John E. Anderson beat back, but was forced to anchor off the bar. The anchors dragged and the schooner struck at about three o'clock in themorning. Efforts to launch a boat were unsuccessful, but the nine men aboard were safely removed that night by the Westport lifesaving crew and transferred to the tug Traveler, the sea being so rough that the lifeboat could not be landed on shore. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balclutha
In San Francisco Bay, restored by San Francisco Citizens, Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969. P. 98 AND 150. Riding out a severe gale in the Bristol Channel, 1894, Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balclutha
Pictured in San Francisco Bay in 1900. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 70.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balclutha
The Balclutha, a steel ship of 1,716 tons, 256.5 x 38.6 x 22.7, was built in Scotland in 1886 and until 1899 was in tramp cargo service of Robert McMillan of Dumbarton, during which time she made 17 voyages around Cape Horn. In 1899 she was placed under the Hawaiian flag, making three voyages from Puget Sound to Australia with lumber. She was the last ship to fly the flag of Hawaii at sea and was granted American registry in 1901 when purchased by J. J. Moore of San Francisco, Pope & Talbot later acquiring slightly more than fifty percent ownership, as was also true of the Moore sailing vessels Euterpe, Star of France and Star of Italy. Balclutha not proving a good lumber carrier, had been chartered in 1904 for a sea- son on the salmon fishery. Following her stranding she was sold in February, 1905 to the Alaska Packers Association, who repaired her in San Francisco and placed her in their Alaska cannery fleet, renaming her Star of Alaska late the following year. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. M
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balclutha (full Rigger)
Wrecks in Alaskan waters in 1904 included the full -rigged ship Balclutha, San Francisco for Karluk, which went ashore May 12 in Geese Island Strait. The ship was listed as a total loss, but was subsequently salvaged and outlived allthe other big sailing vessels on the Pacific Coast. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bald Eagle (clipper Ship)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the Western Frontier, p. 169.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ballard (ferryboat)
Built in Everett in 1900. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 104. Ex City of Everett. The City of Everett in its third transformation, into diesel ferry Ballard in 1931, Marine Digest (November 16, 1986), p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baltasara
At 294 tons (Lloyds Register for 1857), the BALTASARA was a small vessel, of no great importance, and her fate may never be known. While she last appears in the Register for 1869, it is possible that she met her end several years earlier, since Lloyds continued to carry the names of vessels whose fate had not been reported to them. The entries in the Register for 1863-1869 are incomplete (they give no measurements other than tonnage, and omit both the owner and the port of registration), and suggest that the BALTASARA was last seen in a British port in 1862. She most probably ended her days sunk or beached somewhere in the Indian Ocean. If her owner made an insurance claim for her, there may be some record of this claim in the loss and casualty books among the records of Lloyds deposited in the Guildhall Library, Manuscripts Section, Aldermanbury, London EC2P 2EJ Great Britain.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 August 1997]
Baltic (1)
Built in 1850 by Jacob Bell, New York (engines by Allaire Iron Works, New York) for the Collins Line, she was a 2,123 gross ton ship, length 282.5ft x beam 45ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sails), wooden construction, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation was provided for 200-1st class passengers. Launched on 5/2/1850, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Liverpool on 16/11/1850. In 1851, accommodation for 80-2nd class passengers was added and between 6th-16th/8/1851 she made a record passage between Liverpool and New York. In approx. 1853 her mizzen (third) mast was removed and she commenced her last Liverpool - New York voyage on 3/2/1858 (arr New York 18/2/1858). This was the last voyage of the company which was then wound up, and the "Baltic" was laid up from 1858-9. On 9/7/1859 she was bought by the North Atlantic Steamship Co. and ran between New York and Aspinwall until 1860, when she was laid up again. In 1861 she was used as a Civil War transport, and on 26/4/1866 commenced the first of two round voyages for North American Lloyd between New York, Southampton and Bremen. On 21/2/1867 she sailed fom New York on the first of five round voyages for the New York & Bremen Steamship Co between New York, Southampton and Bremen. Her last voyage commenced on 21/10/1867 and in 1870 her engines were removed. She was finally scrapped in 1880.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch -11 December 1997]
Baltic (2)
(of 1873) See VEENDAM.
Citation:
Baltic (3)
The "Baltic" was a 23,876 gross ton ship built in 1903 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line. Her details were - length 709.2ft x beam 75.6ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 425-1st, 450-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21/11/1903, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 29/6/1904. In 1909 she rescued survivors of the collision between the "Republic" and the "Florida" off the US coast, in which the "Republic" sank. On 12/12/1918 she commenced her first voyage after the Armistice, from Liverpool to New York and in 1927 her accommodation was altered to carry 393-cabin class, 339-tourist class and 1,150-3rd class passengers. On 17/9/1932 she commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to New York and Liverpool and on 17/2/1933 sailed for Osaka, Japan where she was scrapped. Most Cunard and White Star vessels are fully described in the Cunard archive site. Your relative would have crossed to England on a North Sea trader (probably Wilson Line to Hull) and boarded a train to Liverpool to embark on the "Baltic".
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 October 1997]
Baltimore
The "Baltimore" was built in 1868 by Caird & Co, Greenock for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 2,321 gross ton ship, length 285ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail),iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 84-1st and 600-3rd class. Launched on 3/8/1867, she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and Baltimore on 1/3/1868. On the night of 22-23/5/1872 she was in collision off Hastings with the Spanish vessel "Lorenzo Semprun", was beached, and towed to Southampton for repairs. In 1881 her engines were compounded by AG Weser, Bremen, and on 10/10/1883 she commenced her last Bremen - Baltimore crossing. She was subsequently used for the Bremen - S.America service. Her final voyage started on 30/12/1893 and the following year she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.545-6] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 February 1998]
Baltimore
U.S. Cruisers Baltimore and Charleston in Portland Harbor, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 326.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baltimore
1915. 299 tons 47.7 feet. # 213337. Libby, McNeil and Libby. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baltimore
Built in Tacoma in 1915 for Libby, McNeil and Libby. 299 ton vessel of 47.7 feet. #213337. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baltimore (cruiser)
An important event in marine circles on the Columbia River in 1892 was the arrival at Astoria and Portland of the cruisers Baltimore and Charleston, the largest vessels that ever entered the river. They came to Astoria to participate in the celebration, on May 12th, of the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the Columbia. The attendant ceremonies lasted for three days, and the barkentine Chehalis, representing the ship Columbia, made a tour of the lower bay, anchoring off Chinook Point, where painted Indians in log canoes paddled out and offered the Boston men fish and furs as in olden times. After the celebration the Baltimore and Charleston were taken to Portland, the former leading the way in charge of Pilot William H. Patterson, and the Charleston following with Pilot William Smith. Each pilot received a handsome watch from the Portland Chamber of Commerce as a testimonial to his skill in safely taking the leviathans so far inland. In connection with this event the Spokane, Wash., Review published
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baltimore (schooner)
1861 Schooner. Wreck was discovered on the rocks 0.6 mile northwest of Cape Arago Light. Half of the ship lay in Lat. 43 degrees 21'03,'N, Lon. 124 degrees 23'00 W. Her stern appeared at a place known as Tunnel Point. Very little else is known of this wreck. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bardaland (freighter)
The Swedish freighter Bardaland arrived at San Francisco earlier in the year with a shipment of Soviet gold bullion valued at $11,220,150. The charming custom of the Russians paying in gold for their purchases of American products somewhat offset a number of less loveable traits, including a marked carelessness in the niceties of maritime housekeeping. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baroda (coal Barge)
The coal barge Baroda was badly damaged and her cargo destroyed by fire at Esquimalt on September 21, 1910, the hull being valued at $ 10,000 and the coal cargo at $ 15,000 Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baumwall (1)
See CHRISTIANA.
Citation:
Baumwall (2)
See LUSITANIA (1).
Citation:
Belevdere (whaler)
American whaler Belvedere, wrecked in the ice off Cape Jinretien, Siberia, September 16. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919- 1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 312.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belvedere (steam Whaler)
The wooden steam whaler Belvedere, on an expedition to hunt walrus, whales and polar bears, narrowly escaped a similar fate[ of the Diamond L whose cargo was confiscated by the Russians] having earlier lost four men of her crew in the capsizing of a boat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 257.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belvedere (whaling Bark)
Wood steam auxiliary whaling bark at Seattle. Built in Maine in 1880. Wrecked off Siberia in 1919. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969. p. 60 (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Benevolence (u.s.n. Hospital Ship)
Gibbs, James A. Sentinels of the North Pacific. Pacific Coast Lighthouses, p. 50.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bengal
Built in 1853 by Tod & McGregor, Partick, Glasgow for P&O Lines, she was a 2,185 gross ton ship, length 295.7ft x beam 38.1ft x depth 25.3ft (90,14m x 11,63m x 7,72m), one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was accommodation for 135-1st class passengers. Launched on 30th October 1852, she was the largest steamer in the world at the time. In 1853, after a few Mediterranean voyages, she was transferred to the Calcutta - Suez route, and during the Crimean war, captured a Russian Barque and towed it to Madras. In June 1859 she was driven ashore in a gale at Galle Point, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and later salvaged. In December 1863, her propellor shaft snapped in the Indian Ocean and she was towed to Aden by P&O's "Sultan", and in 1864 was blown ashore by a cyclone near Calcutta. Left high and dry in the garden of Bishops College, she was only refloated after a channel was cut around her. In 1868 she was used as a troop ship during the Abyssinian Campaign and in July 1870 was sold to the New York, London & China Steamship Co of London. In 1884 she was resold to Gellatly, Hankey, Sewell & Co, London and on March 2nd 1885 was wrecked on Milton Reef, Java. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 20 July 1998]
Boobyalla (motorship)
Wooden motorship; I deck, 2 masts; 3,099 tons; 268.4 x 48.3 x 24.7 feet; 28 crew; freighter; 9 knots. Built in 1919 at Seattle. Operated by the Admiral Line between 1924 and 1929 on Puget Sound to California route. Burned off Discovery Island, British Columbia, March 11, 1929. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boobyalla (motorship)
The wooden motorship Boobyalla, operated by the Pacific Steamship Co., was also destroyed by fire near Esquimalt, the wreck being taken over by the Pacific Salvage Co. and her engines removed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 403.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boobyalla (wooden Motorship)
One deck, two masts, 3,099 tons. 28 cre, freighter 9 knots. Built in Seattle in 1919. Operated by the Admiral Line between 1924 and 1929 on the Puget Sound to California route. The vessel was burned off Discovery Island, British Columbia, March 11, 1929. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Borealis
Built 1880 (two-masted schoonerformer sealer) Reg. No. 97159 Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Borealis (schooner)
The Borealis, a four -masted schooner of 764 tons, was built at Fairhaven in 1902 by the Bendixsen Shipbuilding Co. for the Charles Nelson Co., San Francisco. On February 10, 1913, on a passage from Mukilteo to Samoa she got ashore on one of the Tonga group, and broke up so rapidly that the wreck and cargo brought only two thousand dollars. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 1, 1941. , p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Borealis (schooner)
Part of the northwest sealing fleet. Photograph of a sealers' rondezvous in Victoria Harbor. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 452.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Borealis (schooner)
The Borealis, a four -masted schooner of 764 tons, was built at Fairhaven in 1902 by the Bendixsen Shipbuilding Co. for the Charles Nelson Co., San Francisco. On February 10, 1913, on a passage from Mukilteo to Samoa she got ashore on one of the Tonga group, and broke up so rapidly that the wreck and cargo brought only two thousand dollars. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 1, 1941. , p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bounty (whaler)
In 1821 the presence of the American whaler Bounty in Behring Sea was the means of establishing a precedent in international law that recoiled on the heads of the Americans many years later. The Bonty was seized by the Russians, and on a protest from the United States Government, which contended that Russia had no jurisdiction beyond the three-mile limit, the Bounty was released and an indemnity paid to her owners. Sixty-five years later, long after the United States had bought all of Russia's rights in these waters, the Americans seized some British sealers, and it cost the Government in the neighborhood of a million dollars to learn that it had failed to purchase any water rights from Russia except those which she had a right to sell. E. W. Wright, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961., p. 13.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brenda (sealing Schooner)
The Brenda, a Canadian sealing schooner, wrecked July 2, 1895 on the coast of Shumshu Island in the Kuriles, off Siberia. (P. I. 8-22-1895. Gordon Newell, Casualties, 1895, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. xiii
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
British General
Ships that sail to the Port of Tacoma. West Coast Trade Annual Edition for 1897 p. 31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookdale (motorship)
The Brookdale, a 2,950-ton Grays Harbor Motorship type wooden steamship, was sold in 1921 by the Emergency Fleet Corporation to the newly organized Crosby Marine Corporation of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 324.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookdale (steamer)
The steamer Brookdale, one of the more successful of the Shipping Board's wooden wartime fleet, was purchased by the McCormick Steamship Company in 1931. The firm had been operating her in coastal service for some time under charter from G. H. Walker & Co. of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1931, H.W. McCurdy Maine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 412.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookdale (steamer)
R. W. Crosby of Seattle, who operated the wooden Shipping Board steamer Brookdale in post-war service as the Crosby Marine Corporation, purchased the former Navy collier Caesar (originally the British freighter Kingtor), and shortly resold her to James Griffiths & Sons for Northwest freight service. The 323 -foot steel vessel had been equipped by the Navy with a $ 30, 000 towing engine to tow the huge floating drydock Dewey from the Atlantic coast to Manila and was well suited for the Griffiths steamship-barge oper- ations to Alaska and British Columbia, operating under the new name Mogul in honor of Capt. Griffiths'original Puget Sound vessel. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 341.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookdale (wooden Steam Freighter)
S.S. Brookdale of 1918, Sea Chest. March, 1984, p. 91-94. Launched at Aberdeen on August 8, 1918.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Buffalo
Don Berry. Majority of Scoundrels., p. 114. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., 16, 19, 394.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bunkalation (schooner)
June 1870 American schooner stranded at Cape Blanco. A total loss, $7,000. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bunkalation (schooner)
June 1870 American schooner stranded at Cape Blanco. A total loss, $7,000. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Burdale
See PELDALE.
Citation:
C. C. Calkins (steamer)
Another addition to the lake fleet was the C. C. Calkins, a handsome propeller seventy-eight feet four inches long, sixteen feet three inches beam, and five feet five inches hold. The Calkins was one of the best steamers built on the lake but was never been steadily employed. She was built at Houghton. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C. G. White (sealing Schooner)
C. G. White wrecked in a gale and snowstorm at Kadiak Island, April 14, 1895, with a loss of 11 of the crew. Gordon Newell, Casualties, 1895, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. xiii
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.c.calkins (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C0ntinential (steamer)
Built in 1864 300 fett long, beame of 36 feet built of oak and hickory. Taken over by Ben Holladay to transport the Mercer party. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., II, p. 60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calabria
The "Calabria" was a 4,376 gross ton ship built by D&W.Henderson Ltd, Glasgow in 1901 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. Her details were - length 376ft x beam 47.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 20-1st and 1,150-3rd class passengers. Launched on 9/4/1901, she sailed from Leghorn on her maiden voyage to Naples and New York on 23/5/1901. From 1901-1921 (including the 1914-1918 war years) she sailed between Mediterranean ports and New York, and commenced her last voyage on 8/9/1921 when she left Trieste for Patras, Palermo, New York (arr.2/10/1921), Vigo (5/11/1921), Havana, New York (arr.26/11/1921, dep.1/12/1921) and Glasgow. She then made a single round voyage between Glasgow and New York (starting 22/12/1921) and was then laid up and was sold for scrap on 5/2/1923 and broken up at London. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.465] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 May 1998]
Calamet (schooner)
Other serious marine disasters of the year were the loss of the schooner Calamet, which sailed from Shoalwater Bay for the Columbia with seven persons, and nothing was ever found to throw light on their mysterious disappearance. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calamet (schooner)
At Portland, Terrence Quinn built a small schooner called the Calamet,* which was placed in the Yaquina trade in command of Capt. John Harlow. *The schooner Calamet, built in East Portland in 1856, was a small vessel of about 35 tons burden, and is credited with having been the first vessel to enter Yaquina Bay. She was owned by Capt. John Harlow, her first master, J. C. Ainsworth, George Abernethy, and B. Jennings. The initial trip was successful, but on her return she was put in command of Captain Tichnor, who made a trip to the Siletz, where she went ashore and was abandoned. The schooner was afterward righted, taken to Portland in the spring of 1857, repaired, and sold to Alexander Dodge, Henry Fuller, Charles P. Stewart, James O'Neill, and John A. Hayward, who became master. ln October she drifted ashore at Yaquina, and, after vainly trying to pull her into deep water, Capt. Thomas Mountain was given charge. He placed rollers under the vessel and wheeled and rolled her 2,100 yards to the Yaquina River, w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calapooya (sloop)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calawai (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 54.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calcium (tug)
The tug Calcium was destroyed by fire off Camano Island August 7, and the stern-wheel steamer Helen Hale by the same cause on the upper Columbia, the latter two vessels being lost without fatalities. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calcium (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1904 as the Florence. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Caledonia
Exploded November 2, 1859 killing a fireman on a trip from Victoria to the Fraser River. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 252. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 69-70, 90, 392, 396.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Caledonia
The boiler of the Caledonia exploded November 2, 1859, while on a trip from Victoria to Fraser River, killing the fireman, Charles Green, and injuring Engineer Allen, Fireman Riley, Thomas Burrell, Thomas Alexander and Joe Lewis. Capt. James C. Halsey and five others escaped unhurt. The steamer was badly wrecked and drifted helplessly in the gulf for twenty-eight hours before she finally went ashore near Orcas Island. The hull was afterward repaired and the craft put in commission, but a few years later another boiler gave way, abruptly terminating the career of this pioneer. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.89-90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Caledonia (general Info)
There were five ships with the name "Caledonia". They were all part of the Anchor Line. The first, built in 1840, was the one wrecked in 1851 near Havana. Then came the next, built in 1862, which ran aground in Dec. 1862, was refloated, then wrecked in 1872. The third, built in 1863 was scrapped in 1898. The fourth, built in 1904 was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean on Dec. 4, 1916. The final was built in 1925, was converted to an armed merchant ship in 1939 and renamed the Scotstoun. It was torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic on June 13, 1940.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]
Caledonia (3)
The "Caledonia" was built by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow in 1863 for the Anchor Line. She was a 1,393 gross ton ship, length 261.5ft x beam 33.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st, 90-2nd and 300-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/10/1863, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Portland and New York on 11/12/1863. Between 1863 - 1872 she sailed between Glasgow and New York except for a single round voyage in Feb 1870 Glasgow - Palermo - New York and Glasgow. In 1872 she was rebuilt to 2,125 gross tons, fitted with compound engines and her accommodation increased to 60-1st and 550-3rd class. On 10/7/1872 she resumed Glasgow - Moville - New York sailings and in August 1874 commenced her first Glasgow - Genoa - Naples - New York - Glasgow voyage. She made two round voyages on this service and in March 1875 made a single Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay voyage. From 1875-80 she was used for the Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow service, 1880-81 London - Halifax - Boston (8 round voyages), 1881-84 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow, 1884-86 London - Halifax - Boston (11 round voyages), 1886-96 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow. On 6/5/1896 she left Genoa on her last voyage to Naples, New York (arr 19/6/1896), and Glasgow and on 23/4/1897 was sold and scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.452] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 February 1998]
Caledonia (4)
The CALEDONIA was built for the Anchor Line by D & W Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, in 1904. 9,223 tons; 152,39 x 17,77 meters (500 x 58.3 feet, length x beam); 2 funnels, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion, service speed 16 knots; accommodation for 383 1st-, 216 2nd-, and 829 3rd-class passengers. 22 October 1904, launched. 25 March 1905, maiden voyage, Glasgow- Moville- New York. 11 July 1914, last voyage Glasgow-Moville-New York (arrived 20 July; departed 25 July)-Glasgow. August 1914, troopship. 12 April 1916, torpedoed and sunk by enemy submarine 125 miles East by South of Malta [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1, (1975), p. 466]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 39, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
Caledonia (5)
The "Caledonia" was a 17,046 gross ton ship, built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow for the Anchor Line. Her details were - length 553ft x beam 70.4ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation provided for 205-1st, 403-2nd and 796-3rd class passengers. Her keel was laid in Feb 1920 but she wasn't launched until 22/4/1925 and started her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Moville and New York on 3/10/1925. In Oct 1930 she was refitted to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class, and in March 1936 altered to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She was reconditioned in 1938 with remodelled 3rd class accommodation, new propellers and a speed of 17 knots. In June 1939 she commenced her last N.Atlantic voyage from Glasgow to Moville, Boston, New York, Boston, Moville and Glasgow and in September 1939 was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser and renamed "Scotstoun". On 13/6/1940 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-25, 80 miles west of Barra Island, Hebrides with the loss of 6 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.470]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 January 1998]
Caledonia (steamer)
The Hudson's Bay Company, who were the pioneers in the marine business in the Northwest, set afloat the sternwheeler Caledonia at New Westminster in February, 1891, for the Skeena River trade. She is one hundred feet long, twenty-four feet six inches beam, five feet hold, and was sent to her new field in charge of Capt. George Odin, with Thomas Hatherly, chief engineer. For the past three years she has been commanded by Capt. John H. Bonser. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.391.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Caledonia (steamer)
The Caledonia, which had been rebuilt since her explosion the previous year, was also running to the Fraser. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.94.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calgaric
Edward Hungerford. Wells Fargo, p. 252-53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calhoun (launch)
The Pacific Lumber Company's motor launch Calhoun was wrecked on a reef near Pender Harbor January 5 while trying to enter the harbor in heavy snow and winds, the five occupants barely escaping with their lives. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.230
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
California Whaling Company. Marine Digest. (May 24, 1975), p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State , III, p. 79 Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 143.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
From Panama to California in 1849. Horace Lyman. History of Oregon., IV, p. 104. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 545-56. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 188. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
Edward Hungerford. Wells Fargo, p. 253.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
J. E. Denny, and the California, Captains Thorn and Carroll, were in the local service between the Sound and the Columbia River, the latter also making trips to Alaska. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.275.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (2)
The steamship CALIFORNIA was built by C. Mitchell & Co, Newcastle-upon- Tyne (ship #450; engines by Wallsend Slipway Co), and launched for the Carr Line, of Hamburg, on 27 December 1882. 2,690 tons; 91,58 x 11,79 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; screw propulsion, service speed 10 knots; accommodation for 1,250 steerage passengers; crew of 45. 15 March 1883, maiden voyage, Hamburg-New York. 25 May 1888, acquired by HAPAG (the Hamburg-American Line). 13 July 1888, first voyage, Hamburg- New York, for HAPAG. 18 October 1897, last voyage, Hamburg-New York, for HAPAG. 1897, acquired by W. Kunstmann, Stettin. 1898, acquired by Det Forenede D/S, Kopenhagen, and renamed WINLAND. 30 January 1904, on a voyage from Bremerhaven to Reval (now Tallinn, Estonia), stranded off Ronne (on the island of Bornholm, Denmark, off the coast of Sweden); after salvage and repair, sold to T. Ozaki, Uwosaki (later Kobe), Japan, and renamed NISSHIN MARU. 1910, scrapped in Osaka [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 46 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New_ (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 395]. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 15 April 1998]
Citation:
California (3)
In the 1908-09 Lloyd's Register of Shipping:CALIFORNIA.Call sign: TNRB. Official registration #: 115305. Master: E.B. Heath, appointed to the ship in 1905. Rigging: steel twin screw Schooner; 3 decks, promenade deck and shade deck; fitted with electric light. Tonnage: 5,547 tons gross, 4.206 under deck and 2,991 net. Dimensions: 400.3 feet long, 52.3 foot beam and 26.2 feet deep. Built: in 1902 by Caird & Co. Ltd. in Greenock. Propulsion: triple expansion engine with 6 cylinders of 23 1/2, 38 1/2 & 64 inches each pair; stroke 48 inches; 568 nominal horsepower; engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Port of registry: Liverpool. Flag: British. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]
California (4)
In the 1908-09 Lloyd's Register of Shipping:CALIFORNIA. Call sign: HLQJ. Official registration #: 124230. Master: Captain J. Blaikie, appointed to the ship in 1907. Rigging: steel twin screw Schooner: 3 decks; Water Ballast; fitted with electric light and refrigerating machinery. Tonnage: 8,662 tons gross, 6,791 under deck and 5,403 net. Dimensions: 470 feet long, 58.3 foot beam, 34 feet deep. Poop 70 feet long; Bridge 213 feet long; Forecastle 91 feet long. Built: in 1907 by D. & W. Henderson & Co. Ltd. in Glasgow. Propulsion: triple expansion engine with 6 cylinders of 27 1/2, 46 and 75 inches each pair; stroke 54 inches; 827 nominal horsepower; engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Anchor Line Ltd. (Henderson Bros.) Port of registry: Glasgow. Flag: British. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]
California (5)
The "California" of 1929 was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. This was a 16,792 gross ton ship, length 553ft x beam 70.4ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 251-1st, 465-2nd and 1,044-3rd class passengers. Her keel was laid in Oct 1919 but she wasn't launched until 17/4/1923 and commenced her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Moville (Ireland) and New York on 26/8/1923. Between 1924 and 1937 she made approx.20 Autumn / Winter voyages between Liverpool and Bombay as well as Atlantic crossings. In May 1929 her accommodation was altered to carry 206-cabin, 440-tourist and 485-3rd class passengers. Between Nov 1937 and Feb 1938 she made three trooping voyages and in Feb 1939 re-entered service with remodelled 3rd class accommodation, new propellers and a speed of 17 knots. Her last N.Atlantic voyage commenced 4/8/1939 when she left Glasgow for New York, Boston, Moville and Glasgow and in August was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. In April 1942 she became a troopship and on 11/7/1943 was damaged by air attack 320 miles west of Oporto and set on fire with the loss of 46 lives. She was later torpedoed and sunk by an escorting destroyer.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.469]
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 January 1998]
California (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 144, 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (schooner)
The California, a two-masted schooner of 119 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1869 by Isaac Hall. This was when the Hall brothers were still located in San Francisco as foremen shipwrights. Among the original part owners of the California are listed John N. Ingalls, Robert Sudden, and J. J. Smith of Santa Cruz. The latter was managing owner until 1883. In that year she was apparently wrecked at Hueneme, Calif., and rebuilt there. S. B. Peterson appear as owner in 1884, B. H. Madison in 1886 and the schooner drops out of the 1888 register. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 8, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (schooner)
Columbia Bar Pilot Schooner California of 1853, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (schooner)
The California, a two-masted schooner of 119 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1869 by Isaac Hall. This was when the Hall brothers were still located in San Francisco as foremen shipwrights. Among the original part owners of the California are listed John N. In- galls, Robert Sudden, and J. J. Smith of Santa Cruz. The latter was managing owner until 1883. In that year she was apparently wrecked at Hueneme, Calif., and rebuilt there. S. B. Peterson appear as owner in 1884, B. H. Madison in 1886 and the schooner drops out of the 1888 register. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 8, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamer)
The steamship California, Capt. Gregor Johnson, Capetown for St. Thomas, Puerto Rico, was intercepted in the Atlantic about midway between the Cape Verdes and Brazil on August 13 by a submarine, believed to be Italian. The submarine opened fire with its deck gun, the crew abandoned ship, and the freighter was then sunk by a torpedo. One boat, in charge of Chief Officer Lechner, was picked up 23 days later by the City of Capetown. Capt. Johnson's boat was at sea 32 days before it was picked up by the Norwegian motorship Talisman. The chief engineer later died from the effects of the long voyage in the mate's boat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 511.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamer)
CALIFORNIA, OREGON, and PANAMA, 1848-1870. The wooden sidewheelers California, Oregon, and Panama, were the first three steamers of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS), which had been founded in April 1848 by William Henry Aspinwall. PMSS ordered these ships from Nhew York City shipyards, and they were finished by the end of 1848. The ships built, and indeed PMSS itself had been created, in response to the U.S. Navy's offer to subsidize a mail service between the Pacific side of Panama and the Columbia River in the Oregon territory. In accordance with the mail contract, the steamers incorporated military features so that in time of emergency they could easily be converted to naval auxiliaries. As usual for this time, the wooden vessels were fully rigged for sail should the single -expansion engine break down or run out of coal. The 200-foot-long ships had been designed primarily to carry cargo, although they also had passenger accommodations initially just for sixty persons; later the company added spac
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamer)
The steamship California, known during the early days of her career on the Coast as the Little California, and afterward as the Eureka, was built at Mystic, Conn., and, after coming round from the East, made her first voyage North in 1866, arriving at Portland in August, in command of Captain Godfrey. The following year she relieved the steamer Gussie Telfair on the Portland and Victoria route, making her initial trip in January with Captain Lyons in charge. She remained in this service several years, except at intervals when she ran to Alaska. After Ben Holladay met his Waterloo, and lost his steamship line, he contrived to retain possession of the California, and she continued in his service until 1876, when young Ben Holladay disposed of her to P. B. Cornwall, who had the Alaska mail contract, and operated her on that route, connecting at Portland with the steamship Great Republic after the opposition started. When the Northern Pacific Railroad was completed between Kalama and Tacoma, the travel by ocean w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamship)
Steamer California, first American steamship to round the Horn. Photograph of vessel taken in 1872, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamship)
The steamship California, which was on the Northern route in 1855, was the first American steamship to double Cape Horn, and was on the stocks in New York before gold was discovered in California. With the Oregon and Panama, she had been intended to carry passengers and mail between the Columbia River and the Isthmus in the service of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, then newly organized, San Francisco being at that time almost an unknown factor in Pacific Coast marine business. The three vessels were built at about the same time under the supervision of Capt. William Skiddle, a naval constructor in the employ of the United States Government, and, while the California was yet unfinished, her owners, who were not very wealthy, saw that they would be unable to complete her, and asked aid from Congress. The request was granted on condition that the steamers could be used by the Government for war purposes in case the emergency should arise, and with this understanding some alterations were made, nothing but l
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California Rose (tuna Boat)
The California Rose, a 72 foot diesel tuna boat of 180 - horsepower, was built at Tacoma for E. Alello of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California Rose (tuna Boat)
The California Rose, a 72 foot diesel tuna boat of 180 - horsepower, was built at Tacoma for E. Alello of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calista
Built at Dockton in 1911. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. Roland Carey, Steamer Calista ended her eleven year career in collision, Marine Digest. July 23, 1983, p. 15-20. The vessel was launched August 12, 1911 and sunk July 27, 1922. (il). Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 154-56. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 144. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 252.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calista (steamer)
The Puget Sound passenger steamer Calista of the Island Transportation Co., while on the CoupevUleEverett -Seattle run, was rammed and sunk by the Japanese steamship Hawaii Maru off Meadow Point. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. [/ 33-/
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calista (steamer)
The steamer Calista, 140 feet in length, was launched at Dockton in 1911 for the Island Transportation Company to replace the recently burned Whidby, the triple-expansion machinery from the latter going into the new vessel. Construction was supervised by Capt. H. B. Lovejoy, company manager, and the vessel, christened by Mrs. James D. Esary, wife of the company president, was named for Capt. Lovejoy's mother, Mrs. Calista Leach. Mrs. Leach, then the oldest resident of Whidbey Island, a spry lady of 73, was noted for her daily spins about the island on a bicycle. The new steamer was towed to Seattle by the company's Camano for final completion, the upper deck being Uluminated by Japanese lantems for a sea -going barn dance which was led by the vessel's energetic namesake. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 189.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Callapooya (barge)
Jansen Marine Corporation of Troutdale, Oregon completed the 200-foot cargo and petroleum barge Callapooya of 700,000-gallon capacity in addition to deck freight capability, for Halvorsen Towing Co. of Seattle, one of the more successful independent tugboat companies of Puget Sound. Fitted with a molded bow to permit ocean towing speeds of 10 knots, the barge was placed in charter service between Puget Sound and southeastern Alaska. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.64.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calliope (steamer)
Another factor in Willamette River navigation appeared at Corvallis in the Willamette Navigation Company's steamer Calliope, a sternwheeler, one hundred feet long, twenty feet beam, four feet hold, with engines eight by thirty inches. As usual, the company which owned the steamer was largely composed of farmers along the river. J. C. Avery was president, M. Holgate, secretary, P. Harris, treasurer. She ran for some time on the Yamhill River in opposition to the People's Transportation Company's steamers, but was hauled off in February, 1871, going on the upper Willamette in 1872. The steamer was subsequently purchased by Meyers & Marshall, and in January, 1873, took the first shipment of freight, consisting of forty-seven tons of flour, through the locks, from McMinnville to Portland. In December, 1873, the Calliope ran for a short time on the Cowlitz route, and then passed into the hands of Lewis Love, and was operated by him and afterward by Capt. Fred H. Love until 1883, when they disposed of their interes
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calliope (steamer)
The Willamette Freighting Company started the steamer Calliope on the Yamhill River in opposition to the People's Transportation Company early in the year, but soon withdrew. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calliope (steamer)
The Willamette Freighting Company started the steamer Calliope on the Yamhill River in opposition to the People's Transportation Company early in the year, but soon withdrew. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calmar (steamer)
Described by Capt. R. B. Hughes of the S. S. Calmar as the worst sea I've even seen on any ocean, a giant comber generated by a December gale off the Columbia swept his vessel as she was outward bound for the East Coast with 5,800,000 feet of lumber, throwing her on her side and killing two of her crew. Walter Roberts, a seaman, was swept overboard whue attempting to secure a lifeboat. First Officer Clarence Huron, assisting him, was pinned against a deckhouse and so badly injured that he died before the storm - battered freighter reached port on Puget Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 565.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calmar 1 (steamer)
1949 Steamer. Struck by a huge sea, the Biggest I've ever seen in all my years at sea! exclaimed Captain R. B. Hughes. Two of the Calmar's crew died; one was washed overboard, the other was slammed into the deckhouse. Thrown on her beam ends, the ship was salvaged only by good seamanship. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calopooya (sloop)
Built in 1845. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 27.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calulu (freighter)
The first war prize vessel to put in an appearance in the Northwest the British tramp freighter Calulu arrived at Tacoma in August to load a full cargo of wheat for Australia. The Calulu was the former German steamer Osnabruch, and had been seized at Brisbane at the beginning of the war. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 252.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calulu (freighter)
The first war prize vessel to put in an appearance in the Northwest, the British tramp freighter Calulu, arrived at Tacoma in August to load a full cargo of wheat for Australia. The Calulu was the former German steamer Osnabruch, and had been seized at Brisbane at the beginning of the war. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p.252.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calypso
The "Calypso" of 1907 was a 2,962 gross ton ship, built by Earle's of Hull in 1904 for the Wilson Line. Her dimensions were - length 309.6ft x beam 42.7ft, two funnels, two masts, and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 57-1st, 44-2nd and 863-3rd class passengers. Taken up by the Admiralty in November 1914, she was renamed HMS CALYX and armed with 8-4.7inch and 2-3pounder guns. She served with the 10th Cruiser Squadron until 26.6.1915 when she was returned to the Wilson Line. On 10.7.1916 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.53 in the Skagerrak off Lindesnes while on passage from London to Christiansand. 30 crew including the master were lost. [The Wilson Line of Hull 1831-1981 by Arthur G.Credland and Michael Thompson ISBN 1-872167-58-6] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 February 1998]
Calypso
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 128, 138.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calypso (research Vessel)
Origin of Cousteau's Calypso, launched at Ballard Marine Railway yard in 1942, Marine Digest. October 9, 1982, p. 21+ Letter to the editor, comments regarding the Calypso, Marine Digest. May 7, 1983, p. 18.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calyx
See CALYPSO.
Citation:
Canadian National Number Five (tug)
The 68-ton diesel tug Canadian National No. 5, 67.2 x 17.2, was built at Kelowna, B. C. in 1932 for inland barge service.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 417.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cape Alava (cargo Vessel)
Tacoma launching late this afternoon, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 1, 1940, p. 1. Cape Alava, the first C-1B Motorship, The Sea Chest. March, 1981, p. 81-83. The ship was christened on August 1, 1940 by Anna Boettiger, daughter of Franklin D. Roosevelt whose husband John Boettiger was editor of the Seattle Post Intelligencer.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capital (sidewheeler)
Built at Port Blakely in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Four steamboats built for Captain Troup. Launched in 1898 as the Dalton. Renamed in 1901. Marine Digest. June 11, 1983, p. 11. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capital City (steamer)
In 1901 the 3 year old steamer Capital City collided and sank. Later she was raised (Firemen's Insurance Company 1917:35, Gibbs 1981).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capital City (steamer)
The stern -wheel steamer Capital City, which had replaced the City of Aberdeen in the S. Willey Navigation Co. Seattle Olympia service, collided with the Canadian freight steamer Trader, owned by C. S. Baxter of Vancouver, off Dash Point near Tacoma late in October. A large hole was torn in the stern -wheeler's hull on the port side abaft the companionway and she immediately began to sink. Capt. Mike Edwards rang for full speed ahead, heading her for the beach. Engineer Scott, in the best tradition of the steamboat engineer, remained at the throttle, waist -deep in water, and the Capital City managed to beach herself on the last of her expiring steam. While the Capital City was undergoing repairs the City of Aberdeen returned to the run under Capt. C. F. Gilmore. Marine inspectors Cherry and Bryant, while holding Capt. Parsons of the Trader chiefly responsible for the accident, held that Capt. Edwards had been guuty of contributory negligence and suspended his license for 30 days. The American inspectors had
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capital Victory (steamer)
The former Maritime Commission steamships Capital Victory and Davidson Victory, both built at Portland by the Oregon Shipbuilding Corp. in 1945, were purchased by the States Steamship Co. of Portland, being renamed Arizona and Montana respectively. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carlotta B. Cox (sealer)
The former Victoria sealer Carlotta B. Cox was equipped with a 130-horsepower semi-diesel by Allen Fishing Co. of Prince Rupert. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Castalia
The "Castalia" of 1880 was built by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow in 1872, for Handyside & Henderson, who later became the Anchor Line of Glasgow. She was a 2201 gross ton vessel, length 306.6ft x beam 34.6ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 75-1st, 150-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/12/1872, she commenced her maiden voyage from Glasgow - New York on 12/3/1873. After 11 round voyages on this service, she was transferred in July 1874 to the Glasgow - Genoa - Marseilles - Naples - Messina - New York - Glasgow run. She completed 26 voyages on the Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow service (Maximum number of passengers carried - 554). On 20/5/1884 she was wrecked near Denia, Spain.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor. Vol.1.p458.]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 23 September 1997]
Catala (steamer)
Catala, former Union Steamships coastal passenger steamer, in use as a floating hotel near Ocean Shores, Grays Harbor County, developed 30 - degree list as a result of 70 - mile winds and high seas New Years day; later partially filled with sand and water and was eventually dismantled. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690- 91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catala (steamer)
The Catala, a handsome little two-stacker of 1,476 tons, fitted with twin screws and reciprocating engines, was an entirely new vessel, designed for the company's northern service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior,1966. p. 366.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catala (steamer)
The Union Steamships coaster Catala crashed upon Sparrowhawk Reef near Port Simpson early in November while returning from Alaska with freight. Efforts of the tugs Lorne, Salvage Princess and Cape Scott to free her were unavailing and it was feared for some time that she would be a total loss. Unusally favorable weather conditions prevailed and she was finally refloated nearly a month later having suffered major hull damage. Captain E. A. Dickson and Chief Officer E. M. Sheppard were absolved of any blame both by government officials and the steamship company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 390.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catalina Express (passenger Craft)
Westport shipyard built fiberglass vessel for the Long Angeles Harbor to Catalina Island Transport, Marine Digest. May 11, 1985, p. 7. Hull design was by Edwin Monk, Jr. of Bainbridge Island. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catalonia
The "Catalonia" was built for the Cunard Steamship Co. in 1881 by J & G.Thomson, Glasgow. She was a 4,841 gross ton ship, length 429.6ft x beam 43ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was capacity for 200-1st and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 14th May 1881, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 6th Aug.1881. Her last voyage on this service started on 3rd Mar.1883 and she transferred to the Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston service on 18th Apr.1883. She started her last sailing on this route on 19th Sep.1899, made one voyage as a Boer War transport in November of that year and was scrapped in Italy in 1901. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.152] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 August 1998]
Catalyst
Oceanographic research vessel. A floating laboratory for the Oceanographic Department of the University of Washington, the motor vessel Catayst was launched by the Lake Union Drydock & Machine Works at Seattle. Of 91 tons, with dimensions of 68.2 x 18.3 x 10.5, she was powered by a 150-horsepower diesel. She made her first crwse in June, in charge of Capt C. T. Larsen, with instruction supervised by ProL Guberlet head of zoorogical research in oceanography at the university. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 419.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catalyst (oceanography Vessel)
Catalyst, former University of Washington oceanography vessel, sold to J. H. Scott & Co. of San Francisco for transporting ore from that company's mines near Hyder, Alaska to the Tacoma smelter. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cathedral (clipper Ship)
Willis Thornton. The Nine Lives of Citizen Train. 1948., p. 17.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cavalcade (fish Boat)
Casey Davidson, Launched just last summer the 92 foot fish boat Cavalcade was purchased by the United States Navy paying about $80,000 for the craft. The Cavalcade was built in Tacoma by the J.M. Martinac Shipbuilding Corporation for the Suryan interests of Anacortes and was used last summer as a cannery tender and pickup boat in Alaska, Soundings. The Tacoma Times. November 14, 1940.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cavalcade (purse Seiner)
On the American side, the first commercial fisheries vessels were taken over by the U. S. Navy for conversion to YP class Patrol boats, operating from bases at Kodiak and Dutch Harbor. Cavalcade, a 92-foot purse seiner, became YP-72, flagship of the Alaska patrol. Others to don war paint and mount guns in 1940 were the 77-foot seiner Endeavor (YP-74), the 90-foot cannery tender Corsair (YP-73). The exploits of these and other Yippee boats were to become legendary during the war years in the far north. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cavalcade (purse Seiner)
An interesting facet of the wartime marine history of this period was the continued operation by the United States Navy of its fleet of district patrol craft, the YP boats, known to Navy men as the Yippees. During the early years of the war these little craft carried out some of the most heroic and unheralded tasks of naval warfare on the Pacific Sea Frontier. Not one of them was built originally for war purposes, all being former fishing vessels, largely seiners of from 75 to 104 feet in length. They were commanded by young reserve officers, often on their first actual tour of sea duty. Kodiak, Dutch Harbor and the bleak Aleutians sprawling their uncharted reefs and rocky beaches westward tested the mettle of these little ships and their amateur crews. Often iced down and wallowing in masthead-high seas, the iron bark sheathing ripped from the sturdy hulls by Arctic ice, not one of the YP boats was permanently lost although many of them hit the beach. As recounted earlier, the first commercial fishing
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Centennial
John Rosene's Alaska activities, Sea Chest. X (March, 1977).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Centennial
The venerable iron steamship Centennial, then owned by Charles Nelson & Co., was purchased by Capt. Caine, subject to her safe arrival on Puget Sound from Muroran, Japan. She departed that port for San Francisco with a cargo of sulphur. She never arrived, and it was assumed her cargo had burned and destroyed her. Seven years later, in 1913, she was again to be heard from, however, in weird and mysterious circumstances. xxxx, p. 124.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Centennial (bng, P. 282)
The venerable iron steamship Centennial, then owned by Charles Nelson & Co., was purchased by Capt. Caine, subject to her safe arrival on Puget Sound from Muroran, Japan. She departed that port for San Francisco with a cargo of sulphur. She never arrived, and it was assumed her cargo had burned and destroyed her. Seven years later, in 1913, she was again to be heard from, however, in weird and mysterious circumstances. xxxx, p. 124.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Centennial (steamer)
Two almost forgotten mysteries of the sea involving Pacific Norffiwest vessels were solved in 1913. The old iron steamer Centennial, originally the P. & O. side-wheeler Delta of 1859, brought to the Coast by Capt. Griffiths in gold rush days, had gone missing at sea in 1906 while on a voyage from Japan for San Francisco with a cargo of sulphur. It was thought probable that the cargo had ignited, destroying the ship with the loss of all hands. In due tune the insurance was paid and the old Centennial all but forgotten. A Russian expedition sailing through the lonely reaches of the Okhotsk Sea in 1913 sighted the ice-encased shape of a clipper-bowed steamship frozen in the offshore ice. Seeing no signs of life, the officers of the Russian vessel noted the sighting of this white phantom ship in the log and proceeded on their course. The British pilot of the Russian expedition, Capt. E. Hieber, later described the mysterious frozen ship, his description exactly fitting the Centennial, which was a most distinctive
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cententgal (barkentine)
The four-masted barkentine Cententgal of 1,286 tons, built at East Boston in 1875 and in Alaska Packers' service since 1897, was sold to Capt. Frank Wiedemann, who made one voyage with her from Coos Bay to Australia. Returning empty, she was sold to motion picture producers, who burned her off Long Beach about two years later. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 390.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Central (ferry)
The small steam ferry Central, of 31 tons, 60.2 x 18.5 x 4.8, was built by Capt. Willis Nearhoff at Clinton, Whidbey Island, for service between that point and Everett by his newly-formed Central Ferry Co. The Central was powered with one of the two small steam engines from the Sound freighter Rapid Transit the other going into his later Central 2. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919- 1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 304.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Central America
Kautz, August V. Nothing worthy of note transpired today, p. 110. Ship reported lost. His papers probably went down with her. p. 122.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Central Ii (ferryboat)
The 65-foot ferry Central II was chartered from Mrs. Berte Olson by Puget Sound Freight Lines to run with the Pioneer on the Gooseberry Point - Orcas Island crossing, but she was destroyed by fire on August 20, 1931. The route was then sold to Puget Sound Navigation Co., and Pioneer to Mrs. Olson. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1931, H.W. McCurdy Maine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 412.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challambra (motorship)
Wooden motorship; I deck, 2 masts; 2,400 tons; 262.2 x 46.4 x 21.7 feet; 25 crew; freighter; 8.5 knots. Built in 1918 at Olympia, Washington. Formerly owned by British interests. Chartered by the Admiral Line for Puget Sound to California route between 1925 and 1927. Stranded on White Cliff Island, British Columbia, June 17, 1927. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challambra (motorship)
The wooden motorship Challambra of the Pacific Steamship Co. stranded on White Cliff Island off the British Columbia coast on June 17. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challambra (wooden Motorship)
One deck, two masts. 2,400 tons. 25 crew, freighter. Built at Olympia in 1918. Formerly owned by British interests. Chartered by the Admiral line for Puget Sound to California route between 1925 and 1927. Stranded on White Cliff Island, British Columbia, June 17, 1927. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenge (tug)
Capt. Harry W. Crosby, having briefly operated the steam tug Petrel in conjunction with the Monitor (ex-Lydia Thompson) of the Washington Tllg & Barge Co., disposed of the former vessel for log towing service in British Columbia, in March procured the fast steam tug Challenge, a 70-foot vessel built at Ballard in 1901 as a tender and tug for the Klawak cannery in Alaska. The Crosby tugs were at that time engaged in towing scowloads of building materials from Seattle to Vancouver and Victoria, sometimes making the trip with as many as four loaded scows in tow. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenge (tugboat)
Built at Ballard in 1901. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 36.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger (schooner)
The Challenger, a three-masted schooner of 279 tons, was built at Eureka, Calif., in 1883 for Captain W. J. Sweasey of San Francisco. After his death, in October, 1893, Richard Sweasey became managing owner; the vessel is listed in 1900, but her ultimate fate has not been recorded. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger (schooner)
American schooner, 279 tons, caught fire off the Oregon Coast and burned for several days until towed across Willapa bar and scuttled in the Willapa River, November 7, 1904. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger (schooner)
November 7, 1904. American schooner towed to the Willapaw River and scuttled. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 158.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger (schooner)
The Challenger, a three-masted schooner of 279 tons, was built at Eureka, Calif., in 1883 for Captain W. J. Sweasey of San Francisco. After his death, in October, 1893, Richard Sweasey became managing owner; the vessel is listed in 1900, but her ultimate fate has not been recorded. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850- 1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger (schooner)
The last chapter in the history of the ill-fated schooner Challenger was ended at South Bend in April when the U. S. Marshal seized the machinery with which the Alaska Company, formed for that purpose, had hoped to salvage her. The hull, which had been scuttled to preventher destruction by fire, was afterward destroyed as a menace to navigation on Willapa Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenger (schooner)
The three-masted schooner Challenger, Capt. H. Nelson, a 279-ton vessel owned by the Pacific Stevedoring & Ballasting Co. of San Francisco, carrying 150,000 feet of lumber and 3,800 barrels of lime for San Francisco, was caught in a very heavy storm off Cape Flattery, leakage of water setting her cargo of lime on fire. Seeing the distress signals, the bar tug Astoria in Willapa Harbor, wentout and brought the Challenger in, Capt. Olsen of the tug being seriously injured during the rescue. The schooner was sunk in the bay to extinguish the fire. The Grays Harbor Tugboat Company's new tug Daring, Capt. Stream, lived up to her name, crossing the bar in the same storm to bring in the schooners Sausalito, Lizzie Vance and A. B. Johnson. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 102.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles E. Falk (schooner)
Charles E. Falk, three-masted schooner of 298 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., probably by Bendixsen, in 1889, for N. H. Falk, Eureka. She was wrecked on Copalis Rocks, some 12 miles north of Grays Harbor, on March 31, 1909 the crew of eight getting ashore safely.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles E. Falk (schooner)
Charles E. Falk, three-masted schooner of 298 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., probably by Bendixsen, in 1889, for N. H. Falk, Eureka. She was wrecked on Copalis Rocks, some 12 miles north of Grays Harbor, on March 31, 1909 the crew of eight getting ashore safely.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (barkentine)
The Chehalis was a four - masted barkentine of 690 tons and 850 M capacity, was built at Hoquiam Wash 1891, by T. McDonald for the Simpson Lumber Co. In 1912 they sold her to Peruvian owners and she is listed as owned in Callao as late as 1921. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (barkentine)
The Chehalis was a four - masted barkentine of 690 tons and 850 M capacity, was built at Hoquiam Wash 1891, by T. McDonald for the Simpson Lumber Co. In 1912 they sold her to Peruvian owners and she is listed as owned in Callao as late as 1921. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (barkentine)
The four-masted barkentine Chehalis, 690 tons, built by T. McDonald at Hoquiam in 1891 for A. M. Simpson, was sold to Peruvian owners. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Chehalis, noted as one of the fastest and most dependable of the coastwise lumber fleet was placed back in Grays Harbor-Califomia service in March after a layup of two years, having been purchased by R. C. Sudden from the firm of Sudden & Christenson. Capt. Halfden Hansen, her former master, took charge of the vessel. Gordon Newell,Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 353.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steam Schooner)
The officers of the stream schooner Chehalis en route from San Francisco to Hoquiam for lumber, faced an interesting problem in late April when a passenger, armed with a gun, attempted to take command of the vessel some 24 hours out of the California port. The demented passenger appeared to be laboring under the delusion that the Chehalis was an Oakland street car, of which he was the conductor, and that it was his duty to take it to the car barn. This being quite unthinkable for various reasons, the crew of the steam schooner disarmed him and locked him in a stateroom, turning him over to Grays Harbor authorities upon the vessel's arrival there. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 188.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steam Tug)
The 55-ton Anacortes steam tug Chehalis, 74 feet in length, built at Cosmopolis in 1890 for passenger and freight service on Grays Harbor, was sold to the recently organized Cary-Davis Towing Co. of Seattle, with the former cannery tender Equator forming the nucleus of what was to become one of Puget Sound's most notable towing firms. The Chehalls, also in use as a cannery tender, had last been owned by the Fidalgo Island Packing Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1916, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 265.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steamer)
The steamer Chehalis sank in 1889 in the Snohomish River channel (Straub 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steamer)
The steamers Chehalis, length seventy-three feet six inches, beam sixteen feet, depth of hold six feet, and Elma, were built at Cosmopolis, Gray's Harbor, in 1890. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.376.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steamer)
The steamer Chehalis sank in 1889 in the Snohomish River channel (Straub 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steamer)
The steamer Chehalis, one of Puget Sound's pioneer fleet, was caught in a gale near Ten Mile Point, November 9, 1882, while en route from Suohomisli to Seattle, and blown stern on to the beach, where she became a total wreck, her cargo being strewn along the beach for a distance of ten miles. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 302.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (steamer)
The Chehalis was a small sternwheeler, built at Tumwater in 1867 by H. H. Hyde, and after a disastrous experience on the Chehalis River was operated between Snohomish, Port Gamble and Ludlow. She was subsequently sold to the Black Diamond Coal Company and used for towing barges on the lake, Captain Huffner and William Bailey, who was afterward killed on the Biz, commanding. Brittain & Brennan then bought her and used her on the Skagit. She was the first steamer that ever went up as far as Portage Rapids, and the first to ascend Sauk River. Captains Daniel Benson, Curtis D. Brownfield, and Robert Bailey, had charge of her while she was on the Skagit, and Capt. Hiram Olney ran her on the Seattle and Olympia route. She did good service until November, 1882, when she was caught in a gale while en route from Snohomish to Seattle, in command of Capt. W. F. Munroe, and, becoming unmanageable, was blown stern on to the beach near Ten Mile Point. The vessel was a total loss, and her cargo was strewn along the shore fo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (sternwheeler)
Built at Tumwater in 1867. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Sternwheeler, the first up the Snohomish, Marine Digest. LVI (June 24, 1978).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (tug)
The old steam tug Chehalis, first of the Cary-Davis fleet, stranded on North Reef off the British Columbia coast, the wreck being sold to L. B. Noel of Victoria. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 368.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (u.s.s)
Navy will commission U.S.S. Chehalis, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 2, 1969, p. D-17.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Alokut (river Boat)
Experience in operating the 32 - foot twin - screw river boat Chief Joseph on the upper Snake River resulted in the construction of a new craft of even moreunique design by Blaine Stubblefield. The maiden voyage of his second craft through Hells Canyon was made with nine passengers, all emerging safely from the white water run aboard the 30 -foot converted Army bridge pontoon Chief Alokut. This novel passenger boat was built of rubber and powered by a 25-horsepower outboard mounted on a timber outrigger. Stubblefield was pilot for the trip, with Dan Cole of Homestead, Oregon, as steersman. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 586.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Justic Marshall (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 532.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chikugo Maru (coal Carrier)
Nippon Yusen Kaisha's 111,000-deadweight ton coal carrier Chikugo Maru, with dimensions of 856 x 133 feet, loaded 110,000 tons of coal at Roberts Bank Westshore Terminals near Vancouver, becoming the largest cargo vessel to ply British Columbia waters. The giant motorship, with a loaded draft of 52 feet, was on her maiden voyage, having been especially built for the bulk coal trade at Hiroshima. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chiralite (freighter)
An interesting 85-foot motor vessel, the Chiralite, a twinscrew passenger and freight carrier with two 70-horsepower Sterling gas engines, was built by the Taylor Engineering Co. at Vancouver, B. C. for the International Petroleum Co. of Toronto. She was taken to South America by Capt. H. 0. Jones for ferry service between Payta and Telara, Peru. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 291.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chitral (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century,p.59.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Alberni (schooner)
Five masted City of Alberni built at Hoquiam, Washington. Made 80 day wartime voyage with 1,590,000 feet of lumber from the mills of the MacMillan and Bloedel, Ltd, Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Alberni (schooner)
The five-masted schooner City of Alberni ex-Vigilant), under the management of the Canadian Transport Co. Ltd., a subsidiary of the H. R. MacMillan Lumber Co. of Vancouver, came out of layup for wartime service and was given an extensive refit including new rigging and sails and a couple of new top masts. Under the command of Capt. John Vosper, former master of the rum-running five masted schooner Malahat, she loaded lumber for Australia. After a 71-day voyage to Sydney she loaded a partial cargo of hardwood at Fiji and filled out with sugar at Suva. Late in the year she arrived off Cape Flattery, only to be struck by a year-end gale which opened up her seams and damaged her mizzen mast. Leaking and lame, she struggled into Port Angeles and was towed to Vancouver completing her round voyage on New Years Day of 1941. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Alberni (schooner)
The Canadian five-masted schooner City of Alberni (ex Vigilant), owned by the Canadian Transport Co., a subsidiary of the H. R. McMillan Export Co., had returned to service in the spring of 1940 after nearly a year's layup at Bellingham, carrying lumber from Vancouver to Sydney and returning from Fiji with sugar. On New Years Day, 1940, she returned to Vancouver, leaking and with a damaged mizzen mast, and discharged cargo. In the spring she sailed with lumber from Port Alberni to Sydney, thence in ballast to Apia, Samoa for copra, and thence back to British Columbia. On December 7, 1941 she was west of Hawaii, her master, Capt. John Vosper, estimating later that her course must have coincided within a few miles of that of the Japanese fleet steaming to attack Pearl Harbor. The City of Alberni was leaking badly by the end of this second Australian voyage and had difficulty getting insurance. She finally made her final voyage from the Northwest in November, 1942 with lumber for South Africa. Unable to round th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Baltimore
The "City of Baltimore" was built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1855 for the British owned Inman Line. She was a 2,368 gross ton ship, length 330.7ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 20th January 1855, she sailed from Liverpool for Marseilles on 20th March, where she was charterd by the French government for use as a troop transport for the Crimean War. She commenced her first commercial voyage for the Inman Line from Liverpool to Philadelphia on 23rd April 1856 and her first Liverpool - New York voyage started on 14th Jan.1857. In 1866 she was reconditioned with new engines and boilers and resumed Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York voyages on 21st Nov.1866. Her last sailing on this service commenced 26th Feb.1874 and she was then sold to the Hall Line, retaining the same name. In 1883 she was sold to Spanish owners and renamed "Fivaller" and in 1886 became the Spanish owned "Benicarlo". She was scrapped the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.239; vol.5 ,p.1920] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 August 1998]
City Of Salem
Steamer City of Salem taking on freight at a river landing, Quarterdeck Review. V (Summer, 1977).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Salem (steamer)
The steamer City of Salem, the finest Willamette steamer yet floated, was built, making her trial trip October 21, 1875. The success of this steamer was but a continuation of that enjoyed by the Ohio. She could carry an immense load on very shallow water, and when light her master asserted that all she needed to run on was a heavy dew. In February, 1876, she ascended the Santiam as far as Jefferson. In July, 1878, her engines were replaced by larger ones, those of the City of Salem being transferred to the Ohio, and when she was again in service she was commanded by Capt. E. W. Spencer, J. W. Newkirk, purser, Perry Scott, engineer. Captain Sanborn was also master of the steamer in 1878, and James D. Miller ran her in 1880. In 1881 she was purchased by William Reid, better known as Dundee Reid, who used her in connection with the Oregonian Railroad. Capt. J. P. Coulter handled her for a short time, and George Raabe was in charge for six years. She was thoroughly overhauled in 1884, and the following year, whil
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (alaska Crab Boat)
This vessel sank northwest of Kodiak Island in September of 1981. She was a 96 foot steel ship. Submerged crabber raised from 180 feet of water after three years. Salvaged by Alaska Diving Service of Ketchikan, National Fisherman. (February, 1985), p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ciudad Condal
The "Ciudad Condal" was built by T.R.Oswald & Co, Sunderland in 1873 as the "Washington" for the German owned company, Baltischer Lloyd. This was a 2,576 gross ton steamer, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 150-1st & 2nd class passengers and 700-3rd class. Launched in May 1873, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Stettin to Havre and New York on 31/7/1873. She commenced her fourth and last voyage on 28/5/1874 when she left Stettin for Copenhagen, Antwerp and New York. Sold to A.Lopez y Compania of Spain and renamed "Ciudad Condal" in 1879, she came under the control of Compania Trasatlantica of Barcelona in 1881. I have no details of the sailings of this ship, except that she was used on the feeder service between Havana and New York for a while. She was scrapped at Genoa in 1906. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.774] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 May 1998]
Clallam
Passenger steamer, American, foundered in a storm in the Strait of Juan de Fuca after departing Port Townsend January 8, 1904. She went to the bottom claiming 54 lives.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clallam (built In Tacoma In 1903)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. Wrecked January 8, 1904, Herbert Hunt, History of Tacoma, II, p. 213-15. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 247. The Clallam Sank January 9, 1904 with 44 lives lost. Marine Digest. June 11, 1988, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clallam (steamer)
Passenger steamer, American, foundered in a storm in the Strait of Juan de Fuca after departing Port Townsend January 8, 1904. She went to the bottom claiming 54 lives.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clallam (steamer)
The Heath yards in Tacoma launched the ill-fated Puget Sound steamer Clallam for the Puget Sound Navigation Company. This vessel, designed to operate with the Majestic between Tacoma, Seattle, Port Townsend, and Victoria, was 168 feet in length, 32 - foot beam, with 13 - foot depth of hold. She was equipped with 44 staterooms and her fore - and - aft compound engine developed 800 horsepower, giving her a cruising speed of 13 knots. Those of a superstitious turn of mind were disturbed by two mishaps which marred her launching; the daughter of the Tatoosh Island weather observer, chosen by the people of Clallam County to christen their namesake vessel, missed the bow with the champagne bottle when the new craft slid down the ways with unexpected speed. As the Clallam took to the water her ensign was unfurled, but upside down in the universal signal of disaster at sea. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clallam (steamer)
Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 100. The Clallam, commanded by Capt. George Roberts, left her Tacoma dock for her regular trip to Canada on the morning of January 8, 1904. At Seattle she swung into her dock at the foot of Yesler Avenue to pick up passengers and freight before proceeding to Port Townsend and Victoria. Superstitious seamen who had looked with disfavor on her unlucky launching the previous year had forgotten their predictions of trouble, but a peculiar incident is said to have transpired at Seattle. A trained bell-sheep was utilized at Seattle to lead aboard sheep destined for the Victoria slaughterhouses. She customarily led her charges aboard and rode comfortably back to Seattle each voyage. On the morning of January 8 she refused absolutely to board the ship, and was finally left behind when the steamer departed. Arriving at Port Townsend, the Clallam made the usual transfers of passengers and freight and cleared customs; the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clan Mcdonald
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clan Mcdonald (freighter)
The other, the Clan McDonald, is a freighter ninety-five feet long, twenty-four feet seven inches beam, and five feet five inches hold, and is now owned by Lilly, Bogardus & Co. of Seattle. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clan Mcdonald (steamer)
The stem-wheel steamer Clan McDonald, transferred to Puget Sound from Grays Harbor, destroyed by fire at Chuckanut Bay. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 83.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clarksdale Victory (u.s. Army Transport)
With a death toll of 49 lives, the worst Pacific Northwest marine disasterof 1947 occurredon November24 with thesinking of the Clarksdale Victory. The steamship struck Hippa Island Reef in the Queen Charlotte group while southboundfrom Whittier in command of 29-year-old Capt. Gerald Laugeson. Shortly after striking, the vessel broke in two under the pounding of 50-foot waves, the after section sinking immediately, carrying 45 of her crew to their deaths. Only four men, including the second and third mates, who had been on the bridge, escaped. The steamship Denali launched a boat in a rescue effort, but it swamped and its eight- man crew barely escaped with their lives. Shore parties from the Coast Guard cutters Wachusett and Citrus later located the four survivors and the bodies of three of the victims. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.p.549.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coal Harbour
Length 127 foot Built 1881, (three-masted schooner)32.8 ft beam Hall Brothers, Port Blakely Washington. Reg. No. 150569 Engines: Two 55-HP Imperial Gas Engine Co., San Francisco. Owner: Canadian Mexican Shipping Co., Archibald McGillis, 1747 37th Ave., Vancouver; July 23, 1923. Ex Gunhild II. Seized early in 1925, its story appears in Willoughby's Rum War at Sea, and Greene's Personality Ships. Crew seized: Captain C.H. Hudson, Mate E.F.C. Best, Chief Engineer R-J. Bell. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coeur D'alene (steamer)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 325. Ruby El Hult. Lost Mines and Treasures of the Pacific Northwest, p. 187. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 31-43.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coeur D'alene (steamer)
The Coeur d'Alene Transportation Company, organized in 1883, completed their steamer Coeur d'Alene, the finest sternwheeler yet built so far inland. She was handled by Captain Sanborn and Fngineer Henry Pape, and enjoyed a highly lucrative trade for several years. Captain Sanborn sold the steamer to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and a few years ago replaced her with the Georgie Oakes, one of the fastest sternwheelers in the Northwest. The house and upper works of the Coeur d'Alene were used on the Oakes and the hull was converted to a barge. Captain Sanborn commanded the steamer nearly all the time she was in service, and Captains George Reynolds and William Nisbet were also engaged on her, while Fred Bell, James Kent, F. F. Wilson and several others succeeded Henry Pape as engineer. E. W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895). New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961., p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coeur D'alene (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 184.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colonel Allen
Hudson B.C., Gordon Speck. Northwest explorations ,p. 320.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colonel Allen (brig)
Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 229. Voyage of 1816.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbus California (cargo Vessel)
Columbus California calls at Tacoma; one ofthe two Columbus line vessels carrying freight between Tacoma and Australia\New Zealand, Marine Digest. August 2, 1986, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Comfort (hospital Ship)
The 430-foot former Navy hospital ship Comfort was rebuilt at the Todd Dry Docks in Seattle as a deluxe cruise liner for the New York-Florida-Cuba service of the Ward Line. The vessel was built originally in 1906 for this line as the Havana by the Cramp yard and received her former name upon completion of the reconstruction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 386.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Commissioner (salvage Tug)
Maritime memoris, photo of the Commissioner, Marine Digest. March 9, 1985, p. 9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Commonwealth (1)
The COMMONWEALTH was a side-wheel packet built at Shousetown, Pennsylvania, in 1864. 261 x 43 x 8.6 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull; engines, inside diameter of cylinder 22 in, length of stroke 9 ft; 3 boilers. In 1866, James Lloyd, master, and James K. Boyles, clerk, she ran New Orleans-St. Louis. Owned in 1868 by Benjamin F. Hutchinson, St. Louis (3/4), and M. W. Beltzhoover, Allegheny City, Pennsylvania (1/4); Capt. William Conley. May 1873, sold to Capt. J. P. Sedam and others, who extensively rebuilt her, but could not pay the bills. She was seized by a U.S. marshal at St. Louis in November 1873, and sold to Capt. Thomas W. Shields and others, who ran her New Orleans-St. Louis, and occasionally New Orleans-Cincinnati. She is said to have made a trip up the Wabash River to New Harmony, Indiana, and brought out a large cargo of corn. She was incorporated into the Anchor Line. Late in her career she was sold to a gentleman of Dover, Kentucky, who ran her several times Cincinnati-New Orleans, and then pinch-hit in the excursion trade between Cincinnati and Coney Island; during one such trip she ran over the steamer LAME DUCK and sank her. She burned at the foot of Whittaker Street, Cincinnati, at 11 PM, 25August 1889. She had a mockingbird whistle, and had to lower her stacks to clear the Cincinnati suspension bridge [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994),pp. 107-108, packet #1275].
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]
Commonwealth (2)
See CANOPIC.
Citation:
Constance (halibut Schooner)
Schooners, the Edith, the Constance and Deeahks, ALF p. 74. Wrecked off Cape Suckling Alaska, in 1919, ALF p. 96. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 88-89, 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Continental
CONTINENTAL (1902) It is part of the Arnold Bernstein Line. Built by the Maryland Steel Co.Sparrows Point Maryland. tonnage = 10,005..Dimensions 489'x58'. Twin screw, 13 knots.Triple expansion engines. Two masts and 1 funnel. Passengers:350. In New York -Plymouth-Antwerp service during 1948 season..Ex-Tidewater (1948). ex-Permanente (1946) ex-Ancon (1941) ex-Shawmut .
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by M. L. Durse - 12 July 1997]
Continental (sloop)
This sloop was wrecked near Clo-oose in the 1880s. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Continental (steamer)
The steamship Continental, which brought out the Mercer girls in 1866, was caught in a gale while crossing the Gulf of California, September 27, 1870 and foundered, eight people losing their lives. The Continental was in command of Capt. Chris Dall, who was severely censured for his conduct on the occasion. The survivors were picked up by the steamship Colorado and the United States steamer Ossipee. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.189.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Continental (steamer)
The Continental was built in Philadelphia in 1864 for the Government, but after the close of the war her services were not required, and she was purchased by Ben Holladay. She was constructed of oak and hickory and was of the following dimensions: length, two hundred and eighty-five feet; beam, thirty- six feet; depth of hold, seventeen feet; with engines fifty by forty-five inches. As the vessel which brought the Mercer girls to the Pacific Coast, the Continental enjoyed more than a local reputation. In this connection it may be mentioned that the number of these women has been greatly exaggerated. A. S. Mercer, the originator of the project of peopling the shores of the Pacific with importations of the fair sex from the East, failed to secure anywhere near the crowd required to make the venture profitable. The names of the girls of this much-heralded expedition were as follows: the Misses Bermingham, Grinold, H. Stewart, Davidson, F. Collins, A. Weir, Rhodes, M. Kenney, Robinson, Atkinson, E. Lord, E. B
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Continential
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., IV, p. 179
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corozal (fish Packer)
Length 72 ft. Built 1929, (fish packer) beam 15 feet. Harbour Boat Builders, Vancouver. Reg. No. 156609 Engine: One 300-HP 6-cylinder diesel. Owner: General Navigation Co. of Canada, 1048 Hamilton St., Vancouver, 1929. Captain Malcolm K Savage. Operated on East Coast out of Belize, British Honduras. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corrales (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 84-85, 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corvallis (snagboat)
The Government snagboat Corvallis was completed at Portland in May for service on the Willamette River, and Capt. George Gore was given command of the steamer, which has remained in active service since, and is at present in charge of Capt. Bert Hatch. She is one hundred feet long, twenty-three feet beam, three feet six inches hold. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.253.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corvallis (steamer)
The Columbia and Willamette stern-wheelers Corvallis and Toledo were wrecked during the year. The 100-foot Corvallis was built at Portland in 1877 as a government snagboat. The 128-foot Toledo was built at Portland the following year for the Cowlitz River trade of the Kellogg brothers. For some time she had been operated by the Woodland Navigation Co. on the Lewis River in charge of Capt. W. A. Davis, and at the time of her loss was on the Yamhill route. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corvallis (sternwheeler)
Built in Portland in 1877. The 100 footer was lost on the Columbia in 1896.Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cromdale
Harold Underhill, Masting and Rigging., p. 45, 125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crystal (steamer)
The small passenger steamer Crystal, 25 tons, 45 feetinlength was built at Gig Harbor for Miles Coffman, who operated her between Tacoma and Wollochet Bay until she was replaced by the Audrey, after which she was given a 50-horsepower gasoline engine and operated out of Port Angeles. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 105-06.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crystal Palace (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 85-86, 93, 396, 607.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Curb (salvage Vessel)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cyrus Walker (sidewheeler)
Built at San Francisco in 1864. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 133. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 128.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cyrus Walker (tug)
A most valued addition to Puget Sound's steam fleet in 1864 was the new tug Cyrus Walker, brought up from San Francisco by Capt. A. B. Gove. She was built in San Francisco in 1864 for Pope & Talbot and Cyrus Walker, in whose employ she is still running, apparently good for several years. While she was primarily intended for towing, she frequently ran under a passenger license, as the scarcity of steamboats during the early days of her existence made her services quite a convenience to people living off the routes of the passenger steamers, in localities where the regular duties of the Cyrus Walker frequently carried her. She was a sidewheeler, and at the time of her advent was considered a fine boat; in fact she retained her prestige for fully twenty years, and even after the arrival on the Sound of the modern fleet of tugs she held her own remarkably well. The Walker and the Goliah are owned by the same company, and when the former has added a few more years to her score both of these old gleaners should be
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cyrus Walker (tug)
The tug Cyrus Walker appeared in a new role in the summer of 1867. In charge of Captain Gove and Engineer Williamson she was dispatched to Neah Bay to quell a disturbance among the Indians. A Clallam Indian had been killed by one of the Neah Bay tribe, and, when the agent arrested the murderer, his tribesmen forcibly released him. A messenger was sent to Steilacoom, and a lieutenant, surgeon and thirty-two privates were sent to Port Gamble by the Eliza Anderson. At this point they boarded the Cyrus Walker, equipped her with a couple of howitzers, and started for Neah Bay, arriving at the Indian camp at daylight. The lieutenant and twenty men landed, but before reaching the camp a kloochman gave the alarm, and the Indians fled to the woods. The howitzers were trained on them, and several were wounded. These, with other captives, were conveyed to Tatoosh Island, where word was sent to the chief. He came on board with about sixty of his followers, and they were promptly made prisoners in the lower hold. The chie
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cyrus Walker (tugboat)
Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 69-71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
D. M. Hall (bark)
October 3, 1868 Bark. En route in ballast San Francisco-Coos Bay. She became a total loss on the spit. Two died. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
D. M. Hall (bark)
The bark D. M. Hall, Captain Harrington, was coming to Coos Bay from San Francisco, October 3, 1868, attempting to sail against an ebb tide. The wind died out, the dense fog and smoke rendered it difficult to work back to sea, and in a very short time she was aground on the south spit, where she rapidly pounded to pieces. Two of the crew were lost. The vessel was an old-timer on the Coast, had been overhauled in San Francisco two years before, and was thought to be in very good order. She went into the Coos Bay lumber trade after she was repaired, and at the time of her loss was four days out from San Francisco in ballast. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.170.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Daedalus
Vancouver's supply ship at Nootka. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 80-81. Visiting Grays Harbor. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 96, 100. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 90-92, 97. Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 126. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., I, p. 217. Edmond S. Meany, Vancouver's Discovery of Puget Sound. p. 290. Buell and Skladal. Sea Otters and the China Trade., p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Daisy Kimball (steamer)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 171-172.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dale M.hunt (fireboat)
A new fireboat for Ketchikan, the 42 - foot Dale M. Hunt with 100 - horsepower Hall - Scoff gasoline engine, was placed in service at that Alaska port in 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dale M.hunt (fireboat)
A new fireboat for Ketchikan, the 42 - foot Dale M. Hunt with 100 - horsepower Hall - Scoff gasoline engine, was placed in service at that Alaska port in 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dallas City (steamer)
Oregon stern -wheel steamer construction in 1910 included Dallas City, 345 tons, 151 feet in length, with 14 x 60 engines, a rebuild of Dalles City of 1891 (402 tons, 142 feet) constructed by The Dalles, Portland and Astoria Navigation Co. (the Regulator Line) to connect with the middle river steamers at The Dalles for Portland and Astoria. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalles City (steamer)
On January 10 the stern-wheel steamer Dalles City, en route from Portland to The Dalles, struck a rock in a narrow section of the river near Stevenson, Washington, tearing a large hole in her bow. The boat was beached and her 70 passengers transferred to the Regulator, which took them on to their destination. The Dalles City was refloated and repaired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1905, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalles City (steamer)
An unusual marine mishap occurred on the Columbia River on September 14, 1912, when the Regulator Line stern -wheel steamer Dalles City was wrecked as the result of a sand storm. So violent was the blinding storm sweeping down the Columbia River gorge that the steamer, while attempting to land at Stevenson, Washington, was blown ashore and so firmly stranded that two other steamers at the scene were unable to free her. Part of her wheat cargo was removed, after which she was refloated and placed back in service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalles City (sternwheeler)
September 14, 1912. Sternwheel. Those acquainted with the Columbia River Gorge will appreciate that a steamboat can be wrecked by a sandstorm, and that is exactly what happened to the Dalles City. Totally blinded by stinging sand and opaque-etched pilothouse windows, her skipper ran the steamer ashore at Stevenson, on the Washington side. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalriada
The DALRIADA was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built at Quebec, by George H. Parke, in 1849. 1383/1504 (or 1507) tons (old/new measurement). 184 x 34 x 24.7 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). She was re-registered at Belfast on 1 October 1849 [Frederick William Wallace, Record of Canadian shipping; a list of squarerigged vessels, mainly 500 tons and over, built in the Eastern Provinces of British North America from the year 1786 to 1920 (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1929), quoted in Maritime Museum of the Great Lakes at Canadian Ship Information Database. The annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1850/51-1861/62 contain the following information on the DALRIADA: Master: 1850/51 - Kell[e]y; 1851/52 - T. Smith; 1851/52-1856/57 - J. Scott; 1857/58-1861/62 - Ewing. Owner: Granger. Port of Registry: 1850/51-1855/56 - Belfast; 1856/57 - Liverpool; 1857/58-1858/59 - Belfast; 1859/60-1861/62 - [none given]. Port of Survey: 1850/51-1855/56 - Liverpool [1851/52 also has "London" crossed out]; 1856/57 - London; 1857/58-1858/59 - Liverpool; 1859/60-1861/62 - [not given]. Destined Voyage: 1850/51 - New Orleans; 1851/52 - Callao; Quebec [crossed out]; 1851/52-1853/54 - Bombay; 1854/55-1855/56 - Valparaiso; 1856/57 - Akyab; 1857/58-1858/59 - Aden; 1859/60-1861/62 - [not given]. The DALRIADA is last mentioned in .Lloyd's Register for 1861/62; however, she was last surveyed in 1856, and as Lloyd's Register often kept vessels on the register for several years after they were lost, condemned, or sold foreign (that is, until they were officially notified of such an occurrence), it is possible that the DALRIADA was lost, condemned, or sold foreign several years before 1861. If you wish to determine precisely the DALRIADA's fate, your most efficient method to do so is to check the microfilmed annual indexes to Lloyd's List (which record vessel movements and casualties) beginning in 1857. Copies of these microfilms are held by the Memorial University of Newfoundland , the last of which provides a research service for $35 Canadian per hour, minimum one hour. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 September 1998]
Dalton (steamer)
The stern-wheel steamer Dalton one of the boats built by Capt. Troup for planned Stikine River service, was purchased by the S. WUley Navigation Co. and placed on the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia route as the Capital City, replacing the City of Aberdeen and running in conjunction with the Multnomah. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalton (sternwheeler)
Built at Port Blakely in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. Four steamboats built for Captain Troup, Marine Digest. June 11, 1983. The Canadian Pacific Comes to Port Blakely, The Sea Chest. September, 1978.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dante Alighieri
The "Dante Alighieri" was built by Societa Esercizio Baccini, Riva Trigoso in 1914 for Transatlanta Italiana. She was a 9754 gross ton vessel, length overall 503.7ft x beam 59.5ft, two funnels, two masts,twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st, 260-2nd and 1,825-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/11/1914 she left Genoa on her maiden voyage for Palermo, Naples and New York on 10/2/1915 and commenced her last voyage on this service in October 1927. Arrived NY on 5/11/1927 and left for Lisbon, Naples and Genoa on 15/11/1927. In 1928 she was sold to a Japanese company and was renamed "Asahi Maru". Her funnels reduced to one in 1940 and on 5/2/1944 she was damaged in collision off Bisan Seto in the Japanese Inland Sea. In 1949 she was scrapped.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]
De Kalb
See MOUNT CLAY.
Citation:
Don Alvaro De Bazan
See GALLIA (1) .
Citation:
Donald (steam Tug)
The steam tug Donald, an old-timer on the lower coast, arrived on Puget Sound in 1877, where J. B. Libby was her first master, with J. Putnam, engineer. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.253.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donald (tug)
The tug Donald went out of service in 1889 and her machinery was placed in a new hull constructed at Portland for the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company,y. The new tug was christened the Wallowa and is one hundred and eleven feet six inches long, twenty-three feet nine inches beam, and eleven feet six inches hold. She has been in charge of Capt. R. E. Howes since her completion. A. F. Goodrich was her first engineer, and John S. Kidd has recently filled that position. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]., p. 366.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donegal
The British brig DONEGAL (Official Number 33717, International Signal Code R.G.L.S.) was built in Belfast in 1808. The annual volmes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1812, 1820, and 1834/35-1876/77 contain the following information on her: Tonnage: 1812 - 200; 1820 - 194; 1834/35-1852/53 - 196; 1853/54-1859/60 - 190/196; 1860/61-1874/75 - 174/196; 1875/76-1876/77 - 142/196. Master: 1812 - Courtney; 1820 - Gowan; 1834/35-1836/37 - J. Matches; 1836/37-1852/53 - J. Hodgson; 1853/54-1859/60 - R. Dixon; 1860/61 - W. Clark; 1861/62-1862/63 - Irvine; 1862/63-1864/65 - Wiltshire; 1864/65-1876/77 - Crossley. Owner: 1812, 1820 - G. Langtry; 1834/35-1835/36 - [not given]; 1836/37-1876/77 - Hodgson. Port of Registry: 1812, 1820 - [not given]; 1834/35-1836/37 - Whitehaven; 1836/37-1852/53 - Maryport; 1853/54-1876/77 - Whitehaven. Port of Survey: 1812 - London; 1820 - Belfast; 1834/35-1835/36 - [not given]; 1836/37-1840/41 - Maryport; 1840/41-1842/43 - Whitehaven; 1842/43-1843/44 - Liverpool; 1844/45-1859/60 - Whitehaven; 1860/61 - Marypoart; 1861/62-1876/77 - Whitehaven. Destined Voyage (-1873/74): 1812 - Belfast; 1820 - London; 1834/35-1835/36 - [not given]; 1836/37-1840/41 - North America; 1840/41-1842/43 - Dublin; 1842/43-1843/44 - Newfoundland; 1844/45-1845/46 - [not given]; 1846/47-1847/48 - Dublin; 1848/49-1850/51 - North America; 1851/52-1852/53 - coaster; 1853/54-1854/55 - Quebec; 1844/45-1859/60 - [not given]; 1860/61-1873/74 - coaster. The 1812 and 1820 volumes of Lloyd's Register also indicate that the DONEGAL had a single deck with beams, and that she drew 15 feet of water when fully loaded. Lloyd's Register for 1876/77 contains the notation "lost". However, the event may have occurred some time before 1876/77, as the DONEGAL appears to have been last surveyed in May 1865. Fortunately, the National Maritime Museum (NMM), Greenwich, London SE10 9NF,, has among its collections wreck registers maintained by the Board of Trade from 1855, in accordance with the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854. The NMM is your best possible source for additional information on the history and ultimate fate of the DONEGAL, as well as for information on any surviving pictorial representations of her. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]
Dorothy Alexander (steel Steamer)
Four decks, two masts, 5453 tons. 391.1 x 46.2 x 19.7 feet. 130 crek, 537 passengers. 16.3 knots. Built in 1907 at Camden, New Jersey as the President. Brought to the West Coast and operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company prior to 1916. Between 1916 and 1922 she sailed under the Admiral flag between Seattle and California. Renamed the Dorothy Alexander for the daughter of H.F. Alexander on July 12, 1922. Between 1922 and 1936 she continued to serve the Puget Sound to California route. 1925 and 1926 she wasoperated on the East Coast by the Clyde Mallory Line. During the summers of 1926 to 1932 she was the larged vessel to operate in Alaskan waters. Purchased by the Alaska Steamship Company in 1937 and renamed the Columbia. sold to Portuguese interests in 1946 and scrapped in 1952. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duchess Of Albany
This British ship was stranded at Bonilla Point, B. C., in 1888. No details. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Earl Of Dalhousie
Raising the Earl of Dalhousie, The Overland Monthly. (March, 1888), p. 232.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Gale (steamship)
The steel Shipping Board steamship Eastern Gale was purchased by the Northwestern Fisheries Co. of Seattle and placed in the cannery trade in charge of Capt. W. C. Ansell as the Perry L. Smithers (in honor of the general manager of the Booth Fisheries Co., of which Northwestern was a subsidiary). Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edendale
1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping lists : EDENDALE ex. Baikal, ex. Edendale. Call sign : WDHR. Official # : 68994 Master : Captain J. LeBosquet, appointed to the ship in 1904. Rigging : Iron single screw Schooner with 1 iron deck and awning deck with load line; 4 cemented bulkheads; water ballast in double bottom, aft 55 feet long and forward 28 feet long. Tonnage : 1,109 tons gross, 1,104 under deck and 718 net. Dimensions : 227 feet long, 29.5 foot beam and holds 15.9 feet deep. Built : in 1879 by J. Laing in Sunderland. Propulsion : compound engine with 2 cylinders of 27 and 50 in. diameter respectively. Stroke 36 inches. 125 nominal horsepower. New boilers in 1893. Engine built by G. Clark in Sunderland. Owners : Goh Syn Koh. Port of registry : Singapore. Flag : British -
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 29 September 1998]
Edith R. Balcom (schooner)
The Victoria sealing schooner Edith R Balcom was wrecked off South America whue on a southern cruise, the vessel and a number of skins becoming a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 155.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edmund B.alexander
See AMERIKA (2).
Citation:
Edward Sewall (bark)
Off Pacific Coast, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 77. Seaports linked by historic schooners; the Edward Sewall among others built at Bath, Maine with ties to Seattle and Puget Sound. Marine Digest. October 6, 1984, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edward Sewall (bark)
The famous American four masted bark Edward Sewall was also purchased by APA and renamed Star of Shetland. Following the 1922 season the remaining wooden sailing vessels of this company were withdrawn from service, except the schooner Metha Nelson, which was used a few more seasons. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 321.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edward Walsh (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 345
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Egalite (steamer)
The Woodland Navigation Company constructed the small steamer Egalite, length seventy-six feet, beam twenty feet, depth of hold four feet, to run to the headwaters of Lewis and Lake rivers. She was afterward purchased by Jacob Kamm. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elizabeth Kimball
Among the flying passages made by the Sound fleet was that of the ship Elizabeth Kimball, which arrived at Port Madison in January, four days and seven hours from San Francisco. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elizabeth Kimball
Among the flying passages made by the Sound fleet was that of the ship Elizabeth Kimball, which arrived at Port Madison in January, four days and seven hours from San Francisco. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald (bark)
The American bark Emerald, which had been in the Puget Mill service for eighteen years, burned at the wharf at Port Gamble at 1:00 A.M., May 26, 1889, while partly loaded with lumber. The Emerald was built in New York in 1855, and was of 1,134 tons register. Her last master was Capt. A. Ford. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 90, 424.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald Princess (sternwheeler)
Harbor tour busineses thrive in Seattle, new to the business this year, the Major Charter's sternwheeler, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1986 p. 11 + (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald Queen (sternwheeler)
An old Queen may ply the Snohomish River, Seattle Post Intelligencer. October 13, 1984. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald Straits (towing Vessel)
Capt. Cecil Rhodes, secretary-treasurer of the Canadian Merchant Service Guild's western division, demanded a government recall of steel hulled tugs for safety inspection following another sudden and unexplained sinking of another small steel towing vessel, the 51-foot Emerald Straits, which went down in heavy weather in Howe Sound in April. Barry Gordon, the mate, was swept from the tug's deck as she sank and he was rescued, but Capt. Billie Rapitta, Joseph Kachowski and John Cords were drowned. The 19-foot mini-submarine Pisces, owned by International Hydrodynamics Ltd. of Vancouver, was chartered by the Department of Transport and Straits Towing to locate the sunken tug, which was found lying on an even keel in 670 feet of water a half mile off shore near Britannia Beach. Underwater films showed that the covers were missing from two hatches and the stern plates were buckled. International Hydrodynamics raised the Emerald Straits during the summer in one of the deepest salvage jobs ever undertaken in Pacifi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emile N. Vidal (barge)
The Emile N. Vidal, converted to a barge in 1947, was sold in 1948 to the Powell Pdver Co., but was resold within a few months to Pennsalt Chemicals Corp. and taken to Willbridge, near Portland, for salt storage. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emma Alexander (steamer)
Steel steamer; 4 decks, 2 masts; 7,793 tons; 423.8 x 54.9 x 17.7 feet; 153 crew; 442 passengers; 14.3 knots. Built in 1913 at Camden, New jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Company as the Congress. Operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company between Seattle and California until she caught fire off Coos Bay, Oregon, September 14, 1916. Sold to the China Mail Steamship Company which renamed her the Nanking and operated to the orient. Purchased by the Admiral Line, November 17, 1923. Renamed Emma Alexander and placed in service on the Seattle to California route in February 1924. Operated on that route until 1936. Sold to British by 1942. Sunk at sea 1946. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emma Alexander (steel Steamer)
Four deck vessel, two masts, 7793 tons, 423.8 x 54.9 x 17.7 feet; 153 crew, 442 passenger, 14.3 knots. Built in 1913 at Camden, New Jersey by the New York Shipbuilding company as the Congress. Operated on the Pacific Coast until she caught fire off Coos Bay on September 14, 1916. Sold to the China Mail Steamship Company which renamed her the Nanking and operated to the Orient. Purchased by the Admiral Line November 17, 1923 and renamed the Emma Alexander. Ran on the Seattle to California route 1924 to 1936. Sold to British interests in 1942 and sunk at sea in 1946. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more. Maritime memories, fire aboard the Congress near Coos Bay, September 14, 1918, The Marine Digest. August 29, 1987, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emmett Felitz (sealing Schooner)
At Seattle the sealing schooner Emmett Felitz, fifty feet long and seventeen feet beam, for the Neah Bay Indians, who have since operated her as a sealer. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.393.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Australia
See DE GRASSE.
Citation:
Empress Of Australia (liner)
The Empress of Australia, built by Vulcan in 1914, was also a three-stacker with two masts, but her Teutonic design presented a bulkier silhouette than that of the British-built Empresses. She was also noticeable for her elliptical stern, being the only liner of the post -war C. P. R. fleet to be so designed. She was a 22,000-ton vessel with dimensions of 590 x 75 x 42, with an overall length of 615 feet. Her six turbines and twin screws gave her a cruising speed of 18 knots. She carried 1, 100 passengers and a crew of 520. As the Tripitz she had been fitted with a special royal suite for the Kaiser and it was said that he had selected this splendid new liner to be his royal yacht for the triumphal cruise he hoped to make after the German victory' It is ironic that, although she never served under the German colors, she was commissioned a royal yacht in later years, carrying the British King George V and Queen Elizabeth to Canada in 1939.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine Histo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of India (royal Mail Steamship)
The new and the old, Canadian Pacific Railway's Royal Mail Steamship Empress of Indian passing the wreck of the steamer Beaver near Vancouver, in 1890. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Empress of India at the docks at Vancouver. PM (October, 1891), p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan (royal Mail Steamship)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 390.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Enoch Talbot (bark)
The old wooden bark Enoch Talbot of 1857, which had been brought to the Pacific Coast in 1875 by the Kenfield interests of San Francisco, and had been operated in gold rush service to Nome by the La Conner Trading & Transportation Co., was abandoned after many years as a coal barge for the Navy, and later at Seattle. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 357
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Esmeralda
The ESMERALDA was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, 907 tons, built in Brunswick, Maine, in 1849, by Robert McManus, who also served as her first master. She ran in Williams & Guion's Black Star Line of packets between New York and Liverpool in 1850, and, under George W. McManus, in the Blue Ball Line of New York-Liverpool packets in 1852. Originally registered at Brunswick, Maine, she received her first New York certificate of registry on 30 September 1854 [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), V.3303; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 385 and 388; Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 219]. I do not at present know anything of the later history or ultimate fate of the ESMERALDA. However, if she survived until at least 1857 there should be a record of her in the annual volumes of American Lloyd's Registry of American and Foreign Shipping (begun as the New York Marine Register, title changed the following year), and if she survived until 1867 there should also be a record of her in both the annual Record of American and Foreign Shipping, published by the American Shipmasters' Association (later the American Bureau of Shipping, a voluntary "classification" society, equivalent to Lloyd's or the Bureau Veritas), and in the annual volumes of the List of Merchant Vessels of the United States, published by the Treasury Department (later, in turn, by the Bureau of Navigation, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, and the Bureau of Customs). The most collection of all three of these registers is held by the Mariners' Museum, 100 Museum Drive, Newport News, VA 23606-3798,, whom you should contact for further information.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 December 1997]
Eton Hall (bark)
Chilean Bark Eaton Hall with sails set, The Tacoma Daily News. February 5, 1906, p. 39.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Exxon Valdez (tanker)
Later known as the Exxon Mediterranean. The Exxon Valdez became the most notorious U.S.-flag ship in recent times when this tanker ran aground in Prince William Sound, off Vaidez, Alaska, in the first moming hour of 24 March 1989. The resulting oil spill, the worst in the nation's history, caused immense environmental damage, and in the ensuing legal settlement, Exxon agreed to pay over $1 billion during a ten-year period. The Exxon Valdez, a tanker of 209,200 deadweight tons built in 1986, was the largest U.S.-flag ship owned by Exxon Shipping Company, the ocean transportation subsidiary of Exxon. The company put Joseph Hazelwood, a graduate of the New York Maritime College at Fort Schuyler, in command of its flagship vessel, apparently because he was well liked and treats everyone like a gentleman (Journal of Commerce, 6 April 1989) and evoked affection from fellow officers and the crew. The company knew the captain had alcohol problems and earlier had put him in a rehabilitation program, but neither the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. W. L. No.1 (coal Barge)
The Waterhouse Lighterage Co., a subsidiary of Frank Waterhouse & Co., sold the last of its big coal barges to the Washington Tug & Barge Co. in April. The 140 x 40 foot barges F. W. L. No. 1 and F. W. L. No. 2 were the largest barges of their type on the coast, having a capacity of 850 tons each. The Washington Tug & Barge Co., which had previously taken over the Waterhouse barges Pacific No. 8, Chesley No. 9 and Chesley No. 11, thus had a total fleet of 36 large scows and barges, the largest in the Pacific Northwest. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.240-241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairwjoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris Of Nisquallyer (
NOAA vessel painted before departure to survey in SE Alaskan areas, Marine Digest November 7, 1981, p. 7+ (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon
Fishing department patrol vessel, sixty feet. R. Geddes Large. Drums and Scalpel, p. 38.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon
In 1910 the new Falcon was one of the most modern purse seiners on Puget Sound. ALF, p. 115.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (1)
The FALCON was a wooden side-wheel steamship, built by William H. Brown, New York, in 1848 for a group of New York and Boston businessmen. 891 17/95 tons; 244 ft 2 in x 30 ft 2 in x 21 ft 5 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); 1 deck, 3 masts, round stern, sharp tuck, billethead; 2 inclined engines built in 1846 by Hogg and Delamater, New York, for John Ericsson's ill-fated Hudson River steamboat IRON WITCH, and transferred to the FALCON; diameter of cylinders 5 ft, length of stroke 5 ft; diameter of paddle wheels 32 ft; 360 h.p. 10 September 1848, maiden voyage, New York-Savannah-Havana-New Orleans. Purchased by the United States Mail Steamship Co, and sailed from New York for Chagres on 1 December 1848. Remained in the New York-New Orleans- Chagres service until 1852. 1857, converted into a towboat. By 1859, her engines had been removed, and she was serving as a quarantine hulk at Hoffman's Island, New York, where in April 1866 she was used to remove the passengers who had arrived sick with Asiatic cholera on the National Line steamship VIRGINIA [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943), p. 225]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 6 July 1998}
Falcon (2)
I know nothing about the FALCON except that she was built by John Patten, Bath, Maine, in 1849. 813 tons; 157 ft 6 in x 33 ft 6 1/2 in x 16 ft 9 1/4 in (length x beam x depth of hold) [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), vol. 5, p. 3196]. She should not be confused with the well-known tea clipper of the same name, which was built by Robert Steele & Co, Greenock, Scotland, in 1859, or with the steamship of the same name, 891 tons, built in New York City in 1848. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]
Falcon (passenger Boat)
The Falcon, a 85 x 16-foot passenger and freight boat with 100-horsepower Eastern Standard engine, designed by L. H. Coolidge and built at Bellingham for the Bellingham-Anaeortes service of the Island Transportation Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (schooner)
The Falcon, a three-masted schooner of 205 tons, was built at Fairhaven by Bendixsen in 1882. Her first owner is given as H. R. Jacobsen, San Francisco, followed by Wright, Bowne & Co- Shortly after 1900 the Falcon was sold to Williamson. Balfour & Co., Valparaiso, the lessees of Easter Island and put under Chilean registery to operate in connection with her owners' sheep ranch on the island. She was still owned in Valparaiso as late as 1924. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (schooner)
The Falcon, a three-masted schooner of 205 tons, was built at Fair- haven by Bendixsen in 1882. Her first owner is given as H. R. Jacobsen, San Francisco, followed by Wright, Bowne & Co- Shortly after 1900 the Falcon was sold to Williamson. Balfour & Co., Valparaiso, the lessees of Easter Island and put under Chilean registery to operate in connection with her owners' sheep ranch on the island. She was still owned in Valparaiso as late as 1924. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (schooner)
C. A. Hooper of San Francisco (said by some authorities to be the prototype of Peter B. Kyne's Cappy Ricks) dispatched the schooner Falcon to St. Michael with freight and 52 passengers, in charge of Capt. 0. B. Lindholm (later to gain literary immortality as Kyne's two-fisted shipmaster, All Hands and Feet), the vessel sailing between solid pack ice and Yukon Flats, arriving in port ahead of all otherf,, sail or steam. Capt. Lindholm then returned to Grays Harbor, loaded a full cargo of piling for Dutch Harbor. sailed in November and completed the round voyage in +@'le record time of 46 days. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 37.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (steamer)
The steamship Falcon arrived at Portland November 8 with her cargo on fire. About 20 per cent of the cargo was lost before the fire was controlled. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (tugboat)
Tug men rescued victims of 11th street street car wreck, The Tacoma Sunday Ledger. January 3, 1926 P. 6 E. Proud lady at sixty-one, The Tacoma News Tribune. January 14, 1962. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falgout (coast Guard Vessel)
The Coast Guard ocean station vessel Falgout, a converted Navy destroyer escort with a complement of 160 officers and men, was transferred from the East Coast and assigned to permanent station at Tacoma, with the patrol cutter CC, 83527. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falke
The "Falke" and her sister ship "Albatross" were built in 1893-94 by Stettin shipbuilders for North German Lloyd, which at that time ran a service from Bremen and Hamburg to London, Hull and Leith. In order to finance the building of their new express liners to New York, they sold the UK trade and it's ships in 1897 to the newly formed Argo Steamship Co of Bremen. The "Falke" was a 1,083 gross ton ship, length 213ft x beam 30ft, one funnel, two masts, acccommodation for 20-1st and 35-2nd class passengers, but have no details of her later history. As far as I can tell, the Argo Line continued operations until 1966, when it withdrew and sold it's last passenger ships. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by A.Greenway] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]
Citation:
Falls Of Clyde
At Ketchikan in the early 1950s Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 127. William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 20-21, 22, 28, 29, 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falls Of Clyde (bark)
The iron four-masted bark Falls of Clyde was sold in 1922 by George W. McNear of San Francisco to General Petroleum Corp., having rounded out her 43-year career under sail upon her return to San Francisco earlier in the year. She was towed to Seattle, where her topmasts were removed, and thence to Ketchikan where she was moored at a pier to serve as a bulk oil and gasoline storage hulk. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falls Of Clyde (square Rigger)
Reprieved at the last minute from an ignominious fate, the neglected hull of the once famous square rigger Falls of Clyde is to be towed to Honolulu for conversion into a museum ship. Efforts by Los Angeles and Seattle to raise funds to purchase the ship failed and she was reported by Capt. A. F. Raynaud, Seattle marine surveyor to be on the verge of being taken to British Colum- bia to be sunk as part of a breakwater. Built in 1878, the vessel moored at Kennydale, has had a colorful career as an Australian bride ship and a sailing oil tanker. Her figurehead is presently a part of the McCurdy collection on display at the Seattle Museum of History & Industry. The Matson Navigation Co., which once operated the vessel is reported to have put up the initial funds to save the ship. She once operated under the Matson banner. Falls of Clyde saved from breakwater fate, The Marine Digest. XLI (June 8, 1963), p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falmouth
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, 139. W.H.H.Hall. The private letters...of Captain Hall., p. 45.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falmouth (sloop Of War)
Brought Governor Gaines to Oregon in 1850. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 468. Used to transport Oregon Territory officials from San Francisco. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 314.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falstria
Ed Garrison, The Danish ship Falstria, along Tacoma's waterfront, The Tacoma Ledger. May 6, 1951. Line Falstria calls at the Tacoma Smelter to load 3100 pigs of copper, The Marine Digest. May 12, 1951.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farallon (steamer)
Steamer Farallon with a deck load of ice, ALF p. 126.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farallon (steamer)
The Farallon had been running north for several months and diverted a large amount of traffic from the Pacific Coast Steamship Company by cutting rates. The big corporation decided to remove her by the same method, and fares between San Francisco and Sound ports went as low as $5.00 cabin and $2.50 steerage. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.422.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farallon (steamer)
The steamer Farallon wrecked in Iliamna Bay, January 5, 1910. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910., p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Faralones (u.s.s)
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 305, 321.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Federalship (steamship)
Built in 1884 by G. Howaldt in Kiel, Germany. Length 222 feet beam 31 ft. Reg. No. 153023 Engine: 2-cylindersteam. Owner: Edward Thompson MacLennan, 416 W. Pender St., Vancouver. Ex Gertrude, later La Golondrina. Captain: S.S. Stone. Seized at sea early 1927 by U.S. Coast Guard, later released. Cargo was 12,500 cases. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feltre (italian Motor Ship)
Raised from the Columbia River at Portland. Agnes Rothery. Ports of British Columbia, p. 241-42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferdinando Palasciano
See KONIG ALBERT.
Citation:
Ferndale (bark)
Built at San Francisco in 1887. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. The lost Ferndale, further particulars of the shipwreck above Gray's Harbor, The Weekly Ledger. February 5, 1892, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (bark)
The wreck report for 1892 opened with a disaster strikingly similar to that which had overwhelmed the bark Abercorn a few years before. The victim in this case was the British bark Ferndale, en route from Newcastle to Portland with a cargo of coal. The Ferndale was spoken fifty miles off the Columbia, January 26th, and was then standing in, but, in the heavy fog which prevailed during the following few days, she was caught in the northerly current. On the morning of the twenty-ninth a fearful gale came on, and she struck the beach at 3:30 A.M. about fifteen miles north of the entrance to Gray's Harbor. Being deeply laden she struck a considerable distance from shore and was soon battered to pieces. In attempting to reach land eighteen of the crew were drowned, and the remaining three were taken from the surf nearer dead than alive by Mrs. Edward White, residing near the scene of the disaster. Those losing their lives were Blair, captain; Gilby, first mate; Charles Wright, second mate; John Fraser, steward; Mo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (steamer)
The Ferndale, a one hundred and fifty ton propeller, was brought up from San Francisco and engaged in the Island trade. Her career on the Sound was brief, and while in charge of her owner, Capt. A. 0. Benjamin, she was destroyed by fire in December, 1890.E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 396.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (steamer)
The Ferndale, a one hundred and fifty ton propeller, was brought up from San Francisco and engaged in the Island trade. Her career on the Sound was brief, and while in charge of her owner, Capt. A. O. Benjamin, she was destroyed by fire in December, 1890. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (steamer)
The Ferndale, from San Juan for Port Townsend in command of her owner, Capt. A. O. Benjamin, burned in Richardson Bay, Lopez Island, December 15th. On leaving San Juan the steamer encountered a very heavy sea, to escape which she turned back. Shortly afterward an unusually heavy swell struck her and broke the guys of the smokestack, which went adrift, setting fire to the steamer, and before the flames could be extinguished her steam pipe broke, and she drifted helplessly on the south side of Lopez Island. Her cargo, consisting of five hundred barrels of lime, caught fire, and the vessel was soon consumed. Her anchors were let go before the lime was ignited, but failed to hold. The total loss of vessel and cargo was about thirty thousand dollars, with an insurance of nearly thirteen thousand dollars on the steamer. The twenty-one persons on board narrowly escaped a horrible death. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific North
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (freighter)
The Fidalgo, a stern -wheel freighter 110 feet in length, was built by A. S. Nelsen at La Conner to replace the Northern Light, whose engines were installed in her. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (steamer)
The Sound freight steamer Fidalgo was lost on the night of February 11 when she broke her moorings and went to pieces in a storm at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 343.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (steamer)
Capt. Harry Barlow, who in association with William Marmont operated the Star Steamship Co. in independent Puget Sound freight service, in 1909 perfected the Barlow Marine elevator, the first one being installed on the company's freight steamer Fidalgo. This device made it possible to load and unload freight directly to or from the elevator platform at any stage of the tide, doing away with the costly and time consuming labor of man handling loaded handtrucks up and down gangways. Captain Barlow soon sold out his interest devoting full time to the development and promotion of the elevator which in its basic form, is still used on Puget Sound freight vessels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (sternwheeler)
Part of the La Conner grain trade, the 110 ft, stern-wheeler Fidalgo capsized in a winter storm on February 1 1, 1923 (U.S. National Archives Record Group 41:50, Newell 1966:106, 343).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Finwale (tug)
The 150-foot steel Admiralty steam tug Finwale of 1,200 horsepower, built in Great Britain in 1915, was purchased by Hopkins Bros. of Hopkins Landing, B. C. for the west Howe Sound Mail run under the name Hopkins Brothers. She was delayed by boiler trouble in the Azores, with the result that her owners lost the government mail contract, and upon her arrival on the B. C. coast she was operated in log towing service in charge of Capt. Gordon Hopkins. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fivaller
See CITY OF BALTIMORE.
Citation:
Florence E. Walton (steamer)
A fine steamer named the Florence E. Walton was constructed at Coos Bay in 1860 for the coasting traffic. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence Nightingale
The 1943-44 Lloyd's Register of Shipping gives the following details : FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE ex. Mormacsun-1942. Call sign : WHLG. Official # : 240541. Rigging : 2 decks and shelter deck; decks electrically welded; longitudinal framing at bottom and at decks; cruiser stern; fitted for fuel oil; equipped with Direction Finder, Gyro-compass and Echo Sounding Device; water ballast. Tonnage : 7,773 tons gross and 4,585 tons net. Dimensions : 469 feet long, 69.6 foot beam and holds 29.2 feet deep. Forecastle 39 feet long. Built : in 1940 by Moore Dry Dock Co. in Oakland, CA. Propulsion : 2 steam turbine double reduction geared to a single screw shaft. Engine built by DeLaval Steam Turbines Co. in Trenton, NJ . Owners : Moore-McCormack Lines Inc. Port of registry : San Francisco Flag : U.S.A. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 1 October 1998]
Fort Yale (steamer)
Union Bar on the Fraser River, two miles above Hope, was the scene of a terrible steamboat explosion on the afternoon of April 14, 1861. The steamer Fort Yale, Capt. Smith B. Jamieson, while passing this point was blown to pieces, instantly killing five men and wounding several others. The destruction of the boat was so complete that it seems a miracle that any one escaped. Among the passengers was Capt. William Irving, of the rival steamer Colonel Moody. Captain Irving was in the pilot-house a few moments before the accident occurred, and when the dinner bell rang offered to steer while Captain Jamieson went below. Jamieson laughingly remarked that he would not trust his boat in the hands of an opposition pilot, so Irving left him and, in company with Messrs. Langley, Stevens, Vale, and Landvoight, Dr. Oliver, Captain Grant, H. S. Alley, purser Barnard and bartender Barry, seated himself at the table. A moment later the explosion occurred. Everything above the deck was razed, and, as the dismantled wreck flo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis Alice. (schooner)
Francis Alice, two - Masted schooner of 131 tons, was built at St. Helens, Ore., in 1881 by W. J. Stevens. Her first owner lived in Astoria; from 1883 to 1886 she was in the cod fishery for Nicholas San Francisco, and subsequently was sold to Alaskan interests . She was wrecked in 1905 in Alaskan waters, property loss being given as $15,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis Alice. (schooner)
Francis Alice, two - Masted schooner of 131 tons, was built at St. Helens, Ore., in 1881 by W. J. Stevens. Her first owner lived in Astoria; from 1883 to 1886 she was in the cod fishery for Nicholas San Francisco, and subsequently was sold to Alaskan interests . She was wrecked in 1905 in Alaskan waters, property loss being given as $15,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galatea (bark)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gale (troller)
Gale was a salmon troller, operated by James Robinson of Seattle, was driven aground two miles south of Cape Flattery on October 18, 1967. The surge of the tide drove the vessel into a rocky wedge, ripping off the keel and knocking a big hole in the bow. The rudder and propeller were also torn off. Robinson abandoned and had to be rescued from the rocks by a Coast Guard helicopter. The boat was beyond salvage and left to the elements. The Gale was reported overdue at Neah Bay the day before the rescue was made. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galena (bark)
November 13, 1906 Bark, four masts, 2294 tons, 292'x 43'x 24', built at Dundee, Scotland by A. Stephens & Sons in 1890. The ship, in ballast from Junin, Chile, was 59 days en route to Portland for grain. Captain J. J. Howell reported to her owner Thomas Shute in Liverpool an occurrence very similar to that of Captain Laurence of the Peter Iredale, lost just 18 days previously a few miles north. Poor visibility caused the Galena to go ashore at Surfpines. Her remains are presently under some new homes in the dunes about three miles north of Seaside and some 600'from the surf. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galena (bark)
British bark, 2,294 tons, stranded on Clatsop Beach at night, on November 13, 1906. She was inbound from junin, Chile, in ballast to load grain at Portland. The weather had been severe and the vessel was beating off the mouth of the river waiting opportunity to pick up a pilot. She got in too close to shore and was carried on the beach by the surf. Captain Howell, and two of his officers stood by the vessel in hopes of salvaging her, but with the storm season coming on, the sands built up around the hull of the 292 foot steel vessel, and salvage prospects were abandoned. A few years later the ship was devoured by the sands. She was one of the largest and finest of the grain fleet and was owned by S. Galena and Company of Liverpool, for whom she had been built at Dundee in 1890. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galena (bark)
British owned vessel. Stranded on Clatsop Beach in 1906. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 151. Aground on Clatsop Beach November 13, 1906, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 142.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galena (bark)
On November 13, 1906 the 2,294-ton iron and steel British fo masted bark Galena, Capt. J. J. Howell, ran ashore about three miles north of Gearhart, Oregon, in the same vicinity as the wreck of the Peter Iredale. She was inbound for Portland from Chile and, like the Iredale, became embedded in sand, although her hull remained more or less intact fpr some years, and was finally scrapped. Built by A. Stephen & Sons at Dundee in 1890, she was owned by Thomas Shute of Liverpool, she and the other Shute vessels, the bark Eudora and ships Tamar and British Isles, having be frequent callers at Northwest ports as units of the Oregon and Puget Sound grain fleets. xxxx, p. 126.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galena (steamer)
The Galena, the pioneer on the lake with suitable accommodations for passengers, was a twin-screw propeller built at Bonner's Ferry in 1887 by the Kootenai Mining & Smelting Company. She made regular trips on the lake and river for four or five seasons and is still in existence, with headquarters at Pilot Bay, B. C. Capt. George Hayward, now with the Columbia & Kootenai Navigation Company, was her first master, and Hiram S. Sweet was engineer. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.348.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galiano (patrol Vessel)
The worst disaster to strike a Canadian vessel in 1918, aside from the Princess Sophia tragedy, was the loss of the 162 -foot steel fisheries patrol steamer Galiano, builtin 191 3 by the Dublin Dockyard Co. in Ireland for British Columbia coastal service. As was customary at the time, the government steamer was performing additional duties as a lighthouse tender. In November she called at Triangle Island Light with supplies. Two passengers were to be picked up, the housekeeper for the wireless station, a Miss Brunton, and Sidney Elliott, one of the operators. At the last moment Elliott's leave was cancelled and he returned to the station shortly before the Galiano's departure. At this point a sudden gale struck The last of the supplies were hastuy unloaded, Miss Brunton was taken aboard the tender's work boat it was hoisted aboard, and the Galiano steamed north toward Ikeda Head in the Queen Charlotte Islands. Shortly thereafter @ier master, Capt Pope, ordered a distress message to be transmitted by wireless
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galilee (brigantine)
The Galilee was a brigantine of 354 tons, built by Captain Matthew Turner at Benicia, Calif., in 1891, for his packet line to Tahiti. She had the reputation of being the smartest sailer in that trade. In 1905 the Galilee was chartered to the Carnegie Institution of Washing ton for use in making the oceanic observations of the earth's magnetism which 1 a t e r led to the building of the non-magnetic vessel Carnegie. In 1911 the Galilee was sold by Bowes & Andrews to the Union Fish Co., San Francisco, and converted to a three-masted bald-headed schooner. In March, 1924, she lost two masts shortly after leaving San Francisco for Pirate Cove, Shumagin Island, but was towed to port and refitted. Her last cod fishing voyage was completed in 1927; in 1929 she was one of a small fleet of sailing vessels operated off Cape San Lucas in connection with the budding tuna industry, but she subsequently r e t u r n e d to San Francisco. A b o u t 1935 she was bought by the owner of the Echo, and beached at Sausalito as a fl
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galilee (brigantine)
The Galilee was a brigantine of 354 tons, built by Captain Matthew Turner at Benicia, Calif., in 1891, for his packet line to Tahiti. She had the reputation of being the smartest sailer in that trade. In 1905 the Galilee was chartered to the Carnegie Institution of Washing ton for use in making the oceanic observations of the earth's magnetism which 1 a t e r led to the building of the non-magnetic vessel Carnegie. In 1911 the Galilee was sold by Bowes & Andrews to the Union Fish Co., San Francisco, and converted to a three-masted bald-headed schooner. In March, 1924, she lost two masts shortly after leaving San Francisco for Pirate Cove, Shumagin Island, but was towed to port and refitted. Her last cod fishing voyage was completed in 1927; in 1929 she was one of a small fleet of sailing vessels operated off Cape San Lucas in connection with the budding tuna industry, but she subsequently r e t u r n e d to San Francisco. A b o u t 1935 she was bought by the owner of the Echo, and beached at Sausalito as a fl
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gallia (1)
Built in 1878 by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow for the Cunard SS Co, she was a 4,809 gross ton ship, length 430.1ft x beam 44.6ft, one funnel, three masts (barque rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12th Nov.1878, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 5th Apr.1879. On 20th Apr.1886 she started her first Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston sailing and commenced her last voyage on this service on 5th Sep.1895. Chartered to Cia Trasatlantica of Spain in 1896 she was temporarily renamed "Don Alvaro de Bazan" and used for transporting troops to deal with the Cuban Rebellion. Later the same year she reverted to her previous name of "Gallia" and resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston voyages on 21st May 1896. Her last sailing on this route started 7th Oct.1897 and she was then sold to the Beaver Line. Her first voyage for these owners started 20th Nov.1897 when she left Liverpool for Halifax and St John NB, and her last on 18th Mar.1899 from Liverpool to St John NB. In 1899 she went to the Allan Line and commenced her first sailing from Liverpool for Quebec and Montreal on 4th May 1899 but went aground near Sorel Point, Quebec, was salvaged and scrapped at Cherbourg the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.152] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 26 September 1998]
Citation:
Gallia (2)
The "Gallia" was built by Chantiers & Ateliers de la Gironde, Bordeaux (engines by Schneider & Cie, Creuzot) in 1883, she was a 4,035 gross ton ship, length 386.5ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 50-1st and 1,200-3rd class. Launched on 17/11/1883 as the "Chateau Yquem" for the French owned Bordeaux Line, she sailed from Bordeaux on her maiden voyage to New York on 30/6/1884. On 27/2/1886 she started a single Palermo - Naples - Valencia - New York round voyage and on 10/5/1887 started a single round voyage from Bordeaux to Naples and New York. Her last Bordeaux - New York sailing started on 6/9/1887 and her last Naples - New York on 21/4/1888. In the Autumn of 1888 she was chartered to Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line) and sailed between Bordeaux, Havana and Vera Cruz. Damaged in collision with the Spanish ship "Cristobal Colon" at Havana on 28/1/1889, and on 3/11/1891 was offered for sale at Bordeaux but found no buyer. Chartered to the French government in April 1895 and used as a transport for the Madagascar Expedition, and on 9/10/1896 sailed from Havre to New York. Sold to the Fabre Line in 1896, she commenced her first Marseilles - Genoa - Leghorn - Naples - New York voyage on 29/3/1897. On 31/12/1897 she stranded at La Seyne, was refloated and had an extensive refit. She resumed Marseilles - New York sailings on 21/1/1899 and started her last Marseilles - Naples - New York voyage on 3/6/1900. Renamed "Gallia" she resumed Marseilles - Naples - New York sailings on 28/7/1900 and commenced her last Marseilles - New York voyage in December 1909 (arr. NY 15/1/1910). In December 1910 she was sold and scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1064] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 July 1998]
Gallup (gunboat)
Tacoma Boatbuilding launches a gunboat, Tacoma News Tribune. June 16, 1965.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gallup (gunboat)
Tacoma boatbuilding launches gunboat, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 16, 1965.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Galveston (containership)
End nears for vintage ships, Sea Lands World War II vintage freight carriers Philadelphia and Galveston soon to be replaced, The Marine Digest. March, 1986, p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Garibaldi
See VIRGINIA .
Citation:
Gay Head (whaling Bark)
Wrecked at Chignik, Alaska in 1914, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General A.w.greely
The "General A.W.Greely" was one of a class of 30 ships, classified as C4-S-A1. They were 523ft in length x 71.2ft beam, 10,654 gross tons, turbine engines located aft, 17 knots and with accommodation for up to 3,000 troops and a crew of 256. Built by Kaiser, Richmond/Cal. Yard No.22, she was launched 5th Nov.1944 and commissioned for the US Navy on March 22nd 1945 as AP 141. She sailed from San Pedro on her maiden voyage to Australia on April 16th. On March 20th 1946 she was handed over to the US Army, rebuilt to 12,665 gross tons and made seven voyages between Germany and the US with displaced persons. In 1950 she was returned to the US Navy for Military Sea Transportation Service and given the number T-AP 141. Handed over to the Maritime Administration on Aug.29th 1959, she was laid up in the reserve fleet at Olympia, Wash. In 1968 she was sold to Pacific Far East Line Inc, San Francisco and commenced rebuilding as a container ship by Todd Shipyard, Alameda on April 19th. She entered commercial service in May 1969 as the 11,447 ton "Hawaii Bear" and was used by Pacific Far East Line until 1975 when she was purchased by Farrell Lines Inc, New York, who renamed her "Austral Glade" the following year. [Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.4, 1936-1950, by Arnold Kludas. ISBN 0-85059-253-4] -
Citation: [posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 June 1998]
General Banning (schooner)
General Banning, a two masted schooner of 177 tons, was built on the Navarro River, Calif., in 1883 by Capt. T. H. Peterson for Robert G. Byxbee and others of San Francisco. She was later sold to Mexican owners, and was listed as belonging in La Paz, Baja California, in 1920. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Banning (schooner)
General Banning, a two masted schooner of 177 tons, was built on the Navarro River, Calif., in 1883 by Capt. T. H. Peterson for Robert G. Byxbee and others of San Francisco. She was later sold to Mexican owners, and was listed as belonging in La Paz, Baja Cali- fornia, in 1920. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850- 1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Banning (schooner)
The schooner General Banning was engaged for a few months in the local trade between Astoria and Gray's Harbor but was withdrawn March 17th on account of lack of business. E. W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895). New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961., p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Belgrando
Sinking of old cruiser sad news to Tacoma, Tacoma News Tribune. May 10, 1982.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Brooks
Harry S. Drago. Roads to Empire, p. 94.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Buell (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Butler (bark)
December 8, 1891 Bark, en route Port Gamble-San Francisco with one million feet of lumber. The ship lay about 100 miles southwest of Cape Arago as she fought against a fierce gale. When she began breaking up, Captain Parker ordered all hands to abandon ship. Part of her hull drifted to Yaquina where it struck the jetty. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Butler (bark)
The bark General Butler, from Port Gamble for San Francisco, November 28th, with a million feet of lumber for the Puget Mill Company, encountered a fearful gale and broke up December 8th about one hundred miles southwest of Cape Arago. The crew left the vessel in two boats, Captain Parker and five men landing at Cape Arago on the night of December 11th in an exhausted condition. Portions of the hull and the lumber cargo hung together until December 17th, when the derelict drifted into Yaquina Bay and struck the jetty, of which it carried away about eighty feet and then went to pieces. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.394.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Canby (steamer)
The largest steamer yet constructed on Shoalwater Bay, the General Canby, was launched at South Bend in 1875 for the Ilwaco Steam Navigation Company, of which L. A. Loomis was manager. The General Canby arrived at Astoria on her first trip September 16th, in charge of Capt. John Schofield, who was succeeded by Capt. W. P. Whitcomb, and in command of the latter she continued on the Ilwaco route, with occasional trips to Gray's Harbor and Shoalwater Bay, and in the towing service. Whitcomb remained in charge until 1882, when he left to take command of the new steamer General Miles, and was succeeded by Thomas Parker, who has had charge for over twelve years. Capt. George A. Whitcomb also served on the steamer, and W. H. Clough was her first engineer. In 1894 the Ilwaco Railway & Navigation Company, which succeeded the Ilwaco Steam Navigation Company, sold the steamer to Puget Sound parties, and since her arrival at Seattle she has been on the Port Orchard route. The Canby is ninety-three feet long, eighteen fee
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Chernakhovsky
See BOCHUM.
Citation:
General Cobb
The General Cobb was built at Bath, Maine in 1854, and at the time of her loss was owned by W. J. Adams of San Francisco. The point where she grounded is but little over a mile from the spot where the American bark Mustang had been lost fourteen years before. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.280.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Cobb (bark)
The American bark General Cobb, Capt. J. L. Oliver, from San Francisco for Seabeck, stranded three-quarters of a mile east of Portland Point, January 14th, [1880] at 8:00 P.M., during a heavy gale from the southwest. The captain's account of the disaster is as follows: We sighted Cape Beale at 7:30 on the morning of the fourteenth, and the vessel stood off under shortened sail until 3:00 P.M., when we commenced making sail and continued standing off shore. About 7:30 P.M. the main topgallant sail was carried away and two men were sent aloft to repair the damage. Land was sighted, but before we could get the ship around she struck. The second sea lifted her over and off the reef and the wheel was put hard up again, but she immediately brought up on a large rock. The masts were cut away to ease her, and the anchors were dropped. The crew attempted to reach shore by crawling out on the spanker boom, but a heavy sea smashed it and washed one man overboard. All hands then went forward and remained until daylight,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Custer (steamer)
The General Custer, a little propeller with a six by six inch engine, was launched at Astoria by R. E. Jackson and ran on the lower Columbia and Shoalwater Bay for several years. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.269.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Fairchild (bark)
The 1,427 -ton wooden bark General Fairchild, built at Freeport, Me. in 1874, was sold by W. E. Mighell of San Francisco to the Thlinket Packing Co. and was converted to a cannery barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Frisbee (steamer)
George R. Whidden of New Whatcom built the passenger steamer General Frisbee for the Monticello Steamship Co. of San Francisco, operated by Capt. Z. J. Hatch, formerly a well-known Puget Sound steamboat man. The General Frisbee was a 670-ton propeller with dimensions of 183.8 x 29.3 x 1 1.6. She was fitted with a four cylinder triple expansion engine (16, 25, 30, 30) and two return tube bouers delivering steam at 175 pounds working pressure, her machinery developing 1,000 horsepower. As in the case of many of the larger vessels launched at Northwest yards at this time, the General Frisbee was loaded with lumber and towed to San Francisco, where she received her machinery. In later years she returned to Puget Sound to run the Seattle- Bremerton route under the name Commander. xxxx, p. 60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Garfield (steamer)
The propeller General Garfield was launched at Rainier in 1881 and was purchased by the Shoalwater Bay Transportation Company, of which L. A. Loomis was president, C. A. Reed, secretary, and I. W. Cole, treasurer. After running a while on Shoalwater Bay she came back to Astoria, where she was operated by Fred G. Lewis. In 1887 she was taken to Tillamook by H. B. Johnson, who used her in the towing and passenger trade for two years and then sold her to the Truckee Lumber Company, who allowed her to lie on the mud flats for several months and then turned her over to George Woodruff and S. F. Snyder. She subsequently passed into the hands of E. A. Snyder, and is at present owned by Claude Thayer. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 286.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General H.h.arnold
See GENERAL R.E.CALLAN.
Citation:
General Harney (schooner)
The schooner General Harney, after numerous wrecks in the past thirty years, in 1889 encountered one which proved fatal. She was en route from Dungeness to Whatcom, in command of Capt. W. G. Clarke of Seattle, and, while speeding before a gale in the darkness, stranded on Goose Island in the San Juan passage and became a total loss. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Harney (schooner)
The schooner General Harney, one of the historic craft of the Sound, had quite an eventful career. Her first work was carrying lumber from Utsalady to Port Townsend to be used in the erection of a Catholic church. On her arrival the priest received her with much ceremony, coming aboard to bless the vessel. She was next employed in moving guns and Government troops from Bellingham Bay to San Juan during the discussion of the ownership of that place. In 1860 Capt. H. H. Lloyd took command, and carried brick and lime from San Juan and stone from Port Orchard for the foundation of the Territorial University. She was next in the Victoria trade carrying cattle, and in 1862 Captain Goodell was placed in charge and ran her between Chuckanut and New Westminster as a stone transport until 1864, when Captain Tucker sailed her a while in the general freighting business. Captain Oberg next had her in the Seabeck and Victoria lumber trade, and was succeeded by Chris Williams. In 1872 Lloyd again bought an interest and oper
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Hubbard (steamer)
February 16,1914 Steamship collided with the SS Portland and was repaired. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General J. Franklin Bell (mine Planter)
The steel steam mine-planter General J. Franklin Bell a 704-ton twin-screw vessel with triple-expansion engines and dimensions of 172 x 32 x 17, built at Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1919, was assigned to the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and stationed at Fort Worden. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 306.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General J. M. Wilson (tug)
A steel steam tug of 106 tons with dimensions of 94 x 19.6 x 1 1, the General J. M. Wilson, was built at Detroit, Michigan and assembled at Seattle for use on Puget Sound by the U. S. Army Engineers. The Wilson, fitted with a compound (1.5,30 x 20) engine, remained in government and private operaton on Puget Sound for many years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Jackson
Sternwheeler excursion boat. Seattle ship design firm Nickum and Spaulding designed General Jackson, Opryland, USA, Marine Digest. July 20, 1985, p.9+ Built by an Jeffersonville, Indiana firm. Launched in April 1985.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Jackson (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 38, 80, 655.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Jessup (riverboat)
On the Colorado River, Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 102.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Jessup (steamer)
The next steamboat to test the Colorado [ after the intial runs of the steamer Uncle Sam] was the side-wheeler General Jessup. She was 108 feet long, with a beam of 28 feet, and of very light draft. She was owned by Captain George A. Johnson, the flatboatman. By schooner, he brought her down from San Francisco in sections to the delta and put her back together at Puerto Ysabel, where there was a machine shop of sorts and a primitive drydock. The latter was a basin scooped out of the sand and lined with planks. It had dock gates but no pumps or the other equipment that is usually a part of such enterprises. At Puerto Ysabel (Port Isabel to Americans) the tidal range was as much as twenty feet, and it did the work of filling or emptying the basin as well as pumps could have done. The gates were opened at low tide; on the next high tide a boat could be brought into drydock. When the tide fell, the gates were closed, and kept closed until the work being done was finished, after which, at the lo@v tide they were o
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General John Biddle (dredge)
Another recently constructed dredge, the self-propelled turbo-electric General John Biddle, arrived at Portland late in the year, havinlr been constructed on the Gulf Coast at a cost of $4,500,00@to replace the Corps of Engineers dredges Dan C. Kingman and Col. P S. Michie for work on the Columbia River and Grays Harbor bars. The 3,000-cubic yard hopper dredge, 351 feet long with an 81 -foot beam, was powered by two 3,000-horsepower motors. She was equipped with air -conditioned quarters for her crew, complete with recreation rooms and a library. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 572.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Lane
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 48-49.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Le Roy Eltinge
The "General Le Roy Eltinge" was one of a class of 30 ships, classified as C4-S-A1. They were 523ft in length x 71.2ft beam, 10,654 gross tons, turbine engines located aft, 17 knots and with accommodation for up to 3,000 troops and a crew of 256. Built by Kaiser, Richmond/Cal. Yard No.20, she was launched on September 20th 1944 and commissioned on 21st Feb.1945 for the US Navy as AP 154. She sailed from San Diego on her maiden voyage to Calcutta on March 23rd and in June 1946 was handed over to the US Army, refitted to 13,100 gross tons. She made five voyages from Germany to the USA with displaced persons and in 1950 was returned to the US Navy for Military Sea Transportation Servica and numbered T-AP 154. On Sept.17th 1968 she went to the Maritime Administration and was laid up until Jan.1969 when she was sold to Waterman Carriers Inc, New York and was rebuilt as a 10,562 ton container vessel by Albina E&M Work, Portland. She was renamed "Robert E.Lee" and entered commercial service in Dec.1969. In Sept.1973 she was again renamed "Robert Toombs".[Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.4, 1936-1950, by Arnold Kludas] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 June 1998]
General Lytle (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 158, 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General M. C. Meigs (troop Transport)
Early on the same morning that the Dona Anita went down with all hands, the San Francisco tug Gear put out to sea from the Strait of Juan de Fuca in the face of gale warnings, towing the 622-foot troop transport Gen. M. C. Meigs, formerly in layup at the Olympia Reserve Fleet and en route to the remaining West Coast reserve fleet at Suisun Bay near San Francisco. No sooner had the tug and tow rounded Tatoosh Island than the wind and seas tore the big two stack transport loose and drove her ashore seven miles south of Cape Flattery. Soon afterward she broke in two against a murderous cluster of pinnacle rocks. Although unmanned, the Meigs was carrying much material from the Olympia Reserve Fleet, including a steel harbor tug chained down on deck forward. The loss of the Meigs and her valuable cargo aroused numerous questions in maritime circles, aside from the basic one of why the Gear, under contract to the U.S. Navy, proceeded to sea in defiance of a Force 8 gale. Several experienced mariners reported seeing
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General M.c.meigs
The 1948-49 Lloyd's Register of Shipping gives the following details : GENERAL M.C. MEIGS Call sign : AOAAOfficial registration # : 249811 Rigging : 4 decks; longitudinal framing at bottom and at decks; partly electrical welded; equipped with Direction Finder, Echo Sounding Device and Gyro Compass; fitted for oil fuel.Tonnage : 17,707 tons gross and 10,115 net. Dimensions : 573.5 feet long, 75.6 foot beam and 28.5 foot draught. Bridge 80 feet long and Forecastle 39 feet long. Built : in 1944 by Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock Co. in Kearney, N.J..Propulsion : 4 steam turbines double reduction geared to 2 screw shafts. Engine built by DeLaval Steam Turbine Co. in Trenton, N.J..Owners : United States Maritime Commission. Port of registry : San Francisco Flag : US -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 8 August 1998]
General Mcpherson (schooner)
General McPherson, schooner, doubtless two-masted, of 109 tons was built originally as a steamer for the Quartermaster Department of the U. S. Army. She was launched at San Francisco in and served the military establishments of that area for many years. In 1887 she was sold to owners in San Diego, who converted her to a schooner in 1895. She w as owned in Seattle in 1900 and disappears from registry shortly thereafter. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Mcpherson (schooner)
General McPherson, schooner, doubtless two-masted, of 109 tons was built originally as a steamer for the Quartermaster Department of the U. S. Army. She was launched at San Francisco in and served the military establishments of that area for many years. In 1887 she was sold to owners in San Diego, who converted her to a schooner in 1895. She w as owned in Seattle in 1900 and disappears from registry shortly thereafter. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Mcpherson (schooner)
The schooner General McPherson, owned by Denny Brogan of Seattle and operated by Capt. Gus Miller of Whatcom, was lost on the beach at Safety Harbor on the Bering Sea September 12. xxxx, p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Mifflin (steamer)
The steam fort tender General Mifflin of 1904 was purchased from the goverrunent by the Cary-Davis subsidiary of the Puget Sound Tug & Barge Co. She was amply powered with 600-horsepower oil-burning steam engines and it was planned to operate her in towing service, but she was not utilized for this purpose, being resold to the Alaska Steamship Co. the following year and entering upon a new and interesting phase of her career. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Mifflin (steamer)
The steam fort tender General Mifflin 406 tons, 130 x 27 x 12. 1, was built at San Francisco and assigned to Fort Worden, as was the 2 12 ton Major. Evan Thomas, 105 x 20 x 6, built at Ballard. The latter vessel gained a place in seacoast artillery legend when, as she was towing a target for gunnery practice, a one - pound sub -calibre shell was neatly put through her pilot house roof by one of the batteries. After along Army career she became the Los Angeles motor tug Retriever. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Miles
Built in Portland in 1882, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208. Original name for Willapa and later the Bellingham, Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w p. 340.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Miles (steamer)
A fine wooden steamer built for service on the bar and for the coasting trade was launched at Astoria, June 15th, by the Ilwaco Navigation Company and christened the General Miles. Capt. W. P. Whitcomb was put in charge, with Charles Smith, engineer, both remaining with her until 1889, when she was sold to the Portland & Coast Steamship Company, who lengthened her, renamed her the Willapa, and in command of Capt- L. A. Bailey and John Peterson operated her in the Gray's Harbor trade, with occasional trips to Coos Bay and other coast ports. In 1894 she was leased by the Hastings Steamboat Company and handled by Capt. A. W. Horn, with Herbert Adams and Daniel Fairfield, engineers. In 1895 she was purchased by Capt. George Roberts and Engineer Kent of the City of Kingston, and extensively overhauled and refitted. They are now operating her on the Alaska route. As originally built the Miles was one hundred feet long, twenty-two feet beam, and ten feet hold, with engines sixteen and thirty-two by thirty-two inches
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Miller (schooner)
General Miller, two-masted schooner of 108 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1874 by Middlemas. She was wrecked in 1882 while engaging in the Bering Sea cod fishery. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Miller (schooner)
General Miller, two-masted schooner of 108 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1874 by Middlemas. She was wrecked in 1882 while engaging in the Bering Sea cod fishery. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Paterson
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p 450.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Perhsing (schooner)
The five -masted auxiliary schooner General Pershing of 1918 was sold in 1921 by her Norwegian owners to P. E. Harris & Co. of Seattle. She departed Norfolk, Virginia in June with a cargo of coal for Bremerton and was wrecked July 11 on Endymion Rock in the Bahamas, the 25 persons on board getting away safely. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 329.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Pike (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 24, 35, 326, 344, 381, 394, 495, 396.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General R. M. Blatchford
The "General R. M. Blatchford" was built at the Kaiser Shipyard, Richmond, Calif. for the US Navy. She was one of a class of C.4 type ships, 10,654 gross tons, length 523ft x beam 71.2ft, one funnel, two masts, engines aft and accommodation for 3,000 troops. Launched on 27th Aug.1944, she was commissioned number AP 153 on Jan.26th 1945 and commenced her maiden voyage from San Francisco to Manila on Mar.12th 1945. In June 1946 she was handed over to the US Army and made 28 voyages between Germany and the USA with displaced persons. Returned to the US Navy, she entered the Military Sea Transportation Service and was numbered T-AP 153. In Sep.1968 she was handed over to the Maritime Administration and laid up. Sold to Waterman Carriers Inc, New York in Jan.1969, she was rebuilt at Portland as a container ship, renamed "Stonewall Jackson" and entered commercial service in 1970. In 1973 she was renamed "Alex Stephens" and in 1979 went to the US Department of Commerce. On April 13th 1980, scrapping commenced by Chien Yu Steel Enterprises, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.4,p.106; vol.6,p.181] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 23 October 1998]
Citation:
General R.e.callan
The "General R.E.Callan" was one of a class of 30 ships, classified as C4-S-A1. They were 523ft in length x 71.2ft beam, 10,654 gross tons, turbine engines located aft, 17 knots and with accommodation for up to 3,000 troops and a crew of 256. Built by Kaiser, Richmond/Cal. Yard No.15, she was launched on April 27th 1944 and commissioned on 17th August 1944 for the US Navy as AP 139. She sailed from San Francisco on her maiden voyage to New Guinea on Sept.25th and on 24th May 1946 was handed over to the US Army and refitted to 12,351 tons. In 1950 she was returned to the US Navy for Military Sea Transportation Service and numbered T-AP 139. Laid up by Maritime Administration on July 17th 1958 in the reserve fleet, and in 1962/63 was rebuilt by the Bethlehem Steel Corp. as a satellite tracking ship. In 1963 she was renamed "General H.H.Arnold" and commissioned by the US Air Force, handed over to the Navy in 1964 and numbered T-AGM 9, she was still in service in 1985. [Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.4, 1936 - 1950 by Arnold Kludas] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 July 1998]
General Robertson (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 284.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Sherman (steamer)
1899 Steam propeller, built at Coeur d'Alene in 1884. She sank near the Northern Pacific dock in 1893; Sanborn, McCarty and Shallis raised her and put her into service on the St. Joe run until 1899. Retired, she was eventually put to rest in Lake Coeur d'Alene. Her obituary appeared in the press, Steamer General Sherman, in the Crystal Waters of Coeur d'Alene Lake you were Christened and to her waters we consign you. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Sherman (steamer)
Post Trader King at Fort Coeur d'Alene was the owner of the steamer General Sherman, built by Captain Sorenson for the lake trade. The Sherman was a small propeller, equipped with a Westinghouse engine. She is still in service on the lake, and is at present owned by Captain Sanborn, who operates her as a towboat. E. W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895). New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961., p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Sherman,
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 9, 31, 34-35, 42-43, 51, 55, 62, 74. Ruby El Hult. Lost Mines and Treasures of the Pacific Northwest, p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Siglin (schooner)
Ship losses of 1897 included:General Siglin schooner (built at Coos Bay in 1894) enroute, San Francisco for Kodiak, was sighted May 5 abandoned, with bulwarks stove in and boats missing. The body of the mate was found lashed to the davits, and that of a six-year-old boy in the cabin. The hull was towed to Sitka and beached by the revenue cutter Corwin. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966., p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Siglin (schooner)
Losses in northern waters in 1902 included the 81-ton two-masted schooner General Siglin, built at Marshfield in 1894, foundered October 13 off False Pass, the eight men aboard being drowned Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 84.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Taylor (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 647.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General W. C. Gorgas (steamer)
General W. C. Gorgas, formerly Hamburg-American Prinz Sigismund, 4,636-ton steel steamship, 370 feet in length, built at Rostock, Germany, 1902, sold by the Panama Railroad Steamship Line to Libby, McNeill & Libby, Seattle, for service to the company's Bristol Bay canneries. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General W.c.langfitt
The "General W.C.Langfitt" was one of a class of 30 ships, classified as C4-S-A1. They were 523ft in length x 71.2ft beam, 10,654 gross tons, turbine engines located aft, 17 knots and with accommodation for up to 3,000 troops and a crew of 256. Built by Kaiser, Richmond/Cal. Yard No.17, she was launched on July 17th 1944 and commissioned on Sept.30th as AP 151. She started her maiden voyage from San Diego to Eniwetok on Nov.10th. In June 1946 she was handed over to the US Army and rebuilt to 12,544 gross tons, making 9 Germany - USA voyages with displaced persons. Returned to the US Navy in 1950 and used in the Military Sea Transportation Service, number T-AP 151 until May 13th 1958 when she was laid up by the Maritime Administration in the reserve fleet in the James River. In 1968 she was sold to Hudson Waterways Corporation, New York and rebuilt as a 13,489 ton, 633ft long container vessel by the Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co, Baltimore. In Dec.1969 she entered commercial service as the "Transindiana".[Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.4, 1936-1950 by Arnold Kludas, ISBN 0-85059-253-4] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 June 1998]
General Warren
General Warren. Wooden screw steamer; 1 deck, 2 masts, square stern, billethead; 309 13/95 tons; 148 ft x 23 ft. 6 in. x 9 ft. 4 in.; 2 high-pressure engines; diameter of cylinders 1 ft. 6 in., length of stroke 2 ft. Built at Portland, Maine, in 1844, George Knight, Jr., owner.Was in New York in 1850 and was sent to the Pacific coast, arriving at San Francisco on July 20, 1851, thirdy-one days from Panama. She entered the coastwise service north of San Francisco and was wrecked on Clatsop Spit, Columbia River, January 31, 1852.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]
General Warren (american Steamer)
309 ton vessel. Aground on Clatsop Spit, January 28, 1952. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p.167. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 203-04, 341. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 136,138.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Warren (steamer)
January 30, 1852 Steamer, 309 tons, built at Portland, Maine in 1844. Grounded and lost on the Clatsop Spit. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Warren (steamer)
American steamship, 309 tons, put aground on Clatsop Spit, in sinking condition, January 28, 1852. Fortytwo lives were lost when the vessel was leveled by the surf. (Sce story page 51.) The TVarren was built for the Portland Steam Packet Company, of Portland, Maine, in 1844, as one of the early sidewheel steamers scen in Maine. She came to the west coast during the California Gold Rush, and eventually entered coastwise service. It is interesting to note that in October, 1854, two years after the Warren was lost, the whole stern frame of the vessel was found on the beach sixty miles to the north of the wreck, an example that shows the prevailing littoral current around the Columbia Bar. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Warren (steamer)
Columbia River and Puget Sound steamboats did not escape the sinkings, burnings and explosions that occurred so frequently on the Mississippi and other rivers. The first notable disaster was recorded in January, 1852, when the steamer General Warren went to pieces on Clatsop Spit at the mouth of the Columbia. The General Warren was an old boat and although powered by steam, she was also schooner-rigged. En route from Portland to San Francisco, she passed out of the river late in the afternoon of January 28, in charge of Captain George Flavel, the well known pilot, who left her soon after crossing the bar, turning the command over to her master, Captain Charles Thompson. The Warren stood out to sea with a stiff breeze blowing from the south. The weather continued to thicken. Shortly after midnight the foretopmast of the Warren was carried away. It convinced Cap- tain Thompson that his safest course was to return to the Columbia. The ship was making water. Deeply laden with grain, her cargo had begun to shift,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Washington (steamer)
The 97-ton passenger and freight steamer General Washington a screw propeller 80 feet in length and of 220 horsepower, was built at Astoria for William Anderson, Ed. Simmons and Ed. Shatto, who operated her on the Deep River run to Knappton in opposition to the steamer Julia B. of Babbidge & Holt. The Washington was the victor in this competifion and the Julia B. was diverted to the Astoria- Cathlamet Route. The latter vessel, built the same year at Astoria, was of 95 tons, 75 feet in length, with an engine of 110 horsepower, having been designed to replace the Shamrock of 1905. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 139.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Werder
The steamship GENERAL WERDER was built for North German Lloyd by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland, and launched on 4 March 1874. 3,020 tons; 105,79 x 11,94 meters (347.1 x 39.2 feet, length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 144 1st-, 68 2nd-, and 502 3rd-class passengers. 16 September 1874, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton- Baltimore-Bremen, 1878-1885, many New York passages. 11 September 1886, last voyage, Bremen-New York. 3 November 1886, scheduled to sail Bremen-Far East, but no trace of this or further North German Lloyd voyages. 1893, sold to Armstrong Mitchell in part payment for the H. H. MEIER; became MIDNIGHT SUN (British cruise ship); triple-expansion engines. 1899, PRINCESS OF WALES (Boer War hospital ship). 1901, MIDNIGHT SUN. 1912, scrapped on the River Tyne [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 550-551. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 109, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 For additional information on the GENERAL WERDER, see 1. Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd , Bd. 1. 1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991). 2. Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995).
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 September 1997]
General Willard A.holbrook
See PRESIDENT TAFT .
Citation:
General Wright (steamer)
The steamer General Wright was purchased in San Francisco by Colonel Gillespie for Government work at Yaquina Bay. Pennell, her first master, was drowned a few days after taking command, and Capt. S. R. Babbidge succeeded him. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 283.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Generale Diaz
See KAISER FRANZ JOSEF I.
Citation:
George W Kendall
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
George Walton (liberty Ship)
The steamship George Walton was swept by fire 390 miles off the Washington coast on November 6 as a result of a boiler explosion which kuled Second Engineer Gus Larsen. Capt. Alfred Bentsen and the crew launched boats in heavy seas which capsized one of the boats. Five more members of the crew were drowned as a result of this accident. The Greek freighter Katherine picked up 12 survivors, the Japanese freighter Kenkon Maru rescued 12, and the Coast Guard cutter Wachusett, six. Two injured seamen were flown to Seattle hospitals, the remainder being landed at Port Angeles. The George Walton, a Liberty ship, had departed Portland with 9,000 tons of grain for India. It was a first assumed that the burned -out vessel would sink, but she maintained an even keel and, almost two weeks later, was towed to Puget Sound by the tug Barbara Foss. She was later scrapped. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 578.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
George Walton (steamer)
The George Walton was an American steamship (freighter), 7,229 tons, caught fire following a boiler explosion, 390 miles southwest of Cape Flattery, November 6, 1951. The explosion killed one crew member. The ship got so hot from the fire that she had to be abandoned by Captain Bentzen and his crew. Four crew members were later killed when trying to climb from a Iffeboat up the side of the Japanese freighter Kenkon Maru. An SOS had earlier brought the Coast Cuard vessel Northwind to the scene. She later transferred the tow to the tug Barbara Foss. The long tow began, as the ship continued to burn, settling ever lower in the water. She finally went down about 50 miles off the Strait of Juan de Fuca, after the towing hawser was cut. The vessel was bound for India from Portland, Oregon, with 9,600 tons of grain and became a victim of the graveyard on November 17, 1951, at 7 p.m. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gerald C (gas Screw)
May 10, 1907 Gas screw, lumber cargo. Captain Tabell. A total loss on the north spit entrance to Nestucca. Built in 1895 with two masts, 58'x 181 x 5'. Don Marshall, Ship disasters from Cascade Head to Nehalem River,Oregon Shipwrecks, 1985, p. 96-98.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gerald C (schooner)
The gasoline schooner Gerald C., Capt. Tabell, was wrecked on the north spit at the entrance to Nestucca harbor, Oregon while outward bound with a cargo of lumber May 10, 1907. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gibraltar Straits (tug)
The RivTow Straits tug Gibraltar Straits, Capt. Bob Mollison, became the first of that company's vessels to ply the Atlantic, arriving at Searsport, Maine on March 1 with the barge Saint John Carrier in tow after a 6,300-mile voyage from Vancouver, B.C. via the Panama Canal. The 350-foot, 7,200-ton barge, slated for service between Saint John and Baltimore, carried 8,400 tons of British Columbia wood pulp to the East Coast. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glenalvon
The Glenesslin was the second ship to be lost by C. E. DeWolf & Co. in 1913, the Glenalvon, equally well-known in the Northwest grain fleet having been rammed and sunk by a German trawler in the Elbe River early in March. The Glenalvon, a ship at least as smart as the Glenesslin, was for many years commanded by Capt. W. Frank Andrews, who left her to become a resident of Tacoma and who, in 1913, was commander of the Washington Naval Militia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p229.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glendale (schooner)
The Glendale, three-masted schooner of 296 tons and 420 M capacity, was built at Fairhaven, California by Bendixsen for Higgins & Collins of San Francisco. From 1914 to 1926 she fished for the Alaska Codfish Co.; in 1927 they sold her to a tuna packing company in Los Angeles to become a tender to the fishing fleet working off Cape San Lucas; and a few years later she became a fishing barge under the name of Point Loma, being stationed first off San Diego and more recently at San Pedro. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glendale (schooner)
The Glendale, three-masted schooner of 296 tons and 420 M capacity, was built at Fairhaven, California by Bendixsen for Higgins & Collins of San Francisco. From 1914 to 1926 she fished for the Alaska Codfish Co.; in 1927 they sold her to a tuna packing company in Los Angeles to become a tender to the fishing fleet working off Cape San Lucas; and a few years later she became a fishing barge under the name of Point Loma, being stationed first off San Diego and more recently at San Pedro. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Alaska (fish Processor)
West Coast focus,302 foot processor ready for work,The National Fisherman, January, 1983, p. 6. (il). The 302 Golden Alaska to begin another new life; Tacoma ship finished refurbishing in May, The National Fisherman. August, 1985, p. 57. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Graf Waldersee
The "Graf Waldersee" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 for the Hamburg America Line and was one of four sister ships. This was a 12,830 gross ton ship, length 561.2ft x beam 62.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 162-1st, 184-2nd and 2,200-3rd class. Laid down as the "Pavia" she was actually launched on 10/12/1898 as the "Graf Waldersee" and commenced her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Boulogne and New York on 2/4/1899. In Autumn 1910 she was rebuilt to 13,193 gross tons and with accommodation for 408-2nd and 2,310-3rd class passengers. She started her first Hamburg - Philadelphia crossing on 28/10/1910 and her last Hamburg - New York - Hamburg voyage started on 27/6/1914. On 23/3/1919 she was surrendered to the US government under the war reparations scheme and was used to repatriate American troops from Europe and later as a naval transport. In 1920 she was ceded to Britain and managed by P&O Line until 1922 when she was sold to Kohlbrand Werft, Hamburg and broken up. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.405] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 January 1998]
Great Admiral
December 6, 1906 Fully rigged ship, built at Boston in 1869. En route under Captain E. R. Sterling, Mukilteo-San Francisco with a cargo of lumber. The ship went under. Three days later the British ship Barcore, sailing some 200 miles off the mouth of the Columbia, came across some wreckage, including the roof of the cabin; clinging to it-were a portion of the crew, two of whom were dead, and Mrs. Catherine Martin, wife of the 1st mate. The backboard of the captain's gig, with the name Great Admiral carved into it, was found some years later tacked to a native hen-house in Hawaii. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Admiral (full Rigged Ship)
The American full rigged ship Great Admiral, Captain E. R. Sterling, Boston built in 1869 and for several years engaged in the Puget Sound lumber trade departed from Mukilteo for San Pedro on December 1, 1906. Offshore she was beset by heavy gales and began leaking badly, and by December 6 she was completely under water, being kept from going to the bottom only by the bouyancy of her lumber cargo. The crew, with Mrs. Catherine Martin, the wife of the first mate, huddled on top of the main cabin, the only area above water. The ship's cook and cabin boy died of exposure during the night, but the following morning the British square-rigger Barcore, outward bound from Puget Sound for Australia, sighted the wreckage and removed the survivors, transferring them on Christmas Eve to the inward bound Andrew Welch, which landed them at San Francisco. xxxx, p. 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gul Djemal
See GERMANIC.
Citation:
Gulcemal
See GERMANIC.
Citation:
Gulf Sally (tug)
Gulf Sally, 77 x 24-foot tug powered by two 1,400-horsepower GM diesels, designed by Robert Allan and built by Vito Shipyards (Vito Steel Boat & Barge Construction Ltd.) Vancouver, for Gulf of Georgia Towing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf Sally (tug)
Gulf Sally, 77 x 24-foot tug powered by two 1,400-horsepower GM diesels, designed by Robert Allan and built by Vito Shipyards (Vito Steel Boat & Barge Construction Ltd.) Vancouver, for Gulf of Georgia Towing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gwalior
See RUAPEHU (1) .
Citation:
H. F. Alexander (liner)
The H. F. Alexander, speed queen of the Pacific, lost her way in a dense fog on the Strait of Juan de Fuca while in bound with about 500 passengers from California on July 24. She struck the rocky shoals off Point WHson at the entrance to Admiralty Inlet, causing hull damage of about a quarter of a million dollars. Capt. Charles G. Hansen, John C. Freeman, senior second officer, Ottar Drotning, junior second officer, Samuel Hall, quartermaster, all on the bridge, and two able seamen on lookout testified that they did not hear the Point Wilson fog horn, although the lighthouse keepers insisted it was sounding. Apparently the radio beacon at Point Wilson was not picked up by the liner either. The officers of the Admiral Line flagship were cleared of blame at the subsequent investigation. The 535-type liner President Grant of the Dollar Line, diverted from San Fran- cisco to replace the damaged President Madison, carried coastwise passengers to Seattle in August to aid in handling the heavy traffic disrupted by
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (liner)
The year 1922 was not marked by major marine disasters to well-known Northwest vessels, although the Admiral Line's flagship H. F. Alexander narrowly escaped such an accident. On a northbound voyage August 7 she struck Cake Rock off the Washington coast at about 12:50 a.m., crumpling her bows back almost to the foremast. No lives were lost, although a number of passengers were shaken up, and her collision bulkheads held, preventing her sinking. The Admiral Schley, on the Portland run, responded to wireless messages from the flagship and successfully took off 317 passengers and about 135 of the crew, landing them at Seattle. Manned by a skeleton crew and with tugs standing by, the H. F. Alexander then proceeded to Seattle under her own steam, repairs being rushed to completion at a cost of almost a quarter of a million dollars. She was back on the run in two weeks. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 329.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (liner)
A historic event in sea communications occurred in May with the official tests of the radio telephone equipment installed aboard the steamships H. F. Alexander and Dorothy ALxander. Greetings, Capt. Bartlett of the H. F. Alexander, this is Capt. Harris of the Dorothy Alexander off Cape Blanco. How's the weather at Cape Flattery? Such was the first voice radio conversation ever held between ships at sea on the North Pacific. The H. F. was then 300 miles south of Seattle; the Dorothy 280 miles north of San Francisco. This event took place shortly before the placing in operation of similar equipment aboard the U. S. liner Leviathan on the Atlantic. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 338.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (steamer)
Steel steamer, three decks, two masts, 8357 tons 500.1 x 63.1 x 20.6 feet. 225 crew, 585 passengers 23 knots. Built in 1914 in Philadelphia as the Great Northern. Operated between Portland and San Franciso by the Great Norther Pacific Steamship Company from 1915 until 1917. U.S. Government purchased the vessel for War service during which she made ten round trips between New York and Brest establishing a world record of fourteen days, four and a half hours for a round trip. After War service she became the Columbia and was commissioned as the flagship of the Atlantic Fleet of the United States Navy. She was purchased by the Admiral Line Mar 4, 1922 and brough to the Pacific Coast. She served as a troop transport during World War II under the name General George S. Simonds and was sold for scrap in 1948. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., II, p. 283. Inducted into the national maritime hall of famy May 18, under name Great Northern, Marine Digest. May 4,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.f. Alexander (liner)
The H. F. Alexander was removed from ]ayup at San Francisco in March, having passed to the Canadian Pacific for British Admiralty war service. After Pearl Harbor she was returned to the United States government, serving throughout the remainder of the war as the transport George S. Simonds. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 491.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.k. Hall (schooner)
H.K. Hall, five-masted schooner of 1237 tons, carrying a million and a half feet, was built by Hall Bros. in 1902 at Port Blakely for their own account. In October 1923 she hit a rock at Maldon Island arriving from New Zealand. She was repaired at Raratonga and sent to Sydney. Here she got into debt and was eventually sold for two thousand dollars to a shipmaster who sailed her to Peru and resold her there for fifteen thousand dollars. Under the Peruvian flag she was renamed the Dante. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.k. Hall (schooner)
H.K. Hall, five-masted schooner of 1237 tons, carrying a million and a half feet, was built by Hall Bros. in 1902 at Port Blakely for their own account. In October 1923 she hit a rock at Maldon Island arriving from New Zealand. She was repaired at Raratonga and sent to Sydney. Here she got into debt and was eventually sold for two thousand dollars to a shipmaster who sailed her to Peru and resold her there for fifteen thousand dollars. Under the Peruvian flag she was renamed the Dante. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.k.hall (schooner)
Five masted schooner being towed into Commencement Bay. Tacoma Daily News. February 5, 1906.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.m. Delanty, Along The Waterfrontn
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Haddon Hall
Sailing ship. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 126. Figurehead of sailing ship Haddon Hall, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. February 29, 1920 A-14.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halaur (fishboat)
The 42-foot commercial fishing vessel Halaur was built at Tenino, Washington, a community located 15 miles from the nearest navigable water, and hauled to Puget Sound for launching, after which she voyaged to Ketchikan for opera tion by H. D. Royer of that port. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: :Superior, 1966,, p. 429.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon
C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., p. 124.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon (schooner Yacht)
Another legendary Pacific Coast vessel, the old schooner yacht Halcyon, was then finishing out her days in the Alaska fishery trade from Puget Sound. Claus G. Spreckels, the California sugar, real estate and transportation magnate, owned her for a time, the 74-foot two-master having been built at San Francisco in 1886 for Henry Tevis of that city. She soon passed into the hands of A. W. Old Bill Whalley, probably the most notorious of the Puget Sound smugglers, who was much taken with her reputation for being able to outsail anything on the Coast. She became a notorious opium smuggler under Whalley's ownership. E. W. Wright, in Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest noted that in 1888 the Halcyon was listed as a member of the Victoria sealing fleet, commanded by Capt. A. Metcalf, but that she only brought back 17 skins at the end of the season and had probably used this as a pretense to hide her real occupation. In 1891 Whalley slipped the Halcyon across to the Hawaiian Islands, where sh
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon (schooner)
Halcyon, three-masted schooner of 293 tons and 375 M capacity, was built at Eureka, Calif., in 1881 for Dolbeer & Carson. Later owned by the Charles Nelson Co., she was listed as lost at sea on November 27, 1918. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon (schooner)
Halcyon, three-masted schooner of 293 tons and 375 M capacity, was built at Eureka, Calif., in 1881 for Dolbeer & Carson. Later owned by the Charles Nelson Co., she was listed as lost at sea on November 27, 1918. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon (schooner)
The 68-ton power fishing schooner Halcyon foundered in Akutan Bay, Alaska on November 12, the 12 crew members escaping in the boats. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon (schooner)
The schooner Halcyon, famous as a smuggler, was also on the list as a Victoria sealer, commanded by Capt. A. Metcalf, but was only credited with 17 skins as a result of the season's catch. She had probably used this as a pretense to hide her real occupation. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.433.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halcyon (schooner)
One of the handsomest additions to Victoria's fleet was the famous smuggler Halcyon, built at Benicia in 1886 for Harry Tevis of San Francisco. She was seventy-four feet long, twenty-one feet beam, and eight feet five inches hold, was fitted up in elegant style, and when completed was one of the handsomest yachts that ever sailed out of the Bay City. Having no particular use for her, Tevis soon sold her, and she eventually fell into the hands of A. W. Whalley and E. W. McLean, who were engaged in smuggling opium on a wholesale plan. Their speedy craft was occasionally seen in a number of harbors along the Pacific Coast, but her owners were too cautious to be captured, and when she was intercepted the custom-house officers invariably found that they had made a water haul. When the authorities became too vigilant, the Halcyon would fly over to the Orient. On one of these trips she went ashore on the coast of Japan, and over $50,000 worth of opium which she had on board was seized by that Government. Whalley,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hale (gunboat)
Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, II, p. 408.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Haleakala (steamer)
The 3,679-ton cruise steamship Haleakala, a handsomely rifted vessel built at Chester, Pennsylvania in 1923, was chartered from the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Co. of Honolulu by the Alaska Steamship Co. for a series of seven nine-day Totemland Cruises during the summer of 1934, the vessel being placed in charge of Capt. Joseph Ramsaeur. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1934, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 430.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Halle
The steamship HALLE was built by Germaniawerft, Kiel (ship #66), for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 3 August 1895. 3,960 tons. 112,75 x 13,28 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 20 passengers in 2nd class, and 1,071 in steerage; crew of 51. 2 November 1895, maiden voyage, Bremen-Montevideo-Buenos Aires. 15 February 1896, first voyage, Bremen-New York. 13 August 1896, first voyage, Bremen-Baltimore. 1913, sold to Jebsen & Diederichsen, Hamburg, and renamed PAWEL. 1915, acquired by De Dordtsche Stoomscheep Maatschappij, Dordrecht, and renamed WOUDRICHEM. March 1918, seized by the U.S. Government for its war effort, and placed under the control of the U.S. Shipping Board. 1919, returned to owners; resold to Universal Transportation Co., New York. 1921, sold, in succession, to Kennebec Steamship Co, New York; D. Pace, New York (renamed LLOYD; 4,007 tons); and Pace, Sons & Co, New York. March 1923, sold to Achille Lauro, Naples; 3,871 tons. November 1923, renamed IRIS. November 1924, sold to M. Bottigliere, Torre del Greco. October 1925, to Genoa for scrapping [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), p. 64, no. 95 (photograph, as the LLOYD); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 558-559]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 August 1998]
Halycon (minesweeper)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harald (bark)
The first German flag to be seen in Portland since the outbreak of the war (except for the Dalbek and Arnoldus Vinnen, interned from 1914 - 1917) was flown from the German four-masted bark Harald (ex-Niobe), which was one of the few remaining sailing vessels in zhe post- war grain fleet, loading for Europe for the Strauss interests. The vessel arrived at Portland in ballast from China, being 69 days from Chinwangtao in charge of Capt. August Coitzau. bile at Portland awaiting loading she made use of old fashioned ballast logs chained alongside, a method once common in Northwest ports. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 318.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo (steamer)
Ran the Cascades. Built above the Cascades. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, II, p.102, 138. Steamer Hassalo shooting the Cascades, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 274. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 202. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 480. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 235-37, 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo (steamer)
Hassalo, the noted stern-wheel steamer built at The Dalles in 1880 as the first new vessel of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Co. and employed on the middle river until 1888, when she was taken to Puget Sound for service between Seattle and Olympia and Whatcom, after which she was returned in 1892 to the Columbia River and converted to a towboat; broken up. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 43.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo (steamer)
The splendid stern-wheeler Hassalo was placed in service at Portland for the Oregon Railway & Navigation Co. Of 561 tons, 181 feet long, her passenger accommodations were lavishly furnished, the main cabin being lined with leather-upholstered Pullman-type seats. Her dining salon had the innovation of small private tables. She was powered by horizontal engines with high and low pressure cylinders with a 98-inch stroke, which developed 1,228 horsepower. On her trials she attained the phenomenal speed of 26 miles per hour and was advertised by her owners as the fastest river boat in the world, an honor which was consistently challenged by the Telephone and T J. Potter. She operated between Portland and The Dalles and on the lower river route to Astoria, where she was in spirited competition with the other two famous river speedsters. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo (steamer)
The Oregon Railway & Navigation Company constructed their first steamer, the Hassalo, at The Dalles in 1880. She was one hundred and sixty feet long, thirty feet beam, and six feet hold, with engines seventeen by sixty inches. Capt. Fred Wilson, first in command, was succeeded by H. F. Coe. Capt. John McNulty was in charge during her last five years on the middle river, and in May, 1888, she was piloted over the Cascades by Captain Troup at a stage of water lower than when any other steamer except the Okanogan had attempted the passage. She was slightly repaired after reaching Portland and was then sent to the Sound in charge of Capt. O. A. Anderson, and on arrival was started on the Bellingham Bay route. She remained on the Sound until 1892, when Capt. Cyrus Harriman brought her back to the Columbia. Since that time she has been employed principally as a towboat. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacifi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo (steamer)
The Hassalo was brought over the Cascades, May 26th, by Capt. J. W. Troup and Chief Engineer Peter De Huff, making the run to the lower Cascades in seven minutes, in less depth of water than had prevailed on any previous trip of this nature with the exception of the Okanogan. The steamer came through without a scratch and was hauled out in Portland for repairs, after which she was sent to the Sound in command of Capt O. A. Anderson, arriving at Seattle, June 25th, and commencing work on the Bellingham Bay route at once. The D. S. Baker took the Hassalo's place on the middle river, Captain Troup bringing her over Tumwater in June. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.358.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo (steamer)
The Hassalo was the first sternwheeler built at the Cascades, and was 135 feet long, 19 feet beam, and 5 feet hold. She made her initial trip in July, 1857, and while not very speedy was a serviceable boat. Her power consisted of the engines which were in the Gazelle at the time of the explosion at Canemah in 1854. These engines served for a time in the Senorita, but proving too small for that craft were turned over to the Hassalo. The steamer went into the Oregon Steam Navigation Company with the rest of the boats on the middle river at the time of the organization, and continued running until 1865, when she was laid up. Among the masters of the Hassalo were the Baughmans, McNulty, Van Pelt and Ainsworth. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hassalo. (number Two)
William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, 235-37, 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Healy (motor Vessel)
The motor vessel Healy, a converted 135 - foot YMS - type wooden minesweeper owned by Factors, Ltd. of Seattle, was completely destroyed by fire which broke out while she was moored at Houghton in June. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 591.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen Hale (steamer)
The fifty-two ton Helen Hale, 100 feet in length, was built at Kennewick for upper river jobbing service, being destroyed by fire the following year. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 204-05.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen Hale (sternwheeler)
1913 Sternwheel, 52 tons, 100' long, built at Kennewick in 1912. Lost by fire on the upper Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen N. Kimball (schooner)
The Helen N. Kimball, two - masted schooner of 192 tons, was built by T. H. Peterson at Coffey's Cove on the Mendocino coast for J. S. Kimball, San Francisco. Later owners were Higgins & Collins, followed by Charles Nelson, and the schooner, was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 3, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen N. Kimball (schooner)
The Helen N. Kimball, two - masted schooner of 192 tons, was built by T. H. Peterson at Coffey's Cove on the Mendocino coast for J. S. Kimball, San Francisco. Later owners were Higgins & Collins, followed by Charles Nelson, and the schooner, was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 3, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen W. Almy (bark)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Herald
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, 104.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Herald
Joseph Thomas HJoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris of Nisqually. Memoris of Nisqually. p. 56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Herald (steamer)
The small propeller Herald, length sixty-one feet four inches, beam fourteen feet nine inches, and depth of hold five feet three inches, at present owned by C. B. Weatherwax, was launched at Aberdeen for service on Gray's Harbor. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.356.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Himalaya (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoegh Mallard (westwood Shipping Lines)
TNT, 3/7/1982: Weyerhaeuser's fleet of ships first cabin. Marine Dig., 6/5/1982, p. 29: New Tacoma fire boat arrives on Westwood ship.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Howland (whaler)
On April 15, 1852 the American whaler Isaac Howland (Captain West) of New Bedford, rescued four shipwrecked Japanese seamen from a small junk about 300 miles N. N. E. of Guam at 31 degrees N. and 150 degrees E. The junk was in ballast, the survivors emaciated sustaining life only with a little oil. The junk's tiller had been lashed and the ship had been drifting for 49 days. The crew had given themselves up to die. Two of the crew were transferred, according to Brooks, but sold, according to Wildes, to another ship which was headed toward Japan and Captain West kept the other two, eventually landing them at his home port of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Bert Webber, Wrecked Japanese Junks adrift in the North Pacific Ocean. Fairfield, Washington: Ye Galleon Press, 1984, p. 69.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hualalai
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hyojun Maru (coastal Junk)
In 1833, a Japanese junk was wrecked on the coast of Washington Territory, in the immediate vicinity of Cape Flattery. Many of her crew had perished, and several dead bodies were found headed up in firkins, (a small wooden barrel or keg sometimes used to store lard) in customary Japanese style, ready for burial. Out of 14 persons, the only survivors, one man and two boys, were taken by Indians. Their vessel was a small coastal junk, the Hyojun Maru and had been loaded with a cargo of rice and porcelain for the markets of Yedo from Toba-a distance of about 220 miles. While crossing Enshu Nada, the outside entrance to Ise Bay, a storm came up causing the junk to lose its mast and rudder, then came the drifting. First into Kuroshio, the current which runs along the Japanese islands to about 35 0 N. then into the Kuroshio Extension current which flows nearly due east. Finally drifting into the North Pacific current, the little ship drifted on toward North America reaching th@ California current which carried it d
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ikalis (steamer)
Coming into the Strait of Juan de Fuca August 22 from San Francisco, the British steamship Ikalis struck and sank the halibut power schooner Dove of Seattle. Capt. Weaver and Engineer C. E. McMaster, the only persons on the Dove, were rescued by the crew of the steamer and landed at Nanaimo. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial
See JOHN ERICSSON.
Citation:
Imperial (passenger Vessel)
The Imperial, a 30-ton. passenger vessel 60 feet in length, was builtby Herman Bros. at Prosper for Coquflle River service. After operating there, on the Columbia River and at Eureka, Calif., she was transferred to Puget Sound, where she is still in service in the Puget Sound Excursion Lines fleet of J. S. Devenny. Gordon Newell,Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 353.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 255, 416, 647.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial Eagle
Gordon Speck. Northwest explorations, p. 124-25. Albert Salisbury. Here rolled the covered wagons, p. 124. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 17, 249. Menzies, Archibald. Journal of Archibald Menzies p. 37. Visited the Northwest Coast in 1787. Commanded by Captain Charles W. Barkley under the flag of the Austrian East Indian Company, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 54-56. Used in trade by Captain Barkley. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 15. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., I, p. 107. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 49. Henry R. Wagner. Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan De Fuca, p. 3. Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast., p. 99, 107-111, 120. Strang, p. 22, 29-30, 38. Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 128
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial Nanaimo (tanker)
Imperial Nanaimo, 127-foot coastal tanker replaced by Imperial Tofino, sold by Imperial Oil to Cloverdale Shipping Co. of Vancouver and converted to a fish packer under the new name of Pelapus. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial Nanaimo (tanker)
Imperial Nanaimo, 127-foot coastal tanker replaced by Imperial Tofino, sold by Imperial Oil to Cloverdale Shipping Co. of Vancouver and converted to a fish packer under the new name of Pelapus. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial Skeena (tanker)
The 300-foot coastal tanker Imperial Skeena was launched at Burrard Dry Dock for Imperial Oil Ltd. The $3.23 million, 4,400-deadweight ton vessel was subsequently placed in service carrying petroleum products to B.C. coastal ports, replacing the older tanker Imperial Vancouver. This was the first vessel on the B.C. coast to be fitted with a bulbous bow for increased propulsion efficiency, and the first Canadian tanker designed to carry containers and palletized packaged petroleum products in addition to her bulk oil capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Her 3,000-horsepower diesel engines are operated by remote control consoles in the wheel house and a control room forward. In addition to twin screws and rudders, she was fitted with a 185-horsepower bow-thrust propeller for added maneuverability. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.64.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial Tofino (tanker)
Imperial Tofino, a 146-foot coastal tanker of 750-deadweight tons and a capacity of 200,000 gallons, was built by McKenzie Barge & Marine Ways Ltd. (formerly McKenzie Barge & Derrick Co.), for Imperial Oil, replacing the Imperial Nanaimo, a 120-foot vessel built in Quebec in 1937 as the Beeceelite. The new tanker, fitted with a 1,000-horsepower Atlas diesel, has a cruising speed of 11.2 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial. (passenger Vessel)
A 64 x 15.5 foot Port Orford cedar hull, built at Portland in 1935, but never completed, was rifted out by Mat Tolonen at Astoria as the passenger and freight vessel ImperiaL The 100-horsepower Caterpillar diesel installed in the Imperial gave her a 12 mile per hour service speed on her Astoria-Cathlamet route, replacing the converted fishing boat Molly Lou in Foster Bros. service. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 472.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
In November The Oregon & Alaska Transportation Co.
such business and shipping leaders of the community as John McCracken, J. C. Ainsworth and Charles E. Ladd, announcing plans to EUGENE Steamer. An episode rivaling that of the Eliza Anderson expedition in drama and comedy was that of the Columbia River stern wheel steamboat Eugene, a light-draft lightly constructed vessel 140 feet long with engines 12 x 60 inches, built at Portland in 1894 by Capt. F. B. Jones for the route between Portland and the headwaters of the Willamette River. Arrangements were made by the newly-formed Portland & Alaska Trading & Transportation Co. in the late summer for the steamer Bristol, Capt. Mc Int-yre, to tow her from British Columbia to St. Michael for Yukon River service. Setting out in charge of Capt. C. H. Lewis and chief engineer Stearns, the river boat reached Union Bay under her own power, but the Bristol did not arrive as planned and the Canadian customs officials impounded the vessel on various charges. When the ocean steamer finally put in an appearance Capt. Mc Intyre
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Infallible (cannery Tender)
Among the other smaller craft completed at Northwest yards in 1936 were the following: Infallible, 86-foot diesel cannery tender of 240 -horsepower, at Tacoma for the Brindle Brothers of the Wards Cove Packing Co., Ketchikan, the vessel being rifted with purse seining equipment as well as being adapted to regular cannery tender work. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Infallible (cannery Tender)
Among the other smaller craft completed at Northwest yards in 1936 were the following: Infallible, 86-foot diesel cannery tender of 240 -horsepower, at Tacoma for the Brindle Brothers of the Wards Cove Packing Co., Ketchikan, the vessel being rifted with purse seining equipment as well as being adapted to regular cannery tender work. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
International (steamer)
There was considerable activity on Kootenay and Arrow Lakes on the upper Columbia River in British Columbia territory, where the Canadian Pacific Railway had, in 1890, purchased the holdings of the pioneer Columbia & Kootenay River Navigation Co. The 143-foot stem-wheel steamers International and Kokanee were placed in service at Nelson, B. C., while the 165-foot Trail, a stern-wheel towboat designed by Capt. James Troup for barge handling, was launched at Nakusp. Kokanee long maintained her reputation as the fastest of the Canadian Columbia River steamers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iralda
U.S. wooden, propeller steamer: 99 gross tons, 106.2 feet x 18.7 feet. 130 I.H.P., triple-expansion engine. Crew: four. Captain W.S. Neusome's second Iralda was built at Portland, Oregon in 1906 using components of the first Irulda. She was a fast riverboat for passenger and freight service. Her original route was down the Columbia River from Portland to Rainier, Oregon and back by way of Willamette Slough, collecting milk and other dairy products for Portland markets. In her later years the Iralda was owned by the Hosford Transportation Company, and her route was extended to Astoria. As late as 1921, she engaged in a rate war that drove the Portland-Astoria fare down to $ 1.00. The light, narrow Iralda was not a success on the often rough estuary of the Columbia and was withdrawn from the route. She was abandoned in 1932. (A.G. Graham, Voyage in a Square Rigger, 1913-1914. Astoria: Columbia River Maritime Museum, 1984, p. 38.)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iralda (steamer)
The propeller Iralda 99 tons, 106 feet in length and fitted with triple expansion engines of 130 horsepower was built at Portland for local passenger service on the lower river. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 119.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iralda (steamer)
The Iralda was a small propeller boat built by Capt Neusome for the run from Portland to Rainier on the lower Columbia which is opposite Longview, Washington. His boat was on this run for some considerable time and used to go down the Columbia to Rainier and then come back up Willamette Slough picking up freight and especially milk in large tin cans and also other dairy products to deliver to Portland. Later on she was taken over by the Holman Transportation Company on this same run and they eventually extended her run to Astoria in the passenger and freight service in competition with Harkins Transportation Co. with the Lurline and the Georgians. However, she was too narrow and too light a boat for this run and was, of course, not built for heavy weather and lots of times when she got into the flood tide and the surge coming up the river around Tongue Point she did not do so well and finally they took her off the run. Note by Capt. Homer T. Shaver Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iralda (steamer)
The Iralda, completed at Portland for W. S. Newsom, was ninety feet long, thirteen feet beam, feet six inches hold, with engines eight, thirteen and twenty by twelve inches, and was a very fast steamer. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Italia (1)
The "Italia" was built by Robert Duncan & Co. of Port Glasgow in 1872 for Henderson Bros. which later became the Anchor Line. She was an iron built vessel of 2245 gross tons, length 306ft x beam 34.4ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. She had accommodation for 130-1st class and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 24/7/1872, she commenced her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Marseilles, Genoa, Naples, Messina, New York and Glasgow in December 1872. After two voyages, she was transferred to the Glasgow - New York [direct] service for ten trips commencing 2/7/1873 and then, in Sept.1874 resumed the Glasgow - Mediterranean - NY - Glasgow service. After eight voyages she transferred to the London - NY run for one voyage commencing 22/1/1877 and then from 1877-1880 was used on the Glasgow - Bombay run. In 1880-1881 she did two trips from Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York and on 25/5/1881 commenced running from Barrow - Dublin - New York. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 26/10/1881 after four trips and was transferred to the Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay run for three voyages between 1881-83. From then until 1897 she was transferred to the Mediterranean - New York service and on 31/3/1897 left Genoa for Naples and New York on her last voyage arriving on 6/5/1897. On 24/2/1898 she went to the scrapyard in Italy.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]
Italia (2)
The "Italia" of 1890 was built in 1889 by Armstrong, Mitchell & Co, Walker-on-Tyne. She was a 3,564 gross ton ship, length 344.5ft x beam 43.5ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st and 1,400-3rd class passengers. Purchased on the stocks by Hamburg America Line in March 1889, she was launched on 2/4/1889 and commenced her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York on 6/6/1889. She commenced her last voyage on this route on 3/5/1890 (6 round voyages), and on 25/6/1890 started sailings between Stettin (Sczeczin) and New York. She started her last voyage on this service on 19/11/1893 (21 round voyages) and on 7/3/1894 commenced Hamburg - Boston - Baltimore voyages. On 6/11/1898 she was chartered to Red Star Line and made a single Antwerp - New York voyage and in Jan 1899 made a single Antwerp - Philadelphia crossing. Chartered to the American Line in March 1899, she made 5 round voyages between Liverpool and Philadelphia, the last in August of that year. Her last Hamburg - New York voyage for Hamburg America Line started on 31/1/1900 and she then went to the Sloman Line of Hamburg and was renamed "Milano". Her first voyage for these owners started on 29/3/1900 when she sailed from Hamburg for New York, and her last voyage on this route commenced on 5/6/1903. Later the same year she was sold to Deutsche Levante, renamed "Tenedos" and used on their New York to Black Sea ports service. She started her final voyage on 28/5/1904 when she left Odessa for Batum, Constantinople, Smyrna, Piraeus and New York. In 1914 she was transferred to the Turkish Navy and used as an auxiliary and in 1915 was torpedoed and sunk by the British submarine E-19 near Akbash, Turkey. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.395-6]
Citation:
Italia (3)
See KONIG ALBERT.
Citation:
Italia (4)
The "Italia" of 1950 was built as the "Kungsholm" (2) for the Swedish American Line in 1928. Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg (engines by Burmeister & Wain, Copenhagen), she was a 21,532 gross ton motorship, length overall 609.2ft x beam 78.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 115-1st, 490-2nd and 970-3rd class. Launched on 17/3/1928, she sailed from Gothenburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 24/11/1928. In April 1932 she was feritted to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class passengers and on 5/10/1939 commenced her last Gothenburg - New York voyage. Subsequently she was used until December 1941 on New York - West Indies cruises. She was bought by the US government on 13/12/1941, renamed "John Ericsson" and served as a US troopship. On 7/5/1946 she was chartered by United States Line and commenced New York - Southampton sailings. In February 1947 she commenced her eighth and last crossing from Southampton to Havre, Cobh and New York and on 7/3/1947 was damaged by fire in New York and repurchased by Swedish American Line. Sailed from New York for Genoa on 21/11/1947 and was refitted and acquired by Home Lines of Panama and renamed "Italia". After refit, she was 16,777 gross tons and with accommodation for 226-1st, 296-cabin and 800-tourist class passengers. On 8/4/1948 she commenced her first voyage from Genoa to South America, and on 12/6/1979 started her first Genoa - Naples - Lisbon - New York voyage. In 1952 she was altered to carry 213-1st and 1,106-tourist class and on 14/3/1952 started her first New York - Hamburg crossing. On 29/3/1952 she started sailings between Hamburg, Southampton, Halifax and New York and in 1958 was altered to carry 140-1st and 1,150-tourist class. She started her first Cuxhaven - Zeebrugge - Havre - Southampton - Quebec voyage on 23/4/1959 and her first Cuxhaven - Havre - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 23/5/1959. Her last Montreal - Quebec - Southampton - Havre - Cuxhaven - Havre - Southampton - Halifax - New York round voyage commenced 28/11/1960 and she then did a single crossing from New York to Halifax, Lisbon, Naples and Piraeus. On 4/9/1962 she resumed sailing between New York, Halifax, Lisbon, Naples, Piraeus, Messina, Naples and New York and subsequently sailed between New York and the Bahamas. In 1964 she became the "Imperial Bahama Hotel" at Freeport, Grand Bahama Island and on 8/9/1965 arrived at Bilbao where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1461] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 March 1998]
Italia (liner)
A relatively minor collision occurred in mid-July when the cruise liner Italia was caught by tidal current while docking at Pier C, Vancouver, and swept into the Liberian cargo vessel Oriental Light, damaging lifeboats and other deck gear. Following hasty repairs, the liner was able to sail on schedule the next evening. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Italian
See DONA MARIA
Citation:
Italis
See AMERICA (5).
Citation:
Italy
The steamship ITALY was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co., Glasgow, for the National Steamship Company Limited (National Line). 4,169 tons; 389 feet long x 42 feet broad; straight bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 11 knots. 2 April 1870, launched. 13 July 1870, maiden voyage Liverpool-New York. 1884 and 1890-91 London-New York; otherwise Liverpool-New York. 1894, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (Prescott, Lancashire: T. Stephenson & Sons., 1955), p. 207]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 137, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 July 1997]
J. M. Wjoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris Of Nisquallyer
Launching of the WJoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris of Nisquallyerwax, Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 82.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. N. Teal
Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. 365.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. N. Teal (steamer)
The seasonal wheat trade provided the offly work for steamboats above Cascade Locks on the Columbia River, the O.W.R. & N. freight-carriers Lewiston and Spokane operating in the late summer and fall of 1921 between Portland and the lower Snake River country. After their destruction by fire they were replaced by the J. N. Teal which was leased for the wheat trade. The Teal had, since the summer of 1921, returned to her run between Portland and The Dalles, operating in charge of veteran river vavigator Capt. R. F. Caples. Leaving the Taylor Street Dock at 10:00 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, she reached The Dalles at about 10:00 a.m., beginning her return trips at 6:00 p.m. on the alternate days. Stops were made at Lyle, Mosier, White Salmon, Underwood, Cooks, Carson, Stevenson and all points above Cascade Locks. Although primarily in freight service, she provided overnight accommodations for 35 passengers at the nominal fare of $ 1.00 plus war tax. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. M
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. N. Teal (steamer)
New stern-wheel steamer construction on the Columbia River and its tributaries included the 513-ton J. N. Teal, 160 feet in length, at Portland, designed for the Open River Transportation Co. wheat trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. N. Teal (steamers)
Another navigational aid which it was hoped would increase shipping activity on the Columbia River was completed in 1915 with the opeing of the Celilo canal and locks, an eight-mile project skirting most of the rough water in the vicinity of Celilo Falls with a depth of eight feet. On April 28 the river steamers J. N. Teal and Inland Empire passed upriver through the locks, followed shortly by the Undine, carrying a party of dignitaries from Portland for the opening ceremonies. Following these formalities, the Undine returned downriver to Portland, where the official party transferred to the Georgiana for Astoria, boarding a tug there and passing over the bar, having traversed the newly improved waterway from the Inland Empire to the open sea. The Teal, in charge of Capt. Arthur Riggs, became the first of the lower steamers to reach Lewiston, Idaho, and there were hopes of a steamboat revival. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 19
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. N. Teal (sternwheeler)
October 22, 1907 Sternwheel, 513 tons, 160'. She was the first lower-river steamer to reach Lewiston, Idaho. Captain Arthur Riggs, in the employ of the Regulator Co., attempted to control docking at Hood River in 1915 by renting space at the dock, tying up the largest barge he could find and thus effectively limit tie-up space for other ships. Open River Line tied the J. N. Teal to the offending barge, pulled the throttle wide and yanked the barge, along with several bitts and pilings, out to the river. A dock fight started, the sheriff arrived and the docks were once again opened to regular traffic. The J. N. Teal burned at Portland. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. R. Mcdonald (steam Freighter)
The J. R. McDonald, a large steam freighter, was set afloat at Lake's yard on Salmon Bay, March 13th, for the Pennington Navigation Company. Capt. George W. McGregor was first in command, and the steamer proved a profitable vessel of her class. She burned at Prevost Island in 1893, and was afterward rebuilt and put under the British flag at Victoria. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. R. Mcdonald (steamer)
The steamer J. R. McDonald, Capt. Frank Worth, from Seattle for Vancouver, B. C., caught fire and was beached on the east side of Prevost Island, February 23d. The hull was afterward saved and taken to Victoria. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J.n. Teal (steamer)
The large stern-wheel steamer J. N. Teal, just completed at Portland for service on the Columbia River with the Open River Navigation Company's Mountain Gem, caught fire and burned at that city on October 22, and had to be completely rebuilt, not finally entering service until 1908. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jackall
C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., p. 122, 124, 126, 129 Guns fired in salute in Honolulu Harbor hit Lady Washington and killed Captain John Kenrick, Buell and Skladal. Sea Otters and the China Trade., p. 153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Marshall
James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait., p. 44. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 102. Took first cargo of piles and lumber from Port Townsend. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 339.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A. Falkenberg
The Jane A. Falkenberg sailing from Honolulu to Astoria in twelve days, making a record which is still unbroken. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A. Falkenberg (barkentine)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 67. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 214, 301. Stranded on Clatsop Spit in 1872, Refloated. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 170.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A. Falkenberg (barkentine)
An important addition to the fleet in the Northwest this year was the barkentine Jane A. Falkenberg, which was bought by Capt. George Flavel. The Falkenberg had been running to the Columbia in the lumber trade, and, while Flavel was sailing his old schooner Halcyon up and down the coast, he often looked with envious eyes on the clipper that was never known to make a slow passage. Flavel had made considerable money with the Halcyon, carrying ice from Vancouver to San Francisco and bringing back Government freight. Along in the summer he made the owners of the Falkenberg such a good offer that they turned the vessel over to him. She arrived at Portland the first time in command of her new owner September 29th, with 530 tons of freight, which, according to the Oregonian, was the largest cargo that had ever been brought to Oregon. The same paper also paid a glowing tribute to Captain Flavel for his enterprise and ability as a navigator. The barkentine Jane A. Falkenberg was built at New Bedford in 1854, and came
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A. Falkenberg (steamer)
Among the fast passages of the Northwestern fleet were those of the Jane A. Falkenberg from Honolulu to Astoria in a few hours less than thirteen days. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A.falkenberg (barkentine)
American barkentine, 310 tons, stranded on Clatsop Spit in 1872. At first it was feared that she would be lost, but determined salvage efforts were rewarded, and the vessel was eventually refloated from her sandy perch. She was built at New Bedford in 1854, and came to the Pacific Coast the following year. She had clipper lines and seldom made a slow passage. Shortly after her arrival on the coast she was purchased by Captain George Flavel. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A.falkenburg
1872 Aground on Clatsop Spit. Hauled off with no danger. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane Falkenburg (barkentine)
November, 1899 Barkentine,137'x29.7'x 11.9'. Built at New Bedford in 1854, she came west the following year. The trip took 115 days and gave the captain an idea as to how fast she really was. She made her first trip to Manila in 39 days, beating the famous clipper Flying Fish by 7 days. Captain Falkenburg was killed in San Francisco in February, 1856 and the ship was purchased by Captain George Flavel of Astoria. In 1861 he expertly guided her in a fantastic run of 31/2 days from Astoria to San Francisco. She collided once with the Brother Jonathan on that ship's last trip on the Columbia just prior to her loss. The Jane Falkenburg was a hard-working ship and a great money-maker. On her last voyage from Port Hadlock to San Francisco, the 45 year old vessel just had to give up and quietly slip forever into the encompassing arms of the sea. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Japan Alliance (containership)
Japan line assigns bigger ship to Pacific Northwest Route, including Seattle, Vancouver and Portland, Marine Digest. August 11, 1984, p. 11+ (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jennie Alice
Another noteworthy arrival of questionable value to the country was that of the French ship Jennie Alice, which reached Portland from Hongkong with four hundred and thirty Chinese passengers, the first shipload ever brought direct to the Northwest, but unfortunately not the last. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jennie Walker (schooner)
The Jennie Walker, a two - masted schooner of 137 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1880 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners for the inter island trade. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jennie Walker (schooner)
The Jennie Walker, a two - masted schooner of 137 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1880 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners for the inter island trade. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jerousalim
See LOMBARDIA.
Citation:
Jerusalem
The "Jerusalem" of 1953 (there was a later one of 1957) was originally the "Bergensfjord". She was built in 1913 by Cammell Laird & Co, Birkenhead for the Norwegian American Line and was a 10,666 gross ton ship, length overall 530ft x beam 61.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 100-1st, 250-2nd and 850-3rd class. Launched on 8/4/1913, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Christiania (Oslo) on 25/9/1913 for Christiansand, Stavanger, Bergen and New York. In July 1924 she was beached following an engine room explosion shortly after leaving Bergen, and her passengers transferred to other ships. She was repaired and resumed Christiania - New York sailings on 26/9/1924. She was refitted to carry 367-cabin class and 572-3rd class passengers in November 1925 and in September 1927 was again altered to accommodate 90 cabin, 155-tourist and 500-3rd class. Her machinery was modified in 1933, her tonnage increased to 11,015 tons and in January 1939 she was refitted to carry cabin and 3rd class only. She left Bergen on her last voyage to New York on 7/4/1940 and in November 1940 became an Allied troopship. After the war, she went to Home Lines of Panama, was renamed "Argentina", and commenced Genoa - South America sailings on 13/1/1947. In 1949 she was adapted to accommodate 126-1st, 250-cabin and 574-tourist class and in September 1949 commenced her first Genoa - Central America sailing. On 13/7/1951 she started her first New York - Naples - Genoa voyage, August 1951 - first Genoa - Naples - Halifax, September 1951 - first Genoa - Naples - Halifax - New York. Her last Naples - Genoa - Lisbon - Halifax - New York crossing took place in November 1952, and she commenced a single New York - Hamburg - New York voyage on 26/11/1952. Her last New York - Mediterranean crossing started on 20/12/1952 and in 1953 she was sold to Zim Lines of Israel. Renamed "Jerusalem" and refitted to carry 38-1st and 741-tourist passengers. On 29/4/1953 she started a service between Haifa, Limasol, Malta, Cannes, Halifax and New York and made 11 round voyages on the N. Atlantic, the last one starting in August 1955 when she left Haifa for Piraeus, Halifax and New York. In 1957 she was renamed "Aliya" to enable her name to be used for a new ship, and in 1959 was scrapped at Spezia. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.4, p.1442]
Citation:
John Alleyne (schooner)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 258.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John And Winthrop (whaling Bark)
H.W. McCurdy's Marine History notes that this vessel is owned by the world's only black whaling company ....being entirely owned and largely officered by men of this race....
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Calvin
The bark JOHN CALVIN, 420/510 tons (old/new measurement), built at Greenock, Scotland, and launched in June 1839. She appears in Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1839/40 through 1851/52: Master: 1839/40-1841/42 - Abercrombie; 1841/42-1845/46 - Knox; 1845/46-1847/48 - Hunter; 1848/49-1849/50 - J[ohn] Davison; 1850/51-1851/52 - [not given]. Owner: 1839/40-1845/46 - Taylor & Co; 1845/46 - Sands & Co; 1845/46-1849/50 - R. Hunter; 1850/51-1851/52 - [not given]. Port of Registry: 1839/40-1845/46 - Greenock; 1845/46-1850/51 - London; 1851/52 - [not given]. Port of Survey: 1839/40-1841/42 - Clydeside; 1841/42-1850/51 - London; 1851/52 - [not given]. Destined Voyage: 1839/40-1841/42 - Calcutta; 1841/42-1845/46 - Bombay; 1845/46-1847/48 - Sydney; 1848/49-1849/50 - Hobart Town; 1850/51 - California; 1851/52 - [not given]. Australian Joint Copying Project, National Library, Canberra, Australia, reel 3199, contains surgeons' reports of two voyages to the South Pacific (London, 13 May 1846 - Norfolk Island, 29 September 1846, with 199 male prisoners; Dublin, 24 January 1848 - Hobart Town, 18 May 1848, with 170 female prisoners). The last entry in Lloyd's Registerfor the JOHN CALVIN is in 1851/52, an incomplete entry giving only her name, tonnage, and place and date of building. As the destination of her last printed destined voyage was California it is probable that she was either wrecked during the passage, sold American, or even abandoned at San Francisco. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 29 March 1998]
John D. Tallant (schooner)
John D. Tallant, a four-masted schooner of 561 tons, was built at Alameda in 1892 by Alex. Hay for Wright, Bowne & Co., San Francisco. Capt. William Henderson, master, owned a one-eight interest. The schooner drops from registry shortly after 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941. Mr. Lyman later reported that the Tallant foundered at sea in August of 1901.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John D. Tallant (schooner)
John D. Tallant, a four-masted schooner of 561 tons, was built at Alameda in 1892 by Alex. Hay for Wright, Bowne & Co., San Fran- cisco. Capt. William Henderson, master, owned a one-eight inter- est. The schooner drops from registry shortly after 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941. Mr. Lyman later reported that the Tallant foundered at sea in August of 1901.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John D. Tallant (schooner)
The John D. Tallant, a four master shcooner of 561 tons built by Hay at Alameda, California, in 1892 sailed from Vancouver B.C. with lumber and a deckload of piling on August 13, 1902 for Mollendo. She failed to reach port and on April 1, 1903 her wreckage drifted ashore, bottom-up and dismasted, on Mille Island, one of the Marshalls Group. All hands, including Capt. Fred Holland and his bride, were lost. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 83.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Howland (whaler)
In January 1841, a 20-foot fishing boat from southeastern Japan was wrecked in a wild storm then drifted seven days to an uninhabited island (Torishima), where the fishermen managed to survive for the next six months. After much suffering, a chance visit to the area by the American whaler John Howland (Captain William H. Whitfield), on the search for sea turtles, discovered five underweight and badly distressed Japanese, the youngest was fourteen years old. Captain Whitfield, with the obligation to search for whales, kept the survivors on board for the next five months at sea during which time the Japanese regained their health and were taught the basics of whaling. Eventually the John Howland reached the Sandwich Islands and put in at Honolulu. Some of the waifs stayed at Honolulu under the care of Rev. Samuel C. Damon, the Seaman's Chaplain as well as publisher and editor of The Seaman's Friend (usually called just The Friend), a semi-monthly journal. Manjiro, who had been named 'John Mung by Captain Whitf
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John J. Healy (steamer)
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition program, 1909, p. 85.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John J. Healy (steamer)
The 450 - ton, 175 - foot stern - wheeler John J. Healy was assembled at St. Michael and placed in the lower Yukon River service of the North American Transportation & Trading Co. as its second river steamer and the largest then in service on the Yukon. (The Portus B. Weare, built by the same company at Fort Get There in 1892, was of the same length, but had a beam of only 28 feet compared to 36 feet for the Healy. ) Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Marshall
The John Marshall was an American ship, overcome by a gale off Cape Flattery, November 10, 1860. Parts of the derelict later came ashore near Bonilla Point but the entire crew was lost without trace. Vessel was en route to Port Discovary, Washington, from San Francisco, in ballast. She was to have loaded lumber. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Marshall
The ship John Marshall, from San Francisco for Port Discovery, was caught in a storm off Cape Flattery, November 10th, and was lost with all on board. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Mcdonald
June 20, 1901 Ship burned at sea. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Palmer (barkentine)
John Palmer, a four-masted barkentine of 1187 tons and 1300 M capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1900 by H. D. Bendixsen for Sudden & Christenson, San Francisco. They sold her in 1916 to J. M. Scott, Mobile, who resold her a year later to French owners in Marseilles who renamed her the Yvonne. She was wrecked in October, 1920. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Palmer (barkentine)
John Palmer, a four-masted barkentine of 1187 tons and 1300 M capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1900 by H. D. Bendixsen for Sudden & Christenson, San Francisco. They sold her in 1916 to J. M. Scott, Mobile, who resold her a year later to French owners in Marseilles who renamed her the Yvonne. She was wrecked in October, 1920. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
July (french Naval Vessel)
Clarence A. Vandiveer. The fur trade and early western exploration, p. 80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kainalu (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 84-85, 164, 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kake (salmon Packer)
American gas propelled salmon packer 34 tons was swept on the spit on the south jetty of the Columbia River bar on November 1, 1913. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 171.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kake (salmon Packer)
The gasoline-powered salmon packer Kake, 34 tons, inbound from Kake, Alaska with 360 cases of salmon, was wrecked on the south spit at the Columbia River entrance on November 1, breaking up in the surf. Capt. Morzey and the crew were rescued. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kake (salmon Pakcer)
Gas propelled salmon packer, American, 34 tons, was swept on the spit at midnight near the south jetty of the Columbia bar, November 1, 1913. The craft was destroyed in the surf but the crew was rescued. The Kake, commanded by Captain Morzey, was inbound from Kake, Alaska, with 360 cases of packed salmon. She was owned by the Sanborn Cutting Company of Astoria. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kalakala (ferry)
The streamlined ferry Kalakala provided a spectacular bit of action at the Seattle ferry terminal in August when a reverse gear failure caused her to smash through the southeast corner of the dock structure, sideswipe the dredge Seahorse, a converted Navy LSM, and ram her bow into the Alaskan Way waterfront. Nervous from a severe earthquake which had struck the Puget Sound region in April, the personnel of the ferry operation and other occupants of the dock evacuated the premises in record time. It was reported that a large timber sheared off the dock entered the auto deck and completely demolished a model A Ford, this being the only actual fatality resulting from the crash. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 566.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kalakala (ferry)
The famous streamlined ferry Kalakala was sold by the Washington State Toll Bridge Authority to American Freezer Ships for $101,551 and moved to Lake Union for conversion to a crab processing vessel for use at Dutch Harbor. During the conversion process, the weight of some $400,000 worth of new equipment caused her to settle on the bottom and it was necessary to use three tugs, Anna Foss, Shannon Foss and Wallace Foss, to pull her into deeper water. She was subsequently towed to Hoonah by the Pacific and on to Dutch Harbor by the Andrew Foss, where her three crab processing lines went into production in the fall of 1968. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLVI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kalakala (ferry)
The Puget Sound ferry fleet of the Washington State Toll bridge authority continued its long record of spectacular rammings of terminal facilities without inflicting serious injuries on vessels or individuals. In February the Kalakala, nearing the end of her long career on San Francisco Bay and Puget Sound, traveling at excessive speed as she approached the new Seattle ferry terminal, failed to reverse her engines and crashed into the south slip, inflicting heavy damages which forced its closure for several weeks. Two automobiles aboard the Kalakala were out of commission temporarily, but the vessel, despite an estimated $2,500 damage to the upperworks above the car deck, was back on the Bremerton run the next day. Captain Robert Lundgren, in charge of the Kalakala at the time, was later reprimanded for misjudgment in handling vessel. In July the ferry Tillicum repeated the performance, smashing the south slip so badly that it was out of service for a month. Four passengers were slightly injured and eight car
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kalakala (ferryboat)
Called the Peralta on San Francisco Bay, then Kalakala as a Washington State ferry until 1967 when the was remodeled to become a fish processor named the Gibson Cove. BNG. p. 296. Faces undecided future, The Marine Digest. March 19, 1983, p. 19. (il) Shrader, p. 9-10. Kalakala for sale again,. As the Gibson Cove has been a fish processor near Kodiak. The Marine Digest. March 16, 1985, p. 4. Not yet sold, The Marine Digest. April 13, 1985, p. 5. Maritime Memories, steam ferry Peralta before converson to the Kalakala, The Marine Digest. May 18, 1985, p. 6-7. Maritime Memories, the Kalakala's waning glory, The Marine Digest. May 25, 1985, p. 6-7. Kalakala may find new life as a floating mall, The Marine Digest. July 6, 1985, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kalamalka (trawler)
In August the 115-foot British Columbia trawler Kalamalka (a converted naval minesweeper), inbound from Hecate Strait with a near record cargo of 250,000 pounds of sole and cod, collided with the 90-foot trawler Sea Prince near the mouth of the Fraser River and was beached in shallow water. The five-man crew headed by Captain C. M. Ethiar was taken off by the Canadian Coast Guard cutter Racer and fisheries patrol vessel Star Rock. The Kalamalka was subsequently raised and towed to a Vancouver drydock, but her cargo was a total loss. The Sea Prince, outward bound with a crew of 16 fishermen under Captain Norman Sigmund, was not seriously damaged in the collision. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXX.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kalani (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 84-85, 164, 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kaleetan (ferry)
The Washington State ferry Kaleetan collided with an oil barge being towed in Elliott Bay by the Washington Tug & Barge tug Reliance in November, the ferry sustaining about $60,000 in damages and the barge minor damage. The Coast Guard charged Matthew Dorobis, mate and pilot of the ferry, with negligence for having failed to sound the proper whistle signals to indicate his intention to hold course and speed as the privileged vessel in a crossing situation. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975.x, p.108.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kaleetan (ferry)
The year 1967 was marked on Puget Sound by the completion of four more modern steel ferries, three of which were of the 382-foot, 160-car superferry class, identical to the Hyak, which arrived late in 1966 and began operation on the Seattle-Bremerton run during the Fourth of July weekend of the following year, cutting the crossing time from 65 minutes to 45. The second of the class, Kaleetan, was aunched on March 11, with Mrs. Warren G. Magnuson as sponsor, the third, Yakima, on May 20, christened by Princess Vivian Saluskin, a descendent of the last hereditary chief of the Yakima Indian tribe, and the fourth Elwha, on December 16, with Mrs. Charles G. Prahl, wife of the ferry system's general manager, as matron of honor. All four superferries, then the largest and fastest double-ended ferries in the world, were built by National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. of San Diego. The Elwha had originally been scheduled for launching in August, but a shipyard labor dispute resulted in a four-month delay. Gordon Newell, M
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kaleetan (superferry)
In March the Hyak's sister ferry, Kaleetan, failed to reverse her engines while approaching the north slip at the Seattle Ferry Terminal and rammed the structure, inflicting $80,000 damages. The slip was out of service for six weeks. The Kaleetan suffered minor damage, while five automobiles on the car deck were also damaged. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kapalama (tug)
The Kapalama, a 52 x 14.9-foot welded steel tug with two 165-horsepower Gray diesels, was built by Reliable Welding Works at Olympia for Pacific Naval Airbase Contractors of Alameda, California.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 510.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Katala (steamer)
The sloops, scows and schooners which for more than a quarter of a century had been engaged in business on the Astoria and Skipanon routes were succeeded in 1874 by the steamer Katala, christened in honor of a Clatsop chief. She was built at Astoria by Capt. J. G. Hustler, a veteran pilot, and Edward Hughes, a purser on Holladay's steamers. W. L. Pool was her first master, and he was succeeded by Frank Stevens and Eugene Brock. The people who made their annual pilgrimage to the seashore were not so numerous at this early day, and the Katata failed to clear expenses, and was sold to Lienenweber, the canner, who used her for transporting salmon. In 1879 her machinery was removed, and the engines were placed in the steamer Tom Morris, subsequently renamed La Camas, where they are still doing duty. The Katala amounted to but little as a steamboat, but as the pioneer on the Skipanon route she will always be remembered by the Clatsop beach visitors of twenty years ago. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Complete
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kate Alexander (plunger)
A. Horace Tucker and his bride went to Sequim from Port Townsend on their honeymoon aboard the Kate Alexander. Lucile McDonald, Where the Washingtonians lived, p. 81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Katherine (sealer)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest< p. 452.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kettle Falls
The 50-foot gas sternwheeler Kettle Falls was built at Bremerton for use by the Army Engineers on the Columbia and later on the Puget Sound rivers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Keualaska (barge)
The barge Keualaska, southbound from Anchorage in tow of the Pacific Western Lines' tug Daphne, collided nearly head on with the Japanese motor vessel Shoyo Maru No. 5, suffering a 48-foot gash in her hull above the waterline. The Japanese vessel also received some bow damage, but was able to proceed under her own power. The damaged barge, together with another, which had been in tandem tow at the time of the collision, was taken to Seattle by the Daphne, in charge of Capt. Jug Knowles. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kevalaska (barge)
The use of a helicopter was again instrumental in December in the refloating of the 300-foot barge Kevalaska of Pacific Western lines, which stranded in December at the entrance to the Dangerous River 25 miles southeast of Yakatat. During the salvage efforts by the Astoria-based Salvage Chief the line to the barge parted just as she was floated and she drifted onto the rocks at the other side of the river entrance. However, the skilled crew of the salvage tug got her off again and into deep water, turning her over to the original towing vessel, the Daphne, for return to Seattle for survey. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
King Alexander
See BREMEN (2).
Citation:
King Of Italy
See AUGUSTUS WATTENBACH.
Citation:
King Salmon
Built in 1916 for te King Salmon Fishing Company. 53 tons 97.5 feet #207184. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
King Salmon (steamer)
Built in Tacoma, perhaps in 1916. #207184. 53 gross ton vessel. Salmon Sport Fishing Company, Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kohala (barkentine)
The Kohala, a four-masted barkentine of 891 tons and one million feet lumber capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1901 by the Bendixsen Shipbuilding Co. for the management of Hind, Rolph & Co., San Francisco. Her last sail passage was from Callao to San Francisco in ballast in the summer of 1921, after which she was laid up. About 1928 she was sold to become a fishing barge in Southern California waters, in which capacity her hull is still afloat. John Lyman Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. May 31, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kohala (barkentine)
The Kohala, a four-masted barkentine of 891 tons and one million feet lumber capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1901 by the Bendixsen Shipbuilding Co. for the management of Hind, Rolph & Co., San Francisco. Her last sail passage was from Callao to San Francisco in ballast in the summer of 1921, after which she was laid up. About 1928 she was sold to become a fishing barge in Southern California waters, in which capacity her hull is still afloat. John Lyman Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. May 31, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kohala (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Konig Albert
The "Konig Albert" was built by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin in 1899 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was a 10,643 gross ton ship, length 499.3ft x beam 60.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 227-1st, 119-2nd and 1,799-3rd class passengers. Launched on 24/6/1899, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg, via the Suez Canal to the Far East. She completed 8 round voyages on this service and was then transferred on 14/3/1903 to the Bremen - Cherbourg - New York route for a single voyage. On 16/4/1903 she went to the Genoa - Naples - New York run and stayed mainly on this service until commencing her last voyage on 11/6/1914. At the outbreak of the Great War, she took refuge in Italy but in May 1915 was seized by Italy, renamed "Ferdinando Palasciano" and was used as a hospital ship. In 1920 she was chartered to Navigazione Generale Italiana and on 15/6/1920 commenced her first voyage Genoa - Naples - New York. She completed 6 round voyages on this route, the last one commencing 13/4/1921 and then, in 1922 became the "Italia", and was used as a floating exhibition ship. She was scrapped in Italy in 1926.1923.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 November 1997]
Krystal Sea (freighter)
Alaska's beaches are the Krystal Sea's docks, The Marine Digest. August 8, 1981. p. 23. Landing craft design coastal freighter, Homer, Alaska.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Paloma
Built in Tacoma in 1922. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Paloma (scow)
The 13 ton gas scow La Paloma caught fire and sank in Elliott Bay 1913 (McClellan 1954:1 1 0).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Paloma (tug)
Other additions to the rapidly expanding fleet of gasoline powered vessels in the Northwest were as follows: La Paloma, a 48-foot tug designed by L. H. Coolidge with pilot house controls for one man o-neration and built at Ballard for the Stimson Mill Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Paloma (tug)
The La Paloma, fitted with a 40-horsepower Frisco Standard heavy duty engine, was the prototype of scores of similar efficient harbor tugs, among the first to be built along her lines being the Governor for Capt. Charles Norton of Anacortes and the Henrietta H. for Capt. E. E. Still of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Salle (tug)
The need for increasingly powerful docking tugs to handle larger merchant vessels also resulted in the addition of the 71 x 23-foot harbor tug La Salle to the fleet of Vancouver Tug Boat Co. Designed by Cove, Hatfield and built by Star Shipyard (Mercers), La Salle, fitted with a 1,440-horsepower Deutz diesel, driving a controllable pitch propeller in a steering nozzle, was considered to be the most powerful tug of its size and type on the British Columbia West Coast. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lady Alexandra (steamer)
Little new construction was added to themajorfreight and passenger fleets of the Pacific Northwest in 1924. The most important was the day steamer Lady Alexandra, built by the Coaster Construction Co. at Montrose, Scotland and delivered to the Union Steamships, Ltd. at Vancouver during the, summer. A handsome two -stacker of 1, 396 tons, she had a capacity of 1,200 passengers and was advertised by her owners as the largest excursion steamer in the Pacific Northwest. The 230 -foot vessel was driven by twin screws and a pair of 1,000-horsepower triple-expansion engines which gave her a cruising speed of 13 1/2 knots. She was handsomely appointed, with one of the most attractive dining salons of any coastal steamer. Extending the full width of the vessel, it was fitted with a hardwood dance floor for the Moonlight Dance Cruises to Bowen Island, which were a popular summer feature of the Lady Alexandra's operation. During the almost thirty years she served Union Steamships she seldom left the Howe Sound routes an
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lady Alexandra (steamer)
The handsome ex-Union Steam two-stacker Lady Alexandra, in use as a restaurant ship on the Vancouver waterfront for several years, was sold to California owners and renamed Princess Louise II. Shiplovers who had long admired her trim and salty lines were horrified when the new owners, in an apparent attempt to glamorize her to Hollywood standards, had her rebuilt into a strange looking object vaguely resembling Noah's Ark, and were relieved when she was eventually towed to the Los Angeles area. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lash Italia (steamship)
Another milestone in the history of the American Merchant Marine was reached with the initial sailing from the East Coast of Prudential-Grace Lines' LASH (Lighter Aboard Ship) vessel LASH Italia, an 820-foot steamship which was the first of her type to fly the American flag and was also listed as the largest dry cargo vessel in the American merchant fleet. This was the first of five similar vessels being built for the line, each designed to carry 73 lighters with a cargo capacity of 870 long tons each. The lighters, called floating cargo holds, are hoisted on and off over the stern of the mother ships by gantry cranes which travel on rails and have the capability of stowing or off-loading a lighter in 15 minutes. Container cranes were also provided for handling container vans at the rate of one every three minutes. The first such vessel on the Pacific Coast, the Pacific Far East Lines' Thomas E. Cuffe, was launched at the Avondale yard in New Orleans during the year, the first of six LASH ships under contract
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lawrence (whaler)
Whale ship Lawrence of Poukeepsie, New York, wrecked off Kuriles May 27, 1846, with loss of all crew except 2nd Mate, George Howe and six others. Imprisoned in Japan from time of rescue until October 27, 1847. Survivors discovered by two Ainus (aboriginals of Japan then found almost entirely in the northern islands) at Toshimoi on Etorofu Island. Guards were called and the survivors, by gestures, communicated they had been shipwrecked. The guards ascertained the waifs were hungry so fed them homemade rice balls which the guards had carried with them presumably for their own lunch. Waifs incarcerated in guard house at Rubetsu when they refused to take their small lifeboat, with which they had made landfall, back into the sea, saying it was unsafe as being too small for their number. Communications being hand carried on junks between the islands, it took months for questions to be answered. The local officials wanted to rid themselves of these waifs but were stuck with them summer, fall and winter due to c
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Legal Tender (schooner)
Legal Tender, 210 tons, was built at Meigg's Mill, Port Madison, Wash., in 1863, and although she was in later years a bark, she apparently started out as a schooner. In the early '70's, under , bark rig, she was codfishing for Andrew Crawford, San Francisco, and subsequently was owned in New Bedford as a whaler, th@ugh operating out of San Francisco. She drops from registry in 1886, her last owner being E. 0. Avery, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast built sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 7, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Legal Tender (schooner)
Legal Tender, 210 tons, was built at Meigg's Mill, Port Madison, Wash., in 1863, and although she was in later years a bark, she apparently started out as a schooner. In the early '70's, under , bark rig, she was codfishing for Andrew Crawford, San Francisco, and subsequently was owned in New Bedford as a whaler, th@ugh operating out of San Francisco. She drops from registry in 1886, her last owner being E. 0. Avery, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast built sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 7, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Les Alpes
See BRITISH PRINCESS.
Citation:
Lief E (halibut Schooner)
The small halibut schooner Lief E., loaded with 30,000 pounds of fish, collided with the Grand Trunk steamship Prince George in a heavy fog on October 14, 1912. Capt. J. MacKenzie of the Canadian steamer, after having boats lowered to pick up the eight- man crew of the schooner, had steel cables passed under the sinking vessel and towed her to Harbor Island, where she was beached with the assistance of the fireboat Snoqualmie. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lieutenant C. V. Donaldson (fort Tender)
The steam fort tender Lieut. C. V Donaldson of 1907 was purchased from the goveriunent at Valdez by Capt. Alexander Allan, who replaced her steam engine with a 50 horse power oil engine, renaming her Donaldson. She was first chartered by Stefansson to go to the relief of his illfated Wrangell Island party, but only a single Eskimo woman was found alive. The vessel then entered the Nome trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 340.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lieutenant C. V. Donaldson (fort Tender)
The 65 foot steam fort tender Lieut. C. V. Donaldson was completed at Valdez and assigned to duty at the U. S. Army post there. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 141.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Linda (salvage Vessel)
Linda, former LCT converted to a salvage vessel by Nickey & Sprague for use in the refloating and subsequent scrapping of the former Canadian National steamship Prince George, sold by them for service on the Kuskokwim River. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Little California (steamer)
The Oregon Steamship Company, which still retained possession of the Little California, operated her on the route from Victoria to the Cassiar mines, Sitka and Fort Wrangel. When the steamship war ended, the Goodall, Nelson & Perkins Steamship Company, consisting of Charles Goodall, Chris Nelson, George C. Perkins, John O'Farrell, John Rosenfeld, N. S. Winganger and Edwin Goodall, purchased from the Pacific Mail Company the steamships Mohongo, Orizaba, Senator, Pacific, Gypsy and California for $230,000, and also secured the Fidelater from William Kohl. They afterward sold the California to Nicholas Bichard for $10,000, and the pioneer steamship was converted into a bark. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.236.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lizzie Marshall (bark)
American bark, 434 tons, Captain Adolph Bergman, lost on Bonilla Point, B. C., February 22, 1884. The vessel was 14 days out from San Francisco when she first sighted Cape Flattery. Fog set in and the wind died, leaving the vessel little steerageway. With a heavy swell running and no foghorn blaring on Tatoosh, the vessel lost her bearings and was carried toward Vancouver Island. Both anchors were dropped in 20 fathoms on February 21, and a boat with four volunteers was sent to Neah Bay for help. When a southeast gale came up, the vessel parted her anchor chains and went broadside on the rocks. A German sailor attempting to retrieve personal effects was drowned. The after part of the vessel wedged tight in the rocks and afforded a means of escape for crewmen. The vessel was built on the Sacramento River in 1870. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lizzie Marshall (bark)
The year 1884 was a fortunate one for the Northwestern fleet, and wrecks were few. The only one of much importance was the American bark Lizzie Marshall, 434 tons, lost on Bonilla Point, Vancouver lsland, February 22d. The vessel was fourteen days out from San Francisco when she first sighted Cape Flattery, but was driven off shore twice. Coming in the third time the cape was sighted for a moment, but a fog set in and the witid died out, leaving the vessel without steerage way. No foghorii was going at Tatoosh, and a heavy swell running off the coast, together with the tide, set the vessel toward Boinilla Point. Both anchors were dropped in twenty fathoms of water on the morning of February 2ist and a boat with four men dispatched to Neah Bay for assistance. A heavy southwest gale started the vessel to dragging, and though the masts were cut away they could not save her. Both cables parted, and she struck broadside on and broke in pieces in a few minutes. The stern of the bark from the mizzenmast aft held tog
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Llandovery Castle (british Hospital Ship)
The sinking of the British hospital ship Llandovery Castle announced by the British Admiralty to have been sent to the bottom by an enemy submarine on June 27, 1918 with the probable loss of more than 200 lives was due to her striking a British mine says a semi-official note from Berlin received in Amsterdam on July 3, 1918. Like all similar assertions of the British admiralty, the note reads, the assertion in this case that a German submarine was responsible for the fate of the Llandovery Castle is also probably incorrect. It appears from the later news that no one on board the steamer observed a U Boat or a torpedo. In all probability the cause of the loss will be found to be attributable to a British mine. The Tacoma Daily Ledger. July 4, 1918, p. 1.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lloyd California
Lloyd Brasiliero plans to add Pacific Northwest to service. First vessel to inaugurate service on August 17, 1984 will be the Lloyd California running between the Northwest and Rio de Janeiro. The Marine Digest. July 21, 1984, p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lotta Talbot (sternwheeler. )
Built in Tacoma in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Louis Walsh
Windmills used to pump bilge. Built at Belfast, Maine in 1861, Wreck at Dutch Harbor in 1902. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Loyal Ellsworth (steamer)
The steamer Loyal Ellsworth of the Farmers' Packet Line, which had started on the Cowlitz the year before, came to grief in February and was attached and sold by the sheriff. When she was placed in operation again Capt. H. A. Emkeil, the well known pilot, was given command. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.147.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Loyalist
See BYRON.
Citation:
Lucy Walker (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 287, 288.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lyondale
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
M. R. Hallett (towboat)
The Nichols Boat Works at Hood River completed the 440 -horsepower diesel towboat M. R. Hallett for Miles Hallett, the vessel subsequently passing to the Shaver Transportation Co. as the Manzanillo, named in honor of the pioneer Columbia River steamer of that name operated by the Peoples' Freighting Co. in the 1880's. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mabel Gale (schooner)
The Mabel Gale, a four-masted schooner of 762 tons and 900 M cadacity was built by Hall Bros., Port Blakely, in 1902 for a single-ship company managed by the Loop Lumber Co., San Francisco. She was sold in 1917 to J, M. Scott, Mobile, and her register was abandoned in 1933. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mabel Gale (schooner)
The Mabel Gale, a four-masted schooner of 762 tons and 900 M cadacity was built by Hall Bros., Port Blakely, in 1902 for a single-ship company managed by the Loop Lumber Co., San Francisco. She was sold in 1917 to J, M. Scott, Mobile, and her register was abandoned in 1933. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mable Gale (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Mabel Gale of 1902 was sold to J. M. Scott of Mobile, Ala. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 292.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Magallanes
See ALASKA (1).
Citation:
Magdalene
The bark MAGDALENE was built by Johann Lange, Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 15 March 1847 for the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen & Co.; she was named after the eldest daughter of C. H. Watjen. 167 Commerzlasten/340 tons register; 32,8 x 8,4 x 4,4 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). 30 April 1847, maiden voyage to New York. Under captains Johann Heinrich Kuhlmann and Gerhard Bremer she carried passengers to either New York or New Orleans, returning with a cargo of either tobacco or cotton. 27 October 1855, last voyage under the Bremen flag to New York. She then proceeded with a cargo of cotton to Genoa, where she was sold to Fratelli Rossi, of Genoa, renamed CARLOTTA, and placed under the flag of the kingdom of Sardinia. Her new captain was A. Chiozzia. The CARLOTTA appears in the records until the mid-1860's; her ultimate fate is not known at present [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 211].
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 December 1997]
Magdalene (grain Ship)
In January, 1900, the German ship Magdalene, being docked at Portland by the 0. R. & N. stern -wheel steamer Hassalo, took over from the towboat and went on a rampage, smashing into the German ship Margaretha and the 0. R. & N. wharf, inflicting $ 15,000 damages to the other ship and $ 1,500 to herself. There was a freshet in the river, with a strong current running, and the captain of the Magdalene charged that the Oregon company was negligent in furnishing only one towboat to handle the big grain ship. Both the mishaps resulted in litigation. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Magdalene Vinnen (bark)
Harold Underhill, Masting and Rigging., p. 58.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Magdalene Wilhelmine
The MAGDALENE WILHELMINE was built in Karlshamn, Sweden, in 1822. I have no record of here measurements, but her cargo capacity was rated at 60 Commerzlasten, or about 85 register tons. She had originally been owned in Altona--now part of Hamburg, but in the 19th century a port city in the kingdom of Hannover--and was known first as MARTIN LUTHER, and later as MARIA HENRIETTE. On 14 June 1832, she was purchased from Schagen, of Altona, by the Hamburg merchant Matthias Diederich August Segnitz, who on 14 March 1842 sold her to Willem Smitt, also of Hamburg. Master: 1832-1834 - H. J. Schagen [presumably her prior owner]; 1834-1838 - N. Quedens; 1838-1841 - C. A. Nueschke; 1842-1845 - W. Smitt [owner]. Voyages: 1832 - Port au Prince; 1832/1833 - Port au Prince/Jeremie, Haiti; 1833 - Bilbao/Malaga; 1833/1834 - Madeira/Port au Prince; 1834 - Malaga; 1834/1835 - Port au Prince; 1835 - Port au Prince/Santo Domingo; 1835/1836 - Port au Prince; 1836/1837 - Malaga/intermediate ports/Santiago de Cuba; 1837 - New York/Puerto Rico; 1837/1838 - St. Thomas; 1838 - Port au Prince; 1838/1839 - Jersey/Lisbon; 1839 - Boston, Massachusetts/Malaga; 1840 - Le Havre/Rio de Janeiro; 1840/1841 - Rio de Janeiro; 1841 - Madera/Rio de Janeiro; 1842/1845 - Algiers/intermediate ports/Gibraltar; 1845 - Port au Prince. The MAGDALENE WILHELMINE disappeared in 1845, on a voyage from Santo Domingo to Hamburg [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur HamburgischeGeschichte, 1969), vol. 2, pp. 200 and 221]. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 6 October 1998]
Citation:
Maine (whaler)
American ship, 294 tons, was wrecked on Clatsop Spit, Aug. 25, 1848. She was a whaler out of Fairhaven, Mass., in quest of whales, when disaster overtook her. The crew was saved. John Hobson, of Astoria, secured rights to the wreck and recovered sufficient materials to open his own copper shop. The survivors tried in vain to book passage home, but no ship was available. Thus they purchased a ship's boat, lengthened and equipped it with sail and set out for San Francisco, where upon their arrival they signed on another ship for the passage home. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maine (whaler)
294 ton vessel wrecked on Clatsop Spit August 25, 1848. A whaler out of Fairhaven, Massachusetts. Gibbs. Pacific Graveyard, p. 172. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 24.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maine (whaler)
A vessel lost at the mouth of the Columbia River in 1848 was the whaling ship Maine, which went ashore on Clatsop Spit, and a quantity of her wreckage washed up on Clatsop beach, John Hobson of Astoria securing a complete cooper-shop outfit which formed part of her equipment. The crew were all rescued and were sent to San Francisco in a ship's boat which had been lengthened and rigged for the service. E.W. Wright, Lewis and Drydens Marine History., p. 24.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malahat (barge)
The Gibson Bros. log barge Malahat foundered in heavy seas off the West Coast of Vancouver Island. The submerged hull was taken into Barkely Sound and her cargo removed. This ended the career of Canada's most colorful rum runner, old age and hard use proving too much for the ship that had laughed at U. S. Protective Services for 10 years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 520.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malahat (ferryboat)
Formerly known as the Napa Valley. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malahat (five Masted Schooner)
Length 245.7 feet, beam. 43.8 feet Built 1917, Cameron Genoa Nulls Shipbuilders, Victoria. Reg. No. 134655Engines: Two 160-HP Bolinder diesels. Owners: Archibald McGillis, 1701 Georgia St.West, Vancouver, 1923; General Navigation Co., 1048 Hamilton St., Vancouver, 1929. Capacity 84,000 cases in the hold plus approximately 16,000 on deck when the Ryuo II loaded from her, summer 1933. Well-known, longservice mother ship. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malahat (steam Ferry)
The steam ferry Malahat of the Puget Sound Navigation Co., in service on the Seattle - Bremerton route, was swept by a fire of undetermined origin on March 18. She was beached at Manette and her passengers and crew removed, after which her entire upperworks were destroyed by the flames. She was rebuilt and returned to service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 520.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malamute, (troller)
This fishing troller from Seattle, burned and sank two miles off Seldu, Washington, October 29, 1966. Harry Hebert, the only person aboard, escaped in a skiff. The fire started in the engine room and totally destroyed the craft. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malaspina (ferry)
Malaspina, 352-foot Alaska state ferry, fitted with a new midsection at Swan Island, Portland, giving her a length of 408 feet and accommodations for 750 passengers and 134 passenger vehicles, the $6 million modernization including a heated upper deck solarium for better viewing of the majestic scenery on her Marine Highway voyages from Seattle to Skagway. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malaspina (minesweeper)
In 1914 the Department of Naval Service went in for small steel minesweepers of trawler design and ordered the Malaspina, of 850 tons, to be built on the Clyde, and she was used for Fishery Patrol duties. Frederick Victor Longstaff, Descriptions and Illustrations, Esquimalt Naval Base: A History of Its Work and Its Defenses. Vancouver, B.C.: Clarke & Stuart Co. Ltd. 1942., p.179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malaya I (tuna Boat)
Tuna boats Malaya I and Malaya II built several years ago by Martinac Shipbuilding, Tacoma, remain unsold since buyers backed out, The Marine Digest. December 21, 1985, p. 23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maleck Adhel
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malibu (yacht)
Ted Geary, Yacht designer who designed some of Puget Sounds most elegant vessels, The Marine Digest. May 31, 1986. p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malina (fishboat)
American fishboat, 165 tons, owned by the San Juan Fishing and Packing Company, Seattle, ran aground off Carmanah Point, B. C., August 29, 1957. The powerful Canadian tug Sudbury, of Island Tug & Barge Ltd., was despatched to the scene and managed to get a line aboard the stranded 100-foot vessel. The Malina was on the rooks with her engine room flooded. The tug was forced to maintain a taut line between her towing engine and the stranded ship for 24 hours for the proper high tide. Meanwhile, the captain, mate, and crew were transferred to the tug, in case the Malina should sink. The tug was by brute force, able to drag the vessel a hundred feet across the rocks to a spot where there was sufficient water to get her afloat. She grounded on Thursday and was refloated the following Sunday in a touch-and-go operation. She was one of very few vessels of size to be refloated along this stretch of coast. The Malina was originally built at Seattle in 1943, as a unit of the U. S. Army. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan d
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malleville (bark)
The American bark Malleville, 924 tons, Capt. E. F. Harlow, from Shanghai for Victoria with a crew of eighteen men, struck a ledge off the western entrance to Hesquiat harbor, on the west coast of Vancouver Island, about 9:45 P. M. October 10, 1882 and broke up immediatelv, all on board losing their lives. Captain Harlow was accompanied by his wife and three children, and their bodies came ashore, with those of nine members of the crew. Father Brabrant, a well known frontier missionary, was informed of the wreck by the Indians and interred the remains. He also found a clock which had washed ashore, and it had stopped at 10:00 o'clock. Nothing is definitely known of the particulars of the disaster, as the vessel had disappeared from view by the following morning. The Malleville was built at Freeport, Maine in 1866, and had been for a long time in the Puget Sound lumber trade. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 301-302.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mallory (bark)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 119, 123.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malolo
See VASILISSA FREIDERIKI .
Citation:
Malolo (schooner)
The Malolo,a two-masted schooner of 133 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1879 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners. She made the voyage from Flattery to Honolulu in ten and a half days and then remained in the inter island trade. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malolo (schooner)
Malolo, two-masted schooner of 133 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1879 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners. She made the voyage from Flattery to Honolulu in 10 1/2 days and then remained in the inter island trade. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malolo (schooner)
The Malolo,a two-masted schooner of 133 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1879 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners. She made the voyage from Flattery to Honolulu in ten and a half days and then remained in the inter island trade. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malolo (schooner)
Malolo, two-masted schooner of 133 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1879 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners. She made the voyage from Flattery to Honolulu in 10 1/2 days and then remained in the inter island trade. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malolo (schooner)
The schooner Malolo, one of Hall Brothers' productions, sailed from Cape Flattery to Honolulu in ten and one-half days, breaking all existing records until another from the same yard, the barkentine Catherine Sudden, Captain Ingalls, sailed the same distance from Honolulu to the Cape in nine days and thirteen hours. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.272.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malolo (steamer)
1927-1937; later, MATSONIA, 1938-1948. When William P. Roth decided to stimulate tourism to Hawaii, the construction of the Malolo, a specially designed liner, was central to the success of his strategy. The Malolo was the first luxury liner in the Hawaiian trade and surpassed anything previously seen in the islands. With a speed of twenty-one knots and accommodations for over 650 first-class passengers (no second or third class), the plush ship catered to the crime of the tourist trade. The long vessel (582 feet) allowed space for many ample lounges and other social areas, including a Pompeian Etruscan swimming pool. When on land, the tourists stayed in the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, also built by Matson. The Malolo was a tremendous success and convinced Roth to order three more vessels, the Mariposa, Monterey, and the Lurline. However, the Malolo confirmed that the tourist trade to Hawaii was seasonal, with peak periods in winter and late summer, but for the rest of the year Matson had to find employment for the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Malwa
The "Malwa" was built in 1908 by Caird & Co, Greenock for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co (P&O Line). She was a 10,883 gross ton ship, length 562ft x beam 61.2ft x depth 24.6ft, two funnels, two masts and twin screw. There was passenger accommodation for 407-1st class and 200-2nd class. Launched on October 10th 1908, she sailed from Tilbury on her maiden voyage for Columbo, Melbourne and Sydney on January 29th 1909. In 1910 she was in collision with the British steamer "Nairn" off Columbo, and in 1917 was requisitioned for use as a troopship. She resumed the Australia service on September 24th 1920 and continued on this route until December 16th 1932 when she was sold for breaking up in Japan. [Merchant Fleets, vol.1, P&O, Orient & Blue Anchor Lines by Duncan Haws] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 June 1998]
Manhattan (whaler)
On April 1, 1845, the American whaler Manhattan (Captain Mercator Cooper), when in the northern islands of Japan looking for whales, sighted eleven stranded Japanese seamen on a barren island. After picking up these men, the ship started for Yedo to repatriate them. While still at sea, Captain Cooper found ten more men from a wrecked junk which he also took on board. just as Manhattan neared Yedo Bay she stopped to pick up two more. When Manhattan entered Yedo Bay, it was agreed that two of the waifs would be quietly put ashore and these two would proceed to tell the coast guards not to fire on the foreign ship as the mission was merely to return cast-aways. In time, the officers of the local area, having intercepted the two landed waifs and heard their stories, asked Yedo for decision on allowing the Manhattan to proceed with the repatriations. All this was very strange and against the edict and caused arguments in high places as to what to do. Eventually a delegation was dispatched to the ship, along with a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Manuel Calvo
The MANUEL CALVO was built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co., Walker-on-Tyne (engines: Hawthorn, Leslie & Co., Newcastle), and launched on 19 October 1891 as the LUCANIA, for MacIver. She never sailed for MacIver, and in 1892 was purchased by Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd) and renamed H.H. MEIER, after the founder of the line. 5,140 tons; 128,31 x 14,63 meters (421 x 40 feet; length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; steel construction, twin-screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 75 1st-, 300 2nd-, and 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 27 December 1892, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York (46 1st-class, 259 2nd-class passengers). 20 July 1893, first voyage, Bremen-New York-Baltimore. 23 March 1894-26 July 1895, 5 roundtrip voyages, Bremen-South America. 21 September 1901, last voyage, Bremen-New York. 1901, acquired by Compania Transatlantica Espanola and renamed MANUEL CALVO; 5,617 tons; accommodation for 84 1st-, 32 2nd-, and 1,100 third-class passengers. 21 March 1902, first voyage, Genoa-Barcelona-Cadiz-New York-Havana-Vera Cruz. 10 October 1917, sailed Barcelona-Buenos Aires (may have made other South American voyages). 29 March 1919, damaged by mine off Turkish coast when repatriating 400 foreigners (151 lost). May 1931, last voyage, Barcelona-Cadiz-New York-Havana. 1936, laid up at Port Mahon, Minorca. October 1939, sailed for Cadiz; rebuilt as cargo steamer, and placed in service to New York. 1950, laid up at Santander. 1952, became DRAGO (Spanish). December 1959, scrapped in Spain [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 523 and 556-557; vol. 3 (1979), pp. 1248, 1250, 1252, 1256; Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An illustrated history of the passenger lines and liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, 1983), p. 323.] Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 187, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
Marechal Foch (three
masted schooner) - Reg. Tahiti Employed as a re-supply ship from Tahiti warehouses to mother ships on Rum Row. Reported capacity 15,000 cases Formerly Zane Grey's yacht Fisherman when the author was fishing in Tahitian waters; See Zane Grey, Tales of Tabitian Waters, Harper Press, New York, 1931. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marechal Gallieni
See CASSEL.
Citation:
Marine Challenger (tug)
Another complete renovation of an older tug was that of the 149-foot former Army steam-powered LT Marine Challenger, which was rebuilt into a virtually new vessel at Marine Power & Equipment Co., Seattle, for its subsidiary Marine Leasing Corp. She is now powered by GM diesels which deliver 5,040 horsepower to twin 115-inch Coolidge propellers, providing a light running speed of 16 knots and a 24,000-mile cruising range at 14 knots. Marine Leasing was formed as a bareboat leasing company, but had recently entered the general towing business as well, operating a fleet of nine tugs of from 400 to over 5,000 horsepower, and nine barges. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.189.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Markland (sealer)
The Markland was sold at auction to a Vancouver group which converted her to a gasoline fishing schooner, and the Pescawha and Emma H. to the Canadian Fishing Co. for the same purpose. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marsala
The "Marsala" was built by A.Stephen & Son, Glasgow in 1882 for Sloman of Hamburg. She was a 2,397 gross ton ship, length 320.2ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3/5/1882, she was used on the Australia service until 1886 when the Union Line was formed and she commenced sailing for this new company. She started her first voyage from Hamburg for New York on 2/9/1886 and continued on this service until her last voyage commenced on 7/10/1897. In 1911 she was sold to Italian owners and on 2/7/1913 was sunk in collision with the Italian vessel "Campidano" off Gianutis. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1166]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 November 1997]
Marshall (us Destroyer)
USS Marshall wrote history in two oceans, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 10, 1964. Destroyer on tideflats, The Tacoma News Tribune. April 7, 1968. Destroyer's repairs still under study, The Tacoma News Tribune. February 11, 1969. Roland Lund, Fire damaged ship skipper in quandry, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 2, 1969, p. B-11. Change of command, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 16, 1969, p. A-2. USS Marshall to be repaired and replaced, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 17, 1969, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marshall Clark (carrier)
The 78,900 gross ton Liberian flag bulk carrier Marshall Clark, 820 x 130 feet, with a loaded draft of 41 feet, set a new size record for the Port of Longview in April, loading 20,000 tons of wheat for Pakistan there and an additional 55,000 tons at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXVII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marvale
See CORSICAN. <>
Citation:
Mauna Ala (freighter)
December 10, 1941 Freighter, 6256 tons, 420'in length, owned by Matson Lines. Ordered to return due to the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the vessel ran aground on Clatsop just south of the old Peter Iredale. She was loaded with all kinds of Christmas goodies for the Hawaiian Islanders. The ship was a total loss, but is still fondly remembered by those people of Warrenton and surrounding communities who enjoved her cargo of turkey, chicken, butter and other good things including Christmas trees washed in from her wreck. Had the Mauna Ala not wrecked on Oregon shores, she no doubt would have fallen prey to Captain Megii Tagami's submarine I 25. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mauna Ala (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 55, 88, 163, 174. 6265 ton vessel stranded off Clatsop Beach on December 10, 1941, Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mauna Ala (freighter)
An indirect war loss of this early period was the Matson freighter Mauna Ala, which was enroute to Honolulu on December 7 with a cargo which included 30,000 Christmas trees and a number of new automobiles. Ordered by radio to turn back to the nearest United States port, she approached the mouth of the Columbia River on the night of December 10 just as all navigation lights were blacked out and all radio beacons silenced. The confused officers of the freighter picked up a partial blinker signal from an unidentified passing vessel which was interpreted as a message to halt, and speed was reduced to dead slow for a time, but as no further directions were received, regular speed was ordered resumed in the expectation of sighting the Columbia lightship momentarily. Shortly thereafter the Mauna Ala drove through the light surf and grounded 700 feet from shore on Clatsop Spit near where the bones of the bark Peter Iredale had been rusting for many years. Unlike the Iredale, the Mauna Ala disappeared under the shifti
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mauna Ala (steamer)
American steamship, 6,265 tons, stranded during the coastal blackout off Clatsop Beach, December 10, 1941. All hands were saved. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mihalios Xilos (freighter)
The Greek freighter Mihalios Xilos ran into difficulties while moving to the Zidell Explorations dock on the Willamette River at Portland in May. The vessel, with river pilot Capt. Kenneth G. Raabe aboard and assisted by a towboat, went out of control and rammed the Burnside Street Bridge, inflicting damages to her hull and the bridge superstructure. When the anchors were dropped to bring her under control, they caught and severed the underwater telephone cables of Pacific Northwest Bell. Considerable litigation followed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.149.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mission Canal (scow Schooner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mizar (u.s. Naval Vessel)
White Navy ship that visits Pier 36 almost too secret to talk about, The Seattle P.I. October 1, 1986. Vessel publically described as an oceanographic research ship, but mission in northwest is highly classified.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Montcalm
The "Montcalm" was the third ship with that name and was owned by Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd. She was built in 1920 by John Brown & Co, Glasgow and was a 16,418 gross ton ship, length 549.5ft x beam 70.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 542-cabin class and 1,268-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3/7/1920, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John NB on 17/1/1922 and rescued the crew of the Norwegian steamer "Mod" during this crossing. On 21/4/1922 she commenced her first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage and in 1927 was converted to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. On 3/7/1927 she collided with an iceberg in the Belle Isle Straits but received only superficial damage. She commenced her first Southampton - Cherbourg - St John NB voyage on 16/3/1929 and her first Antwerp - Southampton - Cherbourg - St John NB voyage on 12/4/1929. On 14/5/1929 she started her first Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec - Montreal crossing and commenced the last voyage on this service on 28/4/1932 (15 round voyages). On 31/1/1930 she resumed Liverpool - Canada voyages (10 round voyages) and between 1932 - 1939 made 48 pleasure cruises as well as North Atlantic crossings from Antwerp, Southampton or Liverpool. On 12/3/1932 she rescued 27 men and the captain's dog from the rescue tug "Reindeer" in heavy seas off Halifax. In April 1939 she was converted to cabin and 3rd class only and commenced her last voyage from Southampton to Cherbourg and St John NB on 8/4/1939 (163 N.Atlantic crossings) On 17/10/1939 she was requisitioned and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser, renamed HMS Wolfe and one one occasion received two direct hits during a bombing raid. One bomb hit a ventilator and rebounded into the sea and the second one failed to explode and was hove over the side. In January 1942 she sailed to Canada and then Baltimore for conversion to a submarine depot ship, but on 22/5/1942 she was sold to the British Admiralty and in January 1943 converted to a destroyer depot ship. Laid up in 1950, she was towed to the Clyde in 1952 and scrapped at Faslane. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1316] [Canadian Pacific 100 Years by George Musk] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 February 1998]
Montreal
The first "Montreal" was built by C.S.Swan & Hunter, Wallsend-on-Tyne (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co Ltd) in 1900. She was a 6,870 gross ton ship, length 469.5ft x beam 56.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. She was launched on 28/4/1900 for Elder Dempster's Beaver Line and sailed from the Tyne on her maiden voyage to Montreal and London on 4/7/1900. She then left London on 26/8/1900 on a single round voyage to Montreal before being transferred as a troopship between New Orleans and Cape Town for the Boer War for 7 voyages. In 1903 she was purchased by Canadian Pacific, together with the rest of Elder Dempster's Canadian assets. She was rebuilt to 8,644 gross tons and with accommodation for 1,000-3rd class passengers in 1904, and in April of that year, made her first London - Antwerp - Quebec - Montreal voyage. In August 1914 at the outbreak of the Great War, she was at Antwerp undergoing engine repairs, together with the "Montrose" which was waiting to bunker. The "Montreal" transferred her coal bunkers to the "Montrose", which then towed her, together with a large number of refugees to Gravesend. On 1/4/1915 she was requisitioned as a troopship, and on 29/1/1918 was in collision with the White Star Liner "Cedric". She was taken in tow, but on 30/1/1918 she sank 14 miles from the Bar Lightship, Liverpool with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1306-7] [Canadian Pacific-100 Years by George Musk] -
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 March 1998]
Montroyal
See EMPRESS OF BRITAIN.
Citation:
Mount Royal (steamer)
The stern-wheel steamer Mount Royal, a boat of very shallow draft, but with the most luxurious accommodations yet seen on that route, was placed in Skeena River service by the Hudson's Bay Co., competing with the Hazelton of Cunningham & Sons. The bitter rivalry between Capt. Johnson of the Mount Royal and Capt. Bonser of the Hazelton was both nerve wracking and expensive, and led the Hudson's Bay Company to subsidize Cunningham to take his steamer off the run and alter to purchase it. Captain Bonser moved to the upper Frazer steamers Chilco and Chilcotin. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 81-82.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mount Royal (steamer)
The stern-wheel steamer Mount Royal, Capt. Stuart B. Johnson, built by the Victoria Machinery Depot in 1902, struck a rock while operating on the Skeena River in June. The accident, the only major disaster to befall a steamer in the dangerous Skeena River, occurred in the fast water of Kitselas Canyon and although she held fast for a time, the swirling currents wrenched her from the ledge and she broke in two and capsized. Among the six who lost their lives was the 21 -year- old purser, James O'Keefe of Victoria, son of Capt. Michael O'Keefe, who came West from Newfoundland in the 1880's to engage in sealing from Victoria and who died at that port in 1899. (Purser O'Keefe was an uncle of J. K. Nesbitt of Victoria, a member of the Editorial Board of Review for the Marine History. ) The 30-ton river steamer Welcome of 1902 stranded on the Coquille River near Myrtle Point, but without loss of life. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 137.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Napa Valley
The Napa Valley was transferred to Puget Sound. She was a steel single-ender of 2,189 tons and dimensions of 231.2 x 62.5 x 15.3, built by the Union Iron Works for the Monticello Steamship Co. in 1910. Her four-cylinder triple-expansion engine(25,41, 48, 48 x 24), built by the United Engineering Co., developed 2,600 horsepower, and gave her a speed of 21 miles an hour. In 1922 she was converted, with the City of Sacramento, to an automobile ferry, the two vessels passing to the Golden Gate Ferries with the purchase of the Monticello Steamship Co. in 1927. She was renamed Malahat in Puget Sound service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 491.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Narwhal (bark)
The Narwhal, a bark of 523 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1883 by Dickie Bros. for J. N. Knowles and Millen Griffith of that port as an auxiliary steam whaler, and was transferred to the Pacific Steam Whaling Co. when the corporation was organized a few months later. Her last Arctic whaling voyage ended in 1908, and she was then laid up. ln 1916 the Narwhal was built by L. A. Pedersen, who removed the engine and operated her off shore in the lumber and copra trade, she having a lumber capacity of 450 M feet. In 1923, after a year's lay-up, she was sold by Pedersen's widow to the Mutual Trading Co., a cooperative venture of artists, writers, and amateur sailors, who made a voyage in her to Australia and return, via Samoa, New Caledonia, and Nukahiva. In 1925 she was sold to a moving picture company and few years later was taken to San Diego, where she was beached in the south end of the bay and was eventually burnt about 1934. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 5,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Narwhal (bark)
Auxiliary steam whaling bark at San Francisco, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Narwhal (bark)
The Narwhal, a bark of 523 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1883 by Dickie Bros. for J. N. Knowles and Millen Griffith of that port as an auxiliary steam whaler, and was transferred to the Pacific Steam Whaling Co. when the corporation was organized a few months later. Her last Arctic whaling voyage ended in 1908, and she was then laid up. ln 1916 the Narwhal was built by L. A. Pedersen, who removed the engine and operated her off shore in the lumber and copra trade, she having a lumber capacity of 450 M feet. In 1923, after a year's lay-up, she was sold by Pedersen's widow to the Mutual Trading Co., a cooperative venture of artists, writers, and amateur sailors, who made a voyage in her to Australia and return, via Samoa, New Caledonia, and Nukahiva. In 1925 she was sold to a moving picture company and few years later was taken to San Diego, where she was beached in the south end of the bay and was eventually burnt about 1934. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 5,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Narwhal (bark)
The old whaling bark Narwhal was sold to San Francisco shipbreakers for $ 1,100 and reduced to a fishing barge at Santa Barbara. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966,p. 357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Natale
See MANITOU.
Citation:
National Defender
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ned Beal
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nedlloyd Baltimore (cargo Vessel)
Nedlloyd Baltimore made first visit to the Port of Tacoma in August, will began regular visits, The Marine Digest. August 27, 1988, p. 27.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Neptun (halibut Boat)
Illustrating what Tacoma can do in the way of building engines and boats, is shown in the performance of the halibut fisherman Neptun, owried by Messrs. Anderson & Oleson, and just in commission at Tacoma. The Neptun is 36 feet long by 11 beam, and put up somewhat on the double-ender order. She is also very deep. The power is a Hallin heavy-duty two-cylinder four-cycle 10 horse-power engine; the wheel is a 26-inch. On the trial trip of the Neptun she made a trifle better than eight miles an hour over the Tacoma Yacht Club course. This certainly shows that the Hallin engine is there with the bore, stroke, power and kick. The owners of the machine are greatly pleased with the way it works and are willing to back it against any machine made. (Western Yacht and Launchman, II (February 15, 1911), p. 35-36.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
New Australia
See MONARCH OF BERMUDA.
Citation:
New Caledonia (sidewheeler)
A little sidewheeler called the New Caledonia appeared at Victoria in the fall, but was too small and too slow to amount to much, her only claim to distinction being that she was afterward the victim of two boiler explosions. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.74-5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightengale (minesweeper)
Hit a Columbia bar buoy and sank December 26, 1941. Raised and sold as surplus. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale
The Nightingale, which was the flagship, was designed by the United States naval constructor at Charlestown, Mass., as a model of American marine architecture. She registered 722 tons, and was built at Portsmouth, N. H., for exhibition at the World's Fair in London; but before completion a difficulty arose between the contractors and the men who backed the project, and the vessel was sold at auction to a Boston firm, and, after sailing around the world for several years in legitimate business, she turned up as a slaver and made fortunes for her owners before she was finally seized off the coast of Africa by the Jamestown, with nine hundred slaves aboard. She was condemned and bought by the United States Navy Department, and after the capture of New Orleans was stationed as a guard and store ship at the mouth of the Mississippi River for eighteen months. She was also in use at Pensacola and other points on the Gulf, and when the war closed was purchased for a song by a Boston house and subsequently passed into
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale (clipper Ship)
Yankee clipper ship, Currier and Ives drawing. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 30.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale (minesweeper)
December 26, 1941 Minesweeper. She struck a buoy and sank at the mouth of the Columbia, later raised. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale (minesweeper)
(AMc 18) U. S. Navy minesweeper, 225 tons, sank after colliding with Columbia bar buoy No. 11, December 26, 1941. After she struck the buoy she was ran for the jetty sands to prevent her sinking in deep water. A big hole had been knocked in her side however and before the sands could be reached she sank. The CG-402 removed 9 men and the CG4315 rescued the remaining 7. There were no casualties. Only the tips of the Nightingale's masts remained above the water. Several weeks later, Capt. Loring Hyde, salvage master, raised the AMc type minesweeper, and the wreck was sold as surplus and rebuilt at Astoria. Cause of the disaster was listed as unknown. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Niqually (barge)
The 2,500-ton steel barge Nisqually (originally the intercoastal steamer Suremico, converted to a barge following collision with the French steamer Arkansas in 1927), was sold by the Pioneer Sand & Gravel Co. of Seattle to the Hubble Towing Co. of Aberdeen for use as a log carrier between the Oregon coast and Grays Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 455.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Niqually (barge)
The 2,500-ton steel barge Nisqually (originally the intercoastal steamer Suremico, converted to a barge following collision with the French steamer Arkansas in 1927), was sold by the Pioneer Sand & Gravel Co. of Seattle to the Hubble Towing Co. of Aberdeen for use as a log carrier between the Oregon coast and Grays Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 455.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (barge)
American barge, 1,251 tons, stranded on Clatsop Spit after breaking loose from the tug Tyee off the mouth of the Columbia, on March 26, 1938. The steel barge went ashore with 600,000 feet of peeler logs. The surf washed the deckload off the barge. Several weeks later salvage efforts proved successful and the craft was refloated. The barge, owned by Allman-Hubble Towing Company of Aberdeen, was the former steamship Suremico, built at Newark, New jersey, in 1920. On June 3, 1927, she had collided with the French freighter Arkansas off Cape Flattery, Washington, and was so badly damaged that she was reduced to the role of a barge. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (barge)
Stranded on Clatsop Spit on March 26, 1938. Refloated. Had previously been steamer Suremico which was built at Neward in 1920. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 176.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (brig)
March 26, 1938 Brig. Lost at Clatsop Spit, in the old channel. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (ferry)
Steel electric ferries being modernized by Tacoma Boatbuilding, The Marine Digest. June 23, 1984, p. 18.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (freighter)
Built at Dockton in 1911. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212. Tacoma freighter will go into San Francisco Bay service, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. December 28, 1919, p. B-6 (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (steamer)
One of the fine steamer launches of last month wag that of the Nisqually, the new steamer of the Tacoma Olympia Navigation Company, which was sent overboard from the builders' ways at Dockton. The steamer was christened by Miss Lavita Wilson, daughter of Captain Fred Wilson, of the company. General Manager Fred Marvin, of the Tacoma-Olympia Navigation Company, sent out a great many invitations to patrons of the line, at Olympia, Tacoma and Shelton, and they came down on the Magnolia, Grayhound and Sol Simpson to watch the launch. The Nisqually, which will be one of the finest and fastest of the Sound steamers, is 140 feet long by 22 feet beam, and powered with a triple expansion engine built by the Phoenix Engine Company of Tacoma. The boilers are the Taylor type. The furnishings of the boat are to be excellent. The Nisqually will be out within a few weeks, when she will be placed on the Tacoma-Olympia route and make three trips each day. At present the Olympia schedule is being covered by the Greyhound and V
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (steamer)
The handsome little two-stacker Nisqually, designed and built only seven years earlier for the Tacoma -Olympia route, was taken from the run in 1918, leaving only the small propeller steamer Magnolia in service, and even she was removed soon after the end of the war. The Nisqually renamed Astorian was taken to the Columbia River by Capt. Fred Willson, her master antiformer manager of the Olympia- Tacoma Navigation Co., where she was placed on the Portland-Astoria route in opposition to the propeller Georgiana of the Harkins Transportation Company. The grand lower river packets had already vanished from the scene . . . the R. P, Thompson dismantled in 1904, the mighty Telephone sold in 1909 for San Francisco Bay ferry service, and the ornate side-wheeler T J. Potter condemned and laid up in 1916. The little propeller steamers virtually had the historic route to themselves and they performed in the tradition of the halcyon steamboat days, leaving Portland on identical schedules and usually racing all the way to
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nisqually (steamer)
A handsome new two-funnel propeller steamer, the Nisqually, was constructed by John Martinolich at Dockton for the Olympia & Tacoma Navigation Company replacing the famous old stern-wheeler Greyhound, which was relegated to extra boat service. Capt. Fred Willson, manager of the Olympia & Tacoma company took command of the new steamer on her trial run between Tacoma and Seattle on June 21, 1911, during which she passed the steamer Indianapolis. Capt. Johnnie Jones took command of the Greyhound, while Capt. Volney C. F. Young was first officer on the Nisqually. The new steamer was of wooden construction, registering 255 tons with dimensions of 127 x 24.5 x 7.8 feet. She was fitted with a triple expansion engine of 1,000 horsepower and Taylor water tube boilers. Although a fast and handsome little steamer, she was plagued with a long series of mechanical breakdowns and her career on the Sound was not a profitable one. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Occidental
Built at Bath, Maine, in 1874, BPSR, p. 79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Occidental (schooner)
This three masted schooner of 209 tons was built at Fairhaven, California in 1844 by Bendixsen for the McKay Lumber Company of Eureka and was still afloat in 1900.. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. July 19, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Occidental (schooner)
This three masted schooner of 209 tons was built at Fairhaven, California in 1844 by Bendixsen for the McKay Lumber Company of Eureka and was still afloat in 1900.. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. July 19, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oglala (minesweeper)
Augmenting the regular operations of the U. S. Coast & Geodetic Survey fleet in the North Pacific, six minesweepers were dispatched by the Navy in the spring of 1934 to begin an extensive charting expedition in the Aleutian Islands. The fleet consisted of the Oglala, Kingfisher, Quail, Gannet, Swallow and Tanager. The flotilla was in command of Rear Adm. Sinclair Gannon aboard the flagship Oglala. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: :Superior, 1966,, p. 428.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Okalhoma (battleship)
Tug A most dramatic sinking in mid -Pacific occurred on the early morning of May 17, the Puget Sound Tug & Barge Co. tugs Monarch and Hercules escaping disaster by a narrow margin. The two ocean tugs, in charge of Captains George 0. Anderson and Kelly Sprague respectively, were engaged in towing the war-damaged battleship Oklahoma from Pearl Harbor for scrapping at Oakland, California. The battleship developed a heavy list when 535 miles out and the tugs put back for Honolulu. Fortunately the two tug masters had the foresight to have the towing cable ends unshackled. An hour after the change of course, the Oklahoma suddenly keeled over and sank, dragging the two tugs backward at the end of 1,400 feet of towline at such a velocity that their engines were stopped and they were estimated to be making sternway at the rate of 15 to 30 knots. The towlines reached their bitter ends before the bulk of the sinking battleship dragged the two tugs under with her, thus preventing what might well have been another myste
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Olalla (launch)
The gasoline launch Olalla, well known on the Sound, and for some time in passenger service to West Seattle and Alki Beach, blew up at Olalla in September, her owner, William Westerman, being severely burned. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Opal
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 228.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Opal (yacht)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 94-95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oral Elwell
Built in Sedro Wolley in 1925. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oriental Falcon
See INDIA VICTORY.
Citation:
Oriental Mariner (container Ship)
On June 5 the 544-foot Orient Overseas Line container ship Oriental Mariner and the 564-foot Liberian flag log carrier Wayway collided in a heavy fog at almost the same location. The Oriental Mariner was outbound from Vancouver, B.C. en route to the Columbia River, while the Wayway was inbound for Tacoma, and were on a head-on collision course at a distance of about 10 miles when they picked each other up on radar. Although both took evasive action, they made similar course changes and were still on collision course when visual contact was made at a distance of less than half a mile. Coast Guard helicopters, the 82-foot cutter Point Countess and a 44-foot motor lifeboat were dispatched from Port Angeles and Neah Bay, while the Canadian cutter Racer minesweeper Chignetco and the tugs Martha and Myrtle Foss also provided assistance. A large section of the Oriental Mariner's bow, above and below the waterline, was gouged out by the collision, while the Wayway's hull as opened up the length of the number 4 hold o
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oriental Monarch (freighter)
Very heavy December storms accounted for a number of losses, including that of the 10,051-ton freighter Oriental Monarch, another of the seemingly vulnerable fleet of aging flag of convenience tramps, which sank some 520 miles northwest of Vancouver Island in the early morning hours of December 19 with the loss of all 40 persons on board.* The vessel had left Vancouver, Washington, with a cargo of wheat for Japan three days before her final distress call was picked up. The Seattle-based Coast Guard cutter Boutwell responded, reporting winds gusting to 50 miles an hour, 30-foot seas and visibility of only about 100 yards, and that only four empty lifeboats had been found. Search vessels and planes later picked up 31 bodies in the vicinity of the sinking, which it was theorized may have been caused by the seas sweeping over the vessel and flooding her engine room through the ventilators. *The Oriental Monarch, registered in Liberia and carrying a Taiwanese crew, was built at Tokyo in 1956 as Andros Star of Gi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ormiidale (motorship)
The arrival of the motorship Ormidale at Seattle in September established regular service between Northwest ports and Houston, Texas, the Pacific-Carribean-Gulf Line operating six vessels in 20day service on this route. Instituting still another new intercoastal service, by the United American Lines and Houlder, Weir & Boyd, the steamship Sudbury sailed September 13 for Pacific Coast ports. Weekly sailings were provided thereafter by a fleet of 12 vessels, with passengers being carried on several of this fleet. Westbound vessels departed New York and Baltimore for Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle and Tacoma. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 334.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ouingondy (scallop Vessel)
An interesting conversion at Seattle involved the rebuilding of two East Coast type scallop vessels to king crabbers at the Marco yard. In addition to new masts and booms, the Ouingondy and Smaragd were fitted with complete hydraulically-powered Marco fishing system and deck machinery. The two boats, owned by Alaskan Scallop Fleet, Inc. of Seward, had fished for scallops in the North Pacific for 18 months before being refitted for the more lucrative crab fishery. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
P. J. Alber (schooner)
The trading schooner P. J. Abler, under charter to Shields & Knaflich, was destroyed by fire at Douglas Island, Alaska as the result of a lighted candle dropped in the bilge while she was undergoing engine repairs. She had been en route to the Kuskokwim River in charge of Capt. E. B. Hoffman and had put in at Juneau September 27 leaking, with part of the cargo jettisoned and the crew Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 257.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
P.caland
The "P.Caland" was a 2,540 gross ton ship, built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow in 1874 for the Holland America Line. Her details were - length 350.1ft x beam 38.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 50-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 2/5/1874, she sailed from Rotterdam on 11/7/1874 on her maiden voyage to Plymouth and New York. On 14/7/1888 she started her first Amsterdam - New York sailing and on 24/5/1890 resumed Rotterdam - Boulogne - New York voyages. She collided with, and sank the British steamer "Glamorgan" in the English Channel on 15/4/1891 and on 15/7/1891 resumed Amsterdam - New York sailings. Her last voyage on this service commenced on 10/4/1897 and later the same year she went to the Italian owned Cosulich Line and was renamed "Ressel". In 1899 she became the French owned "Caramanie" and in March 1910 was scrapped at Marseilles. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.909] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 June 1998]
Pacific Alaska Navigation Company (tacoma, Washing
Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 202. Following the annual meeting in February of the stockholders of the Alaska Coast Co., at which H. F. Alexander, formerly general manager, was elected to succeed John S. Baker as president, announcement was made of the incorporation of the Pacific Alaska Navigation Co., which was the holding company of the majority of the stock of the Alaska Coast and Alaska Pacific Steamship companies. Other officers of the new company were Chester Thorne, vice president, William Jones, treasurer, J. D. Amos, secretary, C. W. Wiley, manager. Directors were Alexander, Thorne, Jones, S. A. Perkins, M. A. Arnold, president of the First National Bank of Seattle, and R. A. C. Smith, president of the American Mail Steamship Co. of New York. With the exception of the latter two, all were residents of Tacoma. The Alaska Coast Co. was at that time operating the steamers Jeanie, Bertha and M. F. Plant, undergoing renovation as the Y
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palatia
The "Palatia" was built by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin in 1894 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a sister ship to the "Patria" and "Phoenicia" and was the first of three ships with this name owned by the company (the other two being cargo ships). Her details were - 7,326 gross tons, length 460ft x beam 52ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8/12/1894, she sailed from Hamburg on 28/4/1895 on her maiden voyage to New York. She commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to Boulogne and New York on 31/3/1902 and on 10/5/1902 commenced sailing between Genoa, Palermo, Naples and New York. Her last sailing on this service started on 26/4/1904 (10 round voyages) and she was sold to the Russian Navy later the same year and renamed "Nikolaiev". She was converted to an auxiliary cruiser and mine schoolship. In 1917 she was renamed "Norodovoletz" and on 6/6/1920, foundered at Petrograd (Leningrad, St.Petersburg). In 1925 she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.401] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 26 November 1997]
Palenstine (schooner)
Took cargo to San Francisco from Oregon. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 642.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palermo (1)
The "Palermo" of 1913 was built in 1899 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne as the "British Princess" for British Shipowners. She was a 9,203 gross ton ship, length 470ft x beam 56.8ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 70-1st and 2,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/7/1899, she sailed between Antwerp and New York for the Phoenix Line probably as a cargo vessel until, in 1906 she was purchased by Navigazione Generale Italiana, fitted with passenger accommodation and renamed "Lazio". On 21/3/1906 she sailed on her first voyage between Genoa, Palermo, Naples and New York, and commenced her last voyage on this service on 21/5/1913. She was then renamed "Palermo", and on 8/7/1913 started Genoa - Naples - Halifax - Boston voyages. On 2/12/1916 she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine near San Sebastian, Spain. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1116-7] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 April 1998]
Palermo (2)
See SAN GIOVANNI.
Citation:
Palestina (bark)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palestine
The "Palestine" was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock (engines by Robert Napier, Glasgow) in 1858 for the Cunard Line. She was a 1,800 gross ton ship, length 276ft x beam 36.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched in 1858 for the Mediterranean service, she commenced sailings between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal under charter to the Allan Line on 16/5/1860. She started her fourth and last Allan voyage between Liverpool and Portland on 8/11/1860 and commenced Cunard voyages between Liverpool and New York on 25/12/1860. On 4/4/1865 she started her first Liverpool - Halifax - New York sailing and in January 1866 made her first Liverpool - Boston - New York voyage. Her last voyage on this route was made in November 1868 (4 round voyages on the Cunard N.Atlantic service). In 1872 she was sold to W.H.Jones, Liverpool, rebuilt to 352.1ft in length, 2,867 gross tons, three masts and fitted with compound engines by J & J.Thomson, Glasgow. Chartered to the Dominion Line, she started a single round voyage from Liverpool to Boston on 27/3/1873, and then started her first of three voyages between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal on 16/5/1873, and her last on 21/8/1873. She was chartered to Warren Line and commenced Liverpool - Boston sailings on 24/6/1876. Her last voyage on this service started on 23/11/1892 and she was scrapped in 1896. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.146] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 April 1998]
Palestine
A sailing vessel of this name was reported to bave been lost south of Tatoosh Island in April 1859. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan De Fuca Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palestine
The American ship Palestine, Captain McCartney, from Tacoma for San Francisco with 2,500 tons of coal, struck on San Francisco bar, June 26th, receiving injuries which sent her to the bottom an hour later. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.394-5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pallas (brig)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., I, p. 523, 424, 467. Brosnan, p. 206, 213, 216. Cornelius Brosnan. Jason Lee, Prophet of the New Oregon, p. 206, 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pallas (steamer)
The steel Shipping Board steamship Pallas was acquired by the Alaska - Mexico Transport Co. for transporting gypsum from the Gulf of Califoria to Long Beach, Calif. and Seattle. The vessel was renamed S. A Perkins for the Tacoma business man who headed the firm and was also chairman of the board of the Standard Gypsum Co. The S. A. -Perkins was built at the Todd Plant in 1920. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palmerston
The PALMERSTON was built by John Laird, Birkenhead, as an iron screw steamer (engines by Geo Forrester & Co, Liverpool), and launched on 23 May 1853, as the CHARITY, for the African Steam Ship Company, who never took delivery; she was registered to the builder at Liverpool on 16 January 1854, and was later purchased by the Canadian Steam Navigation Co. 1,240 tons gross; 244.2 x 28.5 x 22.6 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion (120 horsepower), service speed 9 knots; accommodation for 100 in 1st and 2nd classes, steerage accommodation. 16 January 1854, maiden voyage, for the Canadian Steam Navigation Co, Liverpool-Clyde (departed 29 January) - Portland. 15 September 1854, last voyage, Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal (4 roundtrip voyages). 1854-1855, Crimean War transport. On 26 March 1859, she was purchased from the Canadian Steamship Co, [registered owner: Cropper & Co.] for 15,000 pounds sterling, by the Hamburg shipowner Robert Miles Sloman and his associates (ownership: Sloman, 3/5; Carl August Heeren, of the firm Fr. Heeren & Co, 1/5, for which he paid 40 000 marks banco; and captain Ferdinand Gottfried Herting, 1/5). Almost immediately afterwards, Sloman and his associates sold the vessel to G. Gessler, of Santander, Spain, who renamed her LA CUBANA, and placed her in the service of the Hamburg-Havana Line. On 23 March 1865, Sloman repurchased her, at auction, in Hamburg. Her engines were removed and she was converted into a 4-masted sailing bark, and renamed PALMERSTON. 556 Commerzlasten; 258' 5" x 30' 9" x 24' 2" (length x beam x depth of hold). Master: 1866-1874 - P. Kolln; 1874-? - E. H. Sutor; 1878-1884 - A. B. L. Bohmann; [1888] - A. Cordes. Voyages: 1866 - New York; 1866/67 - New York /Hartlepool; 1867 - New York/Philadelphia; 1867/68 - New York/Antwerp; 1868 - New York; 1868/69 - New York/Bremen; 1869 - New York; 1870 - New York; 1870/71 - Philadelphia; 1871 - New York; 1871/72 - New York/Charleston; 1872/74 - Otago, New Zealand/intermediate ports/Bremerhaven; 1874/84 - Philadelphia/intermediate ports/London (1881)/ intermediate ports/Valparaiso/Tocopillo, Chile; 1884/88 - Drammen, Norway/intermediate ports/Pisagua. The Sloman firm's records of her later history, in particular after 1878, are incomplete; on 9 January 1894, she was sold to Pinceti, of Genoa, and renamed FREDERICO. Her ultimate fate is not known [Return of Registered Steam Vessels of the U.K ., January 1855, Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons, 1854-55 (473) XLVI.293; January 1857, Ibid., 1857 Session 2 (87) XXXIX.61; January 1858, Ibid, 1857-58 (488) LII.83; January 1859, Ibid., 1859 Session 2 (26) XXVII.493; Hieke, op. cit, pp. 375 and 377; Kresse,op. cit., vol. 2, p. 214; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), pp 265-266]. Hieke, op.cit., opposite p. 135, contains a photograph of a half-model of the PALMERSTON.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 December 1997]
Palmetto State
See PAN AMERICA.
Citation:
Palmyra (lumber Carrier)
Palmyra, built by Goss & Sawyer at Bath, Maine in 1876 as a 1,359-ton wooden ship, operated after 1887 by Pope & Talbot in the offshore lumber trade under Capt. A. W. Keller and since 1908 by the Griffiths interests as a barge, sold to California motion picture producers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Paloma (brig)
The Paloma, a brig of 223 tons, was built by Bendixsen on Humboldt Bay, Calif., in 1875 for Tahitian owners, and was operated between San Francisco and Papeete as a packet. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.July 26, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Paloma (brig)
The Paloma, a brig of 223 tons, was built by Bendixsen on Humboldt Bay, Calif., in 1875 for Tahitian owners, and was operated between San Francisco and Papeete as a packet. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.July 26, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palomar (tugboat)
Participant in tugboat races, Olympia Harbor Days in 1984, winnter of ocean going class, The Marine Digest. September 29, 1984, p. 11+ (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palos (brig)
American brig, stranded on Leadbetter Point, at the south entrance to Shoalwater Bay, in November, 1853. The vessel was enroute to Oysterville from San Francisco, and attempted to enter the bay in a thick fog. When the crew and passengers were abandoning the ship, the captain was swept overboard and drowned. The others reached shore safely, but the vessel was pounded to pieces. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palos (brig)
American brig stranded on Leadbetter Point. Pacific Graveyard, p. 177.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palouse (launch)
The 30-foot gas launch Palouse was built at Portland for Army Engineers service on the upper Columbia and Snake Rivers.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Paralla (carrier)
In mid-January, the 653-foot Pacific-Australia Direct Line Ro-Ro carrier Paralla was struck broadside by two freak waves of monstrous proportions while running up the coast from Oakland to Tacoma. The rogue waves struck the vessel off Cape Blanco, rolling her 37 degrees to starboard and forcing the shutdown of two of her three engines. Six 20-foot containers plunged over the bulwarks and were lost, while cargo broke loose on the lower decks. Ten of her crew were injured, but superb performance of duty by both deck and engine room personnel prevented the loss of the vessel, which suffered only minor structural damage. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.149.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Parallel (schononer)
The Parallel was a two masted schooner of 148 tons was built at San Francisco in 1868 by Jacobs and was owned for many years by S.B. Peterson. On January 15, 1887 she saided from San Francisco for Portland with a cargo including fifty tons of dynamite. Finding it calm off the Heads, she began to drift toward the beach and the crew in a panic took to the boats and landed at Sausalito. The schooner struck the beach at mighnight and blew ujp wrecking the Cliff House. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.July 26, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Parallel (schononer)
The Parallel was a two masted schooner of 148 tons was built at San Francisco in 1868 by Jacobs and was owned for many years by S.B. Peterson. On January 15, 1887 she saided from San Francisco for Portland with a cargo including fifty tons of dynamite. Finding it calm off the Heads, she began to drift toward the beach and the crew in a panic took to the boats and landed at Sausalito. The schooner struck the beach at mighnight and blew ujp wrecking the Cliff House. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest.July 26, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Parallel (schooner)
The schooner Parallel, from San Francisco for Astoria with 100,000 pounds of giant powder, was blown up January 15th opposite the Golden Gate. She sailed out of San Francisco at noon, and, the wind dying out, began to drift in toward shore. Anticipating the probable result when she struck the beach, the crew hastily left the vessel and pulled lustily for the opposite shore. They landed near Sausalito and awaited the result. The schooner did not strike until nearly midnight, but the explosion was frightful, almost completely demolishing the Cliff House and breaking windows for miles around. Several persons were seriously injured by the concussion. The ship Commodore, Captain Jordan, felt the shock plainly fifteen miles off shore. A few pieces of floating wreckage were all that remained of vessel or cargo. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peldale
The "Peldale" was a 2,868 ton ship, built be W.Gray, West Hartlepool in 1943 as the "Empire Candida" for the Ministry of War Transport. In 1946 she was sold to the Zinal Steamship Co, and renamed "Burdale" in 1947. In 1948 she was bought by the 'Z' Steamship Co, Newcastle and renamed "Peldale". In 1955 she was sold to Ingvar Jansen of Bergen and renamed "Statius Jansen". This is all I have on this ship. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 April 1998]
Pennwalt (barge)
Penwalt's new barge, the Pennwalt, Marine Digest. August 14, 1982, p. 11 (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peralta (ferry)
The big steam ferry Peralta, a classic hard -luck craft on San Francisco Bay in the service of the Key System San Francisco -Oakland route, was purchased by Capt. Alexander Peabody of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. in 1933, the tug Creole bringing her up from Oakland in October. The Peralta and her sister ferry, Yerba Buena, were built by the Moore Dry Dock Co. at Oakland in 1927. Of 2,000 tons, with a length of 256 feet and beam of 68 feet, they were originally powered by Westinghouse steam turbo-electric drive developing 2,600-horsepower, with steam from four water tube boilers. They were noted as the epitome of the true double -ended ferryboat, both ends being identical down to the last fitting. To avoid confusion the legend, San Fran cisco End was painted in one pilot house and Oakland End in the other. The two ferries were fitted with large water ballast tanks at each end, the theory being to ballast the after tank as they approached their landings, thus off setting the inevitable surge of commute
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peralta (steam Ferry)
Maritime Memories, the steam ferry Peralta before convestion to the Kalakala. Built in Oakland in 1927, The Marine Digest. May 18, 1985, p. 6-7. Lake Washington Shipyard, part two, The Se Chest. (September, 1978).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Petaluma (steamer)
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific.a, p. 71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Iredale (bark)
October 25, 1906 Bark, four masts. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Iredale (bark)
British bark, 2,075 tons, stranded on Clatsop Beach, October 25, 1906, with no loss of life. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Iredale (bark)
Stranded on Clatsop Beach October 25, 1906. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 177. Stranded October 25, 2906. 1947 photo of the remains of the vessel. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 139. :The Peter Iredale, the most photographed wreck, The Marine Digest. February 11, 1984, p. 31. Wreck of the Peter Iredale, copy of the official findings, The Quarterdeck Review. (Spring, 1984), p. 4. Gordon and Rowena Alcorn, The Werck of the Peter Iredale, The Sea Chest. (December, 1985), p. 70-73. Preter Iredale on Clatsop beach, Oregon Coast. (November-December 1991), p. 23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Iredale (bark)
On October 25 the British four-masted iron bark Peter Iredale, Capt. H. Lawrence, 29 days from Salina Cruz, Mexico, for Portland, went ashore in heavy weather on Clatsop Spit about a mile and a half south of the Columbia River entrance. The captain and crew were rescued by the Point Adams lifesaving crew. The wreck later swung around broadside to the beach and after about two months she broke in two amidships, the underwriters selling her to the Pacific Iron Works of Astoria for $500. After thoroughly dismantling the hulk, which was easily reached at low tide, they sold her to R. E. Hendricks, who appears to have almost immediately sold his interest to J. A. Hoshor. Despite the efforts of the wreckers, the forward section of the hull, with bowsprit intact, has remained a picturesque landmark on the beach, a lure for tourists and the target of probably tens of thousands of cameras. xxxx, p. 126.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Iredale (bark)
As recently as the summer of 1960 the ancient remains of Peter Iredale were a subject of public controversy. Clifford Hendricks an Oregon City newspaper reporter, claimed at that time that wreck had been purchased by his father, R. E. Hendricks, from Pacific Iron Works in 1908, and that he intended to complete the w of demolition begun by his father more than a half century earlier. A great outcry arose from local chambers of commerce and other civic groups, while governmental agencies threatened Hendricks with arr if he tried to remove the wreck, the charges being delinquent rental the 54 years the Iredale's remains lay on county property, delinquent personal property taxes of 54 years, and a charge of abandoning a vehicle on a public highway, the beach being declared a public highway by Oregon State law. At last reports the ancient bones of the old British bark are still on the beach at Clatsop Spit, although the bow broke away during the winter of 1961-62, and has been preserved Columbia River Maritime M
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Polaris (halibut Schooner)
Maritime memories, the halibut schooners Polaris and the Vansee pictured under construction at a Seattle Shipyard, 1913, The Marine Digest. August 1, 1987, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Poltalloch (bark)
This British bark, 2,250 tons, stranded north of Shoalwater bar, November 26, 1900, without loss of life. She was eventually refloated. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Poltalloch (bark)
British vessel stranded north of Shoalwater Bar on November 26, 1900. Eventually was refloated. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 178. The Salvage was several months after the stranding, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 134.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Poltalloch (bark)
The British bark Poltalloch, well -known in the offshore trade from Northwest ports, was purchased at auction by Eschen & Minor, San Francisco stevedores, for $ 17,500. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 175.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Port Admiral (schooner)
The well-known San Juan Island schooner Port Admiral, carrying a full cargo of lumber and in charge of Capt. Harry Barlow, was wrecked 20 miles south of Wrangell during a blinding snowstorm on the morning of February 9. Capt. Barlow sold the wreck, which was towed to Wrangell and the cargo salvaged, and returned to Puget Sound, where he obtained the little passenger steam launch Mocking Bird and took her north for Skagway - Dyea ferry service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 42
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Port Alberni (tug)
The Port Alberni was purchased by Vancouver @g Boat Co., rebuilt with a 250-horsepower diesel, and returned to towing service as La Rose. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Premuda Rosa (tanker (italian
flag)) - Tanker delivers gasoline from People's Republic of China to U.S. Oil and Refining Co., Tacoma. Marine Digest, October 10, 1981, p. 28. (photo)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prevail (u.s. Naval Vessel)
T-AGOS submarine tracking ship. Tacoma Boatbuilding launches 8th of T-AGOS class submarine surveilance ships, The Marine Digest. December 14, 1985, p. 3+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pride Of Baltimore
Sailing schooner, replica. The Pride of Baltimore to sail into Seattle June 1 as part of a 17,000 mile tour. Constructred in 1976, replica of original Baltimore clipper, The Marine Digest. May 28, 1983, p. 11+ The Pride of Baltimore, Argus. (June 3, 1983), p. 1. The Baltimore clipper, bane of Britain in 1812 lives again, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 12, 1983. Pride of Baltimore brings glimpse of sailer era. Schooner on display at Pier 59. The Seattle Times. June 5, 1983.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pride Of Wales
According to the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register for 1865/66-1881/82, the PRIDE OF WALES was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built under special survey by Labbee, Quebec, and launched in May 1865. 906 (1866/67: 885)/898/788 tons (gross/net/under deck); 194.7 x 33 x 19.9 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold). Forecastle 35 feet long. Official number 52451; signal code HSVG. Master: 1865/66 - T. Parry; 1866/67 - Corrigall; 1867/68-1868/69 - D. Moore; 1868/69-1870/71 - Power;1870/71-1874/75 - E. Bolt; 1874/75-1876/77 - F. Richardson; 1876/77-1879/80 - R. Jones; 1879/80-1881/82 - White. Owner: 1865/66 - P. Labbee; 1865/66-1866/67 - D. Jones; 1866/67-1873/74 - Hill & Sons; 1873/74-1876/77 - A. Ramage & Co 1876/77-1881/82 - P. Sutherland, Jr., & Co.Registry: 1865/66-1866/67 - London; 1866/67-1873/74 - Cardiff; 1873/74-1881/82 - Liverpool.Port of Survey:1865/66 - Quebec; 1865/66-1866/67 - Swansea; 1866/67 - Bristol [lined out]; 1866/67-1868/69 - London; 1868/69-1870/71 - Bristol; 1870/71-1871/72 - Hartlepool; 1871/72-1873/74 - Cardiff; 1873/74-1874/75 - Bristol; 1875/76-1878/79 - London; 1879/80-1881/82 - Liverpool. Destined Voyage: 1865/66 - Swansea; 1865/66-1866/67 - New Orleans; 1866/67 - North America [lined out]; 1866/67-1868/69 - Kurrache; 1868/69-1873/74 - South America. Lloyd's Register for 1881/82 contains the annotation "burnt"; however, I am unable to determine the particulars of the fire, as the microfilm copy to which I have access of the register of maritime casualties 1881-1882 bound in the Parliamentary Papers is illegible. -
Citation: [Posted to tghe Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]
Prince Albert
The PRINCE ALBERT was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by Westervelt & Mackey, New York, in 1843, for Grinnell, Minturn & Co's Red Swallowtail Line of New York-London packets. 884 tons; 158 ft 3 in x 35 ft x 21 ft 9 in (length x beam x depth of hold). She sailed in the Red Swallowtail Line until she was abandoned at sea on 4 January 1854 (see below); her westward passages from London to New York averaged 35 days, her shortest passage being 24 days, her longest 57 days. The following is an account of the loss of the PRINCE ALBERT, taken from the New York Tribune for 1 February 1854, p. 5d: By the arrival of the steamship ASIA [Cunard Line, Capt. Scott, from Liverpool 14 January, arrived New York 31 January] we learn that the packet ship Prince Albert, Capt. [William King] Bradish, which sailed from this port December 6 [1853] for London, was fallen in with on the 4th of January [1854], in latitude 48 [degrees], longitude 15 [degrees], by the English bark Norfolk from Madras, the Prince Albert being in a disabled and almost sinking condition. The Captain of the Norfolk at once took off the passengers and crew of the Prince Albert, and on the 11th of the same month landed them safely at Queenstown, Cork, Ireland. The Prince Albert had sixteen passengers, whose names we give: Eliza Clarke, E. Fisher, Conrad Whitson, Henry Stolemeyer, Andrew Sharot, Mary Alden, John Easton, James Beattie, Abraham Brittain, Joseph Vermillier, Wm. Fills, Wm. Chippenfield, George Black, Mrs. Geo. Black, Mrs. Dennis, John Hermitage. The names of the crew we have not been able to obtain; but as they were all saved, the omission is immaterial. The Prince Albert was built in this City, nine years ago, and was at this time a splendid and favorite ship of nearly 900 tuns, elegantly fitted up for passengers. The ship was valued at about $50,000 (at the present time,) and was fully insured, mainly in New-York. The cargo on board at the time of leaving port consisted of 3,500 barrels of Flour, 12,289 bushels of Wheat, 611 tierces [a cask intermediate in size between a barrel and a hogshead] of Beef, 646 boxes of Cheese, 900 barrels of Oil Cake, 300 barrels of Resin, 10 half tierces of Tobacco, 537 bundles of Whalebone, 53 tierces of Clover Seed, 50 boxes of Clocks, besides small parcels of considerable value. We believe this property was pretty fully insured, but have not been able to learn the precise amount.The loss of the PRINCE ALBERT does not appear to have adversely affected the career of her master, who had been first mate of the vessel in the early 1840's, before taking command of the packets INDEPENDENCE (Liverpool Blue Swallowtail, later London Red Swallowtail) and YORKTOWN (London Red Swallowtail): in 1854, he took command of the London Red Swallowtail packet ASHBURTON, which he commanded until approximately 1862. He is most probably the William K. Bradish whose will was proved at Brooklyn 7 January 1868 [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 91, 282-283, 332]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 2 March 1998]
Prince Albert (freighter)
The steel freighter Prince Albert, formerly the Bruno, built at Hull in 1892, and the first vessel in the Grand Trunk Prince fleet, sold by the Canadian National Railways and operated for some time as a rum runner, after which she was converted to the steam tug J. R. Morgan. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927- 28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Albert (steamer)
In addition to the two new vessels,[Prince Rupert and Prince George] the railway company had carlier purchased two second-hand steamships in England and dispatched them to British Columbia for coastal service under the Prince designation. The first of these was the Bruno, an 841-ton steel vessel built at Hull in 1892 for the Hull-Antwerp passenger and freight service. Purchased at Hull from the Wilson Line, she was in service on the B. C. coast early in 1910 as the first of the Prince steamers, being renamed Prince Albert. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 172.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Albert (steamship)
Length, 232 feet beam 30 ft.(?) Built 1892,Hull, England Reg. No. 99584 Engine: One 3-cylindersteam engine. Owners: Pan American Shipping Co., 1206 Homer St., Vancouver, 1928; Atlantic and Pacific Navigation Co., 1930. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Alfred (steamer)
One of the most valuable among those making their last port was the old steamship Prince Alfred, which Rosenfeld & Bermingham had been operating as a mail steamer on the Victoria route. She came to grief in Potato Cove, near the Golden Gate, during a dense fog, June 14th. She struck on Duxbury Reef and slid off with a large hole in her bottom; and, although all of her pumps were started, there were three feet of water in the engine-room within twenty-eight minutes, and as rapidly as possible she was run for the shore, striking among the rocks in the cove about three hundred yards from the beach, where she soon went to pieces. The passengers, crew and mail were landed in safety, but the wreck was so complete that it only brought $350. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.220.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Alfred (steamer)
The mail contract between Victoria and San Francisco was in the hands of Rosenfeld & Bermingham, who received a subsidy of $5,000 per month for two round trips, and performed the service with the steamship Prince Alfred, which was so small and slow that it frequently required seven or eight days to make the voyage. She was a British vessel, built in 1865 for the Australian trade. The company owning her failed, and the steamer was registered under the New Grenadan flag and ran for a short time on the Panama route, going to San Francisco in 1870, where she was purchased by Rosenfeld & Bermingham for $12,800. She was two hundred and twenty-five feet long, thirty-one feet beam, and had but twenty staterooms. Early in 1872 she was quarantined at Victoria for nearly two months, but after getting clear continued in the mail service until June, 1874, when she was wrecked (see wreck of Prince Alfred, 1874). Captain Sholl was master of the steamer nearly all the time she was on the northern route, and D. A. McDermott w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Alfred (steamer)
The mail contract between Victoria and San Francisco was in the hands of Rosenfeld & Bermingham, who received a subsidy of $5,000 per month for two round trips, and performed the service with the steamship Prince Alfred, which was so small and slow that it frequently required seven or eight days to make the voyage. She was a British vessel, built in 1865 for the Australian trade. The company owning her failed, and the steamer was registered under the New Grenadan flag and ran for a short time on the Panama route, going to San Francisco in 1870, where she was purchased by Rosenfeld & Bermingham for $12,800. She was two hundred and twenty-five feet long, thirty-one feet beam, and had but twenty staterooms. Early in 1872 she was quarantined at Victoria for nearly two months, but after getting clear continued in the mail service until June, 1874, when she was wrecked (see wreck of Prince Alfred, 1874). Captain Sholl was master of the steamer nearly all the time she was on the northern route, and D. A. McDermott w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Of Wales
At Nootka Sound. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 40,42. C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., viii, xiii, xv, 104. Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast., p. 99, 109,111-113, 142. Aurel Krause. Tlingit Indians. American Ethnological Society., p. 22
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Of Wales
See ROCKLAND.
Citation:
Prince Of Wales (passenger Vessel)
Hailed as the biggest 65-footer ever built on the Pacific Coast, the motor passenger vessel Prince of Wales was built by James Hall at Winslow for W. J. Neil of Wrangell. For ferry service between Wrangell and Juneau, via the west coast of Prince of Wales Island, the vessel was designed by L. H. Coolidge to come within the motorboat specifications of the government, yet of sufficient capacity to provide berths for 32 passengers, carry 50 tons of cargo and all the lifesaving gear required for passenger-carrying vessels under the stringent new government regulations, which included two 800-pound lifeboats and two 1,100-pound life rafts. With a 17.6-foot beam, a length between perpendiculars of 58.5 feet and an overall length of just under 65 feet, she was registered at 98 tons. Eastern Standard reversible gasoline engines of 110-horsepower gave her a service speed of 12 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Of Wales (steamer)
In the Victoria district half a dozen new steamers were built, among them the Prince of Wales, a good-sized craft, intended for Lilloet Lake. The Prince was a sternwheeler, one hundred and fifteen feet long and twenty feet beam, with engines fourteen by fifty-four inches. Capt. Hugh Stalker of Moodyville was with her during the first three years. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.120.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince Of Wales (steamer)
In British Columbia the lake steamer Prince of Wales was dismantled to furnish power for the new Victoria, under construction at Quesnelmouth to run between that place and Big Bar on the upper Fraser. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princesa Real (sloop)
Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Indians of the Pacific Northwest, p. 4. Former Princess Royal. Went to take possession of Nootka for the Spanish. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., I, p. 125. Spanish Vessel commaned by Manuel Quimper in 1790. Robert B.Whitebrook. Coastal Exploration of Washington., p. 123. Robert Whitebrook. Coastal exploration of Washington, p. 123. Henry R. Wagner. Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan De Fuca, p. 11, 15, 82, 132, 181. Jean B. Bolduc. Mission of the Columbia, p. 136.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Alice
PRINCESS ALICE. Built in 1900, for the Hamburg-American Line by Vulkan of Stettin. 10,911 tons; 159,55 meters (522 feet) long x 18,32 meters (60.1 feet) broad; 2 funnels, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion, service speed 15 knots; passenger accommodation: 255 1st-, 115 2nd-, and 1,666 3rd-class passengers). Planned as BORUSSIA, later TEUTONIA. 14 September 1900, launched as KIAUTSCHOU for the Hamburg-American Line. 25 December 1900, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Far East. Remained on this service, except for 2 May 1902, single round-trip voyage Hamburg-Southampton- Cherbourg-New York, 1904, became PRINCESS ALICE (Norddeutscher Lloyd). 22 March 1904, first voyage, Bremen-New York. 30 July 1904, last voyage, Bremen-New York (5 round-trip voyages). 31 August 1904 first voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Far East. 1905-1914, mainly Far East service. 9 May 1905, resumed Bremen-Cherbourg-New York. 14 May 1910, last voyage, Bremen-New York (11 round-trip voyages). 25 June 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Far East. August 1914, sheltered at Cebu, Philippine Islands. April 1917, seized by the U.S.: PRINCESS MATOIKA (U.S. Government). 20 January 1921, first voyage for U.S. Mail (chartered), New York-Naples-Genoa (10,421 tons; 350 cabin-, and 500 3rd-class passengers). 17 May 1921, last voyage, New York-Bremen (2 round-trip voyages). 15 September 1921, first voyage, New York-Bremen (U.S. Lines). 6 February 1922, last voyage, New York-Queenstown-Bremen-Danzig (4 round-trip voyages); renamed PRESIDENT ATHUR. 27 May 1922, first voyage, New York-Queenstown-Bremen. 18 October 1923, last voyage, Bremen-Southampton- Cherbourg-New York (11 round-trip voyages). 1925, PRESIDENT ARTHUR (American Palestine). 12 March 1925, first voyage, New York-Naples-Haifa (departed 17 April)-Naples-Halifax-New York. 19 September 1925, last voyage, New York- Naples-Haifa-Naples-Halifax-New York (3 round-trip voyages). 1925, CITY OF HONOLULU (Los Angeles Steamship Co.), 25 May 1930, damaged by fire at Honolulu; returned to Los Angeles; laid up. 1933, scrapped in Japan [Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway, vol. 2 (1978), pp. 566-567]. Pictured in Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors, p. 268, courtesy of the Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 See also 1. Arnold Kludas, Great Passenger Ships of the World, pp. 28-29 [photographs as KIAUTSCHOU and CITY OF HONOLULU]. 2. Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979). 3. Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd, Bd. 1:1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991). 4. Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995). -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer 4 August 1997]
Princess Alice
The Princess Alice ran aground at the entrance to James Bay when her steering gear broke down while she was rounding into Victoria inner harbor on March 17, but no serious damage was caused. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Alice (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 54. The Princess Alice, The Sea Chest. (June, 1977), p. 42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Alice (liner)
Three well-known steamships of the Canadian Pacific B. C.Coastal Service, Princess Charlotte, Princess Adelaide and Princess Alice, were sold to Typaldos Bros. Steamship Co. of Piraeus, Greece. The Alice, renamed Aegaeon made weekly sailings to the Greek Islands of Tinos, Mykonos, Leros, Calymnos, Cos and Rhodes. The three veteran Princess liners were transferred to the Greek Flag at Vancouver and made their European voyages from that port manned by Greek crews. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Alice (steamer)
Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w, p. 342-43. (Named Aegeon when sold in 1949).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Alice (steamer)
The new Canadian Pacific steamer Princess Alice, sister ship of the Princess Adelaide of the previous year, arrived from the Swan & Hunter yard at Newcastle. Her dimensions and accommodations were very similar to those of the Adelaide, being a steel single-screw steamer of 3,099 tons, with a 4,500-horsepower four cylinder triple-expansion engine giving her a speed of 18 knots. Her dimensions were 290.6 x 46.1 x 14.3. She had accommodations for 1,200 day passengers with sleeping accommodations for 206 in 103 two -berth staterooms. The furnaces were so constructed that either coal or oil fuel could be used. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 182.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Of Alberni (motorship)
Built in San Francisco in 1945 as the Pomare. Other names include Nootka Prince, Ocean Crown. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w, p. 346.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Of Wales
See GENERAL WERDER.
Citation:
Princess Royal
At Nootka. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 40, 42-43, 50-51. At Nootka. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 55. Under Captain Hudson. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 66. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., I, p. 76, 151. Seized by Spanish at Nootka. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., I, p.98-101. Aurel Krause. Tlingit Indians. American Ethnological Society.,p. 22. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 121. Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 93. Constance Skinner. Adventures of Oregon, p. 16. Buell and Skladal. Sea Otters and the China Trade., p. 84. C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792.,p. viii, xiii. Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast.,p. 109, 111-113, 147, 152-54, 159. Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays.,p. 71. Charles Wilson. Mapping the Frontier. 49t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Royal (1)
I found two ships called Princess Royal in the 1912-13 Lloyd's Register of Shipping. PRINCESS ROYAL - Official # : 121988. Master : Captain C.D. Neurotsos. Rigging : wood single screw steamer; 1 deck and awning deck with freeboard; 4 bulkheads; fitted with electric light and wireless; hull, except beams, salted; fastened with copper bolts. Tonnage : 1,997 tons gross, 1,338 under deck and 981 net. Dimensions : 228 feet long, 40 foot beam and holds 16.6 feet deep. Built : in 1907 by Marine Railways Co. Ltd. in Esquimault B.C.. Propulsion : triple expansion engine with 3 cylinders of 22, 35 and 60 inches diameter respectively. Stroke 36 inches. 302 nominal horsepower. 3 single ended boilers, 9 corrugated furnaces, grate surface 190 sq. feet and heating surface 5,596 sq. feet. Engine built by Bow, MaLachland & Co. in Paisley. Owners : Canadian Pacific Railways Co. Port of registry : Victoria, B.C. Flag : British -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 1 October 1998]
Princess Royal (2)
I found two ships called Princess Royal in the 1912-13 Lloyd's Register of Shipping. PRINCESS ROYAL - Call sign : HVTK. Official # : 133044. Master : Captain J.H.R. Rendall, appointed to the ship in 1912. Rigging : steel single screw steamer; 2 decks; fitted with electric light; water ballast. Tonnage : 1,986 tons gross, 1,210 under deck and 866 net. Dimensions : 291.4 feet long, 38.2 foot beam and holds 14.1 feet deep. Poop deck and Bridge Deck 202 feet long; Forecastle 46 feet long. Built : in 1912 by Caledon Ship Building & Engine Co. Ltd. in Dundee. Propulsion : triple expansion engine with 3 cylinders of 22, 35 and 59 inches diameter respectively. Stroke 39 inches. 217 nominal horsepower. Engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners : M. Langlands & Sons. Port of registry : Glasgow. Flag : British -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 1 October 1998]
Princess Royal (steamer)
A handsome single-stack wooden passenger steamer, Princess Royal, was constructed by the British Columbia Marine Railway of Esquimalt for the Canadian Pacific Railway's B. C. Coast Service, being placed for a time on the Victoria - Seattle - Vancouver route and operated on excursions to southeastern Alaska. Princess Royal was a single -screw steamer of 1,997 tons, 228 x 40 x 16.6, having a 1,600horsepower triple -expansion engine (22, 35, 60 x 36), giving her a service speed of 15 knots. She had a capacity of 700 day passengers and overnight accommodations for 164 in 82 staterooms and was the last wooden vessel built for the company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 138.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prins Valdemar
See LIVONIA .
Citation:
Prinz Adalbert
SS Prinz Adalbert. She was built in 1902 by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack for the Hamburg America Line. Dimensions were 6030 gross tons, length 403.3ft x beam 49.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots. There appears to be a discrepancy between North Atlantic Seaway by Bonsor and Merchant Fleets in Profile, vol.4 by Duncan Haws. Bonsor states that she carried 60 1st class and 1200 3rd class passengers. Maiden voyage 1903 Hamburg - Brazil, 1904 Genoa - Naples - New York, 1909 Hamburg - Quebec - Montreal, 1910 Hamburg - Philadelphia until 1914. Duncan Haws says 120 1st, 50 2nd and 300 3rd class passengers. Built for Far East service, 1904 transferred to West Indies route when Norddeutscher Lloyd took over the Far East passenger service, until 1914. Both accounts agree after 1914 when she was seized at Falmouth by Britain and was operated by the Admiralty. Renamed "Princetown" in 1916. Transferred to France in 1917 and renamed "Alesia". Torpedoed and sunk 6.9.1917 by German submarine UC-50 off Ushant. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 28 July 1997]
Protector Alpha (grain Carrier)
Burning grain freighter's owner sues grain firm over cutting ship moorings, The Tacoma News Tribune. February 18, 1982. Fatal grainship fires appears controlled. Tacoma news Tribune. February 17, 1982.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Alexandra (steamer)
The noted turbine steamship Queen Alexandra a River Clyde excursion vessel with a speed of 21.6 knots was purchased in 1911 by the Canadian Pacific Railway to augment its fleet of British Columbia coastal steamships. After undergoing alterations for her new service, accomplished at the yards of her builders, Denny Bros. of Dumbarton under the supervision of Assistant Port Engineer James Alexander, she was placed on the Vancouver-Nanaimo run early in 1912, providing two-hour service, never equalled by any other vessel. Converted to oil fuel, she proved even faster than before, being capable of a top speed of better than 22 knots. The Queen Alexandra was also the second turbine steamship built for commercial service, the first having been her sister-ship, King Edward As built, she had three shafts and five propellers, two on each of the outer shafts. Before coming to British Columbia the two extra screws were removed with no loss of speed resulting. Renamed Princess Patricia, she made her maiden voyage on the P
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of Esquimalt (ferry)
Rapidly increasing patronage of it vessels also prompted the B.C. Ferry Authority to embark on a program of lengthening six of its larger ferries. The first of these was the Queen of Esquimalt, which was lengthened by 84 feet at Burrard Drydock, giving her a new profile similar to that of the smaller modern cruise liners. With her length increased to 426 feet, the vessel's vehicle capacity was increased from 110 to 192. The interior was completely remodeled with new wiring, plumbing and decorations. A 250-passenger solarium was provided on the sundeck amidships, the dining room aft was expanded to accommodate 102 persons, and the cafeteria to accommodate 250. Eight comfortable private day staterooms were provided just aft of the bridge. Upon completion of the $2.5 million renovation of this vessel, the Queen of Victoria entered the Burrard yard for similar conversion Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.66.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ravalli (steam Schooner)
The 1,305-ton wooden steam schooner Rauall4 built at Fairhaven, Califomia in 1905 and in Admiral Line freight service between Puget Sound and southeastem Alaska, caught fire, was beached and completely destroyed at Lowe Inlet, B. C. on June 19, 1918. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ravalli (steamer)
Wooden steamer; 1 deck, 2 masts; 998 tons; 186.2 x 38.1 x 14.8 feet; 20 crew; freighter; 8 knots. Built in 1905 at Fairhaven, California. Prior to 1916, operated by the Paciflc Coast Steamshi Company. Between 1916 and 1918, operated by Admiral Line in Alaskan trade. Burned in Lowe Inlet, Alaska, June 14, 1918. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ravalli (steamer)
Wooden vessel, with one deck, two masts, 998 tons; 186.2 x 38.1 x 14.8 feet with a crew of twenty. 8 knots. Built in 1905 at Fairhaven, California. Operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company until 1916 and by the Admiral Line between 1916 and 1918 when she burned in Lowe Inlet, Alaska on June 14, 1918. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Regal Scout (cargo Vessel)
On October 22, a Greek national holiday, the merriment aboard the Greek cargo vessel Regal Scout, at the same port to load grain for Japan, was interrupted by a violent explosion in the hull forward. The vessel's third engineer was fatally burned and several other crew members received minor injuries. It was reported that the engineering officer was working in a space forward of the boiler room where it was believed acetylene tanks exploded. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.197-8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Regina D'italia
The "Regina d'Italia" was a 6,560 gross ton ship, built by Sir J.Laing &Sons Ltd, Sunderland (engines by G.Clark Ltd, Sunderland) in 1907. Her details were - length 430ft x beam 52.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st and 1,900-3rd class passengers. Originally laid down as the "Sardinian Prince" for the British owned Prince Line, she was purchased on the stocks by Lloyd Sabaudo and launched on 20th Jan.1907 as the "Regina d'Italia. She sailed on her maiden voyage from Genoa to Naples, Palermo and New York on 15th May 1907, made two Genoa - South America voyages the same year and in Dec.1908 she was used as a hospital ship after the Messina earthquake. She continued New York sailings during the Great War up until the end of 1916 when regular passenger voyages on this route were discontinued by the company. On 10th Apr.1919, she resumed N. Atlantic sailings when she left Genoa for Marseilles and New York and in 1920 was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only. On 20th Jan.1920 she arrived at New York from Constanza, Constantinople, Smyrna, Piraeus and Messina and started her last Genoa-Naples-Boston-New York voyage on 14th Mar.1922. In Apr.1922 she transferred to the Genoa - South America service, except for a single round voyage between Genoa, Naples, Palermo, Halifax and New York commencing 22nd May 1924. In Oct.1928 she was scrapped in Italy.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1361-1367] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, p.385] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 September 1998]
Regulus (u.s. Naval Ship)
Korea bound military exercies leaves Tacoma. The Regulus is one of the largest and fastest military ships in the world, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1986, p. 18.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rei De Portugal
See NAPOLITAN PRINCE.
Citation:
Relief (u.s. Naval Vessel)
To the Northwest Coast. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 151, 227. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p 178. The Relief, Marine Digest. LVI (September 3, 1977), p. 11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rickreall (tug)
Rickreall, 48-foot twin-screw shallow-draft tug, purchased from the Army Engineers at Portland by the Pacific Towboat Co. of Everett. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (bark)
September 13, 1881 Bark, American, three masts, built at Baltimore in 1869, 299 tons, 130'x 31'x 12'. Ship left harbor with Captain Thomas B. Adams en route San Francisco-Knappton under pilot Hansen. The ship and her cargo of shingles and hay were a total loss on Peacock Spit. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (bark)
American bark, 299 tons, stranded on Peacock Spit, September 13, 1881, and became a total loss. With a pilot aboard, the vessel was outbound for San Francisco loaded with hay and shingles from Knappton. While on the bar the wind died, and after a lull changed to an easterly direction. The bark drifted on the sands with both anchors dragging. The pilot schooner, near by at the time, summoned the tug Astoria. The tug managed to get a line on the wreck several hours later, but while attempting to pull the Rival free, it parted. Shortly after, the starboard anchor cable broke, and the vessel swung abruptly about. The tug was unable to get another line on the wreck and at 1:30 p.m. September -13, the Rtioal parted her port anchor chain and was carried high on the beach between Cape Disappointment and McKenzie Head. Captain Thomas B. Adams, the Rival's master, his wife and the crew, took to the boats and landed safely on the beach. The bark was valued at $8000, and her cargo at $6000. The vessel was regarded as a v
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (bark)
299 ton vessel stranded on Peacock Spit, September 13, 1881. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (bark)
The bark Rival and the schooner W. L. Richardson arrived at Portland from New York, and, until Mercer established his clipper line several years later, were the last direct charters, as Portland dealers preferred to ship goods in smaller quantities to San Francisco and transport them from there by steamer. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (bark)
The American bark Rival, Capt. Thomas B. Adams, stranded on Peacock Spit, September 13, 1881. She was en route from San Francisco to Knappton with a small cargo of hay and shingles. Pilot Hansen was sailing her in over the bar, when the wind suddenly shifted to the east. The tug Astoria was hailed, but the heavy sea parted the hauling line attached to her hawser, so that the bark was unable to secure it. The starboard anchor was then let go, but the chain parted; the second anchor held, and she brought up with three fathoms under the stern. At 1:30 P. m. she grounded and continued pounding heavily until 2:30, when she slipped her anchor chain and drifted ashore between Cape Disappointment and McKenzie's Head. Captain Adams and wife and the crew took to the boats and landed in safety. The Rival was an old-timer on northern routes and at the date of her loss was valued at about $8,000. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 289.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (steamer)
Maiden voyage. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 745.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (steamer)
The steamer Rival was launched at Knappton by Capt. John Pickernell and B. W. Robson. Pickernell operated her until 1890, when she was succeeded by the Mayflower. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.355.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rival (steamer)
The steamer Rival was built at Oregon City by Capt. George Pease, who was her first master. Associated with him were the Dements of Oregon City. She was started on the route between that point and Portland, with the announcement that she had come to stay and keep the rates down, and was not put on with a view to being bought or run off, and her owners were willing to make long-time contracts at the rate of $2 per ton for freight and 50 cents per head for passengers between terminal points. The Rival made her first trip July 4th from Oregon City to Vancouver, carrying 700 passengers, a load which Captain Pease stated kept him breathing hard from the time he started until he saw them safely ashore. Captain Pease sold his interest in the Rival, two months after her completion, to Capt. J. T. Apperson, and from his hands she passed into the possession of the People's Transportation Company. The kind of freight handled a third of a century ago is shown in the following copy of the steamer's manifest, February 4, 1
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Riversdale
Figure of a woman now at Marine Garden, Victoria, B.C., Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Robert Kerr (coal Barge)
The C. P. R. coal barge Robert Kerr, Ladysmith for Vancouver in tow of the tug Coutli with 1,800 tons of coal for the Empress of India, stranded near Danger Reef and became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 196.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie (ferryboat)
Newell, Inland Se, p. 213. Luxury ferries competed for area passengers. Marine Digest. November 26, 1983, p. 11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie (steam Tug)
A 42 -foot steam tug, the Rosalie, was built at San Francisco as a dispatch boat for the Alaska Commercial Co. at St. Michael, passing to the American Tug Boat Co. of Everett in 1905 and to South American owners in 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie (steamer)
Northwestern Steamship Company Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 414.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie (steamer)
Another historic old steamship, the pioneer Rosalie of the Alaska Steamship and Puget Sound Navigation Companies, was also destroyed by fire while laid up in the West Waterway, Seattle, on June 22. No lives were lost in any of these ship burnings. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie (steamer)
On July 25, 1897, the steamer Rosalie which had been running on the Seattle-Victoria route of the Northwestern Steamship Company ended this service and went into temporary lay-up for alterations to equip her for the Alaska trade. Capt. Ames was replaced by Capt. Roberts and George Lent, another partner in the Alaska Steamship Company, took over as chief engineer. Charles E.Peabody acted as general manager. The Rosalie, a wooden propeller steamer 136 x 27 x 10, was built in Alameda in 1893, being sent north for the Puget Sound-Alaska route. After two trips she was purchased by Capt. D. B. Jackson for service with the side-wheelers Geo. E. Starr and Idaho of the Northwestern Steamship Co. She was placed on the Victoria run in charge of Capt. C. W. Ames, with Capt. William Williamson as pilot. The Starr and Idaho were operated to Port Townsend by way of the mill ports. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 14.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie (steamer)
The Rosalie, a propeller one hundred and thirty-six feet long, twenty-seven feet beam, and ten feet hold, was built in Alameda in 1893, sent north for the Puget Sound and Alaska route, but, after making a few trips there, was turned over to her present owners. She was placed on the Victoria run in charge of C. W. Ames, captain, with William Williamson, pilot. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.414.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie Mahony (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Rosalie Mahony was taken over from Fred Linderman of San Francisco for the Puget Sound British Columbia trade of the Border Line Transportation Co. as the Border Queen, and later placed under Canadian registry. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalie Mahony (steam Schooner)
As a concession to its reputation as a symbol of bad luck the number 13 is usually conspicuous by its absence on board ship, but the well -known San Francisco shipping firm of Olson & Mahony struck a mighty blow at this ancient superstition with the launching of their new steam schooner Rosalie Mahony from the Matthews yard. Thirteen was a predominating feature of the occasion. There were 13 letters in the steamer's name, which was that of Mrs. A. G. Mahony and of her nine - year - old daughter who christened the vessel. Thirteen signal flags were flying as the steamer was launched, the Rosalie Mahony taking her place as the 13th vessel in the company's fleet. The launching took place on June 13, 1913 at 8:23 a.m. (the figures in the hour adding up to 13). This was the 13th anniversary of the day the Mahony family moved to San Francisco. The Rosalie Mahony left Grays Harbor under tow on July 13 to receive her engines at San Francisco, the work being completed on August 13 and the vessel departing on her maide
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalind
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 76, 99. Joseph Thomas HJoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris of Nisqually. Memoris of Nisqually., p. 59-60. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p. 414. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., IV, p. 350.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalind (schooner)
The Rosalind, a three-masted schooner of 288 tons, rigged with square topsails on the foremast and a stump mizzen, was built at Port Blakely in 1883 by Hall Bros. for J. E. Le Ballister, San Francisco. She was wrecked February 18, 1890, three miles north of the Rogue River. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 2, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalind (schooner)
February 18, 1890 Three mast schooner, 288 tons, built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1883. Ship became a total loss three miles north of the Rogue River. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalind (schooner)
February 18, 1890 Three mast schooner, 288 tons, built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1883. Ship became a total loss three miles north of the Rogue River. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalind (schooner)
The Rosalind, a three-masted schooner of 288 tons, rigged with square topsails on the foremast and a stump mizzen, was built at Port Blakely in 1883 by Hall Bros. for J. E. Le Ballister, San Francisco. She was wrecked February 18, 1890, three miles north of the Rogue River. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. August 2, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalind (schooner)
The schooner Rosalind ran ashore three miles north of Rogue River, February 18th, and became a total loss. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.381.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rosalthia (schooner)
The schooner Rosalthia, which the Tillamookers had built in 1857, commenced running this year, but proved a very unprofitable speculation. She was a neat little craft 66 feet long, 17 feet beam, 6 feet 6 inches hold, and was owned by Elbridge Trask, James and Nelson Higginbotham. She was loaded with provisions and farm produce and sent to San Francisco in command of a man named Harris to secure the balance of her equipment. Harris was a poor trader, and when the work was done he could not meet the bills. Accordingly the schooner was libeled and sold, and the owners lost both vessel and cargo. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.69.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Baron (fishing Trawler)
Trawler started out as a U.S. Army Tug and acquired in 1950 to become the Margaret Foss. Converted into a trawler after Foss ownership, The National Fisherman. July, 1987, p. 30.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Charlie (schooner)
The schooner Royal Charlie, a well known Victoria trading vessel, was seized by the Kake Indians about two hundred miles north of the Stickeen River, while cruising along the coast, in September, 1865. She was in command of Capt. Thomas Goin, who had with him James Habut and John Cashman as, crew, Thomas Crawley, trader, and two Stickeen Indian boys. One night, while at anchor in a small bay, the boys overheard the savages planning an attack and at once advised the captain to leave, as the Kakes intended to take the schooner the next day. Captain Goin refused to heed the warning, and the following morning at daybreak three canoes came alongside, and several natives sprang aboard and cut the halyards. Goin immediately fired on the chief, wounding him in the wrist, but the Indian rushed upon him furiously and stabbed him to death. Cashman promptly avenged the deed with a bullet, and the chief dropped dead upon the deck. His confederates retreated, but continued firing until they had killed Cashman and Crawley a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal City (steamer)
Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w, p. 337.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal City (steamer)
The Royal City, a fine sternwheeler one hundred and twenty-eight feet long and twenty-six feet beam, with engines twenty by sixty inches, was launched on the Fraser by Captain Parsons, making her debut April 4 [1875] between New Westminster and Vale, in command of Captain Insley. The steamer was afterward secured by Capt. John Irving and under his management took a prominent part in the numerous steamboat wars on that river. With the exception of Irving, the two Odins were the most prominent masters of the steamer. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal City (torpedo Boat)
Royal City, 100-foot former Royal Navy torpedo boat, converted by a Vancouver syndicate to a gasoline halibut schooner with 100-horsepower engine. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223-224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal George
The "Royal George" was an 11,146 gross ton ship, built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1907 as the "Heliopolis" for the British owned Egyptian Mail Co. Her details were - length 525.8ft x beam 60.2ft, two funnels, two masts, triple screw and a service speed of 19 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 344-1st, 210-2nd and 560-3rd class. Launched on 28th May 1907 she was used on the Marseilles - Alexandria service, but was found to be unprofitable and was laid up in Marseilles in 1909 and offered for sale. In 1910 she was purchased by Canadian Northern Steamships of Toronto and renamed "Royal George". Refitted for North Atlantic service, she commenced Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 26th May 1910. On 6th Nov.1912 she stranded near Quebec, was refloated and sailed for Halifax for further repairs on 12th Dec. and then proceeded to Liverpool. She resumed Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 17th Jun.1913. On 3rd Oct.1914 she sailed from Gaspe Bay for Plymouth with part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and was then taken over as a British troopship. The fleet was purchased by Cunard SS Co in 1916, but the "Royal George" continued trooping for the rest of the war. She resumed passenger voyages on 10th Feb.1919 when she started the first of five Liverpool - Halifax - New York sailings and started her first Southampton - Halifax - New York voyage on 15th Aug.1919. Her ninth and last voyage on this service commenced 10th Jun.1920 and she was then used as an emigrant depot ship at Cherbourg. In 1922 she was scrapped at Wilmhelmshaven. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1433] There is an excellent article written by Capt.F.J.Thompson who commanded the "Royal George" from 1911 and through part of the Great War, including the Gallipoli landings; in Sea Breezes magazine, Oct.- Nov.1960 (vol.30, Nos. 178-179). It describes the day to day life of the ship, both as a passenger vessel and as a troopship. - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 22 September 1998]
Citation:
Royal Pacific (crab Boat)
The third of a series of crab boats built by Martinolich. The Tacoma News Tribune. April 25, 1969.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Princess (cruise Ship)
New cruise ship, The Marine Digest. June 9, 1984, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Princess (yacht)
Big waves flood yacht. Sun, north of Queen Charlotte Sound, The Marine Digest. July 7, 1984, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Princess (yacht)
The Coast Guard and owner disagree on the sunken Royal Princess use as a commerical ship, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 29, 1984.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Tar
Prior to joining P & O, 'Royal Tar' was a steamship belonging to the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company of London, the agents being Willcox and Anderson. It was chartered by the Spanish government for the repatriation of the British Legion, sailing to San Sebastian and arriving 10 July 1835. Once there it was renamed "Regna Governadora". Information would be appreciated on the use of this vessel by the Spanish Government. How many voyages were made while under charter and between which ports did it ply. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Vic Major - 31 May 1998]

The "Royal Tar" was a 308 burthen ton ship,

Royal Venture (fishing Vessel)
Royal Venture and Eastward Ho, 108-foot all-purpose stern-ramp deepsea fishing vessels, designed by Cove Hatfield Ltd. of North Vancouver and built by Star at New Westminster for Emil Jensen and Fred Kohse respectively, as the largest commercial fishing craft yet built on the West Coast for British Columbia owners. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Viking (fishing Vessel)
The first of a new class of 107-foot Alaska king crab fishing vessels designed and built by MARCO at Seattle, the Royal Viking, was delivered to Kaare Ness to fish for Vita Food Products. The 850-horsepower diesel vessel was fitted with complete electronics, including two radars, two auto-alarm fathometers, two lorans, auto pilot, hydraulic steering, intercom system and three radio telephones. Living quarter amenities included insulated woodgrain formica staterooms and all-electric galley. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Royal Viking Star (cruise Ship)
Made first call at Seattle, The Marine Digest. September 8, 1984, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth Alexander
The passenger steamship Ruth Alexander was taken over for offshore operation by the American President Lines, which had succeeded the Dollar interests in the San Francisco - Oriental and round - the - world service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth Alexander (liner)
The former Admiral line coastwise liner Ruth Alexander, recently taken over by the American President Lines of San Francisco, was one of the early casualties of the war with Japan, being sunk by Japanese air attack off the Netherlands East Indies early in December, one crew member being killed and several injured. Survivors were rescued by a Dutch flying boat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth Alexander (liner)
Despite the loss [of the Governor by collison] the Admiral Line proceeded with plans to institute a Portland service, the Admiral Enans making the first voyage between San Francisco and Portland in May, regular calls being scheduled at Astoria, Los Angeles and San Diego. Other Admiral Line vessels augmented this service. Late in the year the situation was somewhat alleviated when the Robert Dollar Co. purchased the steamship Callao from the Shipping Board and turned her over to the Admiral Line on long-term charter as the Ruth Alexander, the first of the line's Alexander ships. This handsome liner was built at Hamburg in 1912 as the Sierra Cordoba 3 for the South American trade. Of 8,135 tons, she had dimensions of 439.1 x 56 x 26.2 and was fitted with reciprocating engines of 5,000 horsepower. She arrived on the Pacific Coast early in 1922, taking her place with the President on the through route between Puget Sound and southem California. She proved one of the most popular and successful vessels ever placed
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth Alexander (steamer)
Steel steamer; 3 decks, 2 masts; 8,135 tons; 439.1 x 56 x 26.2 feet; 150 crew; 409 passengers; 14.1 knots. Built in 1913 at Hamburg, Germany, for the South American trade as Sierra Cordoba. During World War 1, interned by Peru and renamed Callao. Given to the United States under the reparation plan. Purchased by the Robert Dollar Company in December 1921. Chartered by the Admiral Line from 1922 until 1933 and operated on the Seattle to Califomia route. In 1929, made one trip around the world in place of the President Adams of the Dollar Line. Sunk by a Japanese bomber in waters around Dutch East Indies, December 31, 1941, while flying the American flag. Previously she had been sold to British interests. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth Alexander (steamer)
Steel vessel, three decks two masts, 8135 tons. 439.1 x 56 x 26.2 feet. 150 crew; 409 passenger; 14.1 knots. Built in 1913 in Hamburg, Germany for the South American trade as the Sierra Cordoba. Interned in Peru in World War I and named Callao. Robert Dollar bought the vessel through the U.S. Government as part of the reparation plan. Chartered to the Admiral Line from 1922 to 1933. Sunk by Japanese airplanes in the Duth East Indies December 31, 1941 after being sold to British interests. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more. The Ruth Alexander, a different steamship, The Sea Chest. September 1984. p. 27-35. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
S. L. Allard (schooner)
In 1917 the four-masted auxiliary schooner S. L Allard was completed by the ST. Helens Shipbuilding Company of St. Helens Oregon, for the McCormick Lumber Co. The Allard was similar to the five-masted City of Portland, except that the exhaust pipes for her two 320 horse power Bolinder engines extended above the deck where the fifth mast (spanker) was on the Portland. Gordon Newell, World War I ship buidling, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 280.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
S. T. Alexander (schooner)
This four masted schooner of 779 tons and 800 M capacity was built at Fairhaven by Bendixsen in 1899. She was owned by Charles Nelson, San Francisco. On July 18, 1914 she left Mukilteo for the Friendly Islands and was wrecked at Toku, Tonga, September 28, 1914. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
S. T. Alexander (schooner)
This four masted schooner of 779 tons and 800 M capacity was built at Fairhaven by Bendixsen in 1899. She was owned by Charles Nelson, San Francisco. On July 18, 1914 she left Mukilteo for the Friendly Islands and was wrecked at Toku, Tonga, September 28, 1914. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
S.c. Allen (bark)
Wrecked off Diamond Head, October 13, 1913. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
S.l. Allard (schooner)
The 2,130-ton City class auxiliary schooner S. L Allard, a five-masted vessel with a length of 263 feet and engines of 640 horsepower was completed by the St. Helens Shipbuilding Co. for Charles R. Mc Con-nick. The Allard was laid down as the City of Astoria, but was named by McCormick in honor of the Eureka, California banker. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 290.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saale
The "Saale" was built in 1886 by Fairfield & Co. of Glasgow for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). Her dimensions were:- length 439.6ft x beam 48.1ft, 4967 gross tons, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Accommodation was provided for 150-1st, 90-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 21.4.1886 and left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 18.8.1886. In 1896-7 she was refitted and her masts reduced to two. On 30.6.1900 she was severely damaged by fire in New York harbour with the loss of 109 lives. She was then sold to a US company, re-engined and rebuilt with one funnel, renamed "J.L.Luckenbath", and used as a cargo vessel. In 1921` she was renamed "Princess", and in 1923 named "Madison" still under the US flag. She was scrapped in Italy in 1924.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 August & 5 October 1997]
Sadie F. Caller (schooner)
The North Pacific yielded up another of its mysteries after almost twenty years of silence when Seattle diver Walter McCray, engaged by the Columbia River Packers' Association to prepare the foundations of a new fish trap at Chignik Lagoon, Alaska, discovered the wreck of the schooner Sadie F. Caller of San Francisco. The 131-foot, three-masted vessel, built at Essex, Massachusetts in 1873, had left San Francisco in 1895 with a cargo of tin ingots consigned to an Alaska cannery. She was never heard from and no clue to her fate appeared until McCray, working in 60 feet of water, found himself on the bulwarks of a sunken ship. Scraping away the marine growth, he found the name Sadie F. Caller carved on the bow. Although the main deck was torn open and only the stumps of the masts remained, the hull was fairly intact and the cargo was salvaged. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., pg.229-230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saginaw (u.s. Naval Vessel)
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., IV, p. 111. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 205. Aurel Krause. Tlingit Indians. American Ethnological Society., p. 72. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 165. Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 305, 321-322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saint David (coal Barge)
The old Cape Horn ship Saint David, reduced to a coal barge, was damaged by fire in her cargo at Seattle September 29, the loss amounting to $ 8,500.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saint Lawrence (whaler)
In contrast to the poor showing of the traditional deep water whalers, the shorebased steam killer boats of Vancouver Island established a new record of success. The Orion and the St. Lawrence, which had joined her in British Columbia service, took over 600 whales. The latter vessel, operating from Kyuquat, broke the world's record with a catch of 318, including 241 humpbacks, 66 sulphur bottoms, 10 finbacks and onesperm, her crew earning from $ 300 to $ 400 for the season. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 147.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salamander
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 75, 99.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salatiga (steamer)
The 7,600 -ton freight steamer Salatiga, built at Chester, Pa. in 1920, was purchased by the Alaska Packers Association from Dutch owners and renamed Bering, joining the steamship Arctic in the continued replacement of sailing tonnage in the cannery fleet of this company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salee (yacht)
Salee, 73-foot auxiliary schooner yacht, purchased in Maryland by W. T. Hoyt of Seattle and sailed to Puget Sound via the Panama Canal. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1946, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 533.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salem (launch)
The 35 -foot U. S. Army Engineers gas launch Salem was also completed at Portland for Willamette River use. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salem (schooner)
This four masted schoon of 767 tons and 1100 M capacity was built was built at San Francisco in 1902 by W. F. Stone & Son. She was owned by J. R. Hanify, San Francisco, who sold her in 1918 to J. M. Scott, Mobile. Her registry was abandoned in 1929. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salem (schooner)
This four masted schoon of 767 tons and 1100 M capacity was built was built at San Francisco in 1902 by W. F. Stone & Son. She was owned by J. R. Hanify, San Francisco, who sold her in 1918 to J. M. Scott, Mobile. Her registry was abandoned in 1929. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salem (steamer)
The Salem, a light-draft sternwheeler one hundred and sixty feet long, twenty-nine and one-half feet beam, and four feet four inches depth of hold, was launched at Portland for the upper Willamette trade and began running in command of Capt. George Raabe. She was sold in 1883 to Capt. E. W. Spencer, who rebuilt her and operated her for eight years, making large profits whether the steamer was running or tied up. When freights or subsidies were not liberal enough on the Willamette, Spencer was in the habit of taking her to Astoria and offering to tow ships at such sweeping reductions in rates that he was always sure of securing a good bonus to retire. In 1891 the Salem was purchased by Capt. George W. Taylor, who has since operated her on the upper Willamette and in jobbing at Portland. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.274.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salier
Steamship SALIER, built in 1874 by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Hull, England, for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). 3,083 tons; 107,59 metres long x 11,91 metres broad; straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 142 first- and 800 3rd-class passengers. 15 June 1874, launched; 14 July 1875, trials held. 8 September 1875, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). 1 April 1876, first voyage, Bremen-South America service. 10 February 1880, last voyage, Bremen-South America Service; returned to Bremen-New York service. 1890-1891, triple-expansion engines by Vulkan. 10 December 1895, resumed Bremen-South America service. 7 December 1896, wrecked on the north coast of Spain with the loss of her entire complement of passengers and crew (279 people) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (Prescott, Lancashire: T. Stephenson & Sons., 1955), p 185; Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An illustrated history of the passenger lines and liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, 1983), pp. 235 and 240]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 292, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 July 1997]

Salina (brig)
The American brig Salina, Captain Miller, arrived at Victoria from Petropaulovski, July 16th, with a cargo of furs for the Alaska Commercial Company. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.427.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salina Cruz (schooner)
The most spectacular marine disaster of the year was the loss of the wooden steam schooner Salina Cruz, operated under the Panamanian flag by the Seven Seas Shipping Co., of which A. C. Stralla, former operator of California gambling ships, was a major shareholder. The Salina Cruz, originally the North Bend-built Anne Hanify of 1920, had discharged a cargo of hardwood logs on Puget Sound and had then loaded a cargo of lumber and foodstuffs at Vancouver, B. C. for Honolulu. While outward bound and laboring in heavy seas west of Grays Harbor on the morning of October 17, the wooden steamer was set ablaze by a fire originating in the engine room. Whipped by 25 -knot winds, the flames soon engulfed the upperworks and Capt. Benjamin F. Ivey ordered the 17-man Mexican crew into the boats. Two large whaleboats were launched and the crew abandoned the blazing hulk after a brief SOS message was dispatched. This was intercepted by the U. S. Fish & Wildlife vessel Black Douglas and the Coast Guard cutter Balsam, both of
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salisbury
The German ship Salisbury, 1,017 tons, while en route from Port Discovery to Montevideo in command of Captain Keitzenstein, with a crew of eighteen, encountered a hurricane with a terrific cross sea two hundred miles west southwest of Cape Flattery and soon became water-logged. The pumps became choked, and the crew took to the boats and were picked up by the British bark Seriel Wyn, Captain Storm, February 13, 1888. The vessel was valued at $20,000 and the cargo at $8,500. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.359.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sallie Brown (bark)
The first overseas flour cargo left Portland on the American bark Sallie Brown in 1868, a year before the first wheat cargo was dispatched, the vessel being operated by Asa Mercer, who gained a place in history with his post-Civil War importation of the famous Mercer Girls to the Pacific Northwest. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sallie Brown (bark)
The most important arrival of the year at Portland was that of the bark Sallie Brown from New York, the pioneer in a new line established by A. S. Mercer, who had made himself famous by bringing a cargo of women from the East a few years before. It had been five years since any sailing vessel had arrived at Portland direct from New York, and the Sallie Brown was accorded a hearty welcome. She was one hundred and seventy days on the voyage, and on arrival was loaded with flour and wheat and started back to the port from whence she came. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sallie Robinson (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 457.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sallie West (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers.. p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sally (brig)
Lost in 1796 Supposedly the first casualty in the Columbia River. An ancient wooden block identified as having come from the wreck of the Sally is displayed at Astoria's Clatsop County Historical Museum; however, my search for any records of this wreck proved fruitless. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salmo (scow)
The 14 ton gas scow Salmo caught fire and sank on August 22, 1916 (U.S. National Archives T926:277).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salmo Point
Built in Tacoma in 1929. eighty-five foot vessel. The Salmo Point, The Marine Digest. March 12, 1983, p. 14. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salmo Point (canner Tender)
The H. C. Hanson-designed cannery tender Salmo Point, 85-feet long with twin 90-horsepower Atlas diesels, was built at Tacoma for use at Cordova. Hanson also designed the 130-foot U. S. Fisheries patrol boat Penguin with 400-horsepower Union diesel, built by Ballard Marine Railway for Pribiloff Island service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 402.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salmon King (schooner)
The wooden steam schooner Salmon King, originally the H. B. Lovejoy, was sold by the Offshore Gold & Dredging Co. to George E. Howard of San Francisco, after having been in layup at Alameda since 1930. Her last active service had been under the ownership of the Crosby Fisheries Co. of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 465.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salmon King (schooner)
The wooden steam schooner Salmon King ( ex H. B. Lovejoy), following her nine -year layup at San Francisco, was dismantled and added to the fleet of beached hulks forming the yacht harbor breakwater at Point San Pablo. Gordon Newell, Maritime Activities of 1939, McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p 476.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saluda (sailboat)
Sea Scouts snare big super sailboat, The Tacoma News Tribune. December 12, 1978. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chief (salvage Vessel)
Salvage Chief, flagship of Fred Devine Diving and Salvage, Inc of Portland gets new propellers, The Marine Digest. December 21, 1985, p. 9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chief (tug)
A most important reconstruction project of 1949 was that of the deep-sea towing and salvage vessel Salvage Chief by Fred Devine of Astoria. The original Navy landing craft, 192.6 x 34 x 10.7, was built at Houston, Texas in 1944. Two 10-cylinder, 1,800-horse power Fairbanks Morse diesels were installed, and the vessel equipped with auxiliaries, Pumps, salvage winches, compressors and other equipment making her capable of performing the most arduous towing and salvage duties. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chief (tug)
The old Salvage Chief (ex -William Jolliffe) of Pacific Salvage Co. was replaced in 1925 by the new Salvage King, built at Parsley, Scotland as one of the finest craft of her type in the world. Of 1,164 tons and with dimensions of 186.3 x 36.2 x 16.2, she was driven by 3, 000 -horsepower reciprocating steam engine, having a cruising radius of 15,000 miles and a top speed of 14 knots. She was fitted with equipment to distill sea water at a rate of a ton an hour, wireless, radio-telephones, wame-talkies for communication with barges or ships in tow, a fully equipped machine shop, air compressors, decompression chamber for divers, and a battery of portable pumps with a capacity of 50 tons of water per minute. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior,1966 p. 367.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chief (tug)
The old Canadian Pacific steamer Tees, refitted as the Salvage Chief, was operated with the Salvage King and Salvage Queen, replacing the Algerine. Salvage King's first job was the salvage in October of the Dutch motorship Eemdyk, during which the old steam tug Hope was lost with a number of lives and considerable salvage gear.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior,1966 p. 367.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chief (tug)
The ocean-going steam salvage tug Salvage Chief (ex William Jolliffe and Nitinat) of the Pacific Salvage Co., Victoria, went aground on the reefs off Merry Island early in March and was abandoned after attempts to refloat her failed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior, 1966 p. 367.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chief (tug)
The veteran Salvage Chief, which had distinguished herself in Pacific salvage operations for more than a quarter of a century, added to her laurels during the hazardous months of the 1975 sealift. During 143 days in the Arctic, this vessel and her skilled crew saved more than $40 million worth of barges and cargo. Her assignments included towing two barges to Port Clarence followed by standby duties for rescue and salvage operations. The storms of August 25 and 26, with wind gusts to 65 miles an hour, put her to work in earnest. She was ordered to Wainright, some 80 miles south of Point Barrow, where heavily laden barges had been blown hard around and a third, loaded with a $12 million, two-story base camp for 200 men, had been holed by the ice and sunk near the beach. The salvage crew first refloated the two grounded barges, aided by two 9,000-horsepower Red Stack tugs; then went to work on the sunken barge which was completely filled with water in all holds. They refloated her in six days and the Salvage Ch
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chieftain (steamer)
The powerful deep-sea salvage steamer Salvage King having been requisitioned by the Admiralty for war service in the Atlantic, the recently acquired Lillooet was rifted out by Pacific Salvage Co. for similar duties and renamed Salvage Chieftain her first major assignment in her new trade being the salvage of the U. S. transport Kvichak in February, 1941. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 473.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Chieftan (towboat)
Salvage Chieftan, former Canadian Government patrol and survey steamer, sold by Pacific Salvage Co. to Pacific Towing, Ltd. of Vancouver and returned to her original name, Lillooet, for British Columbia coastal car barge towing service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage King
Bottom torn out in 1940. Agnes Rothery. Ports of British Columbia, p. 246, 247.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage King (2) (tug)
The 164-foot U.S. Army ocean tug ATR- 13 was acquired by the Pacific Salvage Co. and refitted by the Pacific Drydock Co., North Vancouver, as the best equipped salvage vessel to enter service in Northwest waters. Renamed Salvage King (2), the powerful steamer was based at Victoria, replacing the first Salvage King, a casualty of wartime service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 555.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage King (tug)
Fire gutted and sank the powerful tug Salvage King at her Victoria berth October 19 despite every effort of the Victoria Fire Department to control the blaze. Tons of water pumped into the hull caused a bulkhead to give way, causing the vessel to sink, smoke still pouring from her holds. No casualties resulted. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 592.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Queen
Pacific Salvage Company vessel. Agnes Rothery. Ports of British Columbia, p. 239.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvage Queen (salvage Steamer)
Pending preparations of plans and the construction of a specialized salvage vessel to replace the Salvor, the steamer Tees was taken over on long - term charter from the Canadian Pacific by the Pacific Salvage Co. to perform salvage duties, later becoming the Salvage Queen. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 298.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvator (schooner)
The Salvator, a four-masted schooner of 467 tons and 550 M capacity, was built at Eureka in 1890 for C. A. Hooper, San Francisco. She was named for J. B. Haggin's great race horse. Later owned by the Pacific Shipping Co., the schooner was sold in 1912 to Libby, McNeil & Libby and operated out of Seattle as a salmon packer. In 1931 she was sold to owners in Seward, and was wrecked in Seldovia Bay in 1935. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvator (schooner)
Unloading barreled salmon at San Francisco. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvator (schooner)
The Salvator, a four-masted schooner of 467 tons and 550 M capacity, was built at Eureka in 1890 for C. A. Hooper, San Francisco. She was named for J. B. Haggin's great race horse. Later owned by the Pacific Shipping Co., the schooner was sold in 1912 to Libby, McNeil & Libby and operated out of Seattle as a salmon packer. In 1931 she was sold to owners in Seward, and was wrecked in Seldovia Bay in 1935. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvatore (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Salvatore 467 tons, built at Eureka, Calif. in 1890, was sold by the Pacific Shipping Co. to Libby, McNeUl & Libby for cannery service out of Seattle, replacing the recently lost Bertie Minor. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 201.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Salvor (salvage Steamer)
One of the oldest and best-known craft in British Columbia waters left the Pacific Northwest in 1918, the salvage steamer Salvor being sold by the Pacific Salvage Co., Ltd. to Powell Davies of Montreal, who planned to operate her in freight service to Australia. She shortly passed to Spanish owners, who renamed her Nervion. Originally the Danube, she was built at Goven in 1869 as an iron vessel, but in the course of the years she was so extensively rebuilt that she was, by 1918, a ship of steel in all but her main frames. Her original engines and boilers were replaced about 1910. The Danube was vie of the British steamships which replaced the famous tea clippers in the trade between China and London, having been the first tea-laden vessel to pass through the Suez Canal when that short-cut to the Far East was first opened to commerce. She was much in the eyes of the British public in 1873 when she was selected by the government to bring the body of the explorer, Dr. Livingstone, from the African coast home to
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Samual Adams (bng, P. 57, 78)
Thirty South Korean fishermen were apparently drowned in the storm-lashed North Pacific some 200 miles south of the Aleutians in September. The South Korean fishing vessel Samsu No. 301 reported two catcher boats of the offshore fleet sunk, each carrying 15-man crews. The Coast Guard Cutter Balsam put to sea in the face of 50-knot winds and searched the area without success. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LVI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Augstin (galleon)
Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. 35-36.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Francisco Xavier (galleon)
Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays.,p . 1, 37-38, 41-42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Juan (halibut Steamer)
ALF, p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Salvador (steamer)
Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 11. Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 314.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Santa Catalina
The new W. R. Grace Co. steamship Santa Catalina, en route upriver to Portland, was set on fire by an explosion below decks which could be heard at a distance of ten miles. Flames immediately shot up from below and swept over the decks with such rapidity that Capt. J. F. Rose beached the vessel. A river steamer removed the crew, and after a 24-hour battle, which claimed the life of a Portland fireman, the flames were subdued, having ruined the vessel's machinery and much of her cargo. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.247.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Santa Catalina (freighter)
October 18, 1914 Freighter, oil, 420'x 53.9'x 29', 6309 gross tons, built in 1913 for W. R. Grace Co. at Philadelphia. The ship, en route New York-Portland, was one of the first through the Panama Canal and, at that time, one of the largest ships to navigate the Columbia. She suffered a fire and explosion in her engine room when twenty miles from Portland; fireman Gus Johnson was trapped and killed in the engine room. Captain J. F. Rose beached his stricken ship, but the cases of ammunition which formed a portion of her 2000 tons of mixed cargo exploded. The $700,000 vessel was repaired at Portland for a cost of $300,000. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sapphire (sealing Schooner)
The sealing schooner Sapphire, an earlier (1888) arrival from Halifax,22 was totally destroyed by fire in the North Pacific on March 25. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966., p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Satsall (steamer)
The Chehalis River, which had been without a steamboat since the ill-starred expedition of the Enterprise in 1859, came to the front in the fall with a home-made production named the Satsall, which was built and operated by a number of dwellers in the vicinity. She was a small steamer, but had plenty of owners. Among them were S. S. Ford, C. Ethridge, A. J. Miller, J. Boise, O. B. McFadden, S. S. Ford, Jr., J. Brady, S. Benn, R. Redmond and G. W. Biles. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.147.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sausalito (schooner)
The Sausalito, a shoal draft threemasted schooner of 367 tons and 500 M capacity, was built by W. F. Stone & Son at Oakland in 1903 for the Humboldt Lumber Co. Later owned by Tidewater Mill Co., Portland, she was sold late in 1915 to the Crowley Launch Co., San Francisco, and was to have been converted to an auxiliary; but she was wrecked on Waddah I., Wash., in December, 1915. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sausalito (schooner)
The Sausalito, a shoal draft threemasted schooner of 367 tons and 500 M capacity, was built by W. F. Stone & Son at Oakland in 1903 for the Humboldt Lumber Co. Later owned by Tidewater Mill Co., Portland, she was sold late in 1915 to the Crowley Launch Co., San Francisco, and was to have been converted to an auxiliary; but she was wrecked on Waddah I., Wash., in December, 1915. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sausalito (schooner)
The shallow-draft three-masted schooner Sausalito, recently purchased from the Tidewater Mill Company of Portland by Thomas Crowley of San Francisco and en route south from Victoria for installation of gasoline auxiliary power, was driven ashroe on Waddah Island, Neah Bay on December 27, 1915. The surf boat from the lifesaving station then maintained at Neah Bay put out in response to rockets fired by the crew of the wrecked craft, removing all hands, the Sausalito becoming a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior,1966., p. 258.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sausalito (schooner)
The shallow-draft three-masted schooner Sausalito, recently purchased from the Tidewater Mill Co. of Portland by Thomas Crowley of San Francisco and en route south from Victoria for installation of gasoline auxiliary power, was driven ashore on Waddah Island, Neah Bay, on December 27. The surf boat from the lifesaving station then maintained at Neah Bay put out in response to rockets fired by the crew of the wrecked craft, removing all hands, the Sausalito becoming a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.258.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sea Royal (tuna Seiner)
Sea Royal, 225 x 41-foot tuna seiner of 1,400-tons capacity, with 20-cylinder General Motors EMD diesel of 3,600 horsepower, probably the most luxuriously appointed fishing vessel in the world, and Atlantis, 237 x 41-foot seiner of 1,600-ton capacity and fitted with new type 4,300 horsepower GVB Enterprise supercharged diesel engine, built by Tacoma Boat, the Sea Royal for Capt. Manuel Andrade, the last of the colorful independent tuna boat owners, and the Atlantis for the Edward Gann fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seal (freighter)
The fast growing inland freight fleet of Capt. F. E. Lovejoy was reorganized, his company taking over the 85-foot semi-diesel freighter Seal of 1913, operated from Seattle to Port Townsend, Hadlock and Washington Harbor by R. M. King and the Wayports Transportation Co., and the passenger steamer Mohawk (formerly the diesel Islander, of 1921), running from Seattle through the San Juan Islands to Bellingham under Island Transportation Co. ownership, these vessels and firms being merged in the Puget Sound Freight & Ferry Lines, a subsidiary of Puget Sound Freight Lines. The remaining vessels of the fleet were operated under the trade name of Capitol Line. An outline of the Washington state capitol building was placed on the funnels of all craft operated by Capt. Lovejoy, the funnels of the passenger carriers being buff and black and the freighters red and black. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 383.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seal (freighter)
The 43-ton motor freighter Seal, 65 feet in length, was built at Seattle and fitted with a 50-horsepower distillate engine. Designed as a fish packer, she was operated in general freight service by Capt. Frank Bevier between Seattle and Hood Canal points. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seal (launch)
A heavy gale which swept Puget Sound in mid-April 1911 overwhelmed the launch Seal off Seattle, the tug Atlas proceeding to her assistance. Capt. W. Hogan, ovaer and operator of the launch, was caught between the hulls of the two vessels in attempting to board the Atlas, both legs being badly crushed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 196.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sedalia (steam Tug)
A small steam tug named the Sedalia was launched at Astoria in November 1873 by the Spedden Brothers. She was used principally in towing, but was totally destroyed by fire near Kalama, July 1, 1874, while en route to Portland in command of Capt. Charles Parker, less than six months after making her initial trip. She was valued at $10,000. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sedalia (steam Tug)
The steam tug Sedalia, built in November, 1873, burned on the Columbia River, near Kalama, July 1st, loss $10,000. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.222.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sedalia (tug)
July 1, 1874 Steam tug, built at Astoria in 1873 by E. C. Spedden, 2 masts, rated approximately 44 tons. Burned at Kalama. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seealder
Sunk by a bomb in 1917. Launched as the Pass of Balmaha. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 117.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seravalle
See WESER (2) .
Citation:
Shoalwater (sidewheeler)
May 1853 Sidewheeler, 93 tons, built at Canemah in 1853, owned by Captain Leonard White. She remained afloat after her explosion at Rock Island in which no one was injured. Rebuilt and renamed Fenix. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shoalwater (steamer)
Low water boat, later called the Fenix and then the Minnie Holmes. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 743-74.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shozui Maru (coal Carrier)
Another new Japanese-built coal carrier, the 747 x 104-foot Shozui Maru, became the largest vessel yet to navigate the Second Narrows of Burrard Inlet when she arrived at Port Moody to load 62,500 long tons of coal at Pacific Coast Bulk Terminals. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Signal (steam Schooner)
The Alaska Pacific Coast Co. operated the steam schooner Signal 475 tons, in freight-only service between Seattle, Skagway and Dyea with semi -monthly sailings. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Signal (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Signal, length one hundred and fifty feet, beam thirty-four feet four inches, depth of hold thirteen feet eight inches, was launched at North Bend in 1887 and has been engaged in the coasting trade since, most of the time in command of Captain Bendegard. The steamer was operated for a few months between Portland and Vancouver in connection with the Canadian Pacific Railway, but proving too slow for that route resumed her work as a freighter. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.345.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Signal (steam Schooner)
The little wooden steam schooner Signal of 1887, of historical importance as the first such vessel to be built in a Pacific Northwest yard, was lost in 1911. She was owned at this time by Capt. E. Curtis, who had a contract with the city of Oakland, Calif. to dispose of the city's garbage at sea. The Signal was engaged in this unromantic trade when, on June 27, 1911, she stranded on Point Lobos while refuming from sea, and became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 198. AL-KI Steamer. The noted old Alaska steamer Al-Ki laid up at Eagle Harbor in October, 1909 following her final voyage from the north in Pacific Coast Steamship Co. service, had been destined for reduction to a barge, but was sold, instead to Capt. Wallace Langley, who planned to enter her under British registry for service between Vancouver and Portland Canal ports. In June, libels totalling $ 10,388 were filed against the veteran steamer as she lay at Eagle Harbor an
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Signal (steam Schooner)
Eight wooden steam schooners were built in California from 1884 to 1887. The first Northwest-built vessel of this type, the 475 ton Signal, was built by John Kruse at North Bend for A. M. Simpson in 1887, a total of 11 being built that year in California. California yards reached their peak the following year when 15 were constructed there and two in the Northwest. Only 10 were built on the entire Pacific Coast from 1888 to 1898, when three were built in Northwest yards and eight in California. By 1905 the Northwest yards had gained a definite lead in this type of shipbuilding. In 1906 only four steam schooners were built in California, with a total of three in 1907. With the exception of the World War I year of 1917, only a dozen steam schooners were completed in California yards after 1907, while 47 were built in the Northwest. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 138.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sinaloa (gas Schooner)
June 15, 1917 Auxiliary gas schooner, 1648 tons. This Norwegian-built ship sailed under the American flag, en route San Francisco-Astoria with Captain James Sannaes in command. She ran ashore someplace in the vicinity of Blacklock Point after she struck a reef in the a.m. hours. Ship and her cargo were a total loss, crew was saved. The Sinaloa is variously listed as north of Cape Blanco, threequarter mile south of Cape Blanco station and 300 feet south of Cape Blanco (it was foggy at the time of the wreck). Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sir Robert Hale
The SIR ROBERT SALE, built in Moulmein, Burma, in 1843. 741 tons (readmeasured in 1875 to 704 tons); 138.3 x 29.9 x 20.5 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); poop 48 feet long, forecastle 21 feet 8 inches (1877 readmeasured at 22 feet) long. Originally rigged as a ship, the SIR ROBERT SALE was re-rigged as a bark in 1867/68. The following information is taken from Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1844/45-1881/82: Master: 1844/45-1850/51 - [not given]; 1851/52-1853/54 - W. Loader; 1854/55-1860/61 - Santry; 1861/62-1867/68 - Lansdown; 1867/68-1868/69 - W. Hawkins; 1868/69-1875/76 - J. Eales; 1875/76-1879/80 - Wake; 1879/80-1881/82 - Wooldridge. Owner: 1844/45-1853/54 - Gldstanes; 1854/55-1874/75 - Teighe & Co; 1875/76-1879/80 - J. D. Wake & Co; 1879/80-1881/82 - W. Paterson. Registry: London. Port of Survey:1844/45-1853/54 - London; 1854/55 - Liverpool; 1855/56-1881/82 - London. Destined Voyage (-1873/74): 1844/45-1846/47 - Madras; 1847/48 - Madras; 1848/49-1850/51 - [not given]; 1851/52-1853/54 - China; 1854/55 - Calcutta; 1855/56-1857/58 - [not given]; 1858/59-1859/60 - India; 1860/61 - [not given]; 1861/62-1864/65 - India; 1864/65-1865/66 - Australia; 1865/66-1867/68 - India; 1867/68-1869/70 - Australia; 1869/70-1870/71 - Kurrache; 1871/72-1873/74 - India. Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs : a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication Nos. 41, 47 (2 vols; Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]-1993), indicates that the SIR ROBERT SALE made voyages, inter alia, from London to Auckland in 1847, from Plymouth to Melbourne in 1852, and from Plymouth to Geelong in 1852. She was also apparently in the Sunda Strait, and within sight of Krakatoa, when the volcano erupted on 26 August 1883. The latest volume of Lloyd's Register to which I have access is for the year 1881/82. For the subsequent history, ultimate fate, and any extant pictures of the SIR ROBERT HALE, contact the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. The ANMM has placed a number of very helpful subject guides, called Pathfinders, on line, of which No. 2: Immigration Sailing Ships is of particular relevance to the history of the SIR ROBERT HALE. -
Citation: [Posted to the Australia Mailing List by Michael Palmer 19 January 1998]

Snoqualmie
Built in Seattle in 1890. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 376.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Snoqualmie (fireboat)
The pioneer fireboat Snoqualmie, having been declared surplus by the Seattle Fire Department, was at this time in use as a pump boat in connection with the placement of the concrete pontoons for the first Lake Washington floating bridge, under construction by the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. and allied firms. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 465.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Snoqualmie (fireboat)
The pioneer Seattle fireboat Snoqualmie, having been sold by the city to Nieder & Marcus and in layup except during her use as a pump-boat in the construction of the Lake Washington floating bridge, was sold to Capt. Martin B. Dahl and completely rebuilt as the diesel freighter Robert Eugene. Capt. Dahl placed the rebuilt vessel in freight and trading service between Puget Sound and southeastern Alaska ports. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 527.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Snoqualmie (fireboat)
The Snoqualmie, the first and only fireboat in the Northwest, was launched at Seattle. She is seventy-nine feet seven inches long, twenty-two feet nine inches beam, and nine feet three inches hold, is built on fine lines with considerable power, and equipped with immense pumps, which on more than one occasion have demonstrated her value. The steamer has been in active service since completion, most of the time in charge of J. W. McAllep and R. C. Connor, with H. H. Kent, engineer, and D. T. Davis, pilot. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.375-6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Snoqualmie (fireboat)
Another historic Northwest vessel, the old Seattle fireboat Snoqualmie of 1890, received a new lease on life under her original name when she was purchased by Menshikof Fisheries from the widow of the late Rufus Choate, who died in 1966. He had used her, under the name Robert Eugene, to supply his sheep ranch on Unimak Island. After a complete overhaul at Seattle Shipbuilding Co., the Snoqualmie was dispatched to Ketchikan to begin a new career as a shrimp and herring spawn processor for the Seattle-based fisheries company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.44.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Snoqualmie (fireboat)
The former Seattle fireboat Snoqualmie of 1890 was destroyed in Alaskan waters by a fire which started in the engine room. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sophus Magdalon (iron Bark)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 37, 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Spallamacheen (steamer)
A sternwheel steamer, the Spallamacheen, eighty-three feet long, seventeen feet beam, and five feet hold, was launched on Kamloops Lake, July 3d, for the Kamloops Steam Navigation Company. She was built by A. Watson of Victoria for the Spallamacheen River trade, and was equipped with a threshing-machine engine, which was very noisy. It was owing to this fact, and probably, also, to a disinclination to attempt the pronunciation of her name in full, that the residents along the lake and river called her the Noisy Peggy. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.261.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Spirit Of Alderbrook (catamaran)
Speedy catamaran carries human cargo to Alderbrook, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 5, 1984. Second Nicholas built catamaran christened; Wes Johnson family of Union, owner, The Marine Digest. October 13, 1984, p. 4.+ Seattle Harbor Tours operator of Spirit of Alderbrook and other vessels, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1986, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sprague (coal Tug Boat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 168, 169, 580.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Stalwart (tug)
Tug refitted here to aid Valdez tankers, The Tacoma News Tribune. December 21, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Stalwart (usns)
Tacoma Boat launches USNS Stalwart, Navy's first ocean surveillance ship, eleven more to be built at Tacoma boat, The Marine Digest. July 16, 1983, p. 26. Tacoma Boat launches first T-AGOS survey ship, The Marine Digest. July 23, 1983, p. 11-14. Navy's first ocean surveillance ship to be christened, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 6, 1983. Tacoma Boat's first sub snooper set for Monday launch, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 7, 1983.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Stampalia
The "Stampalia" was built in 1909 as the "Oceania" by Cantieri Navale Riuniti at Spezia, Italy for La Veloce. She was a 8999 ton vessel, 476ft x 56ft., two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 16 knots. She had accommodation for 100 1st and 2,400 3rd class passengers. She originally sailed between Genoa, Palermo, Naples and New York. In 1911 she was altered to carry 30 1st, 220 2nd, and 2,400 3rd class passengers and sailed between Genoa, Naples and NY. In 1912 she was renamed "Stampalia" and continued on the same service until 17.8.1916 when she was torpedoed and sunk in the Aegean Sea by the German submarine
Citation:
Star Of Alaska
Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 161. Rechristened Balcultha Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Alaska (steamer)
The Alaska Packers' ship Star of Alaska, originally Balclutha, idle at Alameda, California since 1930, was sold in October to F. G. Kissinger of Los Angeles, who planned to convert her to a floating aquarium and museum and tour the Pacific and Atlantic ports with a piscatorial exhibition. She later appeared in Mutiny on the Bounty, serving as a backdrop for one of the opening scenes. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 423.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Bengal
This American bark broke loose from the towline of the tug taking her to open water, and in a gale crashed on Coronation Island, Alaska, outbound from Wrangell for San Francisco, claiming the lives of 110, mostly Chinese cannery workers, September 20, 1908.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Bengal (bark)
This American bark broke loose from the towline of the tug taking her to open water, and in a gale crashed on Coronation Island, Alaska, outbound from Wrangell for San Francisco, claiming the lives of 110, mostly Chinese cannery workers, September 20, 1908.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Bengal (bark)
Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 153-54. One of the most tragic marine disasters in Pacific Northwest history took place with the stranding of the Alaska Packers Association bark Star of Bengal, Wrangell for San Francisco, on Coronation Island on September 20, 1908. In command of Capt. Nicholas Wagner with Gus A. Johnson as mate, the iron sailing vessel departed from Wrangell with about 50,000 cases of salmon in her holds, topped off by several thousand large steel oil drums, being returned empty. More than a hundred cannery workers, mostly Orientals, were passengers for the return voyage south. The steam tenders Hattie Gage, Capt. Dan Farrer, and Kayak, Capt. Hamilton, took the deeply laden vessel in tow, their duty being to take her through the restricted waters of the Alexander Archipeligo to the open sea, where she would proceed south under sail by the outside route. Capt. Farrar was in over- all charge of the two tugs. Although the two sma
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Bengal (bark)
Space would never allow coverage of the hundreds of tragic shipwrecks that have occurred on Alaska's deadly outcroppings. Perhaps none is more grisly than that of the American bark Star of Bengal While returning from Wrangell she was left to the mercy of a great storm and high seas as the two vessels towing her to sea cut the towlines and ran for safety to prevent their own destruction. Some 111 persons, mostly Oriental cannery workers perished in the awful wreck on September 20, 1908, off Helm Point near Coronation Island, when the 262 foot long bark broke up on jagged rocks. An army of cannery workers and crewmen were thrown into the vortex to fend for themselves among 40,000 cases of canned salmon, hundreds of oil drums and a welter of rigging and wreckage. When the veteran iron-hulled square-rigger departed for San Francisco from Wrangell she had either 132 or 133 persons aboard. Only 22 persons survived and among them was Captain Nicholas Wagner, her master, who was falsely blamed in the following court
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Falkland
The Star of Falkland met her fate at Akun Head in Unimak Pass in May 22, 1928, ALF p. 73. Built as the Dunbridge at Glasgow in 1892, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 100.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Italy (iron Ship)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century,p. 20-21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star One (steam Whaler)
Steam whaling in Southeastern Alaska, The Alaska Journal. (Summer, 1984), p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of Alabama
The "State of Alabama" was built by T.Wingate & Co, Glasgow in 1873 for the British, State Line. She was a 2,313 gross ton ship, length 321.2ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 50-intermediate and 200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/3/1873 as the "Alabama" she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Larne and New York on 24/6/1873. In Dec.1873 she was renamed "State of Alabama" and in the same month commenced sailings between Liverpool and New Orleans. On 27/2/1874 she started her first Glasgow - New York voyage and her last voyage on this route commenced on 17/2/1888. She subsequently carried cargo only and in 1891 was sold to the Allan Line, but never sailed for them. She was resold and eventually scrapped in 1896. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.866]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch -13 December 1997]
State Of California
Passenger steamer, American, struck rocks at Gambler Bay, Alaska August 17, 1913 and went down in 240 feet of water carrying 35 of the 146 aboard to a watery grave.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (liner)
A number of serious accidents befell passenger steamships operating in Northwest waters in 1913, the most tragic being the loss of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company's liner State of California in Gambier Bay, Alaska on August 17. The 2,276-ton iron steamer of 1879 vintage had departed Seattle on August 13, 1913 (a sailing date worthy of Olson & Mahony) with a capacity passenger list, a new gold strike having recently occurred in the Shushanna district. Capt. Thomas H. Cann, Jr. commanded the vessel. Capt. Cann had been in charge of the Valencia on her last voyage from Puget Sound to San Francisco, transferring to another command just before her fatal return voyage which ended in disaster off Cape Beale on January 22, 1906. The Admiralty Trading Co. had built a large cannery at Gambier Bay, 90 miles south of Juneau, the previous year, and the steamship company had agreed to place that location on its schedule. The bay had not previously been navigated by large vessels and was sketchily charted. A reef must b
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (steamer)
Passenger steamer, American, struck rocks at Gambler Bay, Alaska August 17, 1913 and went down in 240 feet of water carrying 35 of the 146 aboard to a watery grave.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (steamer)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 268. The State of California, Quarterdeck Review. (Summer, 1981).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (steamer)
The new steamship State of California, built for the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, reached San Francisco, May 8, 1879, fifty-nine and one-half days from Philadelphia, her actual running time being fifty days and twelve and one-half hours. She came out in charge of J. M. Lachlan, captain; Thomas Huntington, first officer; Gustav Reichmann, second officer; C. N. Goodall, third officer; J. A. Jones, chief engineer; H. McLellan, purser; G. W. Edwards, steward. I. W. Wood, at present a well known engineer, was also one of her crew, and W. K. Maitland afterward served as first assistant for several years. She arrived at Portland, May 25th, with Gerard Debney, captain; John Fields, first officer; Gustav Reichmann, second officer; William Thatcher, third officer; J. Jones, chief engineer; H. Wilson, first assistant; M. M. Buckman, purser. Debney remained in command until 1888, when he was succeeded by Capt. H. S. Ackley. In April, 1886, the steamer was in collision with the barkentine Portland, sustaining $10,000
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (steamer)
The first State of California was completed at Philadelphia in 1878 for the Pacific Coast Steamship, but was immediately sold to the Russian government, which offered a large bonus above the contract price. A duplicate vessel was completed the following year, receiving the original name, arriving at San Francisco May 8, 1879 in charge of Capt. J. M. Lachlan, making the excellent time of 50 days, 12-1/2 hours actual steaming time from Philadelphia. A handsome steamer of rakish lines, she maintained a reputation for speed well into her old age, having set a record for the round trip on the Puget Sound-Nome - route in 1901, while in charge of Capt. H. H. Lloyd, which stood for more than a decade. Of 2,266 tons, the State of California was 300 feet long, with a beam of 38 feet. Following her renovation she was placed on the San Francisco San Diego and Eureka runs, returning to northem service in 1911 following the loss of the Cottage City, remaining in that trade until her loss in August, 1913. Gordon Newell, Ma
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (steamer)
The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's passenger vessel State of California was extensively rebuilt by the Moran Company of Seattle receiving new boilers, new cabins and general furnish- ings, and improved deck gear. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 142.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of California (steamer)
The new steamship State of California, built for the northern trade, was secured on completion by the Russian Government, who paid a big bonus over her original cost. Work was immediately begun on a duplicate, which is now on the Portland and San Francisco route. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.257.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Stonewall (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 440.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sudbury Ii (salvage Tug)
Famous old tug awaits her fate in Seattle, The Marine Digest. March 7, 1981, p. 11. Sudbury II sports new lines as Lady Pacific, The Marine Digest. August 15, 1981, p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sun Dial (tuna Clipper)
The Sun Dial, a clipper of similar size and identical power,as the Vina Del Mar produced by the Birchfield works of Tacoma was completed by the Pacific Coast Building Co. at Tacoma, the hull having been previously launched at the Reliable Welding Works yard in Olympia.Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1946, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 532.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sunnyvale (barge)
Sunnyvale, 80 foot self-propelled barge, designed by H. C. Hanson and built by Weldit Tank & Boiler Works at Bellingham for the Libby, McNeill & Libby Packing Co., a twin-screw vessel was powered by two 120-horsepower Caterpillar diesels. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Swallow (steamer)
Another small steamer was built at Portland to be used as a trading-boat. She was a diminutive sternwheeler called the Swallow, apparently not because of her speed, as she was about the slowest contrivance which had yet appeared in the shape of a steamboat. Her owners were Vallard & Underwood, who afterward sold her to T. M. Arnold, who in turn disposed of her to J. S. Heller. The Swallow was forty-five feet long, with eleven feet beam. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Swallow (strang, P. 60)
Another small steamer was built at Portland to be used as a trading-boat. She was a diminutive sternwheeler called the Swallow, apparently not because of her speed, as she was about the slowest contrivance which had yet appeared in the shape of a steamboat. Her owners were Vallard & Underwood, who afterward sold her to T. M. Arnold, who in turn disposed of her to J. S. Heller. The Swallow was forty-five feet long, with eleven feet beam. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Taku (alaska Ferry)
Tacoma boatbuilding refurbishes Taku, The Marine Digest. July 25, 1981, p. 11+ Tacoma Boat refurbishing makes Alaska ferry better than new, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 25, 1981. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Talbot
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Talisman (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 276, 435.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Talkeetna
Another aging Liberty, Alaska Steamship Company's Talkeetna, one of the pioneer container ship conversions, was sold to the Amicus Shipping Co. of Greece and placed in the tramping trade as the Amicus. Like the coastal type motor freighters disposed of earlier in the year, the Talkeetna had last been employed in carrying military cargo to Vietnam. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLVI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Teal (fisheries Vessel)
The U. S. Bureau of Fisheries patrol vessel Teal, 78 feet in length and fitted with a 150-horsepower diesel, was designed by Coolidge & Hanson, Seattle naval architects, and built by Kruse & Banks at North Bend. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 384.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Teekalet Ii (log Tug)
New forty foot long tug delivered to Pope and Talbot, The Marine Digest. October 10, 1981, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Terminal Knot (motorship)
The 3,812-ton Maritime Commission motorship Terminal Knot, built at Richmond, California in 1945 by Kaiser Cargo Corp. and previously operated under a general agency agreement by Alaska Steamship Co., was purchased from the government by that firm. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Thalassa (bark)
German vessel loads at Port Blakely mill around 1900. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
The Dalles (wharf Boat)
Went over the Cascades, North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, II, p. 103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
The Dalles City (steamer)
The Dalles City, on the Portland end of the line, was built at that place, and is one hundred and forty-two feet long, twenty-six feet five inches beam, and six feet hold, with engines fourteen by sixty inches. Capt. Sherman V. Short and Chief Engineer James Gilbreath were in charge of the steamer for the first three years of her existence, and for the past year Capt. William Johnson has had command. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.387.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Thessaloniki
The "Thessaloniki" was built by Workman, Clark & Co Ltd, Belfast in 1889 for the City Line. She was a 4,682 gross ton ship, length 421.3ft x beam 46.7ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 50-2nd and 1,900-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/12/1889 as the "City of Vienna", she sailed for the City Line except for a period starting May 1906 when she was chartered to the Allan Line and completed three round voyages between Glasgow, Liverpool and Philadelphia. In 1914 she was sold to the National Greek Line and renamed "Thessaloniki". She commenced her first voyage for these owners on 16/2/1914 when she left Piraeus for Kalamata, Patras, Palermo and New York. On 24/11/1915 she sailed from Piraeus for New York but called for assistance on 22nd December with disabled engines. The National Greek Line vessel "Patris" attempted unsuccesfully to tow her to port, and she was eventually scuttled on 5/1/1916 when 350 miles east of Sandy Hook. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.323; vol.4, p.1416] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 March 1998]
Thingvalla
The "Thingvalla," belonging to the Danish Thingvalla Line, was a 2,524 gross ton ship, built by Burmeister & Wain, Copenhagen in 1874. Her details were - length 300.7ft x beam 37.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 50-1st, 50-2nd and 900-3rd class. Launched in Oct.1874, for the "Sailing & Steamship Co of 1873" of Copenhagen, there is no evidence that she was used as a passenger ship before being bought by the Thingvalla Line in 1880. She commenced her first voyage for these owners in April 1880 when she sailed from Copenhagen to Newcastle and New York. On 14/8/1888 she collided with and sank the Thingvalla Line vessel "Geiser" with the loss of 105 lives. On 19/5/1890 she was slightly damaged in collision with an iceberg and on 15/9/1898 sailed from Stettin on her last voyage to Copenhagen, Christiania, Christiansand and New York. In 1898 she went to the Scandinavian American Line and on 9/11/1898 commenced her first voyage for these owners from Copenhagen to Christiania, Christiansand and New York. On 26/5/1900 she commenced her last voyage from Stettin to Copenhagen, Christiania, Christiansand and New York. She was sold to Norwegian owners the same year and in September 1903, stranded at Torgfjord, was sold and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1050] The ship was named after the field in Iceland where the old assemblies of the people were held according to Norse custom and usage, and where resolutions were passed for the benefit of their commonwealth. The year 1874 when the "Thingvalla" was built marked the 10th centenary of settlement in Iceland.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 January 1998]
Tidal Wave
Fast passages among the Northwestern fleet in 1877 were made by the Tidal Wave, Captain Reynolds, which completed five round trips between Puget Sound and San Francisco in five months. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tidal Wave (bark)
The Tidal Wave, a bark of 603 tons, was built at Port Madison, Wash., in 1869 by W. H. Bryant for Meiggs Gawley, San Francisco, costing $50,000. Like nearly all the West Coast-built squareriggers she was a smart sailer; in December, 1872, she ran from Port Madison to San Francisco in 5 days, making the round trip in 25 days gross time, and in 1877 made five round trip@ in five months. In 1894 she was sold by the U. S. marshall to A. W. Jackson, being laid up at the time, and dropped from registry in 1909, last being owned as a barge by the Union Lumber Co., San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 6, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tidal Wave (bark)
In 1870, the bark Tidal Wave, built at Port Madison and owned by Meigs and Gawley, made a round trip record for speed between Port Madison and San Francisco, which remained unchallenged for many years, it has been recorded. She sailed to the Bay City, where she discharged 750,000 feet of lumber, loaded a return cargo and reached Port Madison in the short space of twenty-two days. Elsie F. Marriott Bainbridge through bifocals.Seattle: Gateway Printing Company, 1941, p. 183-202
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tidal Wave (bark)
The Tidal Wave, a bark of 603 tons, was built at Port Madison, Wash., in 1869 by W. H. Bryant for Meiggs Gawley, San Francisco, costing $50,000. Like nearly all the West Coast-built squarerig- gers she was a smart sailer; in December, 1872, she ran from Port Madison to San Francisco in 5 days, making the round trip in 25 days gross time, and in 1877 made five round trip@ in five months. In 1894 she was sold by the U. S. marshall to A. W. Jackson, being laid up at the time, and dropped from registry in 1909, last being owned as a barge by the Union Lumber Co., San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 6, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tidal Wave (bark)
Puget Sound's latest production, the bark Tidal Wave, owned by Meiggs & Gawley, made a round-trip record between Port Madison and San Francisco which remained unchallenged for many years, sailing to the Bay City, where she discharged 750,000 feet of lumber, loaded a return cargo and reached Port Madison in the short space of twenty-two days. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.188.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tole Mour (medical Schooner)
Medical scooner in the works, being built by Nicholas Brothers, will be used as a medical vessel in Micronesia, The Marine Digest. October 18, 1986, p. 6-7. Tole Mour, a ship with a heart, the first working sailing ship in the area since 1921, The Marine Digest. May 14, 1988, p. 11-16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tom And Al (dragger)
Tom & Al (ex -Ragnhild of 1900), in use as a dragger, heavily damaged by fire while docked at Astoria in March. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Torrisdale
The figurehead drifted ashore after the ship was wrecked at Grays Harbor in December of 1912, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 122.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Torrisdale (bark)
A series of fierce gales which swept the coast late in December of 1912 caught the 2,184-ton four-masted steel bark Torrisdale at sea, 49 days from Callao for Portland in ballast. Far off course and with both anchors dragging, the big British bark drove into the south jetty at Grays Harbor early on the morning of December 28. Six hours of heroic effort by the Westport lifesaving crew reswted in the rescue of Capt. G. Collins and the 27-man crew, but the Torrisdale, her back broken, was soon engulfed by the sands off the south jetty. The bark was built at Glasgow in 1892 and was 390 feet in length with a beam of 42 feet. She was owned bv J. & A. Roxburgh of Glasgow and was under charter to Comyn Mackall & Co. of San Francisco to loaded a cargo of nearly 2,000,000 feet of lumber at Portland for the west coast of South America. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Transbalt
See BELGRAVIA (2) .
Citation:
Trident (halibut Boat)
Ready for the halibut season, Trident launched in the summer of 1980 by Jones-Goodell of Tacoma, The National Fisherman. (March, 1981), p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Trincomalee
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tusitala
One of the last American full rigged ships to visit the Pacific Coast in 1925. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 172. Honored survivor of a vanished fleet, The Tacoma Ledger. January 24, 1926. Maritime Memories, the Tusitala, The Marine Digest. Defcember 14, 1985 with letters to the editor on December 28, 1985 and January 11, 1986.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tusitala (ship)
The famous full-rigged ship Tusitala, having been sold to the Marine Liquidating Corp. following a long period of layup on the East Coast, was reprieved from the wrecking yard by her purchase (for $ 10,000) for use as a training ship by the U. S. Maritime Commission, which also took over the full - rigged ship Joseph Conrad for the same purpose. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 464.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tusitala (square Rigger)
A most unusual intercoastal and Pacific service was still being provided during these years by the beauffw full -rigged ship Tusitala, which in October, 1927, arrived at Seattle on her fourth voyage from New York and Baltimore via the Panama Canal. The Tusitala was owned by the Tusitala Co., headed by James A. Farrell, president of the United States Steel Corp., and flew the houseflag of the subsidiary Argonaut Line. The lovely sqare -rigger was described as the only luxury in which Mr. Farrell indulges himself, but it was a luxury shared by thousands in the seaports to which she traded, who thrilled to the sight of her gleaming white hull and towering masts, all maintained as no sailing ship in commercial trade for half a century. The Tusitala was built by Robert Steele & Co. of Greenock, the famous builders of British tea clippers, in 1883 as the Australian packet Inveruglas, soon becoming Sierra Lucena of the Sierra Line of Liverpool. She was the last ship built by this notable firm, which failed soon
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tweedsdale (bark)
British four masted steel bark. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 78.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tyee Junior (whale Boat)
Various mishaps befell the fishing and whaling fleets in 1912. The Tyee Jr., Capt. S. B. Shaw being rammed and damaged by an enraged whale in Alaska waters. Gunner Sigurd Blick harpooned the 90-foot sperm whale outside Sitka Bay on August 15. The wounded monster charged the steel killer boat, striking her amidships with a crash whiel shook the vessel from stem to stern. Freeing itself from the harpoon, the whale then disappeared. Two steel ribs on the port side were broken and the dynamo put out of commission by the impact. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Udal
Missionary ship wrecked in 1909. Thomas Crosby, Up and Down the North Pacific Coast, p. 369.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Udal (mission Launch)
The Udal, a twenty ton sloop - rigged mission launch of 40 horsepower, 56 x 12 feet, was built at Vancouver for the Methodist mission service, replacing the Glad Tidings. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Udal (missionary Ship)
Missionary ship wrecked in 1909, CUD, p. 369.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Umbrina (sealer)
The Victoria sealer Umbrina was sold by Capt. J. W. Peppett to Capt. McDonald, old -time South Sea Island trader, for the pearl and sandalwood trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Unalga (cuter)
The cutter Unalga, Capt. John Boedeker, cruised southeastern Alaska and Cook Inlet waters during the summer, was overhauled on Puget Sound in the fall and returned to her regular winter station at Juneau. The famous old cutter Bear, Capt. C. S. Cochran, cruised to the northern limits of navigation, visiting the base of Capt. Roal Amundsen, the noted Arctic explorer, and forcing her way through the ice floes to reach Point Barrow late in August as the first vessel of the year to reach that isolated community. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 323.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Unimak (whaler)
Killer boat Unimak of the Alaska Whaling Company towing a whale into port, ALF, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ural (1)
See PRINZ EITEL FREIDRICH (1)
Citation:
Ural (2)
See KAISERIN MARIA THERESIA .
Citation:
Uralmash (bng, P. 7)
This barge was carried up on the beach north of Long Beach, Washington, after being cut loose from the tug Tidewater Shaver off Columbia bar buoy No. 5, when she and the barge Intrepid threatened to carrry the tug into dangerous waters. Cut free February 22, 1954, at 9 p. m., the barge drifted up on the beach the following day. The 100 foot barge was being towed to Portland from Honolulu when she came to grief. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Urdmak (whaler)
The whaling steamship Urdmak was taken over from the American Pacific Whaling Co. for experimental use as a Coast Guard patrol boat. She proved satisfactory and was later joined by the remainder of the fleet, Aberdeen, Kodiak, Paterson, Moran and Tanginak. The company's moorings at Bellevue, Lake Washington, were also taken over as a patrol boat repair facility. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 508.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Utsalady (sternwheeler)
Built at Utsalady in 1884. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 215.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valdez (barge)
The hydro train barge Valdez, being towed north from Seattle by the Sea Witch, was less fortunate. The rail barge was lost from the tug in an Alaska storm on December 13 two miles west of the entrance to Yukutat Bay and was driven ashore, becoming a total loss along with the 42 loaded rail cars which were to have been delivered to Whittier. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LVI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valdez (barge)
Among the major barges completed in January was the Valdez, seventh Hydro-Train rail barge for Puget Sound-Alaska Van Lines' Seattle-Whittier route. The 400 x 76-foot carrier, capable of carrying 48 loaded rail cars, was identical to the two earlier ones, Kodiak and Homer, placed in service in 1965 and hailed as the world's largest ocean-going rail barges. All three were products of the Bethlehem-Pacific Coast Steel Company's San Francisco yard. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XVIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia
Wrecked off the west shore of Vancouver Island, January 22, 1906, Hunt, II, p. 215. Hero of the Valencia Disaster, The Marine Digest. January 27, 1951.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia
Lost in 1906 with 117 persons. Wrecked off the west shore of Vancouver Island, January 22, 1906. Herbert Hunt, History of Tacoma. II, p. 215. Sea Wreck, Valencia, Pacific Monthly. XV (March, 1906), p. 281. Hero of the Valencia disaster, The Marine Digest. January 27, 1951.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia (liner)
The year 1906- was ushered in with the loss of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company's coastal passenger liner Valencia, in January, and closed with that of the little Puget Sound passenger steamer Dix in November. it is believed that a total of 171 persons died in these two wrecks. The old iron single-screw steamer Valencia, purchased from the Pacific Packing & Navigation Co. by the Pacific Coast Co. in 19(j2, had been built at the Cramp yard in 1882. She was not fitted with double bottom and, like the other old iron steamers of her era, her hull compartmentation was primitive. Normally used in the Alaskan service, she had been diverted to the San Francisco - Puget Sound run, temporarily replacing the City of Puebla, and leaving the former port on the morning of January 21, 1906, in command of Capt. 0. M. Johnson. Passengers and crew totaled 164 persons. The steamer encountered heavy fog off the Farallones, which continued all the way up the coast. Capt. Johnson was forced to rely on dead reckoning. An unusual
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia (steamer)
American passenger steamship, 1,598 tons, wrecked three miles east of Pachena Point, B. C., January 22, 1906, with the loss of 117 lives. This was one of the most tragic ship disasters on the North Pacific. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia (steamer)
Early in 1903, on February 24, the steamship Valencia suffered a mishap wihcih seems indicative of the structural weakness which was to bge tragically demonstrated a few years later on the coast of Vancouver Island. The Valencia was barely under way off her Seattle dock in a heavy fog when the little 110 foot wooden steamer Georgia, just pulling out for Hood Canal points, rammed into the side of the iron steamship about 35 feet from the stem on the port side. Six of the old iron plates were damaged, one being pierced completely through, two beams, two frames and twofore and aft stringers were crushed and broken. The Georgia came off so lightly that she continued on her regular run very much as if nothing had happened. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia (steamer)
The Valencia was also ready for an early start in 1898 in charge of Capt. 0. J. Humphrey. Built for the Red D Line's route between New York, Puerto Rico and Venezuela, she was an 18882 product of Cramp's Philadelphia yard, an iron vessel of 1,598 tons, 253 feet in length and powered by a compound engine 32, 59 x 36. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valencia (steamer)
The Pacific Steam Whaling Co. of San Francisco had the steamers Valencia, Excelsior and Wolcott in service from San Francisco via Puget Sound to Cook Inlet and Copper River, the latter vessel providing feeder service to western Alaska ports. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 36.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valiant (steam Tug)
The 34-ton steam tug Valiant was built at Friday Harbor by Jensen Bros. for their own use, but soon passed to San Francisco owners. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 119.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valid (towboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 372.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valkyrie (yacht)
A colorful Yuletide maritime tradition had its beginning in 1949 when the 106-foot yacht Valkyrie of the Berg Marina was selected as the Seattle Civic Christinas Ship. Decorated by the Seattle Park Department and surmounted by a huge light.ed Christmas tree, the vessel cruised the waters of Puget Sound and Lake Washington for several days prior to Christmas, broadcasting carols by vocal and instrumental musicians provided through the Music Performance Trust Fund of the American Federation of Musicians. The same Christmas Ship has continued to sail annually each year, accompanied by the Hilma III of the Seattle Coast Guard Reserve flotilla. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 561.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vallabhbhai Patel (grain Ship)
Northwest wheat loaded here on huge Indian grainship, The Tacoma News Tribune. September 2, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valley Forge (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 115.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Valparaiso (2)
VALPARAISO (2) was owned by the German, Hamburg South America line. Built by Reiherstieg, Hamburg, she was a 2,247 gross ton ship, length 91,43m x beam 10,97m (300ft x 36ft), straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 30-1st and 150-3rd class passengers. Launched in May 1873, she started Hamburg - Brazil sailings on 19th November 1873. In 1893 she was sold to British owners and in 1902 went to Chilean owners and was renamed "Don Matias". On 23rd July 1908 she was sunk in collision off the coast of Chile. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.201] -
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 July 1998]
Valparaiso.(1)
VALPARAISO.(1) was a 3,575 gross ton ship, built in 1873 by John Elder & Co, Glasgow for the British owned Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Her details were - length 115,57m x beam 12,74m (379.2ft x 41.8ft), clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sails), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 116-1st, 50-2nd and 800-3rd class. Launched on 30th July 1873, she commenced sailings between Liverpool, Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo and Valparaiso on 8th October 1873. On February 28th 1887, she was wrecked off Vigo, Spain while on passage from Liverpool to Montevideo, with no loss of life. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, p.160] -
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 July 1998]
Vandalia
The "Vandalia" was built in 1871 by Caird & Co, Greenock for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 2,810 gross ton ship, length 330ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 150-1st, 70-2nd and 150-3rd class passengers. Launched on 22/4/1871 and meant for the New Orleans service, but started her maiden voyage on 28/6/1871 when she left Hamburg for New York. She made 27 North Atlantic crossings, starting the last on 12/2/1883, and was then sold to British owners. In 1884 she was purchased by the Hamburg Hansa Line, renamed "Kehrwieder" and on 12/4/1885 commenced Hamburg - Montreal sailings. She made her last voyage on this service on 17/10/1891 and on 15/3/1892 made a single round voyage between Hamburg and Boston. She was then taken over by Hamburg America Line, together with the rest of the Hamburg Hansa Line fleet and resumed sailings between Hamburg and Boston on 10/8/1892. In 1895 she was renamed "Polonia" and in 1897 was sold and scrapped at Spezia. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.390] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 March 1998]
Vandalia
The Vandalia, The Sou'wester. (Summer, 1967), p. 35-37. Memorial to a young captain, Sou'wester. (Summer, 1967), p. 35-37.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vandalia (bark)
January 9, 1853 Bark. Bound San FranciscoColumbia. She was spoken the previous day by the Grecian off the Columbia. The Vandalia was discovered bottom-up near McKenzies Head. People from Pacific City (Ilwaco) raced to the wreck scene where Holman, Meldrum, Scudder and Colonel Stewart of that town held off the Indians who were intent upon plundering not only the wreck, but the three bodies that washed up as well. The ship's dead captain, E. N. Beard, washed into a small defile now known as Beard's Hollow. Three other bodies were recovered. It is believed between 9 and 12 people were drowned in the wreck. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Portland: Binfords, 1984, p. 133-134
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vandalia (bark)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 136. Washed ashore north of Cape Disappointment January 9, 1853. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 186. The Vandalia, Sou-wester. (Summer, 1967), p. 35-37.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vandalia (sloop)
700 tons, 127' x 33' x 15'. Built at Philadelphia Navy Yard, 1828; broken up at Portsmouth, N. H., 1870. Armament: 4 8 shell guns, 16 32-pdr. carronades. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 62, 111, 148- 49, 152-55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vansee (halibut Schooner)
Maritime memories, the halibut schooners Polaris and Vansee pictured under construction in Seattle, The Marine Digest. August 1, 1987, p. 5. and The Marine Digest. August 15, 1987, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vasco Nunez De Balboa
See OCEANA.
Citation:
Vera (sealer)
The Vera, formerly the notorious smuggler Halcyon, passed to an Ottowa owner for use as an Arctic exploration vessel. Although she was one of the best of the fleet, she went at auction for only $ 2,100. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207-08.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W.h. Talbot (schooner)
The W. H. Talbot, a four-masted schooner of 816 tons and 1000 M capacity, was built by Hall Bros. at Pork Blakely in 1891 for A. H. Paul, San Francisco, although the managing ownership later passed to her builders. In 1924 she was sold to N. H. H. Borreson, San Francisco, took a cargo of lumber to China, and was sold there for breaking up. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W.h. Talbot (schooner)
The W. H. Talbot, a four-masted schooner of 816 tons and 1000 M capacity, was built by Hall Bros. at Pork Blakely in 1891 for A. H. Paul, San Francisco, although the managing ownership later passed to her builders. In 1924 she was sold to N. H. H. Borreson, San Francisco, took a cargo of lumber to China, and was sold there for breaking up. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W.h. Talbot (schooner)
The 816 -ton fourmasted schooner W. H. Talbot, built by Hall Bros. in 1891, was purchased by N. H. Borreson of San Francisco, who dispatched her to China with lumber. She was resold there and scrapped shortly thereafter. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 355.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Waialeale
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Waialeale (schooner)
The Hawaiian schooner Waialeale, built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakeley in 1884, was brought to Puget Sound by Cary Cook and operated as a propeller steamer on the Tacoma-Vanconver run, replacing the Mainlander. She retained her Hawaiian name (pronounced Wye-Ally-Ally), but was universally known as Weary Willy. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1905, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Waldensian
The "Waldensian" did belong to the Allan Line. She was built in 1861 as the "St Andrew" and lengthened in 1873 and renamed "Waldensian". According to Bonsor's North Atlantic Seaway, she sailed to Quebec and Montreal as the "St Andrew" and to Portland 1874-1880, Halifax and Boston until re engined in 1888. Made last N.Atlantic voyage Glasgow-Halifax-Philadelphia 16th April 1891 and then on the S.America run until scrapped in 1903.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - August 1 1997]
Walla Walla (liner)
The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's old coastwise liner Walla Walla was the victim of the most disastrous shipwreck of 1902. The Walla Walla was one of four iron steamers brought out from the East Coast by the Oregon Improvement Co. and Goodall & Perkins in 1881. Built at Chester, Pennsylvania that year, she registered 2,134 tons, with compound engines 40, 74 x 50. Until 1888 she was operated as a collier, being refitted that year as a freight and passenger carrier, most of her subsequent service being on the San Francisco-Puget Sound run under charter from the parent company to Pacific Coast Steamship Co. On January 2, 1902 she was northbound from San Francisco for Puget Sound ports. In the early morning hours, with the Cape Mendocino light clearly visible off the bow, her officers sighted the dim running lights of a sailing vessel ahead, but there appeared to the officer of the watch to be sufficient sea room and no change of course was ordered. The two vessels came together heavily, the sailing ship drif
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walla Walla (steamer)
The steamship Walla Walla, for many years in the coal trade, was fitted for passenger service in 1888, and in command of Capt. David Blackburn commenced running between San Francisco, Victoria and Sound ports. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.352.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walla Walla (steamer)
The Walla Walla, the fourth steamer of the Oregon Improvement fleet, was built at Chester, Pa., in 1881, and registered 2,134 tons, with engines forty and seventy-four by fifty inches. She arrived at Portland, November 24, 1881, seventy-one days from New York, with W. H. De Wolf,' captain, George C. Campbell, first officer, George L. Hobbs, second officer, Thomas Porter, chief engineer, George H. Crosby, first assistant, D. D. Wass, second assistant. De Wolf was succeeded in command by Captains Simmons, Hansen and Blackburn. The Walla Walla was engaged in transporting coal until 1888, when she was fitted with passenger accommodations. At present she is on the San Francisco and Puget Sound route. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 283.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walla Walla (steamer)
The steamship Walla Walla, under the direction of John Gates, was used in sluicing out a twenty-four-foot channel on St. Helens bar in August. The big propeller moved forty thousand cubic yards of sand in five days, and the work was highly successful. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1882. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 293.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walla Walla (washington State Ferry)
Who's at the Helm? The Marine Digest. April 5, 1985, p. 2 (Comments on a near miss in fog which led to the retirement of its captain also reflects on the system.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallace
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallace Foss (tugboat)
The Wallace Foss began her career in 1897 having been built in Old Tacoma for the Blekum Towboat Company of Seattle who named her the Oscar B. After a rebuilding she was known as the Rouse for her wners and was added to the Foss Fleet when the Rouse interests were purchased. After many years of service to the Foss interests she was sold and was converted to become the yacht Laura E. (Michael Skalley. Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 81.)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallace Langley (steamer)
The river steamboat Wallace Langley was built knocked down by the Johnson Shipbuilding Co. at Seattle and shipped north aboard the steamship W. M. Tupper of the Santa Ana Steamship Co., for assembly at McGrath on the Kuskokwim River. The Langley was built for the Alaska Rivers Navigation Co. of the Northern Commercial Co. and was 110 feet long, carrying 75 tons of freight and 30 passengers on a loaded draft of about 20 inches. The vessel was named for Capt. Wallace Langley of the Santa Ana Steamship Co., a pioneer in the development of water transportation to the vast Kuskokwim River district. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: :Superior, 1966,, p. 429
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallacut (barge)
November 3, 1918 Barge, 708 tons, built at Portland in 1898. While en route under tow Port Ludlow-San Francisco with lumber, the tug tried to cross the bar at low tide. The Wallacut under Capt. Charles Emson, struck the sunken portion of the jetty. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallacut (barge)
The wooden barge Wallacut 708 tons, broke away from the tug Pioneer while on a coastwise voyage from Port Ludlow for San Francisco with lumber and stranded November 2, 1918 on Coos Bay bar. Although later refloated, the Wallacut again broke loose and piled up on the open beach, a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966. p. 300.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallamet
4/8/1854 Steamer, heavily damaged by explosion. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallamet
Used on the Yamhill and the Wilamette. Secured mail contract between Astoria, Fort. Vancouver, and Portland in 1854, Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 160-61, 166. Later used on a run at Sacramento. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 742.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallowa (steamer)
The 125 - foot sternwheeler Wallowa was built at Lewiston, Idaho for the Snake and upper Columbia Rivers' wheat trade. A 150-foot shallow - draft stern - wheel steamer, the Tanana, designed by Capt. J. T. Gray for the Northern Commercial Co., was built at Portland, dismantled and re -assembled at St. Michael for Tanana River service, in charge of Capt. Gray. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallowa (tug)
Tug Arthur Foss, its history, beginning as the Wallowa, The Marine Digest. January 6, 1981. Wallowa, The Sea Chest. September, 1981, p. 1. G.V. T. Spankie, Served as a first mate on the Wallula in 1915, The Sou'wester. (Summer, 1984, p. 31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallowa (tug)
The former Columbia River tug Wallowa went ashore in a heavy gale near Mary Island November 1 while towing the bark Columbia from Skagway for Seattle. She was refloated on the next tide, but three days later the Columbia stranded at the mouth of Portland Canal and became a total loss listed at $ 14,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallowa (tug)
The tug Donald went out of service in 1889, and her machinery was placed in a new hull constructed at Portland for the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company. The new tug was christened the Wallowa and is one hundred and eleven feet six inches long, twenty-three feet nine inches beam, and eleven feet six inches hold. She has been in charge of Capt. R. E. Howes since her completion. A. F. Goodrich was her first engineer, and John S. Kidd has recently filled that position. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.366.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallula (steam Tug)
The Wallula, a U.S. steel, steam tug: 167 gross tons, 99.6 feet x 22.7 feet. 550 H.P., compound engine. Crew: ten. The Wallula was built as a bar tug, to tow sailing vessels over the Columbia River bar, for the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company in 1899 at San Francisco. She figured in many rescue and salvage efforts. The Wallula was sold to the Port of Portland in 1909. In 1912, three of her crew boarded the drifting, abandoned schooner Admiral to secure a tow-line. The schooner capsized while being towed over the bar, but the men scrambled out onto her side and were picked up by another boat from the Wallula. Another time, while crossing the bar on October 10, 1912, the Wallula was completely engulfed by a huge wave that threw her on her side, swept away all her boats and davits, and damaged her super- structure. She was sold to the Hammond Lumber Company in 1912 and again, about 1924, to the Humboldt Stevedore Company, which registered her at Eureka, California under the name Humboldt. The Ship Owners a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallula (tug)
October 10, 1912 This bar tug is a very famous one in the history of the Columbia bar, but whatever happened on this date apparently wasn't much. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Portland: Binfords, 1984, p. 133-134
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallula (tug)
The powerful tug Wallula was built at San Francisco for service on the Columbia River bar. The 167-ton steel steamer was 100 feet in length with compound engines 20 and 42 x 24 inches delivering 550 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 49.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallula (tug)
The Columbia River bar tug Wallula was sold by the Port of Portland to the Hammond Lumber Co. for service at Eureka, Calif. as the Humboldt, subsequently moving to San Francisco as the Red Stack tug Sea Queen. (At this time the Puget Sound Tug Boat Company's Goliah and Tatoosh and the Port of Portland tugs Wallula and Oneonta were scrambling for business at the mouth of the river, ranging as far as 50 miles at sea). Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallula (tug)
The bar tug Wallula was struck by a huge sea while crossing the Columbia River bar October 10. The sea completely engulfed the tug, throwing her on her side, carrying away boats, davits, and damaging the upperworks. The following day the steam schooner Daisy Freeman suffered the same fate while outward bound with a full cargo of lumber. Heavy seas off the end of the jetty damaged her rudder, stove in her hull and carried away her entire deck- load. Drifting helplessly on the ebb tide, she was anchored off the lightship, where the tug Goliah picked her up the following morning and towed her to Astoria, the steam schooner being then so waterlogged that very little of her except smokestack and masts was visible. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walluski (steamer)
The steamer Walluski was built at Astoria by J. H. D. Gray and John G. Blake and after jobbing about the lower river for a few years was sent to Yaquina. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.348.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walpole
Brought supplies to Astoria Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 547. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walsh
The Canadian Pacific Railway comes to Port Blakely, The Sea Chest. (September, 1978). Four steamboats built for Captain Troup, The Marine Digest. June 11, 1983, p. 11. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 215.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walsh (steamer)
The stern -wheel steamer Walsh was destroyed by fire in July 1903 while moored at a dock near Bremerton. Her passengers and crew were ashore at dinner when the fire occurred. The Sound freighter La Conner also burned while carrying lime from Roche Harbor for Seattle, but was later salvaged and rebuilt. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 94.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walter A. Earle (sealing Schooner)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. xxiii.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walter A. Earle (stealing Schooner)
The Sealing Schooner Walter A. Earle capsized with loss of all hands in a gale and snowstorm on April 14, 1895 the same day that the sealing schooner C.G.White was wrecked. Gordon Newell, Casualties, 1895, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. xiii
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walter J. Luckenbach (steamer)
12,000 ton steamer built at Moran Brothers and Company at Seattle. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., II, p. 231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walter L. Rich (schooner)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 441.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walter L. Rich (schooner)
The American schooner Walter L. Rich arrived at Victoria, January 21st, from Provincetown, Mass., having been ashore for six months near Cape Horn. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.432.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Walter Raleigh (bark)
This American bark, 487 tons, reported in trouble off Cape Flattery in 1872. She was owned by Comstock's Dispatch Line of New York. She was towed in. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Washcalore (power Schooner)
Losses in 1911 included the power schooner Washcalore, San Francisco for Astoria, wrecked May 21, 1911, near the Rogue River. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Washcalore (schooner)
May 21, 1911 Oil-powered wood schooner built by Kruse & Banks at Marshfield in 1905. Capt. Peterson carried a crew of 13 aboard when the 140 footer struck Rock Island, a small, bare reef 200 to 300 feet south of the mouth of the Rogue River. The ship drifted and eventually broke in two near a place then called Hunter Point, which may be the same rocks as those located just off Hunter Creek. Captain and crew were saved. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Washcalore (schooner)
May 21, 1911 Oil-powered wood schooner built by Kruse & Banks at Marshfield in 1905. Capt. Peterson carried a crew of 13 aboard when the 140 footer struck Rock Island, a small, bare reef 200 to 300 feet south of the mouth of the Rogue River. The ship drifted and eventually broke in two near a place then called Hunter Point, which may be the same rocks as those located just off Hunter Creek. Captain and crew were saved. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Washcalore (schooner)
A new firm of wooden shipbuilders, Kruse & Banks, began operation in Oregon, at the Stave Mill yard located between Marshfield (now Coos Bay) and North Bend. Late in the year they launched their first vessel, the wooden gasoline schooner Washcalore, which was completed the following year. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1905, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wealleale (schooner)
Formerly the Kauai, Newell, Inalnd Sea, p. 216.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wealleale (steamer)
The Wealleale (pronounced we-alley-alley) carried freight on the Canal in competition with the Buckeye for a short time, but this service was soon abandoned by both steamers. The Weallealle was nicknamed the Weary Willie because it was so slow. You had to line it up with some object on shore to see if it was really in motion. Leslie Stevens, Boats on Hood Canal, memories of Leslie Stevens, Kitsap County History. Silverdale: Kitsap County Historical Society, 1977, Book One p. 30-31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wealthy Pendleton (bark)
The American bark Wealthy Pendleton arrived at Portland in November with the first direct importation of tea, 1,035 packages from Yokohama. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 288-89.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Westphalia
The "Westphalia" of 1872 was built in 1868 by Caird & Co, Greenock for Hamburg America Line. She was a 3,158 gross ton ship, length 339.9ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 520-3rd class passengers. Launched on 24/6/1868, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 16/9/1868. She commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to Havre and New York on 28/4/1875 before being laid up. In 1878 she was rebuilt with two funnels and compound engines, and on 30/7/1879 she resumed the Hamburg - Havre - New York service. She started her last voyage to New York on 19/12/1886 and in 1887 was sold to the British company, H.F.Swan of Newcastle who re-engined her and renamed her "Atlantica". In 1888 she went to Gazzo & Schiafino of Italy and was renamed "Provincia di Sao Paulo". In 1890 she was resold to La Veloce of Italy and was renamed "Mentana" (Haws says "Montana") and was further renamed "Sud America" later in 1890. She was finally scrapped in Genoa in 1901. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.390] [Merchant Fleets in Profile, vol.4 Hamburg America Line by Duncan Haws.]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 October 1997]
Westwhale 7 (whaler)
A most unusual tugboat conversion of 1970 was that of the former British Columbia steam whaler Westwhale 7 into the only commercially operated steam tug in Pacific Northwest coastal waters. The 173-foot vessel, built in Norway in 1952 as the Suderoy XVI, was fitted with modern deck and towing gear and electronics, but retained her original compound steam engines developing 2,200 horsepower. The conversion was done by McKenzie Barge & Derrick at Dollarton to Cove, Hatfield plans for Pacific Towing Services Ltd. As the ocean tug Pacific Challenge, she retains her pleasing lines of a steam whaler and is considered one of the most handsome vessels in the Northwest towing fleets. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Weswhale 4 (whale Catcher)
The former British Columbia whale catcher Weswhale 4, built at Tacoma in 1942 for the U.S. Navy as a YMS-class anti-submarine patrol vessel, was rebuilt, repowered and fitted with sonar and other electronic gear at Celtic Shipyard for a new career as a herring seiner. Renamed Lavallee II, she was assigned by B. C. Packers to its base at Harbour Breton, Newfoundland. The transfer was indicative of the increased interest of British Columbia fisheries firms in the lucrative herring industry of the maritime provinces. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLV.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
White Seal (steamer)
The 193-ton stern-wheeler White Seal, 97 feet in length, was built at Fairbanks for the White Pass & Yukon Route. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1905, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Willamette Valley (steamer)
The Willamette Valley was built at Wilmington in 1883 and was first in command of Captains Hall and Kelly, who were succeeded by Paton in 1889. When the Oregon Pacific became financially involved, the steamer was seized in San Francisco and has been in the hands of the court most of the time since, the receiver preferring to leave her there and to perform her work with smaller steamers, which can be operated at less expense. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.345.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Willamette Valley (steamship)
Steamship Willamette Valley, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 343.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Allen
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., iii, p. 129.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William D, Sewall
"William D. Sewall" was a full-rigged ship of 672 tons, 141 feet long x 32 feet 5 inches broad and 16 feet 2 1/4 inches in depth, built in Bath, Maine, in 1848, by Clarke, Sewall & Co [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), V.3195, 3196, and 3261]. She was apparently a transient trader, following neither a set route nor a set schedule. The only other reference I have to her is the arrival at New York on 4 May 1852 of the ship William D. Sewall, of Bath, Robert Jack, master, from Liverpool 28 March, with 253 passengers (2 deaths) [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 112, list #468; printed in Ira A. Glazier and P. William Filby, Germans to America, (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1988ff), vol. 3, pp. 332-334]..
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 June 1997]
William O'swald
See RESOLUTE.
Citation:
Willie Allen (tug)
An interesting conversion project was worked out in Seattle by Oaksmith Boat Sales and Marine Power & Equipment Co. to provide a specialized fleet for Frontier Rock & Sand Co. of Anchorage, which required a small but powerful tug capable of working the shallow beaches along Cook Inlet, a barge which could be beached and a utility vessel with vehicle-carrying and heavy lift capabilities. A surplus 50-foot LCM-type landing craft was lengthened 15 feet and completely rebuilt as the 65-foot tug Willie Allen, powered by two 12-cylinder GM diesels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLV.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Worrall
According to the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register for 1862/63-1881/82, the WORRALL was a bark, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, and launched in December 1862. 483/483/471 tons (gross/net/under deck); 166.6 x 25.2 x 16.9 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); iron construction; 2 bulkheads; 1 deck, 2 tiers of beams; raised quarter deck 41 feet long. Official number 45441; signal code VDJK. Master: 1862/63 - Parfott; 1862/63-1868/69 - Power; 1868/69-1870/71 - Row; 1870/71 - W. Cholerton; 1871/72 - W. Chalrtn; 1872/73-1875/76 - W. Charlton; 1875/76-1876/77 - W. Cholerton; 1876/77-1879/80 - G. Bowden; 1879/80-1881/82 - Smith. Owner: 1862/63-1870/71 - J. Worrall; 1870/71-1876/77 - W. & J. Tyrer; 1876/77 - G. P. Wakeham; 1877/78-1881/82 - S. Wakeham & Son. Registry: Liverpool. Port of Survey:1862/63 - Belfast; 1862/63-1881/82 - Liverpool.Destined Voyage (-1873/74): South America. The WORRALL was still afloat in 1881/82, and as this is the latest volume of Lloyd's Register to which I have access, I do not know her subsequent history or ultimate fate. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]
Worsley Hall
The "Worsley Hall" was a small cargo steamer owned by the Franco-British line and was heavily involved in the evacuation of Greek refugees from Kemal Pasha who was launching an offensive for the liberation of Turkey. They were evacuated from Smyrna to Salonika in 1922.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 January 1998]
Xenial (motorship)
Tacomans see forty-five foot boat run aground at LaPush. The Tacoma News Tribune. August 7, 1962.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Xenial (motorship)
Tacomans see 45 foot boat run aground at LaPush,The Tacoma News Tribune. August 7, 1962. (From Anacortes, Miles Stevenson, owner.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yale
The "Yale" was launched on December 1st 1906 by the Delaware River Company and was one of the first two American turbine steamers. She was a 3,731 gross ton ship, two funnels and two masts, triple screws and a speed of 22.5 knots. Designed for the express service of the New York - Boston , she actually commenced her first commercial voyage from Boston to St John,NB. She started the NY - Boston service on September 9th 1907 and then went from New York to the Pacific coast in 1910 and was sold to the Pacific Navigation Co of San Francisco. She returned to the Atlantic coast for war service in 1917 and was used to carry American troops from Britain to the French front. After the war she was purchased by the Los Angeles SS Co and returned to service between Los Angeles and San Francisco. In January 1931 she came under the control of the Matson Line, was withdrawn from service in 1935 and laid up at Antioch, Calif. She was sold to a construction company in 1941 and proceeded to Seattle, Sitka and later Kodiak as an accommodation ship for for the employees. She was later purchased by the US Navy, renamed "Greyhound" and used for passenger carrying between the Aleutian Islands. After the end of WWII, she returned to Puget Sound Navy Yard and was turned over to the US Maritime Commission and was offered for sale. In May 1949 she was sold to Walter W.Johnson Co. of San Francisco, was towed to Stockton, Calif. where she was scrapped between July 25th and December 17th 1949. [Article by John H.Kemble, Claremont, Calif. Sea Breezes Magazine, June 1951] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 March 1998]
Yale
The old coastal racer Yale, in service as a barracks ship in Alaska, and later at the Bremerton Navy Yard under the name Greyhound, was declared surplus and assigned to the Olympia Reserve Fleet pending sale for scrap. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yale (steamer)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 53-54, 71-72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yale (steamer)
The famous turbine steamer Yale was purchased by Siems Drake-Puget Sound (a joint venture sponsored by Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co.) for use as a floating hotel at Kodiak, coming north from Antioch, California, where she had been in layup, under her own power and making 17 knots with only half her boilers fired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966., p. 491.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yale (steel Steamer)
One deck vessel with two masts. 3731 tons 376 x 61.3 x 20.2 feet; 1235 crew, 466 passengers; 24 knots. Built in 1906 at Chester Pennsylvania. Brought to the West Coast and operation by the Pacific Navigation Company in the California trade from 1910 to 1916. The Admiral Liner operated her from 1916 to 1918 and became a troopship during World War One. Served in World War II and scrapped in 1949. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Zealandia (steamer)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 8, 12, 23-24, 168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Zealous
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 194, 211-13, 224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Zeballos (seiner)
Canadian purse seiner Zeballos, ALF, p. 116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Zillah May (sealer)
The Zillah May was sold to the Chris Enderson Co. of Aberdeen and converted to the gas fishing schooner Bessie E. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library