Emily
The Emily, of twenty-two tons, was built at Deception Pass, Washington in 1884. E. W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895). New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961., p. 325.
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Emily (steam Schooner)
July 17, 1893 Steam schooner. Captain F. G. Lucas. Ship struck and broke rudder. One dead. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
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Emily (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Emily, Capt. F. G. Lucas, while crossing Coos Bay bar, struck and lost her rudder, July 17th, and becoming unmanageable drifted on South Spit, proving a total loss. Those on board were rescued by the life-saving crew, only one life being lost, that of a passenger who refused to obey the instructions of the captain. The Emily was built in 1887 and valued at about $20,000. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.412.
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Emily F. Whitman (schooner)
The schooner Emily F. Whitman was wrecked at Nushagak in 1912. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 211.
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Emily Farnum
The American ship Emily Farnum, 1,194 tons, sailed from San Francisco for Departure Bay, November 12, 1875, in command of Captain Austin, with nine passengers, nineteen crew, and one hundred tons of railroad iron. She had fine weather until the sixteenth, when a heavy southeast gale raged, during which the cargo shifted and the ship lost considerable canvas. On the eighteenth the wind increased, accompanied by squalls and snow, and at midnight land was reported dead ahead. An attempt was at once made to stay the ship, which failed, and she was again hauled to the wind, but, in endeavoring to weather Destruction Island, a heavy sea drove the vessel toward the rocks, and at 12:30 she struck heavily. The port anchor was let go and the main and mizzen mast cut away. An effort was also made to launch the boats, but they were destroyed by the force of the waves. The foremast was then cut away, forming a bridge to the rocks to the leeward. At 2:00 A.M. the vessel parted amidships, the top part of her house, to which
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emily Farnum
The American ship Emily Farnum, 1,194 tons, sailed from San Francisco for Departure Bay, November 12, 1875, in command of Captain Austin, with nine passengers, nineteen crew, and one hundred tons of railroad iron. She had fine weather until the sixteenth, when a heavy southeast gale raged, during which the cargo shifted and the ship lost considerable canvas. On the eighteenth the wind increased, accompanied by squalls and snow, and at midnight land was reported dead ahead. An attempt was at once made to stay the ship, which failed, and she was again hauled to the wind, but, in endeavoring to weather Destruction Island, a heavy sea drove the vessel toward the rocks, and at 12:30 she struck heavily. The port anchor was let go and the main and mizzen mast cut away. An effort was also made to launch the boats, but they were destroyed by the force of the waves. The foremast was then cut away, forming a bridge to the rocks to the leeward. At 2:00 A.M. the vessel parted amidships, the top part of her house, to which
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Emily Gardiner
See LORD BROUGHAM.
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Emily Harris (steamer)
The steamer Emily Harris, Capt. Alexander Court, left Victoria for Fraser River points on her initial trip March 1st, with eighty tons of miscellaneous freight, and continued in that traffic for several years as a jobbing steamer. She also ran between Nanaimo and Victoria carrying coal, and towing whenever work could be secured. Court was succeeded by Captain Titcomb, the pioneer Victoria pilot; Wallace, Chambers, McIntosh, Hewitt, Greenwood and Frain. The latter, an American who went to British Columbia from Coos Bay, was the last in command, meeting death with two companions when the steamer exploded her boiler in August, 1871 (see wreck of Emily Harris, 1871). The dimensions of the Emily Harris were: length, one hundred feet; beam, sixteen feet six inches; depth, six feet. Her engines were twelve by fifteen inches and drove a propeller four and one-half feet in diameter, with six and one-half feet pitch. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewi
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Emily Harris (steamer)
A laxity of laws governing steam navigation in British Columbia waters was brought to public notice in August, 1871, when the pioneer Emily Harris, the fourth steamer built in the colony, exploded her boiler, killing the veteran Captain Frain, and leaving a mystery regarding the occurrence which has never been solved. The steamer left Nanaimo for Victoria, August 14th, with sixty tons of coal. An Indian called Joe, who acted as engineer while Captain Frain was steering, escaped unhurt, as did two or three other Indians on board at the time, and their accounts of the manner in which the accident occurred were very unsatisfactory. Captain Frain, a passenger, and the Chinese cook, were missing, and none of the bodies were ever found, a fact which at that time caused considerable talk of foul play. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.198-9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emily Harris (steamer)
A laxity of laws governing steam navigation in British Columbia waters was brought to public notice in August, 1871, when the pioneer Emily Harris, the fourth steamer built in the colony, exploded her boiler, killing the veteran Captain Frain, and leaving a mystery regarding the occurrence which has never been solved. The steamer left Nanaimo for Victoria, August 14th, with sixty tons of coal. An Indian called Joe, who acted as engineer while Captain Frain was steering, escaped unhurt, as did two or three other Indians on board at the time, and their accounts of the manner in which the accident occurred were very unsatisfactory. Captain Frain, a passenger, and the Chinese cook, were missing, and none of the bodies were ever found, a fact which at that time caused considerable talk of foul play. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.198-9.
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Emily Packard (schooner)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, P. 301. Donald H. Clark, Floating stores served pioneers one hundred years ago, The Seattle Times. May 3, 1953. First ship built in Olympia. Forty ton schooner. Used for selling goods along the shores of Puget Sound.
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Emily Packard (schooner)
The schooner Emily Packard,* from Shoalwater Bay, and the brig Cyrus, from Steilacoom, were also lost during that year. *The schooner Emily Packard, leaving Shoalwater Bay for San Francisco with a cargo of 2,500 baskets of oysters, was blown ashore during a sudden storm February 21st, becoming a total loss. The crew were all saved. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.79.
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Emily Reed (bark)
February 14, 1908 Bark, American, wooden, 1564 tons, 215'x 40.61 x 24. 11, built at Waldboro, Maine in 1880, owned by Hind-Rolph & Co. See story The Incredible Drift. The ship's ribs were uncovered in the sands by the winds in 1938. She and her cargo of coal were a total loss. Eight died. Because of this and other wrecks in the area, a Life Saving Station was established under Captain Farley with a crew of eight men on stand-by. Don Marshall, Ship disasters from Cascade Head to Nehalem River,Oregon Shipwrecks, 1985, p. 96-98.
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Emily Reed (bark)
The American wooden bark Emily Reed of Hind, Rolph & Co., San Francisco, Capt. Kessel, 102 days out from Newcastle, New South Wales, for Portland with coal, went ashore shortly after midnight February 14, 1908, at the mouth of the Nehalem River on the Oregon coast and broke in- two. Heavy weather had prevailed for several days off the Oregon and California coasts and the bark's chronometers were off. As a result her master worked her in too close endeavoring to pick up Tillamook Rock. When he discovered his position it was too late to wear ship and she struck on one of the most dangerous sections of the Oregon coast, going ashore bow -on in heavy seas and on a strong ebb tide. When she hit the beach her back broke, the forward section listing over to port. A boat was launched with four men in it, but it was believed to have swamped. The men on the forward section were swept overboard by the surf. The captain, Mrs. Kessel, Second Mate Charles Thompson and Seamen Barney Sullivan, H. Franchez and Herman Bertell
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Emily Stephens (schooner)
February 8, 1881 Schooner, 68 tons, built at Westport by W. J. Stephens, 77'x 21'x 7'. Wrecked on Clatsop Spit. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
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Emily Stevens (schooner)
American schooner, 100 tons, stranded on Clatsop Spit, February 8, 1881. She was given up as a total loss and abandoned by her crew, who were picked up by the tug Columbia. Later the schooner drifted off the shoal, and floated out to sea where it was picked up comparatively undamaged by the tug Columbia, which towed it to Astoria, and collected 1950 in salvage money. Master of the tug was Captain Eric Johnson. The 87-foot schooner was built at Westport, Oregon, in 1879, by Captain Alexander Henderson for service as a halibut schooner. At the time the Stevens struck Clatsop Spit she was inbound from Eureka for Portland with a cargo of lumber. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
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Emily Stevens (schooner)
Stranded on Clatsop Spit, February 8, 1881. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 163.
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Emily Stevens (schooner)
The schooner Emily Stevens, eighty-seven feet long, twenty-two feet beam, and eight feet hold, was launched at Westport, Or., by Capt. Alexander Henderson for halibut fishing. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.272.
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Emily Stevens (schooner)
The schooner Emily Stevens, from Eureka with lumber for Portland, drifted on Clatsop Spit, February 8, 1881, and was abandoned by the crew, who were rescued by the tug Columbia, Capt. Eric Johnson. The schooner afterward went out over the middle sands and was picked up comparatively uninjured and towed to Astoria by the Columbia. The tug was awarded $950 salvage, Capt. Eric Johnson, master, $250, Pilot Hewett, who was aboard, $205, the engineer $170, firemen $50 each, three deckhands and a cook $75 each. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 290.
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