Carrier Dove (power Schooner)
The Carrier Dove, which had gone on the rocks at Otter Point, Cinque Island, Discovery Passage the previous week and was salved, broke away from the steamer Salvor, which had her in tow, and foundered in 75 fathoms off Nanaimo. No one was aboard the Carrier Dove, but valuable salvage machinery went to the bottom with her. The Salvor fouled the tow line in her propeller and narrowly escaped going ashore in the severe gale which was then blowing. The Carrier Dove, a two-masted power schooner of 92 tons, was built at Essex, Mass. in 1884, having been brought to the Coast for the codfishing trade several years before. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carrier Dove (schooner)
Carrier Dove, a four-masted schooner of 707 tons and 925 M capacity, was also built by the Halls at Port Blakely, in 1890. Her first owner was Jacob Jensen, San Francisco, but she later came under the ownership of Bowes & Andrews. When they disposed of their fleet in 1916 at what later proved to have been bargain prices, the Carrier Dove went to J. J. Moore for $35,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 8, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carrier Dove (schooner)
Carrier Dove, a four-masted schooner of 707 tons and 925 M capacity, was also built by the Halls at Port Blakely, in 1890. Her first owner was Jacob Jensen, San Francisco, but she later came under the ownership of Bowes & Andrews. When they disposed of their fleet in 1916 at what later proved to have been bargain prices, the Carrier Dove went to J. J. Moore for $35,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 8, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carrier Dove (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Carrier Dove of 707 tons, built by Hall Bros. in 1890, became waterlogged and unmanageable while on a voyage from Tonga Island for San Francisco with copra and stranded November 2 on a reef near Molokai. The vessel broke up within 30 minutes and all the small boats were stove in, but the crew of 11 men reached shore on floating wreckage. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1921- 1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 329.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carrier Dove (schooner)
A remarkable feat of navigation was accomplished with the arrival on Puget Sound in mid-September of the little two -masted schooner Carrier Dove from South Amboy, N. J. by way of the Straits of Magellan. Purchased by George B. Helgesen, a pioneer wholesale grocer of Seattle, for the Nome trade, she was brought around with a cargo of coal by Capt. John Grotle and a crew of five men. Very few saning vessels of any tonnage have successfully passed through the treacherous Magellan Straits. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dove
Built in Tacoma in 1910. Formerly the Typhoon and later the Virginia III. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dover Castle
The annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for the years 1858/59-1881/82 indicate that the DOVER CASTLE was a three-masted vessel, originally rigged as a ship, but re-rigged in late 1874/early 1875 as a bark, built under special survey at Sunderland in 1858. Official number 20847; signal code N.C.T.R. 1003/1003/881 tons (gross/net/under-deck); 185 x 34 x 22 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); poop deck 73 feet long, forecastle 30 feet long. She was owned first by R. Green (presumably of the firm of Richard & Henry Green, shipbuilders and owners of Blackwall, London) (1858/59-1871/72), then by Shaw, Savill & Co (1871/72-1880/81), then by C. Y. Boe, of Arendal, Norway, who changed her name to KEM (1880/81-1881/82). Master: 1858/59-1861/62 - Adams; 1861/62-1864/65 - Ayles; 1864/65-1870/71 - R. Deacon; 1870/71-1872/73 - W. F. Owen; 1872/73-1874/75 - R. Kerr; 1874/75-1880/81 - A. Culbert; 1880/81-1881/82 - not given. Port of Registry: 1858/59-1880/81 - London; 1880/81-1881/82 - Arendal. Port of Survey: 1858/59-1881/82 - London. Destined Voyage (omitted from the Register after 1873/74): 1858/59-1859/60 - not given; 1860/61-1870/71 - Australia; 1870/71-1871/72 - India; 1871/72-1873/74 - not given. I do not know the later history of ultimate fate of the KEM, late DOVER CASTLE. For further information on the DOVER CASTLE, check David macGregor, Merchant Sailing Ships, 1850-1875 (London: Conway Maritime Press, 1985), and contact the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney, which has an excellent collection of sources for the history of sailing vessels to Australia, and whose Pathfinder No.2: Immigration Sailing Ships, is a particularly useful research guide. For surviving accounts of voyages to Australia on board the DOVER CASTLE, check Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs : a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to 1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication Nos. 41, 47 (2 vols; Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]-1993).
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]
Dover Castle (2)
The "Dover Castle" was a 8,271 gross ton ship, built in 1904 by Barclay Curle, & Co, Glasgow for the Union Castle Mail SS Co. Her details were - length 475ft x beam 56ft, single funnel, twin screws and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 220-1st and 250-3rd class passengers. There was also capacity to carry about 300 passengers in open-berth accommodation. She was used on the UK - South Africa service until converted to a hospital ship for the Great War. Torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC.67 on 26th May 1917, with 632 patients, while 50 miles north of Bona. [The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A.Sawyer] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 May 1998]
Llandovery Castle (british Hospital Ship)
The sinking of the British hospital ship Llandovery Castle announced by the British Admiralty to have been sent to the bottom by an enemy submarine on June 27, 1918 with the probable loss of more than 200 lives was due to her striking a British mine says a semi-official note from Berlin received in Amsterdam on July 3, 1918. Like all similar assertions of the British admiralty, the note reads, the assertion in this case that a German submarine was responsible for the fate of the Llandovery Castle is also probably incorrect. It appears from the later news that no one on board the steamer observed a U Boat or a torpedo. In all probability the cause of the loss will be found to be attributable to a British mine. The Tacoma Daily Ledger. July 4, 1918, p. 1.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library