City Of New York (1)
The "City of New York" was a 2,360 gross ton ship, built in 1861 by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow for the Inman Line. Her details were - length 336ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 158-cabin and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/4/1861, she sailed from Liverpool on 11/9/1861 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage started on 24/2/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York and on her homeward journey, when approaching Queenstown in the early morning of 29th March 1864, she struck the sunken reef known as Daunt's Rock, and became a total loss. There were no casualties. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,pps.224/240]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 January 1998]
City Of New York (2)
The second "City of New York" was a 2,642 gross ton ship built by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow in 1865. Length 321ft x beam 39.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched as the "Delaware" for Richardson, Spence & Co, Liverpool on 25/2/1865, she went to Inman Line the same year and was renamed "City of New York". On 7/6/1865 she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1871 she was rebuilt to a length of 375.2ft and 3,523 gross tons and on 4/4/1871 resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service. In September 1876 she was chartered to the American Line and completed three round voyages between Liverpool and Philadelphia, and the following year was fitted with compound engines. She was then chartered to the Guion Line and on 8/6/1878 commenced the first of 2 round voyages between Liverpool - Queenstown and New York. On 19/12/1882 she commenced her last voyage for the Inman Line when she left Liverpool for New York and in 1883 went to the Allan Line and was renamed "Norwegian". Fitted with new compound engines, she commenced Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 12/6/1884, Glasgow - New York sailings on 20/11/1891 and Glasgow - Boston sailings on 4/7/1896. Her last Glasgow - New York voyage commenced on 28/4/1900 and her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 23/5/1903. She was scrapped the same year in Holland. [ North Atlantic Seaway , by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.241] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 January 1998]
City Of New York (3)
The "City of New York" was an iron built, 3,019 gross ton, screw propulsion steamer with a speed of 14 knots. She was built in 1875 by Roach, Chester, PA for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co.and sailed on her first voyage from San Francisco to Kandavau (Fiji) and Sydney on 24th April 1876. On 26th October 1893 she was wrecked on Point Bonita, San Francisco Bay. The company ran a service between San Francisco, Fiji, Honolulu and Australia / New Zealand ports and from 1879, advertised in the London Times "An overland route from Britain to Australia, New Zealand, China, etc, via New York and San Francisco in connection with the Anchor Line from London or Glasgow to New York. Through tickets are available". [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 March 1998]
City Of New York (4)
See NEW YORK (2).
Citation:
City Of New York (steamer)
The Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) ordered the City of New York and the sister ships, the City of San Francisco and the City of Sydney, to inaugurate in 1875 a new PMSS route from San Francisco to Australia. The three ships were iron steamers with screws and compound engines but were smaller than the much larger City of Tokyo and City of Peking, which the PMSS operated between San Francisco and the Far East. The Australian route offered little cargo, and consequently PMSS shifted the City of San Francisco to the route between Panama and San Francisco. On 16 May 1877 the City of San Francisco was wrecked on Tartar Shoal, near Acapulco, Mexico, but without any loss of life. When PMSS abandoned the Australia service in 1885, it transferred the City of Sydney and the City of New York to its other routes. The former continued in service until it was laid up in 1910, but on 26 October 1893 the latter ran into the rocks of Point Bonita right inside San Francisco Bay. The captain did not want to delay his sail
Citation: Tacoma Public Library