Eliza Anderson (steamer)
E.T. Short, The Eliza Anderson--After many years, The Tacoma Times. November 22, 1934. Launched in 1858. Worked on Puget Sound from 1859 to 1889. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 241, 243. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, 105-110. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 70 Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., IV, p. 167, 171, 194. Speidel, p. 99, 326. James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait. , p. 208, 256, 274, 305. OOCR, p. 47-49. Morgan, Murray C. Puget's Sound. p. 150, 155. Pacific Northwest Quarterly. XLV, p 73-84. Kautz, August V. Nothing Worthy of Note Transpired Today. p. 353-54. William Spiedel. Sons of the profits., P. 99, 326.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
For some ten years the Eliza Anderson (the largest, to appear up to this time) ran on the Sound, much of the time without opposition, and it is said that during this period she earned more money than she could carry. While this steamer was charging and receiving $20 each for carrying passengers from Olympia to Victoria, 150 miles, the Brother Jonathan and other ocean steamers were performing the same service between Portland and San Francisco for $5 in the cabin and $2.50 in the steerage. In the one case, however, there was monopoly; in the other active competition. . . In addition to the large sums thus earned (for freight, livestock and passengers) she received for some years a handsome subsidy for carrying the mail, for which the government paid at one period $36,000 per annum for a weekly service only. In view of these facts it may readily be believed that in the course of her career she earned enough money almost to sink her. (Prosch, Reminiscences of Washington Territory). Between Olympia and Vict
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
While at dock in Seattle the steamer Eliza Anderson sank in 1882. Subsequently she was raised and reentered into service (Wright 1961, Argonauts 1988).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
Two vigorous steamboat wars, which had been prolonged for several months, came to an end in 1885. The Canadian Pacific Navigation Company withdrew from the east coast route in consideration of twenty-five per cent of the gross receipts from the business handled by the People's Navigation line. The Eliza Anderson, which had withstood all efforts to remove her from the route, was seized by Collector Beecher of Port Townsend, charged with carrying contraband Chinamen. Wright was ruined and the opposition ended, but the charge was never proven. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1885, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 328.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
The ripple of excitement caused by the incipient rivalry of the preceding year on the Puget Sound routes had subsided, and the Eliza Anderson was almost alone in her glory, charging fifteen dollars fare to Victoria from Olympia, with an additional Federal tax of fifty cents per head. The Anderson had been thoroughly overhauled and supplied with new boilers, and enjoyed three years of prosperity, clearing from $3,000 to $6,000 per month and equipping her owners for any combat which might occur. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
The keel of the Eliza Anderson was laid at the foot of what is now Couch Street in Portland in 1857, but it was about eighteen months later before she was ready for service. She was constructed by Samuel Farnam for the Columbia River Steam Navigation Company, the principal members of which were Hoyt and Wells, the pioneer steamboat men, although S. G. Reed, Benjamin Stark, Richard Williams and J. C. Graham were also interested. This vessel, which was the largest low-pressure boat in Oregon of home construction, was launched November 27, 1858, and made a trial trip January 2, 1859. Soon after completion she was sold to John T. Wright and Bradford Brothers and taken to the Sound in command of Capt. J. G. Hustler. On her arrival Captain Fleming took charge, and the steamer began a career of moneymaking which has never been equaled by so slow a boat. She was the first vessel inspected in the Victoria district after the appointment of an inspector, and, with the exception of a few intervals while she was laid up f
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
Another important addition to the British Columbia and Puget Sound fleet was the steamer Eliza Anderson, built in Portland the preceding year and sent round in March, Captains Wells and Hustler going with her. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.83.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
Finch & Wright had refitted the Eliza Anderson with boilers from the wrecked Suwannee and were using her in place of the new steamer Olympia, and the Anderson and the Isabel indulged in some lively races between Victoria and Port Townsend, the latter boat proving the faster. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Anderson (steamer)
On Puget Sound the steamer Eliza Anderson met with the customary periodical opposition, her antagonist in 1866 being the steamer Josie McNear, which was brought up from San Francisco and placed on the mail route between Olympia and Victoria. Capt. J. G. Parker had secured the postal contract and afterward released it in favor of Hale, Crosby & Winsor, the purchasers of the Josie McNear, who intended taking him in as a partner; but, as Parker did not like the appearance of the Josie, he refused to join them, and they began operating the steamer in July. The Anderson made a desperate fight from the start, and, greatly excelling the McNear in speed, forced the owners of the latter to trade her for a better boat. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.147.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library