Cottage City (steamer)
The Cottage City was a wooden single-screw steamer built in 1890 at Bath, Maine for the New York -Portland, Maine service of the New England Steamship Co. A vessel of 1,885 tons, she was powered with a triple expansion engine, 22, 34, 56 x 36. Her equipment included a very powerful and deep-toned whistle which rattled waterfront windows and was soon recognized in every port at which she called. She was overhauled and ready for service at the opening of the 1898 season, being placed in charge of Capt. Wallace. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cottage City (steamer)
Two well known passenger vessels, the Cottage City and the Tees stranded in Canadian waters on the afternoon and evening of January 26, 1911, both being victims of the heavy snow storm which practically eliminated visibility. The Cottage City, en route from Puget Sound for Skagway in charge of Capt. A. C. Jansen, en- countered the storm shortly after noon. The engines were stopped at about two p.m., while the navigating officers attempted to pick up an echo from the steamer's whistle. None being heard, she resumed her course under a slow bell, picking up a faint echo off the port bow a few minutes later. The helm was put over, but before the vessel responded to the change in course she grounded heavily on the rocks off Cape Mudge at the entrance to Seymour Narrows. A wireless call for assistance was dispatched and the 38 passengers and most of the crew removed in the boats, being taken to Campbell River, where they were comfortably housed in a local hotel. Discipline was excellent and the passengers were unan
Citation: Tacoma Public Library