Britannia
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Britannia (1)
The "Britannia" was built in 1863 by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. She was a 1,392 gross ton ship, length 261.5ft x beam 33.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st, 90-2nd and 300-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18/6/1863, she started her maiden voyage on 8/7/1863 when she left Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal. Her first (winter) voyage started on 14/11/1863 when she commenced Glasgow - New York sailings. Her captain (Capt. Campbell) was washed overboard and lost during a gale in 1864, while going to the aid of a lady passenger. In December 1869 she commenced a single voyage between Glasgow, Palermo, New York and Glasgow and then between 1870-1873 sailed between Glasgow - Moville (Ireland) and New York. On 29/1/1873 she was wrecked with no loss of life on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.451] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The Shipslist by Ted Finch - 6 May 1998]
Britannia (2)
Built by D & W Henderson, Glasgow in 1879 for the British, Anchor Line. 3069 gross tons, length 350ft x beam 38.5ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. I have no information on her accommodation. Launched on 21/8/1879 for the Bombay service, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Liverpool and Bombay in September of that year. Between 1882 and 1904 she was used on the Indian service except on 3/1/1888 when she commenced a voyage from Calcutta - Port Said - New York. In 1892 she started her first voyage from Glasgow - Trieste (Dep.22/8/1892), Kalamata - Messina - Naples - New York (arr.11/10/1892). Between 1892 and 1897 she made 10 round voyages between the Mediterranean and New York, and in 1901, made two similar voyages. She started her last Mediteranean - NY run on 3/5/1901 when she left Marseilles for Genoa, Leghorn, Naples and New York, arriving on 31/5/1901 with 654-3rd class passengers. She then went back to the India service and was sold in Bombay on 12/2/1908 and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.463]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 October 1997]
Britannia (3)
Built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool in 1881 for the French, Fabre Line. She was a 2456 gross ton vessel, length 328ft x beam 40.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 18-1st class and 1,000-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 25/10/1881 and sailed from Marseilles on her maiden voyage to Bone, Almeria, Malaga and New York on 30/8/1882. In May 1883, she broke her shaft in the North Atlantic and was towed to Cadiz by a Spanish steamer; thence to Marseilles by the Paquet Line vessel "Moselle". On 2/10/1901 she commenced her last voyage from Marseilles to Almeria, Malaga and New York and was then renamed "America". On 17/5/1902 she sailed on her first voyage under this name from Marseilles to Messina, Naples and New York and in June 1906, she again broke her shaft in the N.Atlantic and was towed to Bermuda by the Italian vessel "Dinnamare". On 9/10/1907 she started her last round voyage between Marseilles, Denia and New York and in April 1909 was sold and scrapped at Leghorn, Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1132]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 October 1997]
Britannia (4)
The "Britannia" was a 3028 gross ton vessel, built by M.Pearse & Co, Stockton in 1883 for the International Line. Her details were - length 300ft x beam 40.1ft, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 23/5/1883, she sailed on her first voyage from Trieste to Patras, Sicily and New York on 18/5/1884 (arrived New York 26/6/1884 and left 16/7/1884). On 31/7/1884 she was sunk in collision with the British vessel "Bellcairn" off Portland, Dorset on her return voyage to London. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor vol. 3, p. 1159]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 9 October 1997]
Britannia (5)
See GERMANIA (4).
Citation:
Britannia (6)
I haven't a lot of info on this ship, but she was a 4,295 gross ton ship built in 1929 by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Newcastle. Launched in February 1929, she made her maiden voyage in June 1929, She carried 264 passengers and sailed between Goteborg and London and there was refrigerated cargo space for butter, eggs, bacon, etc. At the end of the war she was used for the repatriation of British soldiers and prisoners from Germany. I don't know what her ultimate fate was, but if Swedish Lloyd is still operating, they will be able to help. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 February 1998]
Britannia (steamer)
The former Terminal Steam Navigation Co. day steamer Britannia of 1902, having been withheld from the sale of that company to Union Steamships, passed to the Howe Sound Navigation Co., organized by G. E. Cates, running m opposition to the Union Howe Sound boats. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 323.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Britannia (steamer)
The 114-foot passenger steamer Britannia was built by Capt. George Cates at Cates Shipyard, foot of Hornby Street, False Creek (Vancouver), B. C., the launching taking place on July 7 with the vessel being christened by Miss Lily Cates. She was operated by Capt. J. A. Cates, a brother of the builder, who had formed the Terminal Steamship Co. in June of the same year, with service between Vancouver and North Arm, Burrard Inlet and Bowen Island, departing from Evans, Coleman & Evans Wharf, Vancouver. The machinery for the handsome little steamer was manufactured in England and her furnishings in Chicago. Her seats, which faced forward in rows, were upholstered in maroon plush and she was generally considered the best equipped day -trip vessel operating from Vancouver. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Britannia (steamship)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Britannia (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 51.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library