Brick (steamer)
The steamer Brick, a diminutive sternwheeler about forty feet long, was constructed at Seattle in 1883 and is still in commission, at present owned and run by Capt. J. W. Tarte. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]. , p. 306.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shubrick (steamer)
The steamer Shubrick was on the Sound the greater part of the year towing revenue cutters, carrying mail and jobbing around wherever her services were needed. She was in command of Captains Pease and Wilson, and during the summer engaged in a very warlike demonstration at Port Townsend. Victor Smith, collector of the port, desired to move the custom-house to Port Angeles, and, on the refusal of those in power to give up the keys, he ordered the Shubrick's guns trained on the town, threatening to fire unless they were handed over. The Port Townsend people temporarily surrendered, but a few days later about twenty of the citizens went to Olympia and swore out a complaint against Collector Smith. As the Eliza Anderson demanded $15 fare from Port Townsend to Olympia, the party chartered the schooner R. B. Potter and started in charge of Capt. H. L. Tibballs, with the craft gayly decorated with British and American flags. As the schooner sailed past Steilacoom the Shubrick was lying at the wharf, and when opposite
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shubrick (steamer)
Early in 1858 the United States steamer Shubrick arrived on the Sound and commenced a career of usefulness in the Government service which kept her name prominently before the public for thirty years. She came from the East to San Francisco in charge of Inspector De Camp and Capt. T. A. Harris, with J. M. Frazer, first officer; T. S. Pickering, second officer; T. Winship, chief engineer; T. J. McNamara, second engineer; and W. H. Wiggins,* water tender. The Shubrick was the first lighthouse tender on the Pacific Coast, although she was called a revenue cutter when she first made her appearance in 1859. She was built in Philadelphia in 1857 of live and white oak, copper fastened throughout, was brigantine rigged, and mounted three cannon. Her dimensions were: length, one hundred and forty feet; beam, twenty-two feet; depth, nine feet ; engine (single), fifty by forty-eight inches. On her first trip to the Sound, Capt. Frank West (now living in East Portland) took command, having been appointed by Capt. John De
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shubrick (steamer)
The steamer Shubrick, now engaged in the lighthouse service in the Northwest, was in command of Capt. G. N. Jessen in 1873, with Captain Giddins, first officer, W. Nightingale, chief engineer, Walter D. Scott, second engineer. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library