A. J. Fuller
(Square rigger) - Another of the fast vanishing breed Of American wooden square- riggers, the splendid old A J. Fuller of 1881, met her end in 1918. rae 1,849-ton vessel had once been a unit of Flint & Company's fleet of notable Downeast skysail -yarders. Passing to the California Shipping Co. at the turn of the century, and later to Capt. Derrnot, she was engaged for some years in the Puget Sound - Australian timber trade and made a number of excellent passages despite the later reduction of her sail area. During the war she was engaged in the Alaska salmon trade under the houseflag of Northwestern Fisheries Co. She arrived at Seattle late in October with a full cargo of canned salmon. On October 30shewas moored at a buoy in the harbor, having discharged several hundred passengers consisting of fishermen and cannery workers brought down from the company's station at Uyak, Kodiak Island. It was planned to remove her cargo when space became available at the company's pier. A dense fog blanketed Elliott Bay during the night and early morning hours. At 1:00 a.m. the 0. S.K. trans-Pacific steamship Marico Maru, entering port at the terminati
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
A.j. Fuller
(Square rigger) - Built in 1881 in Bath, Maine, the 1849 ton, 229 foot, square rigged ship, A.J. Fuller was originally a notable Down east sky sail-yarder for the Flint & Company fleet. Purchased at the turn of the century by the California Shipping Company and subsequently by Capt- Dermot, she was engaged for several years in the Puget Sound-Australian timber trade. After the outbreak of World War I the A.J. Fuller sailed under the Northwestern Fisheries Company in the Alaskan salmon trade. On October 30, 1919 she arrived in Seattle with a full load of salmon and salt. While sitting at anchor in a dense fog, the steamship Mexico Maru entered the port on a regular trans-Pacific run and collided with the A.J. Fuller. The ten foot hole torn in the bow of the wooden ship caused her to rapidly sink. Although salvage was deemed possible the underwriters decided against it. The approximate position of the A.J. Fuller is 2000 ft offshore of Harbor Island at a depth of 240 feet. (Newell 1966:163, 300). Some months after the vessel sank Captain Henry Finch, a Seattle diver, descended to the upper yard of the square rigger which was approximately
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
A.j.fuller
- Locked in Bering Sea ice. Built at Bath, Maine in 1881 by J. McDonald. Lost in a collision in Elliot Bay in 1918. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 46.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Adelaide Metcalf
The ship ADELAIDE METCALF, 673 tons, was built in Damariscotta, Maine, in 1849, and registered at New York on 7 May 1850 [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 17]. There is no reference to her in either Fairburn's Merchant Sail or Cutler's Queens of the Western Ocean, so I know nothing about her other than the following 2 voyages to New York: 1852 Apr 29 - Ship ADELAIDE METCALF, of Boston, Scott, master, arrives at New York, 27 days from Antwerp, with 337 passengers to R. W. Trundy. 1855 Mar 27 - Ship ADELAIDE METCALF, Hanson, master, arrives at New York, from Havre 14 Feb 1855, with 136 passengers to Metcalf & Lovejoy. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]
Adeline Foss
(Tug) - Built at Tacoma in 1898. 66 gross tons. 72.2 feet length. Owned by FossLaunch and Tug. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Adeline Foss.
(Tugboat) - The second Adeline Foss was built in 1943 at the Northwest Shipping Company at Bellingham as one of sixty MIKI-Class tugs used by the U.S. Army. She served in Alaska and was given the name SGT. Raymond Baser. After the war she was placed in the reserve fleet until purchased by Foss. After a brief lay-up she was refurbished and operated in Alaskan and Northwestern waters. After service including several times in reserve status she was sold in April 1977 to the Belco Petroleum Company of Callao, Peru and was given the name Ann W. Michael Skalley, The Adeline Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 199.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Rodnf
(Steamer) - Wood steainer; 1 deck, 2 masts; 1,101 tons; 175 x 36 x 14 feet; 19 cre\%,; 75 passengers; 8 knots. Built in 1899 at Fairhaveii, California, as Despatch. Purchased by Admiral Line in 1919. Operated between 1919 and 1930 in Alaskan trade. Burned at Seattle in 1937. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Affon
See LIGURIA.
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Afra
See JUNO.
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Afric
The "Afric" was a 11,948 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line's Australian trade in 1899. She had one funnel, four masts, refrigerated cargo space for the carriage of frozen meat, twin screws and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 350 single-class passengers. She commenced her maiden voyage on 8th Feb.1899 when she left Liverpool on a trial run to New York, after which she returned to Belfast for some months to allow alterations to be carried out. On 9th Sept.1899 she sailed from Liverpool for Capetown, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. She continued on the Australia service until 12th Feb.1917 when she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off the Eddystone Rock, English Channel. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 August 1998]
African (2)
See CITY OF LIMERICK .
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African (1)
See SOVEREIGN.
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African Queen
- Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 185.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
African Queen
(Steamboat) - The African Queen, the 30-foot steamboat that starred with Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn in the motion picture African Queen, was purchased in San Francisco by Hal Bailey of Eugene for use in passenger service on the Deschutes River at a residential development south of Bend, Oregon. The boat was brought from the Congo several years earlier after years of work there as a mail and passenger boat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Agnes Foss
(Tugboat) - The Agnes Foss was constructed for the U.S. Army in 1904 as the Colonel George Armistead. Converted to a tug in 1942 and renamed. Sold by Foss in 1970 and renamed Celtic, working in Philippine waters. (Marine Digest. August 31, 1985, p. 6. Also mentioned in Marine Digest. August 25, 1985 as the Colonel George Armistead.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Agnes Foss (2
(Tugboat) - The Foss Company's second AGNES was built by McDermott Shipyard Group of Amelia Louisiana for the Inland River Transportation Company of Clayton, Missouri. They named her OCEAN STAR and she towed between ports on the Gulf Coast and, the Caribbean. Though her home port was St. Louis, she had none of the characteristics of a Mississippi river boat. The OCEAN STAR was a standard design McDermott ocean-class tug of 3,000-horsepower. Her service for Foss began in the Alaska and Coastwise area but by the end of the 1970s most of her time was begin spent on the Gulf and East Coasts. Michael Skalley, The Agnes Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 288.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alba (of 1920)
See SIERRA VENTANA (1) .
Citation:
Alf, P. 113
-
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alfa
(Gas screw) - American gas screw, 36 tons, wrecked near Ocean Park, Washington, September 19, 1924. The craft was wrecked while trying to land an illegal cargo of liquor on Klipsan Beach. The crew narrowly escaped with their lives and the vessel was leveled by the surf. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alfonso Xii
See HAVEL.
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Alfonso Xiii
See OCEANA.
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Alfred
The ALFRED, variously described as a ship or a bark, was built in Lulea, Sweden, in 1842, and was originally named AUSTRALIA. On 30 November 1844, she was purchased from Liliewalch of Stockholm by the Hamburg firm of Joh. Ces. Godeffroy & Sohn, who renamed her ALFRED, despite the fact that the firm already owned another vessel of this name. 225 Commerzlasten; 133.5 x 32.8 x 19.11 Hamburg Fusse (1 Hamburg Fuss =3D .2=86 meters) length x beam x depth of hold, "zwischen den Steven".. Masters: 1847-1847 - J. Lafrenz; 1847-1851 - H. E. Decker; 1851-1854 - H. Bruhns. Voyages: 1845 - New Orleans; 1845-1846 - Valparaiso/Lima; 1846-1847 - Havre/intermediate ports/New York; 1847-1848 - Arracan/London; 1848-1849 - Adelaide/Callao; 1849-1850 - Adelaide/intermediate ports/London; 1851-1852 - New York/Valparaiso; 1852-1853 - Valdivia/Valparaiso/Iquique; 1853-1854 - Melbourne/intermediate ports/Antwerp. The ALFRED was sold to Norwegian interests in 1855, renamed RHEA, and placed under the command of Capt. Eckersberg. I have no information on her later history or ultimate fate [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 165].-
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration=Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 August 1998]
Alfred Adams
(Schooner) - The Alfred Adams, Capt. W. H. Dyer, was captured and ordered to Sitka, but the Indian crew, having a suspicion of the experience of some of their companions, mutinied, and compelled the captain to go to Victoria, keeping a close watch on the compass to make sure that he went there. The officers of the schooner seized were detained in Sitka for six weeks and then released. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.431-2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alfred I. Bea
(Built in Tacoma in 1898) - Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alice Stofen
(Schooner) - A remarkable voyage from San Francisco to Point Barrow was completed in August by H. C. Slate, an old Arctic trader, who purchased the 1 7 -ton bay scow schooner Alice Stofen, a venerable craft of 46 years, loaded her with trading goods, and took her from the Golden Gate to the Arctic. Peter Peterson was mate, cook and crew, and the ancient Alice Stofen with her tiller lashed, was said to have sailed herself a good portion of the voyage. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Alsterfee
See ORANASIA .
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Amalfi
The "Amalfi" was built by M.Pearse & Co, Stockton in 1881 for the Sloman Line of Hamburg. She was a 2,345 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 36.1ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 600-3rd class. Launched on 7/5/1881, she sailed on the Hamburg - Australia service until 1886 when she came under the control of the newly formed Union Line. She commenced her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 19/5/1886 and started her last voyage on this service on 27/7/1898. In 1911 she was sold to Swedish owners and renamed "Ada". On 9/6/1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.61, while 25 miles east of Fair Isle. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1166] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 May 1998]
Amerique (2) (of 1926)
SIERRA VENTANA (1) .
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Anafi
(719 foot built carrier) - Maiden voyage ceremonies in Tacoma, Marine Digest. (October 26, 1985), p. 20. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Andrew Foss
(Tractor tug) - Third of four Foss Tractor Tugs Christened, November 12, The Marine Digest. November 20, 1982. Pierce 28 in Seattle. by Dr. Marlen Forde Casey. (il). Andrew Foss assisting new APL containership President Lincoln on the day following the tug's christening, The Marine Digest. November 27, 1982, p. 12 and 14.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Andrew Foss
(Tug) - The steam tug Andrew Foss, formerly the Wallows, having recently had her house destroyed and machinery damaged by fire, was rebuilt and repowered with a 500-horsepower diesel. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 386.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Andrew Foss (
(Tug) - The first Andrew Foss was built in 1905 by the Puget Sound Engineering Works of Seattle for the U.S. Army. Named the Lt. George M. Harris the vessel acted as a tender for the coastal defense forts. She worked in California until purchased by Foss in 1923 and after an event filled career she was sunk in a collision with the Macloufay of the Alaska Ship Lines on August 4, 1951. Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Anna E Fay
(Tug) - The shallow-draft propeller tug Anna E. Fay, which had been used by the North American Transportation & Trading Co. at the mouth of the Yukon, was rebuilt at Seattle as the freight steamer A W. Sterrett and was placed on the Seattle - Tacoma freight route by the Merchants' Transportation Co. of Tacoma, which had previously purchased the small freighter T W Lake from the Puget Sound Navigation Co., and was operating the steamer Albion. The Sterrett, as rebuilt, was of 204 tons, with dimensions of 99.8 x 32.6 x 6.4 and was driven by twin screws and two small steam engines developing a total of 75 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Anna Foss
- 109. 59 gross tons. 68.7 feet # 2040707. Foss Launch and Tug Company of Tacoma. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Anna Foss (1)
(Tugboat) - The Anna Foss was a wooden two deck boat built in Tacoma in 1907 and named the Vigilant. She was owned by the Wallace Towboat Company of Tacoma who sold her to the Cascade Tugboat Company. After other owners she was purchased through a bankruptcy on August 1, 1933 by Foss. After a long period of service ending August 2, 1968 the vessel was sold and anchored in Colvos Passage where she sank on September 16, 1969. (Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety years of Towboating.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 91.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Anna Foss (3)
(Tugboat) - Of all the used tugs purchased by Foss, the ANNA came with the most unusual name-MR. CHUCK. The tug was built in 1970 by the Hudson Marine Services of Seward, Alaska for shallow river work in Alaska. As a river boat she was of light draft, wide beam, high power, and a square bow for pushing barges on the winding rivers flowing into various Alaskan waters. By pushing instead of towing, towboat and barge become one tightly connected unit to insure positive control and handling, so essential in swift-flowing, bar-strewn rivers. After some financial difficulties her owner sold her to Foss in January of 1972. Before final outfitting she was given a Foss name and was put on Alaska service. Later she was returned to Seattle and was reworked into LASH (Lighter Aboard Ship) barge service. Michael Skalley, The Anna Foss (3) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 282.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Anne Hanify
(Steam schooner) - The Kruse & Banks yard at North Bend completed the 1,340-ton Anne Hanify and Ryder Hanify, 235 x 43 x 17.7, with (16, 27, 46 x 33) triple-expansion engines and twin water tube bouers developing 1,000 horsepower. These two fine steam schooners entered the coastwise service of J. R. Hanify Co. of San Francisco, joining the Santa Barbara of 1900 and Santa Monica of 1902. The contrast between the old and new vessels of the Hanify fleet was typical of the transition of the wooden steam schooner during the first two decades of the century. The older steamers were of less than half the tonnage and carrying capacity of the new. The Santa Barbara was of 695 tons, 183.5 x 37.5 x 13.5, with a single water tube boiler and engine developing 550 horsepower, while the Santa Monica, with a tonnage of 497 and dimensions of 166 x 34 x 12, was powered with a compound (14, 32 x 24) engine and single Scotch boiler rated at 400 horsepower. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 305.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Annie Faxon
(Ship) - Steamer Annie Faxon at Lewiston, Idaho. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 249 and 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Annie Faxon
(Steamer) - To complete the splendid improvements in their service over the entire line, the Oregon Steam Navigation Company launched the sternwheeler Annie Faxon at Celilo, May 31, 1877. The steamer was one hundred and sixty-five feet long, thirty-seven feet beam, five feet six inches hold, with engines from the Yakima seventeen by seventy-two inches. Capt. F. W. Baughman was in command in 1878 and had with him E. W. Spencer and W. P. Gray, pilots, John Tell, mate, Peter De Huff, chief engineer, E. O. Anderson, second engineer, W. T. Stevens, purser. The Faxon was subsequently in charge of Captains Pingston, Fred Wilson and J. W. Troup until 1887, when she was rebuilt, and from that time until August, 1893, she was handled by Captain Baughman and his son Harry. While in charge of the latter, August 14, 1893, she exploded her boiler, killing eight people (see wreck of Annie Faxon). Her engines were afterward removed from the wreck and placed in the new steamer Lewiston, completed in 1894. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arabic (1) (of 1881)
See SPAARNDAM .
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Arthur Foss
- Two well-known Northwest vessels, the cannery steamer General W. C. Gorgas of Libby, McNeill & Libby, and the Foss Company's steam tug Arthur Foss, changed their names temporarily as featured players in the motion picture Tugboat Annie, which was partially filmed on Puget Sound. The Gorgas portrayed the mythical Alaska passenger vessel Glacier Queen, while the Arthur Foss took the part of Annie's famous fictional towboat Narcissus. When the film was shown at Tacoma in August, the first pre-planned tugboat race was held in Commencement Bay, Marie Dressler, who portrayed Capt. Annie Brennan, awarding the Tugboat Annie Trophy to the tug Peter Foss, Capt. Arthur Hofstead, which crossed the finish line a scant three feet ahead of the Olson Tug Boat Company's Capt. 0. G. Olson. Capt. Louis Torgesen. Other participants were Fearless, Capt. Ed. Telleson, Tacoma Tug & Barge Co.; Alice, Capt. Harold Nelson, Delta V. Smyth Towing Co., Olympia; Advance, Capt. Charles Skewers, Cascade Tug Boat Co.; and Adelphus, Capt. W. P. Thornton, EHiott Bay Towing Co. of Seattle. Shaver's James W. was winner by six lengths over Hosford's Cruiser in the Columbia
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arthur Foss
(Tug) - During the same month, the 5,000-horsepower Arthur Foss, in charge of Capt. Guy Johnson, towed the famous aircraft carrier Princeton from Long Beach, California to Zidell Explorations' Tacoma shipbreaking yard in just 13 days, maintaining an average speed of 100 miles a day. Later in the year she also towed the carrier Philippine Sea north for scrapping. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arthur Foss (
- During World War II the Army Transport Service built a number of large steam-uniflow tugs on the East Coast and the ARTHUR FOSS, ex-LT-784, was one of the group. She operated out of the New York Port of Embarkation In general towing service along the Atlantic Seaboard and on trans-Atlantic convoy duty. After a lay-up after the war Foss purchased the veessel on January 23, 1962. She operated at a wide variety of locations on long tows and eventually was laid up in the Foss yard in Seattle. The Arthur Foss, (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 222.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Asiatic (of 1881)
See SPAARNDAM .
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Asiatic Prince (of 1896 & 1898)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
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Aspenleaf
See LAKE ERIE.
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B. F. Stone (tug)
The tug B. F. Stone of Willamette Tug & Barge Co. was upset by a hog fuel barge she had under tow near Prescott and also sank. Capt. Bob Wilson and Engineer Howard Sternberg escaped safely and this vessel was also salvaged and repaired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
B. F. Stone (tugboat)
The 65-foot motor tug B. F. Stone, with 350-horsepower diesel engine, was completed at Astoria in 1931. On Coos Bay, where a large fleet of small passenger, freight and towing vessels had been built in past years, no new construction of this type was recorded for 11 years after 1930. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
B. F. Stone (tugboat)
The 65-foot motor tug B. F. Stone, with 350-horsepower diesel engine, was completed at Astoria in 1931. On Coos Bay, where a large fleet of small passenger, freight and towing vessels had been built in past years, no new construction of this type was recorded for 11 years after 1930. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bainbridge (ferry)
Built in 1928. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Maritime memories; the Bainbridge built in 1928 at Houghton on Lake Washington, Marine Digest. June 7, 1986, p. 5. Transferred to Canadian ownershp and registry in 1950. In the 1980s was in retirement on the Fraser River. (il). Save the Bainbridge, Marine Digest. December 27, 1986, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bainbridge (ferry)
The 188-foot motor ferry Bainbridge, designed by Capt. John L. Anderson for the Seattle-Port Blakeley route of the Kitsap County Transportation Co., was launched at Houghton. She was fitted with an 800-horsepower Waswngton-Estep diesel, giving her a service speed of 11 knots. With the launching of this vessel, the name of the company's steamboat Bainbridge was changed to Winslow. The ferry was first placed in charge of Capt. C. T. Wyatt and Capt. Alfred Welfare, with James Gibson as chief engineer and George Benson and Maldor Jacobsen, mates. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 385.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bainbridge (ferry)
The only sizeable passenger and freight steamer built for Puget Sound service in 1915 was the Bainbridge, a steel-hulled vessel of 313 tons with dimensions of 109.7 x 25 x 8.4, built at the Lake Washington Shipyards, Seattle, for the Eagle Harbor Transportation Co. to succeed the Florence K on the Seattle -Winslow route, the latter vessel passing to the Port Washington Route. The Bainbridge was fitted with a triple-expansion engine of 650 horsepower, with two water tube boilers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Balclutha (full Rigger)
Wrecks in Alaskan waters in 1904 included the full -rigged ship Balclutha, San Francisco for Karluk, which went ashore May 12 in Geese Island Strait. The ship was listed as a total loss, but was subsequently salvaged and outlived allthe other big sailing vessels on the Pacific Coast. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ballard (ferryboat)
Built in Everett in 1900. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 104. Ex City of Everett. The City of Everett in its third transformation, into diesel ferry Ballard in 1931, Marine Digest (November 16, 1986), p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bamfield
No data available (fish packer) Reg- No. 141197 Owner: Captain A-W Abbott, 1528 Foul Bay Road, Victoria. Sunk by CPR Steamer Princess Joan, June 6, 1930, while leaving Victoria harbour on first rum running trip. No lives lost. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baranof
The first post-war craft designed and built specifically for cannery service, the Tebenkof and Baranof were designed by H. C. Hanson and built at Bellingham for the Pacific American Fisheries. They were 80 feet in overall length, 24.6 beam and six feet moulded depth. Power was provided by two Buda diesels with two - to - one reduction gears swinging 44 x 38-inch three-bladed propellers and giving a service speed of 9.4 knots, somewhat in excess of that of the converted government BSP's in use on the commercial fishery. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior Publishing Company, 1966.,p. 944.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baranof (steamer)
The steamship Baranof of the Alaska Steamship Co. was chartered by the Continental Tours of San Francisco for a 71 -day winter cruise to South American ports via the Straits of Magellan, returning by way of the Panama Canal, but the projected cruise was canceled late in the year because of unsettled world conditions due to the European war. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baranof (steamer)
The imminence of war did not entirely eliminate industrial disputes in 1941, although stoppages by this cause were less frequent and of shorter duration than in the past. Late in September the Alaska steamship Baranof, with 170 passengers and cargo including 1,200 tons of strategic military supplies, was held at the dock in Seattle for more than five days when members of the marine fireman's union protested the qualifications of one of the ship's cooks. The liner eventually sailed with both the unpopular cook and the discontented firemen aboard. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Baranof (tug)
Hubert Bancroft. History of the Northwest Coast, 1543-1800, II, p. 640.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barbara Foss (3) (tugboat)
The third BARBARA FOSS, a new and completely engine-automated tug, was built by the McDermott Shipyard Group in New Iberia, Louisiana for heavy-duty towing as part of the upgrading program to modernize the Foss ocean fleet. The tug is 120 feet long with a 34 feet beam. Upon acceptance by Foss, the BARBARA, under command of Captain Chuck Crawford, left Galveston, Texas for Seattle on July 5th, arriving three weeks later with no first-voyage miseries to report. The Barbara was put to work in three area of Foss interest, Alaska, Coastwise and Ocean work. Michael Skalley, The Barbara Foss (3) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 289.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barbara Foss (tugboat)
The Barbara Foss was built at the Barbee Marine Yard at Kennydale, Washington in 1944. She was 117 feet long with a beam of 28 feet. She began work for the Foss company after World War II having been employed by the Army Transport Service. On May 21, 1973 the Barbara was transferred to Dillingham Tug and Barge in Honolulu and in the summer of 1975 was given to the Navy to be used in target practice. Michael Skalley, The Barbara Foss (2 Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 146.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barbara Foss. (1) (tugboat)
The Barbara Foss (1) was built as the tug WEGO in the John Nelson shipyard of Seattle in 1925. She was launched on September 25, 1925 and was sunk May 31, 1942 on the Port Angeles to Seattle route. The remains of the tug were not found. Michael Skalley. Foss. One hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bardaland (freighter)
The Swedish freighter Bardaland arrived at San Francisco earlier in the year with a shipment of Soviet gold bullion valued at $11,220,150. The charming custom of the Russians paying in gold for their purchases of American products somewhat offset a number of less loveable traits, including a marked carelessness in the niceties of maritime housekeeping. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bayfield
1927. 7 gross tons. 30.4 feet #226505. Severin Aurdal, Aberdeen, Washington. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bayfield
Built in Tacoma in 1927 for Severin Aurdal of Aberdeen. 7 gross tons. 30.4 feet #226505. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bear (ferry)
Bear, side-wheel gas ferry with 46 x 16-foot hull and 65 x 25-foot deck providing space for four automobiles or 200 passengers, designed, built and operated by Capt. O. D. Treiber on the Underwood-Hood River crossing of the Columbia River, Treiber having begun commercial boating in this area in 1908 at the age of 18. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bear (fishboat)
The Bear, a small motor fishing vessel, lost at sea after leaving Tillamook for Ilwaco February 20 in 50-mile winds and 35 foot seas, the owner, Roy Burgess and his son being drowned. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bear Of Oakland
Steam auxiliary barkentine with members of the Byrd Expedition aboard. Formerly the Bear, built in 1874 in Scotland. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Beaver (freight Boat)
Beaver, 14 -ton gasoline freight boat built at Astoria in 1911 and owned by Edward A. McGrath, Jr of that port, stranded on Clatsop Spit Columbia River entrance, August 3, 1940, Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Beeline (ferryboat)
Ex Florence K. Ex Gloria. Built in Tacoma in 1903. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Florence K started life as a mosquito fleet steamer, ended it as a quick little ferryu called Beeline, Marine Digest. (July 27, 1895), p. 7. Converted to ferry in 1926, Marine Digest. (August 3, 1985), p. 8 (il). G. F. Shrader, Letter to the editor regarding how the Beeline was acquired by the Navy to operate between Indian Island and Hadlock during Word War II, Marine Digest. August 24, 1985, p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belfast
Built in 1874 in Belfast. Visited Todd shipyards in Seattle. Down The Ways June 15, 1919, p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belfast (steamer)
The coastwise steamship Belfast owned by Kemp & Waring of Vancouver, burned to the water's edge at False Narrows near Nanaimo early in July, 1911, her crew of seven also having a narrow escape from the flames. Her cargo of lime from Blubber Bay for Seattle was believed to have ignited. The 300-ton twin-screw steamer was a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belle Of Clarksville (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. . Steamboats on the western rivers. Cambridge: Harvard University, p. 176.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belle Of Oregon
Northwest Magazine. January 16, 1972.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belle Of The West (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. . Steamboats on the western rivers. Cambridge: Harvard University, p. 282.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ben Franklin (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. . Steamboats on the western rivers. Cambridge: Harvard University, p. 401, 648.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Benjamin F. Packard
America West. (March, 1970). Photograph taked from astern. Inside the front cover of the magazine. (il). In drydock about 1900. Built at Bath in 1883, Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 61. Loading at Port Blakely Mill around 1900. Gibbs, Jim. Pacific Square Riggers. Seattle: Superior, 1969., p. 31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Benjamin F. Packard
With the arrival of the steamship Eastern Gale purchased by the NOrthwestern Fisheries Company of Seattle the ships St. Paul and Benj. F. Packard and the bark Guy C. Goss were retired from the service of the packing company. The Packard was sold to the Hansen & Nieder Lumber Co. of Seattle and dispatched to the East Coast, where it was planned to use her as a coal barge. She was, however, taken over by Theodore Roosevelt Pell of New York, who hoped to keep her afloat as a museum, and for a time was moored at the foot of 129th Street, New York. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Benjamin F. Packard
The ship Benjamin F. Packard, idle at Seattle since 1908, was purchased by Northwestern Fisheries Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Benjamin F. Packard (fully Rigged Ship)
The wooden full-rigged ship Benjamin F. Packard, 2,156 tons, built by Goss, Sawyer & Packard at Bath, Me. in 1883, was purchased by Northwestern Fisheries, joining the Northwest salmon fleet and making yearly voyages north for the next 16 years. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Benjamin Franklin
Ed Garrison, Along the waterfront, Tacoma News Tribune. January 5, 1958.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bergensfjord
See JERUSALEM.
Citation:
Bettles (utility Landing Craft)
Bettles, 100-foot commercial utility landing craft, recently sold by Puget Sound Tug & Barge to Mrs. Barbara Kalmback of Wasilla, Alaska, returning from DEW line supply work, stranded and broke up on the rocks in 65-mile winds and heavy seas west of Adak, the eight-man crew being rescued by the Coast Guard cutter Balsam. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Beulah (freighter)
Panamanian motor vessel (freighter), 1,389 gross tons. After weathering a terrific battle with raging seas off the west coast of Vancouver Island and narrowly averting being swept on the rocks, she managed to make her way to Victoria on a 31-degree list. Shortly after, she sank at her moorings in the harbor, December 27, 1937. She resisted eight attempts at being refloated. Finally, on the ninth try by use of a 15-foot cofferdam, March 12, 1938, salvagers were successful. The vessel was a floating mass of wreckage. She was owned by Flood Bros. of Panama and was eventually rebuilt and repaired for a large sum of money. When she got entangled in the gale in Juan de Fuca's graveyard prior to malting Victoria, her steering mechanism was badly damaged. Also first officer Tryve Bragdo was washed overboard and drowned and the boatswain severely injured. The ship was enbound from the South Seas when hit by the gale. She was built in Norway in 1923. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blackford (steamer)
The Grays Harbor Motorship Corporation steamer Blackford, on her maiden voyage from Seattle for the West Coast of South America, foundered 250 miles south of Magdalena Bay the same day, later drifting ashore off Rodo Sinaloa. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966. p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blanco (fishboat)
The 18-ton fishing boat Blanco was run down by an unknown vessel off the Umatilla lightship on August 21, two of her three-man crew being lost. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blanco (fishboat)
The 18-ton fishing boat Blanco was run down by an unknown vessel off the Umatilla lightship on August 21, two of her three-man crew being lost. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blatchford (barge)
The wooden Shipping Board Blatchford, in use for some years as a floating grain elevator in False Creek, B. C., was rebuilt in 1929 as a log barge by the Allison Logging Co. of Vancouver. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 402.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blokshif No 5
See HOLSATIA.
Citation:
Blossom (frigate)
Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, Philip H. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 228. Hubert Bancroft. History of the Northwest Coast, 1543-1800, I, p. 339. Hubert Bancroft. History of the Northwest Coast, 1543-1800, II, p. 293. Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State , II, p. 36. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, Barry M. The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 27, 41, 42, 49. Edgar Stewart. Washington Northwest Frontier., I, p. 194. Arrival at Fort George. Bancroft, H.H. History of Oregon., I, p. 216. Captain Hickey formally surrendered Astoria, Horace Lyman. History of Oregon., II, p. 342. Roberts, p. 67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blue Magpie (japanese Freighter)
Freighter Blue Magpie ran around, split apart on Newport jetty November 20, Marine Digest. November 26, 1983, p. 3. Wrecked ship doesn't close Newport channel, The Marine Digest. December 3, 1983, p. 23. Blue Magpie owners agree to $306,700 bill for oil spill clean-up, The Marine Digest. July 28, 1984, p. 22.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blue Pacific (seiner)
The 177-foot tuna seiner Blue Pacific was built by Tacoma Boatbuilding Co. for Capt. Roger Soares, who placed her in operation for Van Camp Seafoods. Although larger tuna boats had been converted from surplus naval vessels, Blue Pacific was, at the time of her completion, the largest ever built from the keel up. Her 2,500-horsepower GM diesel provided a service speed of 14 1/2 knots with a cruising range of 11,000 miles. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blunts Reef Lightship No 100 (lightship)
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 178.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blunts Reef Lightship No 523 (lightship)
GSPN p. 178-180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bockonoff
Built in Bellingham during World War One. Jacobin, With the colors. p. 273.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bohemia (full Rigged Ship)
The full-rigged ships Bohemia and Indiana, built at Bath, Me. in 1875 and 1876 respectively, were purchased from the Alaska Packers by Joseph Markowitz of Oakland for scrap, but were subsequently resold to Cecil B. DeMille and taken to permanent moorings in southern California for use in motion pictures. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boneta (freighter)
Unable to compete in the passenger trade with the fast and luxurious -Idaho, Reynolds & McDonald built the champion lake freight hauler Boneta, originally 96 feet in length by 18 feet beam, but later lengthened 25 feet, and incorporated the White Star Navigation Co. The ensuing rivalry was intense. On one occasion the Boneta, upbound on the St. Joe River, rammed the Idaho coming down. Capt. Reynolds claimed the Idaho chased him clear across the river with the intention of sinking the Boneta, Capt. Jan Spaulding of the Idaho claimed a confusion in signals. As the lake vessels were not subject to government inspection, no legal ruling was made. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boston (sloop Of War)
Attacked by Indians. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 55. House resolution. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, 139.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brandywine (frigate)
1,726 tons, 175' x 45' x 14'. Built at Washington Navy Yard, 1825; burned at Norfolk, 3 September 1861; razed and sold, 1867. Armament: 33 24-pdrs., 22 42-pdrs. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bremerton (ferry)
Formerly the Kitsap. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brenda Gail (fishing Vessel)
A number of small commercial fishing vessels were lost along the southern Oregon coast in 1966. The 12-ton Brenda Gail capsized at Port Orford on March 4, with the loss of one of the men aboard. The other reached shore supported by a fishbox which floated off the deck. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brentwood (freighter)
Brentwood, (ex-Cascade of 1902), 100-foot coastal freighter owned by Coast Ferries Ltd., beached in Howe Sound by Capt. Kenneth Watt when she began taking on water while outward bound from Vancouver in October. She was refloated the following day and after temporary repairs were made, was able to return to Vancouver under her own power, but following survey was declared a constructive total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brinkerhoff 1 (oil Drilling Rig)
The Brinkerhoff 1, first offshore oil drilling rig built on Puget Sound, was completed by Marine Iron Works, Tacoma, for operation in the Philippines. This unique rig was built on a stardard 400 x 76-foot Crowley Martime barge, Crowley having joined with the Brinkerhoff oil-- drilling firm to finance the project. The high-capacity barge hull with its large dry and liquid storage facilities below decks, enabled the rig to continue long periods of drilling in remote locations following its long tow to the Philippines by two Red Stack tugs. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brinkerhoff 1 (oil Drilling Rig)
The Brinkerhoff 1, first offshore oil drilling rig built on Puget Sound, was completed by Marine Iron Works, Tacoma, for operation in the Philippines. This unique rig was built on a stardard 400 x 76-foot Crowley Martime barge, Crowley having joined with the Brinkerhoff oil-- drilling firm to finance the project. The high-capacity barge hull with its large dry and liquid storage facilities below decks, enabled the rig to continue long periods of drilling in remote locations following its long tow to the Philippines by two Red Stack tugs. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
British Columbia (freighter)
The freighter British Columbia was sold by Griffiths in 1919 to the Union Steamship Co. of Vancouver, who operated her as the Chilliwack, replacing the historic Comox of 1891, the first steel vessel assembled in British Columbia, which was sold for scrapping but was resold to Central American owners and renamed Alejandro. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 306.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookdale (wooden Steam Freighter)
S.S. Brookdale of 1918, Sea Chest. March, 1984, p. 91-94. Launched at Aberdeen on August 8, 1918.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookfield (towboat)
Soon after the completion of the Chickamauga the first oil-engined towboat appeared on the lower Columbia. The 65-foot Broofield was placed in service at Astoria by the Brookfield Quarry & Towing Co. handling heavy sand and gravel barges and log booms and doing passenger work. She was fitted with the first of the Fairbanks-Morse CO type heavy oil engines, a 100-horsepower model built as a prototype for display at Eastern boat shows. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brookfield (tug)
The 65-foot Brookfield was placed in service at Astoria by the Brookfield Quarry & Towing Co. handling heavy sand and gravel barges and log booms and doing passenger work. She was fitted with the first of the Fairbanks-Morse CO type heavy ofl engines, a 100 -horsepower model built as a prototype for display at Eastern boat shows. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966 p. 254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brynn Foss (tractor Tug)
A new Brynn Foss serves Tacoma. Marine Digest. October 18, 1986, p. 26. This vessel was built by Tacoma Boat and was first named Pacific Tractor. Bruce Morelan of Grayland built an exquisitve working model of the Brynn Foss, Marine Digest. May 3, 1896,p. 6-8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brynn Foss (tug)
A powerful steel harbor tug, the Brynn Foss, was launched by the Reliable Welding Works at Olympia and towed to the Foss boathouse at Tacoma, where an 800-horsepower diesel engine was installed in the 72 -foot craft. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 573.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brynn Foss (tugboat)
In 1952 the Reliable Welding Works of Olympia, Washington constructed a 68 foot tug with a 21 foot beam vessel that was to be state of the art for the Foss Company. The Brynn Foss worked Puget Sound for Foss in Tacoma, and later in Everett and Bellingham. Her engine gave out in January of 1978 and soon thereafter she was put in layup. Michael Skalley, The Brynn Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 182.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Buffalo
Don Berry. Majority of Scoundrels., p. 114. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., 16, 19, 394.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Buford
William P. Bonney, History of Pierce County II, p. 764.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Buford (army Transport)
The Alaska-Siberian Navigation Co. was formed in San Francisco by Fred Linderman for the purpose of operating the former Army transport Buford, converted to oil fuel, between that port and St. Michael, Nome, Golovin, Kotzebue Sound and the Siberian coast via Puget Sound. Capt. Louis L. Lane commanded the Buford on her earlier voyages, being succeeded by Capt. J. A. (Dynamite John) O'Brien. Although this shipping enterprise was not successful, ' it provided interesting aspects to the marine history of the region. Film star Buster Keaton staged one of his funnier comedies, The Mariner, aboard the steamer, immortalizing the redoubtable Capt. O'Brien on film. Following the 1923 Alaska season the Buford made a winter cruise from San Francisco to the South Sea Islands via Hawaii. This was the first South Seas cruise ever undertaken from the Pacific Coast. Capt. O'Brien commanded the Buford on this historic cruise, having served during the war as a lieutenant-commander in the Naval Reserve, taking three Shipping Boa
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Buford (steamer)
In a letter to Capt. Harold D. Huycke in 1953 Mr. Linderman wrote, As to the S. S. Bifford, an associate and I purchased her from the government in 1923 and spent considerable money refitting her for passenger and freight service to operate to Nome, Alaska. The Yuba Construction @,o. . . . W. P. Hammond & Co.... who had extensive gold dredging operations near Nome, proposed thatwe enter 'he business in competition with the Alaska Steamship Co. They had had unpleasant experience with the Alaska Steamship Co. and promised all their business in freight and passengers to Nome, which made up the principal business to that port. In that year, 1923, we made three voyages to Nome and did good business, but later that year the Hammond people sold out their dredging operations to the Guggenheim interests. Of course the Guggenheims, who controlled the Alaska Steamship Co.,, had no use for us, so we were left out on a limb. This vessel was not a lumber ship and had too small a freight capacity to compete in offshore bus
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bunker Hill (aircraft Carrier)
There was no let up for the tug CRAIG FOSS during the remainder of 1972 and 1973 towing to Alaska and along the Pacific Coast. Her hardest tow during this period was delivering the decommissioned aircraft carrier, BUNKER HILL, from San Diego to Tacoma for scrapping. The trip north required sixteen days at an average speed of just over three knots! Departure San Diego was July 19th and arrival Tacoma, August 3rd. Towing the BUNKER HILL was the heaviest tow the CRAIG ever attempted. The carrier, 872 feet in length, had a beam of 93 feet and a displacement tonnage of 27,000. She was commissioned in 1943 and served many fronts during World War II including engagements at the Gilbert Islands, Marshall Islands, Truk, Marianas, Hollandia, and the Battle of the Philippine Sea. The BUNKER HILL received eleven battle stars for her World War 11 service and the CRAIG's crew felt keen regret at docking such a veteran for scrapping. Michael Skalley, The Bunker Hill, Foss ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 198
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bunker Hill (u.s. Aircraft Carrier)
Bunker Hill be scrappedby Zidell dismantling, The Tacoma News Tribune. April 10, 1974. (il). The Bunker Hill is dead, Tacoma News Tribune. April 10, 1974.(il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Burlington (ferry)
The diesel ferry Burlington 79 x 29.10 x 6, with a 30-horsepower Atlas engine, designed by W. F. Gildner, who drew the plans for the L. P. Hosford and other well-known Columbia River boats, was built at Rainier for Columbia River operation by Multnomah County between Burlington and Sauvies Island. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 417.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Burrard Chief
The 99-ton steam tug Burrard Chief, 67.2 x 19.9, was built at Vancouver, B.C. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 304.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C. F (steamer)
The eight-ton passenger steamer C. F., 42.5 feet in length, with 75 -horsepower compound engine, was built at Tacoma, later being operated on Lake Washington by Adolph Anderson and Louis Birch at Leschi Park. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 119.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.c. Funk (barkentine)
C. C. Funk, a barkentine of 539 tons, was built at Marshfield, Ore., in 1882 by H. R. Reed. A. C. Glaser, San Francisco, was her managing owner, and she drops out of the register just before 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 1, 1941. , p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.c. Funk (barkentine)
C. C. Funk, a barkentine of 539 tons, was built at Marshfield, Ore., in 1882 by H. R. Reed. A. C. Glaser, San Francisco, was her managing owner, and she drops out of the register just before 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 1, 1941. , p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.f.tietgen
See DWINSK.
Citation:
Cadaretta (freighter)
An American steamship(freighter), 2,648 tons, stranded off James Island, Washington, May 28, 1945. Refloated and beached near Neah Bay, where salvagers under Captain Loring Hyde repaired her temporarily and later refloated her. She was escorted to port and overhauled. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cadzow Forest (bark)
January 4, 1896 Bark, British. She picked up a Columbia pilot in anticipation of entering the river, but the sea rose and she beat it out to disappear with all hands. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cadzow Forest (bark)
British bark, 1116 tons, pounded unmercifully by heavy seas while attempting inbound crossing of the Columbia River bar January 4, 1896. The pilot had been taken aboard. The vessel suffered heavy damage and the seas were so ugly that the pilot could not be removed by the pilot schooner. Instead the damaged Britisher drifted northward at the mercy of the elements and was lost with her entire crew. The derelict later drifted as far as the British Columbia coast where it foundered. Built at Port Glasgow, Scotland, in 1878, the ill-fated bark had been in command of Captain McInnis. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cadzow Forest (bark)
British bark, 1116 tons lost with the entire crew in January of 1896 while attempting to cross the Columbia River bar. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 157.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Caledonia (general Info)
There were five ships with the name "Caledonia". They were all part of the Anchor Line. The first, built in 1840, was the one wrecked in 1851 near Havana. Then came the next, built in 1862, which ran aground in Dec. 1862, was refloated, then wrecked in 1872. The third, built in 1863 was scrapped in 1898. The fourth, built in 1904 was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean on Dec. 4, 1916. The final was built in 1925, was converted to an armed merchant ship in 1939 and renamed the Scotstoun. It was torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic on June 13, 1940.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]
California
California Whaling Company. Marine Digest. (May 24, 1975), p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State , III, p. 79 Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 143.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
From Panama to California in 1849. Horace Lyman. History of Oregon., IV, p. 104. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 545-56. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 188. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
Edward Hungerford. Wells Fargo, p. 253.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California
J. E. Denny, and the California, Captains Thorn and Carroll, were in the local service between the Sound and the Columbia River, the latter also making trips to Alaska. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.275.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (2)
The steamship CALIFORNIA was built by C. Mitchell & Co, Newcastle-upon- Tyne (ship #450; engines by Wallsend Slipway Co), and launched for the Carr Line, of Hamburg, on 27 December 1882. 2,690 tons; 91,58 x 11,79 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; screw propulsion, service speed 10 knots; accommodation for 1,250 steerage passengers; crew of 45. 15 March 1883, maiden voyage, Hamburg-New York. 25 May 1888, acquired by HAPAG (the Hamburg-American Line). 13 July 1888, first voyage, Hamburg- New York, for HAPAG. 18 October 1897, last voyage, Hamburg-New York, for HAPAG. 1897, acquired by W. Kunstmann, Stettin. 1898, acquired by Det Forenede D/S, Kopenhagen, and renamed WINLAND. 30 January 1904, on a voyage from Bremerhaven to Reval (now Tallinn, Estonia), stranded off Ronne (on the island of Bornholm, Denmark, off the coast of Sweden); after salvage and repair, sold to T. Ozaki, Uwosaki (later Kobe), Japan, and renamed NISSHIN MARU. 1910, scrapped in Osaka [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 46 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New_ (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 395]. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 15 April 1998]
Citation:
California (3)
In the 1908-09 Lloyd's Register of Shipping:CALIFORNIA.Call sign: TNRB. Official registration #: 115305. Master: E.B. Heath, appointed to the ship in 1905. Rigging: steel twin screw Schooner; 3 decks, promenade deck and shade deck; fitted with electric light. Tonnage: 5,547 tons gross, 4.206 under deck and 2,991 net. Dimensions: 400.3 feet long, 52.3 foot beam and 26.2 feet deep. Built: in 1902 by Caird & Co. Ltd. in Greenock. Propulsion: triple expansion engine with 6 cylinders of 23 1/2, 38 1/2 & 64 inches each pair; stroke 48 inches; 568 nominal horsepower; engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Port of registry: Liverpool. Flag: British. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]
California (4)
In the 1908-09 Lloyd's Register of Shipping:CALIFORNIA. Call sign: HLQJ. Official registration #: 124230. Master: Captain J. Blaikie, appointed to the ship in 1907. Rigging: steel twin screw Schooner: 3 decks; Water Ballast; fitted with electric light and refrigerating machinery. Tonnage: 8,662 tons gross, 6,791 under deck and 5,403 net. Dimensions: 470 feet long, 58.3 foot beam, 34 feet deep. Poop 70 feet long; Bridge 213 feet long; Forecastle 91 feet long. Built: in 1907 by D. & W. Henderson & Co. Ltd. in Glasgow. Propulsion: triple expansion engine with 6 cylinders of 27 1/2, 46 and 75 inches each pair; stroke 54 inches; 827 nominal horsepower; engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Anchor Line Ltd. (Henderson Bros.) Port of registry: Glasgow. Flag: British. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]
California (5)
The "California" of 1929 was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. This was a 16,792 gross ton ship, length 553ft x beam 70.4ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 251-1st, 465-2nd and 1,044-3rd class passengers. Her keel was laid in Oct 1919 but she wasn't launched until 17/4/1923 and commenced her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Moville (Ireland) and New York on 26/8/1923. Between 1924 and 1937 she made approx.20 Autumn / Winter voyages between Liverpool and Bombay as well as Atlantic crossings. In May 1929 her accommodation was altered to carry 206-cabin, 440-tourist and 485-3rd class passengers. Between Nov 1937 and Feb 1938 she made three trooping voyages and in Feb 1939 re-entered service with remodelled 3rd class accommodation, new propellers and a speed of 17 knots. Her last N.Atlantic voyage commenced 4/8/1939 when she left Glasgow for New York, Boston, Moville and Glasgow and in August was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. In April 1942 she became a troopship and on 11/7/1943 was damaged by air attack 320 miles west of Oporto and set on fire with the loss of 46 lives. She was later torpedoed and sunk by an escorting destroyer.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.469]
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 January 1998]
California (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 144, 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (schooner)
The California, a two-masted schooner of 119 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1869 by Isaac Hall. This was when the Hall brothers were still located in San Francisco as foremen shipwrights. Among the original part owners of the California are listed John N. Ingalls, Robert Sudden, and J. J. Smith of Santa Cruz. The latter was managing owner until 1883. In that year she was apparently wrecked at Hueneme, Calif., and rebuilt there. S. B. Peterson appear as owner in 1884, B. H. Madison in 1886 and the schooner drops out of the 1888 register. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 8, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (schooner)
Columbia Bar Pilot Schooner California of 1853, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (schooner)
The California, a two-masted schooner of 119 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1869 by Isaac Hall. This was when the Hall brothers were still located in San Francisco as foremen shipwrights. Among the original part owners of the California are listed John N. In- galls, Robert Sudden, and J. J. Smith of Santa Cruz. The latter was managing owner until 1883. In that year she was apparently wrecked at Hueneme, Calif., and rebuilt there. S. B. Peterson appear as owner in 1884, B. H. Madison in 1886 and the schooner drops out of the 1888 register. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Mar. 8, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamer)
The steamship California, Capt. Gregor Johnson, Capetown for St. Thomas, Puerto Rico, was intercepted in the Atlantic about midway between the Cape Verdes and Brazil on August 13 by a submarine, believed to be Italian. The submarine opened fire with its deck gun, the crew abandoned ship, and the freighter was then sunk by a torpedo. One boat, in charge of Chief Officer Lechner, was picked up 23 days later by the City of Capetown. Capt. Johnson's boat was at sea 32 days before it was picked up by the Norwegian motorship Talisman. The chief engineer later died from the effects of the long voyage in the mate's boat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 511.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamer)
CALIFORNIA, OREGON, and PANAMA, 1848-1870. The wooden sidewheelers California, Oregon, and Panama, were the first three steamers of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS), which had been founded in April 1848 by William Henry Aspinwall. PMSS ordered these ships from Nhew York City shipyards, and they were finished by the end of 1848. The ships built, and indeed PMSS itself had been created, in response to the U.S. Navy's offer to subsidize a mail service between the Pacific side of Panama and the Columbia River in the Oregon territory. In accordance with the mail contract, the steamers incorporated military features so that in time of emergency they could easily be converted to naval auxiliaries. As usual for this time, the wooden vessels were fully rigged for sail should the single -expansion engine break down or run out of coal. The 200-foot-long ships had been designed primarily to carry cargo, although they also had passenger accommodations initially just for sixty persons; later the company added spac
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamer)
The steamship California, known during the early days of her career on the Coast as the Little California, and afterward as the Eureka, was built at Mystic, Conn., and, after coming round from the East, made her first voyage North in 1866, arriving at Portland in August, in command of Captain Godfrey. The following year she relieved the steamer Gussie Telfair on the Portland and Victoria route, making her initial trip in January with Captain Lyons in charge. She remained in this service several years, except at intervals when she ran to Alaska. After Ben Holladay met his Waterloo, and lost his steamship line, he contrived to retain possession of the California, and she continued in his service until 1876, when young Ben Holladay disposed of her to P. B. Cornwall, who had the Alaska mail contract, and operated her on that route, connecting at Portland with the steamship Great Republic after the opposition started. When the Northern Pacific Railroad was completed between Kalama and Tacoma, the travel by ocean w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamship)
Steamer California, first American steamship to round the Horn. Photograph of vessel taken in 1872, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California (steamship)
The steamship California, which was on the Northern route in 1855, was the first American steamship to double Cape Horn, and was on the stocks in New York before gold was discovered in California. With the Oregon and Panama, she had been intended to carry passengers and mail between the Columbia River and the Isthmus in the service of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, then newly organized, San Francisco being at that time almost an unknown factor in Pacific Coast marine business. The three vessels were built at about the same time under the supervision of Capt. William Skiddle, a naval constructor in the employ of the United States Government, and, while the California was yet unfinished, her owners, who were not very wealthy, saw that they would be unable to complete her, and asked aid from Congress. The request was granted on condition that the steamers could be used by the Government for war purposes in case the emergency should arise, and with this understanding some alterations were made, nothing but l
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California Rose (tuna Boat)
The California Rose, a 72 foot diesel tuna boat of 180 - horsepower, was built at Tacoma for E. Alello of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
California Rose (tuna Boat)
The California Rose, a 72 foot diesel tuna boat of 180 - horsepower, was built at Tacoma for E. Alello of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calulu (freighter)
The first war prize vessel to put in an appearance in the Northwest the British tramp freighter Calulu arrived at Tacoma in August to load a full cargo of wheat for Australia. The Calulu was the former German steamer Osnabruch, and had been seized at Brisbane at the beginning of the war. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 252.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calulu (freighter)
The first war prize vessel to put in an appearance in the Northwest, the British tramp freighter Calulu, arrived at Tacoma in August to load a full cargo of wheat for Australia. The Calulu was the former German steamer Osnabruch, and had been seized at Brisbane at the beginning of the war. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p.252.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Canadian Exporter (freighter)
Heavy fog was also the cause of the grounding and loss of the Canadian Merchant Marine freighter Canadian Exporter at the Wfllapa Harbor entrance on August 1. En route for Portland from Vancouver to complete a lumber cargo for the Orient, she struck the beach and efforts to back her off were unsuccessful, as were later attempts to free her by the bar tug Wallula and British Columbia salvage steamer Algeriane. Heavy surf caused her to work heavily in the sand and her back was soon broken. The crews of the salvage vessels were convinced of ghostly doings when the steam whistle of the deserted wreck suddenly began a series of eerie blasts. Investigation showed that the apparently supernatural occurrence was the result of the sagging of the severed forward section of the vessel, which alternately tightened and slackened the whistle cord. The underwriters sold the wreck to H. R. MacMillan and Percy Sills of Vancouver, who made arrangements with Hugh Delanty of the Grays Harbor Stevedoring Co. for skilled workers t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Canadian National Number Five (tug)
The 68-ton diesel tug Canadian National No. 5, 67.2 x 17.2, was built at Kelowna, B. C. in 1932 for inland barge service.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 417.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Canora (ferry)
A number of well-known vessels were laid up or scrapped during 1967. The Canadian National car ferry Canora of 1919, which had operated between the Fraser River and Vancouver Island for 48 years, was replaced by two car barges of Gulf of Georgia Towing and laid up on the Fraser River. The distinctive two-funneled steamer required a crew of 40 and had a capacity of 17 railway cars. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLVIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Canora (ferry)
The old twin-stack steam railway car ferry Canora, in layup at Vancouver, B.C., for about three years, was purchased by Goodwin Johnson Ltd. from H. B. Elworthy and M. L. Greene for conversion to a floating sawmill and training ship for Indians of the Queen Charlotte Islands, but the plan fell through, the conversion was not made and at this writing she is still lying idle in Burrard Inlet at the Goodwin Johnson wharf. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Canuck (length 62 Ft.built 1922,)
(fish packer)beam 18 ft.Harbour Boat Builders Reg. No. 155234 Owner: William Charles Splan, 1155 Pacific St., Vancouver. ade only one rum running trip, 60 days long, Oct.-Dec. 1930. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cape Tryon (freighter)
In August of 1969 the Tug Barbara Foss carried out an interesting job for the navy. She towed the USS Cape Tryon from the navy ammunition dump at Bangor, Washington to a disposal site well off the northern Washington Coast. The CAPE TRYON was a freighter built in 1944 for service in World War 11, but she also served in the Korean and Vietnam wars. By 1969 she had outlived her usefulness as an operating unit, so the Navy brought her to Bangor and loaded her with 6,000 tons of out-dated bombs, mines, and ammunition. Navy personnel cut many holes in the old hull and covered them with soft plugs that could be knocked out to scuttle the ship at the disposal site. The tug BARBARA FOSS left Bangor on August 11th and arrived at the predetermined location in the Pacific at 0700 on the 13th. Upon arrival demolition teams boarded the ship, knocked out the plugs, and opened the main sea valves. The CAPE TRYON slowly sank. At 0912 the ship performed her last duty for the navy as she settled below the surface with her carg
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capella (fishing Boat)
Fisherman's family awarded $1.1 million, Tacoma News Tribune. May 27, 1984.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capillo (freighter)
The Hog Island freighter Capillo of 1920, operated by the American Line, was bombed and sunk by Japanese aircraft at Manila on December 7, the crew reaching Corregidor in the boats, where they were later captured with the garrison. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capitol (freighter)
The Capitol, motor freighter of Puget Sound Freight Lines, destroyed by fire off Hartstene Island June 15 while on her regular Seattle-Olympia run, Capt. Homer Stroup and her crew barely having time to lower a boat. Arthur Watson, assistant engineer on watch, was badly burned when the fire broke out in the engine room. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capitol (freighter)
The Capitol, motor freighter of Puget Sound Freight Lines, destroyed by fire off Hartstene Island June 15 while on her regular Seattle-Olympia run, Capt. Homer Stroup and her crew barely having time to lower a boat. Arthur Watson, assistant engineer on watch, was badly burned when the fire broke out in the engine room. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capitol (freighter)
A new diesel freighter, the 65-foot Capitol of 100 horsepower, was built for Puget Sound Freight Lines at the Martinolich yard in Dockton to replace the Rubaiyat. Gordon Newell,Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 352.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Capt. James Fornance (steamer)
American steamer, 153 tons, strand-d in a gale four miles cast of the Fort Canby Life Saving Station, December 21, 1917. Forty-seven passengers were removed and landed safely at Ilwaco. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Captain James Fornance (steamer)
American vessel. 153 tons. Stranded off Fort Candy. December 21, 1917. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 158.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Captain Joseph Formance (steamer)
Two propeller steamers were built by the Willamette Iron & Steel Works at Portland as passenger and freight tenders for harbor defense service of the Army Quartermaster Corps, both of about 160 tons, 98 feet in length. The Captain Joseph Formance was dispatched to Alaska and the Captain Gregory Barrett to San Francisco. The Barrett was later renamed Gordon being purchased by the Foss Launch & Tug Co., completely rebuilt and powered with a 500 -horsepower diesel as the Mathilda Foss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Car Of Commerce (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 284.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carelmapu (full Rigged Ship)
Loss of life in marine disasters in Northwest waters was light in 1915 compared to most previous years. Probably the most dramatic shipwreck, and one of the most costly in human lives, was that of the Chilean full-rigged ship Carelmapu on Gowland Rocks off the West Coast of Vancouver Island. The C. P. R. steamer Princess Maquinna left Tofmo on Thanksgiving day in the face of extremely heavy wind and seas which had done extensive damage to offshore shipping. As the vessel proceeded down the Vancouver Island coast the weather worsened, Capt. Gillam stating that it was as bad as he had ever seen in his many years of navigating this dangerous route. He was preparing to put about and run for shelter when the lookout reported a sailing vessel in distress and almost in the breakers off the port bow. She was soon made out to be a full -rigged ship, her few sails in tatters, most of her yards bare, andplunging wildly to two anchors. It was the Carelmapu (formerly the Liverpool built Kinross), enbound for Puget Sound f
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carib Prince (of 1894)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
Citation:
Cariboo And Fly (steamer)
Cariboo and Fly, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 99.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cariboo And Fly (steamer)
The steamer Cariboo and Fly while en route from Skeena to Victoria, was wrecked in Granville Channel, but was afterward hauled off and repaired. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.362.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cariboo And Fly (steamer)
In September 1885 the Cariboo and Fly, after a few months' service as a barge, was again converted into a steamer. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1885, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 328.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carl Foss (tugboat)
The Carl Foss was originally named Sound which was built as a cannery tender in 1912 at Anacortes for the Coast Fish Company of Seattle. After several ownerships until being purchased by Foss on December 18, 1940. Foss operated the tug in Puget Sound until sold October 6, 1969. She was sold to a company employee who named her the Jenny W. Michael Skalley, The Carl Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 122-125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carlisle (freight Boat)
The passenger and freight boat Carlisle II of 1917 was rebuilt as a ferry operating from Gooseberry Point to Lummi and Orcas Islands, retaining her original 75-horsepower F-M oil engine and operated by Frank Wright of Bellingham. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 336.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carol Foss (tugboat)
The Carol Foss was built in 1958 at the Todd Shipyard in Seattle and completed by the Foss-Seattle yard. She is 84 feet long with a beam of 25 feet. She started her career on July 5, 1958 in the Seattle Harbor and was repowered in June of 1977. Michael Skalley, The Carol Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 192.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Caroline (pacific Mail Steamer)
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 226. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 282. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 143. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 235. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 112. First ocean going vessel to land at Portland. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 737, 742.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carr (guided Missile Frigate)
Todd's latest frigate: a shake down cruise, Marine Digest. April 27, 1985, p. 11+ The ship was named for gunner's mate third class Paul H. Carr who died in the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carrier Princess (ferry)
The success of the converted tank landing craft Trailer Princess in Canadian Pacific rail-trailer ferry service had prompted the company to contract for a new and larger vessel of similar design, the 380-foot, 6,000-ton Carrier Princess, which was completed by Burrard Dry Dock* at Vancouver and placed in service between Vancouver and Swartz Bay on Vancouver Island near Victoria. Carrier Princess was the most highly-powered motor vessel ever built at this yard, being fitted with four 16-cylinder GM diesels of 2,875 horsepower arranged in pairs to drive twin screws and providing a service speed of 18 knots. The unusual lines of the ferry, with funnels at deck level to port and starboard aft and separate high deckhouses forward, was designed more for utility than beauty, but she has proved highly efficient in operation. Designed primarily to handle truck-trailers between Vancouver and the mainland, the highly versatile craft is also equipped to handle truck-trailers between Vancouver Island and the mainland. Thi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carysfort
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 40, 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cascades Of The Columbia (steamer)
The Cascades of The Columbia, a splendid sternwheeler, was launched at Portland for the United States Engineers, and on completion was put in charge of Capt. John C. Gore and Engineer Charles E. Gore. She was used but little until 1888, when Major Handbury operated her in towing barges from Fisher's Landing to Fort Stevens, trans- porting rock for the jetty. She was admirably adapted for this service, being fast and powerful, and is still engaged in the work. During the past six years she has been in charge of Capt. W. H. Whitcomb, Pilot Andrew Johnson, and Chief Engineer Enoch Davis. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1882. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 294.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Castel Forte
See FAIRSKY.
Citation:
Castillian Prince (of 1898)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
Citation:
Catalina Express (passenger Craft)
Westport shipyard built fiberglass vessel for the Long Angeles Harbor to Catalina Island Transport, Marine Digest. May 11, 1985, p. 7. Hull design was by Edwin Monk, Jr. of Bainbridge Island. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catherine Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma built the Pacific Master in 1967 for the Pacific Towboat Company. The ship began service in April of 1967 in and around Anacortes, Bellingham and Ferndale. Responding to the needs of the Alaska oil boom the Pacific Master went north and worked around the oil rigs as a tender. When Mr. Skalley wrote his book about the Foss Company the Pacific Master had become the Catherine Foss and was working in Tacoma as the prime assist tug for Foss for Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Catherine Foss (2), Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catherine Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma built the Pacific Master in 1967 for the Pacific Towboat Company. The ship began service in April of 1967 in and around Anacortes, Bellingham and Ferndale. Responding to the needs of the Alaska oil boom the Pacific Master went north and worked around the oil rigs as a tender. When Mr. Skalley wrote his book about the Foss Company the Pacific Master had become the Catherine Foss and was working in Tacoma as the prime assist tug for Foss for Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Catherine Foss (2), Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catherine Foss (tugboat)
Built in 1899 in the Hanson Shipyard in Seattle as the steam cannery tug Kathadin. She was sixty-seven feet in length with a seventeen foot beam. She spent her career with Foss working on Puget Sound operating until November 5, 1964. The Catherine was sold in June of 1969 and in April of 1977 she was renamed Kathadin and taken to LaConnor. (Michael Skalley, The Catherine Foss, Foss ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 107).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cavalcade (fish Boat)
Casey Davidson, Launched just last summer the 92 foot fish boat Cavalcade was purchased by the United States Navy paying about $80,000 for the craft. The Cavalcade was built in Tacoma by the J.M. Martinac Shipbuilding Corporation for the Suryan interests of Anacortes and was used last summer as a cannery tender and pickup boat in Alaska, Soundings. The Tacoma Times. November 14, 1940.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cefer Made (tug)
An unusual British Columbia tug which aroused considerable interest was the CeFer Made, the first to be built of ferro-cement. The 43 x 13-foot craft with 200-horsepower Caterpillar engine, was built by a new company, CeFer Designs Ltd., at the former Chappell Boatyard on Lulu Island in the Fraser River. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXIX.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Central (ferry)
The small steam ferry Central, of 31 tons, 60.2 x 18.5 x 4.8, was built by Capt. Willis Nearhoff at Clinton, Whidbey Island, for service between that point and Everett by his newly-formed Central Ferry Co. The Central was powered with one of the two small steam engines from the Sound freighter Rapid Transit the other going into his later Central 2. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919- 1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 304.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Central Ii (ferryboat)
The 65-foot ferry Central II was chartered from Mrs. Berte Olson by Puget Sound Freight Lines to run with the Pioneer on the Gooseberry Point - Orcas Island crossing, but she was destroyed by fire on August 20, 1931. The route was then sold to Puget Sound Navigation Co., and Pioneer to Mrs. Olson. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1931, H.W. McCurdy Maine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 412.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chaco (freighter)
Motor freighter Chaco, 65 x 32 feet with 80-horsepower Winton gas engine, at the Martinolich yard, Quartermaster Harbor, for the Island Transportation Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H. S. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Champion Of The Seas
The "Champion of the Seas" was a 3-masted ship-rigged wooden sailing vessel of 1947 gross tons, built by Donald Mackay at East Boston in 1854 for the Black Ball Line of Liverpool. She was taken over by T.Harrison of Liverpool in 1866. In 1874 she was sold to W.H.Ross & Co of Liverpool and on 3rd January 1876 she foundered off Cape Horn when homeward bound from Chile to Cork with a cargo of guano, the crew being rescued by the British barque "Windsor". The "Champion of the Seas" was evidently a well known vessel in her time and there should be information and probably photos of her in Australian Maritime museums.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 8 August 1997]
Chariot Of Fame (clipper Ship)
Willis Thornton. The Nine Lives of Citizen Train. 1948., p. 17.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles E. Falk (schooner)
Charles E. Falk, three-masted schooner of 298 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., probably by Bendixsen, in 1889, for N. H. Falk, Eureka. She was wrecked on Copalis Rocks, some 12 miles north of Grays Harbor, on March 31, 1909 the crew of eight getting ashore safely.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles E. Falk (schooner)
Charles E. Falk, three-masted schooner of 298 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., probably by Bendixsen, in 1889, for N. H. Falk, Eureka. She was wrecked on Copalis Rocks, some 12 miles north of Grays Harbor, on March 31, 1909 the crew of eight getting ashore safely.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles E. Moody (full Rigged Vessel)
The full-rigged ship Charles E. Moody, a Bath-built Downeaster of 1882 belonging to the Northwestern Fisheries Co., made the passage of 1,350 miles from Puget Sound to Orca, Alaska in 10 days, in 1911. having been taken as far as the Cape by the tug Tatoosh. Capt. Peter Bergman commanded the ship on the voyage north, the average time for which, by sailing vessels of the fisheries fleet, was in excess of 15 days. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles F. Crocker (barkentine)
The Charles F. Crocker, 855 tons, carrying a million feet, was one of the first four-masted barkentines built on the Pacific Coast. She was launched at Alameda in 1890 by C. G. White, and her first owner was J. Simpson, San Francisco. She was owned before the first World War by Sanders & Kirchmann; they sold her in 1916 to William Johnson; and in 1918 Pacific Freighters of San Francisco bought the vessel. She was laid up at Seattle in 1924, after spending a couple of lean years in the Honolulu lumber trade. In 1926 she went to the Hollywood Navy, and was allowed to founder in Isthmus Harbor, Catalina Island, where her bones are one of the wrecks which now foul that otherwise beautiful anchorage. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles F. Crocker (barkentine)
The Charles F. Crocker, 855 tons, carrying a million feet, was one of the first four-masted barkentines built on the Pacific Coast. She was launched at Alameda in 1890 by C. G. White, and her first owner was J. Simpson, San Francisco. She was owned before the first World War by Sanders & Kirchmann; they sold her in 1916 to William Johnson; and in 1918 Pacific Freighters of San Francisco bought the vessel. She was laid up at Seattle in 1924, after spending a couple of lean years in the Honolulu lumber trade. In 1926 she went to the Hollywood Navy, and was allowed to founder in Isthmus Harbor, Catalina Island, where her bones are one of the wrecks which now foul that otherwise beautiful anchorage. John Lyman, Pacific Coast- Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles F. Crocker (barkentine)
The Charles F. Crocker, a four-masted barkentine, was sold by Pacific Freighters Co. to Jack West of San Francisco for filming motion pictures off the southern California coast the vessel departing for Los Angeles in tow of the steam schooner Viking. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles L. Wheeler Jr (freighter)
Maritime history was made by the McCormick Steamship Co. under Pope & Talbot operation early in July when its 2,670-ton ocean freighter Charles L. Wheeler, Jr. voyaged up the Columbia River and through the locks of Bonneville Dam to the historic upper river steamboat port of The Dalles.' Although the voyage was to some extent a publicity stunt in connection with the mid - Columbia -Bonneville dedication celebration, the Wheeler unloaded cargo at The Dalles from Los Angeles and San Francisco, consisting of sugar, building materials, beer, hardware, automobiles and general freight, and loaded lumber, wheat, flour and other Inland Empire products for the return voyage. Capt. Arthur Riggs, veteran upper Columbia pilot, took the vessel upstream from Portland to the inland terminus 200 miles from the Pacific. Hopes of The Dalles residents that this event marked their city's arrival as an ocean port were short -lived, for other deep water vessels did not follow in the her wake, but her historic voyage dramatized t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles L. Wheeler, Jr (freighter)
The Charles L. Wheeler, Jr., with dimensions of 289 x 44 x 19, powered by a 1,400-horsepower triple-expansion engine, was built by the Albina Engine & Machine Works at Portland in 1918 as the Carl for Danish owners, but was requisitioned by the Shipping Board and renamed Point Judith. In 1920 she was sold to the Pacific Mail Steamship Co., in 1925 to Swayne & Hoyt for service in its Gulf -Pacific Line, and in 1929 to the McCormick Steamship Co., being renamed for the son of the vice president and general manager of the company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938 H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 462.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles L. Wheeler. Jr (freighter)
The former McCormick freighter Charles L. Wheeler, Jr., which earned a place in Northwest maritime history by her 1938 voyage up the Columbia River to The Dalles, was taken from layup in the Olympia Reserve fleet and scrapped at the Seattle yard of the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 557.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles N. Curtis (sea Explorer Crarft)
Sea explorer craft comes up shining, The Tacoma News Tribune. December 18, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charlie Wells (ferry)
Peninsula Gateway. Mary 20, 1992. Wishing Wells could be here.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charlotte Frances (brig)
The Charlotte Frances is a brig of 126 tons old measurement and was built at San Francisco in 1863 by J. M. Farnum. Nothing more is known of this vessel. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charlotte Frances (brig)
The Charlotte Frances is a brig of 126 tons old measurement and was built at San Francisco in 1863 by J. M. Farnum. Nothing more is known of this vessel. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chavez (freighter)
The ship that missed, an account of the Chaez collision with the West Seattle Bridge, The Weekly. (March 16, 1983), p. 29. This vessel hit the West Seattle Bridge on June 11, 1978 while under the control of pilot R. Neslund.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cherub (sloop Of War)
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 14, 16-17, 19, 27. Peter Corney. Voyages in the Northern Pacific...1813-1818., p. 17, 41. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 84. Accompanied the Isaac Todd. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 212, Part of a convoy.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chetzmoka (ferry)
Wooden diesel-electric ferries Chetzemoka (1927), and Klahanie (1928), two of the dwindling fleet of former San Francisco Bay ferries brought north in the 1930's by Puget Sound Navigation Co., sold as surplus by Washington State Ferries to California owners, leaving the Vashon of 1930 as the only wooden-hulled vessel in the state ferry fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.191.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chickaree (freight Boat)
The 77-foot gasoline passenger and freight boat Chickaree was sold by Capt F. G. Reeve to Capt. Hopkins of Olympia, who used her on the Oyster Bay and Kamilche run, replacing the steamer Mizpah.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chickawana (freight Boat)
The gasoline passenger and freight boat Chickawana was acquired by the Island Transportation Co. from Capt. Charles E. Maxwell. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 355.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicken Of The Sea (tuna Boat)
An all steel tuna boat, Tacoma News Tribune. November 7, 1945. Powerful tuna clipper built here, Tacoma Times. November 7, 1945.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicken Of The Sea (tuna Clipper)
Among the larger commercial fishing vessels of interest in 1945 were the offshore tuna clipper Chicken of the Sea and the Canadian trawler Scot Hill. The latter vessel, 60 feet in length, was designed to serve either as a beam trawler or halibut boat and was considered one of the best designed and most strongly constructed vessels to be added to the Northwest fishing fleet in some years. She was built at the Nelson Bros. Fisheries yard, New Westminster, to the order of Peter Anderson. The Chicken of the Sea, a 142-foot welded steel vessel, was built at a cost of about a half million dollars by the Birchfield shipyards at Tacoma for California owners. She was rifted with refrigerated cargo space for handling 450 tons of fish. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H.W.McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 527.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicken Of The Sea (tuna Seiner)
All steel tuna boat, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 7, 1945. Powerful tuna clipper built here, The Tacoma Times. November 7, 1945.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief (ferry)
An interesting marine venture was made by Capt. Fred J. Tuttle, who had operated passenger, freight and towing vessels on Lake Chelan since 1913 with his brothers. Thomas and Gaines Tuttle built the boats, which were operated by Fred and Chester Tutfle, their fleet including the ferry Chief tug Vagabond and passenger boats Panama and Comet. In 1937 Capt. Tuttle rebuilt the 50-foot passenger launch Princess, built by Tuttle Brothers in 1907 for the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition service in Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief (ferry)
An interesting marine venture was made by Capt. Fred J. Tuttle, who had operated passenger, freight and towing vessels on Lake Chelan since 1913 with his brothers. Thomas and Gaines Tuttle built the boats, which were operated by Fred and Chester Tutfle, their fleet including the ferry Chief tug Vagabond and passenger boats Panama and Comet. In 1937 Capt. Tuttle rebuilt the 50-foot passenger launch Princess, built by Tuttle Brothers in 1907 for the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition service in Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief (launch)
The passenger launch Chief was sold by Columbia River Packers' Assn. to Capt. John Reid for Northern Pacific Railway ferry service between Kalama and Goble with the launch Queen. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p227.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Alokut (river Boat)
Experience in operating the 32 - foot twin - screw river boat Chief Joseph on the upper Snake River resulted in the construction of a new craft of even moreunique design by Blaine Stubblefield. The maiden voyage of his second craft through Hells Canyon was made with nine passengers, all emerging safely from the white water run aboard the 30 -foot converted Army bridge pontoon Chief Alokut. This novel passenger boat was built of rubber and powered by a 25-horsepower outboard mounted on a timber outrigger. Stubblefield was pilot for the trip, with Dan Cole of Homestead, Oregon, as steersman. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 586.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Joseph
A 30-foot flat-bottomed river boat, the Chief Joseph, was constructed by the Portland Boat Works and moved to Weiser, Idaho by flatbed truck. There it was launched for the novel upper Snake River tourist excursion service instituted by Blaine Stubblefield. Downriver trips only were made, the Chief Joseph voyaging from Weiser to Lewiston by water and returning overland by truck. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 573.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Joseph (motor Vessel)
Application was made during the summer of 1950 by Blaine Stubblefield for an inland waterway certticate on the Snake River from Weiser, Idaho downstream about 125 miles to Granite Creek Rapids at the foot of Hell's Canyon. Stubblefield was owner of the motor vessel Chief Joseph, the first scheduled vessel to go through the Hell's Canyon section of the Snake. The Inland Navigation Co., operating tugs and barges on the upper Columbia, had recently instituted similar service above -The Dalles, providing freight, passenger and mail service from Lewiston, Idaho up the Snake River to Johnson's Bar, utilizing small gasoline-powered vessels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 570.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Justic Marshall (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 532.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Seattle (fireboat)
Chief Seattle to replace the Duwamish, Marine Digest. October 20, 1984, p. 11. Fireboat Chief Seattle to enter service January 1, 1985, Marine Digest. December 22, 1984, p. 30. Fast fire boat serves Seattle waterfront, Marine Engineering/Log. (February, 1985), p. 79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Skugaid (fish Packer)
Reg. No. 133736 Engine: One 100-HP diesel. Union Gas Engine Co., Oakland, California. Owner: General Navigation Co., 1048 Hamilton St., Vancouver, 1929. Served longest term of any rum runner, March 1923 to December 1933 Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chief Washakie (freighter)
The Liberty freighter Chief Washakie was purchased by the Northland Transportation Co., but was not operated under that houseflag, also passing to Alaska Steam with the merger, later in the year, of the two companies. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chieftain (steamer)
The Chieftain, Captain Harnult, was launched May 8th for Cunningham & Son, the Skeena River cannerymen. She was a handsome little propeller eighty-five feet long, sixteen feet beam, and eight feet six inches hold. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.377.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chieftain Iii (tug)
The February gales which brought disaster to the RivTow Rogue caught the tug Chieftain III of wing Service Ltd. and her loaded barge in Malaspina Strait en route from Squamish for the MacMillan-Bloedel pulp mill at Powell River. The barge's cargo consisted of 250 tons of liquid caustic soda in below-deck tanks and four railway tank cars filled with deadly chlorine gas. When the tug's master came on watch at about 5:45 on the morning of February 19, he found the tug moving at a lower speed than normal and, upon investigation, found that the barge had capsized. Canadian and U.S. government vessels responded to the emergency call from the tug. The location of the tug and overturned barge off the north end of Texada Island was easily found, for the caustic soda was continuously leaking from the barge's overflow valve, turning the water a bright green for several miles. The soda becomes harmless when mixed with enough water, but the chlorine gas in the tank cars becomes potentially lethal to both human and marine
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chilkat (ferry Boat)
Lone E. Janson. The Copper Spike. 1975., p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chimacum (freighter)
Chimacum (ex Toandoo), diesel freighter sold by Puget Sound Freight Lines to the Horluck Transportation Co. of Port Orchard and con- verted for local passenger ferry service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 517.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chinook (ferry)
A new concept in ferry design, the steel diesel-powered Chinook, was built at the Todd Shipyards, Seattle, to replace the veteran ferry steamer Iroquois on the Seattle - Port Angeles - Victoria route of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. This streamlined twin -screw vessel, with dimensions of 318 x 65 x 13, was powered by diesel engines developing 5,500 horsepower, providing a service speed of 18 knots. She was capable of carrying 100 automobiles, in comparison to the 40-car capacity of the Iroquois, and had accommodations for 1,000 passengers, compared to 400 for the old steamer. Stateroom accommodations were provided for more than 200, while the dining salon was designed to serve 108 persons at a time. She was also fitted with three large lounges, a coffee shop, and an unusual amount of promenade deck area. Constructed at a cost of $2,000,000 the Chinook was christened by Mrs. Peabody, wife of Capt. Alex M. Peabody, president of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. Overall design of the vessel was by Gibbs & Cox, New
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chinook (ferryboat)
On April 22, 1947 the 318 foot Chinook described by Pacific Marine Review as the most lavisly equpped vessel for automobile passenger service yet built in America would be launched from the ways of Todd's wartime Harbor Island yard that produced forty-five destroyers during World War II. The two and a half million dollar craft would have a diesel electric propulsion system. Grahame F. Shrader, The Blackball Line. p. 12-13. Familiar Pacific Northwest Vessel, Marine Digest. April 30, 1983, p. 11-14. This boat was on the Port Angeles to Victoria run from 1947 to 1961. Was on coastal British Columbia runs from 1962 to 1982. Presently for sale. Letters to the editor, Marine Digest. July 2 and July 30, 1983.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chippewa (ferry)
The 67-year-old Puget Sound ferry Chippewa, purchased earlier from the Washington State Toll Bridge Authority by Foss Launch & Tug Co., was purchased by Isthmian Lines and turned over to the government on its purchase of the C-4 Troopship General C. C. Ballou. The Chippewa was towed from her former berth on Lake Union for storage in the Olympia Reserve Fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLV.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chippewa (ferry)
The 68-year-old ferry Chippewa, declared surplus by the Washington State Ferries in 1965, again changed hands when Donald Clair of Marine Diesel Supply & Equipment Co., Oakland, offered the Maritime Administration $9,768 for the Great Lakes-built vessel. She was subsequently towed to the Bay Area for the purpose of being converted to a museum, shopping and restaurant ship. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.43-44.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chippewa (ferry)
Fire originating in the paint locker gutted the veteran Puget Sound ferry Chippewa at her moorings in Oakland in June. Although the fireboat City of Oakland and 17 landbased fire department rigs battled the midnight blaze, the superstructure was destroyed to the car deck. The hull was subsequently converted to use as a fishing barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chiralite (freighter)
An interesting 85-foot motor vessel, the Chiralite, a twinscrew passenger and freight carrier with two 70-horsepower Sterling gas engines, was built by the Taylor Engineering Co. at Vancouver, B. C. for the International Petroleum Co. of Toronto. She was taken to South America by Capt. H. 0. Jones for ferry service between Payta and Telara, Peru. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 291.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chirikof (steamer)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 65, 162. At Drakes Bay. Buell and Skladal. Sea Otters and the China Trade., 178.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chris Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Chris Foss (1) was built as the Crest in 1925 at the Sieverson Shipyard in Seattle for the Wagner Towboat Company. The vessel was 51 feet in length and had a beam of 14 feet. Her primary service was on Puget Sound and she became part of the Foss fleet in 1937 when Wagner Towing was dissolved. After a checkered career with some years in lay-up without an engine Foss sold the tug in October of 1956. She once again became the Crest and did a variety of work on Puget Sound with plans for cruises up the Columbia and Snake Rivers as well as the Canadian islands. Michael Skalley, The Nancy Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chris Foss (2) (tugboat)
The CHRIS FOSS, a steel harbor-class tug number YTL-159, was built for the navy in City Island, New York, but the tug wandered a long way from home, ending up in Puget Sound. She worked for the navy shifting barges and test equipment around the Sound for twenty years before being declared surplus in 1962 and laid up at Indian Island near Port Townsend. She was purchased by Foss in mid 1962 and a major rebuilding operation began being completed by the end of that year. The tug operated on Puget Sound and its final active day for Foss was June 9, 1980 after which she was put up in lay-up. Michael Skalley, The Chris Foss, (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 226.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Christine Foss (tugboat)
The Christine Foss began service as a Miki-tyupe Army tug, LT-187 built in 1943 at the Sagstad Shipyard in Seattle. After war service in the Aleutians the vessel was sold to the Foss company in April of 1946. The Christine has been involved in two historic tows. In 1957 she towed a rail car barge loaded with lumber from central British Columbia to the Midwest and Est the first of its kind. In January 1958 the Christine carried two barges loaded with dynamite to the Hawaiian Islands Michael Skalley, The Christine Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 149.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chum (fishboat)
Chum, 20 -ton gasoline fishing vessel, built at Cordova in 1917 and owned by the Superior Packing Co. of Seattle, burned at Tenakee Inlet, Alaska, August 18, 1940. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Aberdeen
Built at Aberdeen in 1891. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Aberdeen
Beach comber's notebook, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 28, 1939.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Aberdeen (steamer)
The stern wheeler City of Aberdeen, built at Aberdeen in 1891, was rebuilt by Capt. W. H. Ellis as a day passenger steamer for the Seattle-Bremerton run and renamed Vashon. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Aberdeen (steamer)
The sternwheeler City of Aberdeen, one hundred and twenty-seven feet long, nineteen feet five inches beam, and six feet hold, was constructed for the Aberdeen Transportation Company. Capt. T. S. Tew was first in command. She was sent to the Sound, soon after completion, in charge of Capt. James Hennesy, and is now running between Seattle and Olympia in connection with the Multnomah. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Adelaide
Devitt & Co of London's "City of Adelaide" which was a clipper ship on the UK - Australia run. She was built by W.Pile, Hay & Co.at Sunderland, launched on 7.5.1864. and employed carrying general cargo and emigrants to Australia and wool home. However this was not a steamship but a ship rigged sailing vessel. In 1888 she was sold to Dixons of London, converted to barque rig and used in the N.American timber trade and in 1894, cut down to a hulk and employed by Southampton Corporation as a plague ship during an outbreak of cholera. Bought by the Admiralty in 1922 she was converted and renamed "Carrick" and used as a naval drill ship and headquarters of the Clyde Division, RNVR at Greenock. Used as a naval accommodation ship during the second world war and given to the RNVR after the war for conversion to a RNVR club headquarters at Glasgow. As far as I know, she is still there.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 26 July 1997]
City Of Alberni (schooner)
Five masted City of Alberni built at Hoquiam, Washington. Made 80 day wartime voyage with 1,590,000 feet of lumber from the mills of the MacMillan and Bloedel, Ltd, Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Alberni (schooner)
The five-masted schooner City of Alberni ex-Vigilant), under the management of the Canadian Transport Co. Ltd., a subsidiary of the H. R. MacMillan Lumber Co. of Vancouver, came out of layup for wartime service and was given an extensive refit including new rigging and sails and a couple of new top masts. Under the command of Capt. John Vosper, former master of the rum-running five masted schooner Malahat, she loaded lumber for Australia. After a 71-day voyage to Sydney she loaded a partial cargo of hardwood at Fiji and filled out with sugar at Suva. Late in the year she arrived off Cape Flattery, only to be struck by a year-end gale which opened up her seams and damaged her mizzen mast. Leaking and lame, she struggled into Port Angeles and was towed to Vancouver completing her round voyage on New Years Day of 1941. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Alberni (schooner)
The Canadian five-masted schooner City of Alberni (ex Vigilant), owned by the Canadian Transport Co., a subsidiary of the H. R. McMillan Export Co., had returned to service in the spring of 1940 after nearly a year's layup at Bellingham, carrying lumber from Vancouver to Sydney and returning from Fiji with sugar. On New Years Day, 1940, she returned to Vancouver, leaking and with a damaged mizzen mast, and discharged cargo. In the spring she sailed with lumber from Port Alberni to Sydney, thence in ballast to Apia, Samoa for copra, and thence back to British Columbia. On December 7, 1941 she was west of Hawaii, her master, Capt. John Vosper, estimating later that her course must have coincided within a few miles of that of the Japanese fleet steaming to attack Pearl Harbor. The City of Alberni was leaking badly by the end of this second Australian voyage and had difficulty getting insurance. She finally made her final voyage from the Northwest in November, 1942 with lumber for South Africa. Unable to round th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Anacortes
May 8, 1933 Gas boat, Lost in the Portland Canal. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Anacortes (ferry Boat)
Part of the fleet of the Kasch Transporation Company owned by William H. Kasch doing service between Anacortes, Friday Harbor and Bellingham. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Anacortes (freight Boat)
The City of Anacortes, a 66 x 12 -foot passenger and freight boat with 65 -horsepower Troyer -Fox engine was built by William Reed at Decatur for the Inland Passenger & Express Co. for operation between Friday Harbor, Waldron, Decatur and Anacortes. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Angeles (ferry)
The newly converted ferry City of Angeles, chartered from the Puget Sound Navigation Co., was placed in service in May between Anacortes and Sidney, B. C., with stops at Orcas and Roche Harbor in the San Juan Islands, by the Victoria - Anacortes Ferry Co., headed by Capt. Harry W. Crosby. Capt. Louis Van Bogaert had charge of her for about two months and then was succeeded by Capt. Sam Barlow, who transferred from the steamer Tourist. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 336.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Angeles (ferryboat)
Built in California in 1906. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 80, 95-96, 100, 132, 197, 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Antwerp
The steamship CITY OF ANTWERP was built for the Inman Line by Tod & McGregor, of Glasgow, in 1866. 2,391 tons; 101,19 x 12,01 meters (332 x 30.4 feet; length x beam); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots. 8 November 1866, launched. 20 February 1867, maiden voyage, Liverpool=Queenstown-New York. 13 January 1876, last voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 1879, became THANEMORE (Johnston); compound engines by Barrow Shipbuilding Co; tonnage incrased to 3,032. 26 November 1890, went missing with the loss of 43 lives [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1, p. 242. Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 57, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
City Of Astoria (tug)
The tug City of Astoria, which had been rebuilt at Portland in 1889 from the old City of Sellwood of 1883 and had been brought up from South Bend by Capt. Caine of the Pacific Clipper Line, struck an uncharted rock near Dyea on August 3 and sank incurring a loss of $7,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Astoria (tugboat)
Standing by 1898 wreck of the Mercury with the Resolute. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 49.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Athens
See AROSA KULM.
Citation:
City Of Baltimore
The "City of Baltimore" was built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1855 for the British owned Inman Line. She was a 2,368 gross ton ship, length 330.7ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 20th January 1855, she sailed from Liverpool for Marseilles on 20th March, where she was charterd by the French government for use as a troop transport for the Crimean War. She commenced her first commercial voyage for the Inman Line from Liverpool to Philadelphia on 23rd April 1856 and her first Liverpool - New York voyage started on 14th Jan.1857. In 1866 she was reconditioned with new engines and boilers and resumed Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York voyages on 21st Nov.1866. Her last sailing on this service commenced 26th Feb.1874 and she was then sold to the Hall Line, retaining the same name. In 1883 she was sold to Spanish owners and renamed "Fivaller" and in 1886 became the Spanish owned "Benicarlo". She was scrapped the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.239; vol.5 ,p.1920] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 August 1998]
City Of Baroda
The "City of Baroda" was a 7,129 gross ton ship, built by Barclay, Curle & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1918 for Ellerman's American & Indian Line. Her details were - length 433.4ft x beam 57.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 115-1st class passengers. Launched on 26/6/1918, she was employed on various routes, but on 3/2/1927 commenced her first passenger voyage from New York to Port Said, Karachi, Bombay, Columbo, Madras, Rangoon, and Calcutta. In November 1929 she commenced the last of two voyages from New York to Port Said and Far East ports and on 2/4/1943 was torpedoed and sunk off Luderitz Bay by the German submarine U.509 with the loss of 14 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1474]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 January 1998]
City Of Belleville (motorship)
The 151 x 27 -foot steel motorship City of Belleville, built in 1946 by the Canadian Car & Foundry Co. at Port Arthur and operated by the Canada Transport Co. of Belleville, Ontario, was purchased in 1951 by Frank Waterhouse & Co. of Canada Ltd. (Union Steamships) and brought around to Vancouver in October. The 400-horsepower diesel freighter was placed in B. C. coast service as Capilano (3) under Capt. W. B. Mc Cartney and Chief Engineer John Goodall.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bellingham (ferry Boat)
M.S. Kline and G. A. Bayless, Ferryboards, a legend on Puget Sound., P. 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bellingham (steam Ferry)
The steam ferry City of Bellingham of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. was completely rebuilt at Houghton as the Quilcene, her length being increased from 141 to 146 feet and her beam from 26 to 43 feet She was provided with entirely new public rooms, dining facilities and a number of staterooms, but her original four-cylinder triple-expansion engine installed at the time of her construction in 1916 as the Kitsap II was retained. The Quilcene was placed on the Seattle Port Townsend run in charge of Capt. Allen P. Burneson and upon the granting of a certificate by the state department of public works was diverted to the new Edmonds - Port Townsend route for which she was designed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929- 30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 402.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Berlin
The "City of Berlin" was an iron steamer built in 1875 by Caird & Co. of Greenock for the British Inman Line. Her dimensions were 5491 gross tons, length 488.6ft x beam 44.2ft. She had a clipper stem, one funnel and three masts, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 170 1st, 100 2nd and 1500 3rd class passengers. She sailed between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York and in 1875 made a recird passage between Queenstown and NY. In 1879 she was the first trans Atlantic liner to be fitted with interior electric lighting. In 1893 she went to the American Line but stayed under the British flag and was renamed "Berlin". She then sailed between NY and Southampton. In 1895 she went to the Red Star Line for their Antwerp - NY service and in 1898 resumed the Southampton - Queenstown - NY run. Later the same year she became the "Meade" for the US government and in 1906 was damaged by fire in San Francisco. She was scrapped in 1921.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 July 1997]
City Of Blain
Freight and passenger vessel. The little 54-foot freight and passenger boat City of Blaine, built at Blaine in 1912 for the Point Roberts mail run, was acquired from Capt. L. Devlin by Capt. Earl Sugden, Seattle fireboat pilot and a principal in Northwest Steamship Co., owners of the historic passenger steamer Virginia V. The City of Blaine, in a sinking condition on the Duwamish River, was moved to Lake Union for repairs and the installation of new power. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Blaine (passenger Vessel)
The City of Blaine, 39 tons, 60 feet, was built at Blaine in 1912 for local passenger service; Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bothell (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p.205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bothwell (steamer)
Small steamers built on the Sound were the City of Bothwell, length sixty-four feet nine inches, beam fourteen feet five inches, depth of hold three feet four inches. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.414.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bremerton (ferry)
More of the old time steamboat fleet of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. succumbed to the ship breaker in 1939, including a number of those whose lease on life had been extended by conversion to automobile ferries. The City of Bremerton (ex - Whatcom and Majestic) was broken up. Gordon Newell, Maritime Activities of 1939, McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 476.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bremerton (ferryboat)
Built in Everett in 1901. Known also as the Majestic and the Whatcom. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. M.S. Kline and G. A. Bayless, Ferryboats, a legend on Puget Sound. p. 89, 91-92, 94, 197, 241, 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bremerton (ferryboat)
Converted to carry sixty cars and 1500 passengers on the Seattle to Bremerton run, Marine Digest (September 26, 1981), p. 23. Conversion completed November 19, 1921. The vessel was previously known as the Whatcom.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bristol
See ETNA.
Citation:
City Of Brooklyn
See BROOKLYN.
Citation:
City Of Brussels
The SS CITY OF BRUSSELS was built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, in 1869, for the Inman Line (first steamer built with steam steering gear). 3,081tons; 118,86 meters (390 feet) long x 12,28 meters (40.3 feet) beam clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 14 knots; accommodation for 200 cabin and 600 3rd-class passengers. 10 August 1869, launched. 14 October 1869, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. December 1869, record passage, New York-Queenstown (first undisputed screw "Blue Riband" holder. 9 November 1871, last voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown- New York (20 roundtrip voyages). 1872, iron promenade deck added; 3,747 tons; steerage increased to 1,000. 9 May 1872, resumed Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 26 August 1875, last voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 1876, compound engines by G. Forrester & Co., Liverpool. 28 February 1877, resumed Liverpool- Queenstown-New York. 12 December 1882, last voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 7 January 1883, sank in the River Mersey following a collision with the SS KIRBY HALL (10 lives lost) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 242. Pictured in Bonsor,op. cit., p. 226. Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 59, contains a photograph, purportedly of the CITY OF BRUSSELS, with, however, 2 funnels, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 August 1997]
City Of Chester
The "City of Chester" was a 4,566 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1873 for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her details were - length 444.6ft x beam 44.2ft, clipper stem, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw, two cylinder compound engine, and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 125-1st, 80-2nd and 1,310-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/3/1873, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 10/7/1873. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 15/2/1893 and then went to the American Line, but stayed under the British flag, and was renamed "Chester". On 4/3/1893 she started her first New York - Southampton crossing and on 4/11/1894 commenced her last Southampton - New York voyage. She resumed the Southampton - Queenstown - New York service on 14/5/1898 and started her third and final voyage on this route on 9/7/1898. She then became the US Army Transport "Sedgwick". In 1903 she was sold to Italian owners who renamed her "Arizona" and in 1906 she became the Italian "Napoletano". She was scrapped in 1907. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.243] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 3 March 1998]
City Of Chester (steamer)
The steamship City of Chester, Thomas Wallace, captain, Frank Cookson, chief engineer, was struck by the steamship Oceanic while leaving San Francisco harbor, August 22d, and went to the bottom in a few minutes, thirteen persons losing their lives. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.360.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Chester (steamer)
The Oregon Steam company also added the City of Chester to their Pacific Coast fleet. Captain Bolles of the Ajax was sent East to bring her to the Coast, and she was the first ocean steamer to pass over Hell Gate after that dangerous obstruction was removed from New York harbor. The Chester did not arrive on the northern route until March, 1877. Bolles was succeeded in 1878 by Captain Mackie, with E. Polemann as mate, the latter having command in 1880, with Frank Cookson, engineer. Captains Carroll and Wallace afterward ran the steamers on the northern route. In 1888 the City of Chester was sunk at the Golden Gate by the Oceanic, at which time John Macdonald, who was one of the crew, distinguished himself by rescuing a lady passenger. The Chester and the Elder inaugurated the five-day service between Portland and San Francisco. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Pres
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Chicago
The "City of Chicago" was built by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow in 1883. She was a 5,202 gross ton ship, length 430.6ft x beam 45ft, straight stem, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 140-1st, 100-2nd and 850-3rd class. Laid down as the "Vancouver" for the Dominion Line, she was purchased on the stocks by Inman Line and launched as "City of Chicago". Her maiden voyage started on 18th Sep.1883 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She continued on this service until commencing her last voyage on this route on 8th Jun.1892. While homeward bound, she ran ashore in dense fog on 1st July, near the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland and was wrecked with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.244] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 October 1998]
City Of Clinton (ferry)
The 58 -foot ferry steamery City of Clinton was built at Clinton, Washington for service to Everett. The auto mobile ferries operated by King County in Puget Sound service between Seattle and Vashon Island were turned over at this time to the Kitsap County Transportation Co. for operation and management. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1921-22, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Clinton (ferryboat)
Built in Clinton in 1922, the 57 ton, 1 00 h.p., auto ferry steamer City of Clinton provided service to Everett. The small ferry managed by the Kitsap County Transportation Company ran for 7 years. On March 23, 1929 while enroute the ferry caught fire and sank off Mukilteo southeast of Everett (Hansonl 988, Barnard 1984, Straub 1979, Sobay 1975, Gibbs 1955, Newell 1966:325, 403, Firemen's Insurance Company 1928).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Clinton (ferryboat)
M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Clinton (steam Ferry)
The small steam ferry City of Clinton was wrecked at Mukilteo March 23. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 403.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Clinton (steamer)
Built in Clinton in 1922, the 57 ton, 1 00 h.p., auto ferry steamer City of Clinton provided service to Everett. The small ferry managed by the Kitsap County Transportation Company ran for 7 years. On March 23, 1929 while enroute the ferry caught fire and sank off Mukilteo southeast of Everett (Hansonl 988, Barnard 1984, Straub 1979, Sobay 1975, Gibbs 1955, Newell 1966:325, 403, Firemen's Insurance Company 1928).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Coquitlam (schooner)
The first vessel built for deep-sea trade on the Fraser River, the 215 x 40 foot four-masted auxiliary schooner City of Coquitlam, powered by heavy duty oil engines, was completed at Coquitlam for British Columbia-West Indies service via the Panama Canal, but was subsequently chartered to J. J. Moore & Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Cork
The "City of Cork" was built in 1862 by Wm Denny & Brothers, Dumbarton for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her details were - 1,547 gross tons, Length 252.6ft x beam 32.8ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She was rigged for sail as well as steam. There was accommodation for 20-cabin class passengers as well as 3rd class. She was launched on 22/11/1862 without a name and was bought by Inman in 1863 and named "City of Cork". She started her maiden voyage Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York on 21/3/1863. Commenced her last voyage Liverpool - Queenstown - Halifax - New York voyage on 14/1/1871 and was then sold to the Florio Line of Italy who renamed her "Mediterraneo". In 1881 she went to Navigazione Generale Italiana who ran her until 1899 when she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.240]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 November 1997]
City Of Denver (ferryboat)
Built by the LaConner Trading and Transporation Company. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 39-40, 102
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Dublin
See QUEBEC.
Citation:
City Of Dublin
October 8, 1878 Ship, British, 814 tons, en route Port Chalmers-New Zealand-Columbia River. Captain David Steven. In 1880 the Weekly Astorian reported parts of the City of Dublin had washed through the woods and were now lying behind the Fort Stevens garrison quarters. Rigging and other fixtures of the wreck were sold Dec. 1, 1878. The sale was well attended, $500 more was brought in than was expected -Daily Astorian, Dec. 1878. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Dublin
British ship, 814 tons, wrecked on Clatsop Spit, after the currents carried her on the shoal when the wind failed on the bar, October 18, 1878. The vessel was enroute to Portland from Port Chalmers, and was forty-nine days at sea. She was in command of Captain David Steven who, being unfamiliar with the landmarks, stood in too close to the bar, and was helpless to bring his ship about after the breeze failed. The anchor cables parted and the vessel was dashed hard on the sands. The crew made shore safely. Two weeks later salvage attempts were commenced but proved unsuccessful. The City of Dublin was valued at $40,000. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Dublin
Wrecked on Clatsop Spit in 1878. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. p. 159.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Dublin
The British ship City of Dublin, eight hundred and fourteen tons, was wrecked on Clatsop Spit, near the mouth of the Columbia, October 18th. She had made a rattling passage of forty-nine days, from Port Chalmers, New Zealand, and, approaching the mouth of the Columbia in the darkness and thick weather, came in too close, and a sudden shift of wind prevented her from getting away from the land. The anchors were dropped, but the chains parted, and she drifted on the beach. The weather was comparatively calm, and, when an unsuccessful attempt was made to float her two weeks later, it was found that she had made less than five feet of water. As she could not be hauled off she was dismantled, and the hull remained in the sand for many years. The City of Dublin was valued at $40,000 and was in command of Capt. David Steven at the time of the disaster. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiq
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Edmunds
M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 95, 98.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Ellensburg (steamer)
The stern-wheel steamer City of Ellensburg was constructed at Pasco in 1888 by Thomas L. Nixon, Tacoma mining man in association with L. E. Post of Tacoma and Ellensburg business interests, for operation on the upper Columbia above the Big Bend. The steamer was insufficiently powered for the fast water service required of her, but in 1893 she was acquired by Capt. Griggs and rerifted with higher powered engines and bouer which greatly increased her capacity for the difficult river work. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Ellensburg (steamer)
The other, the City of Ellensburg, was one hundred and nineteen feet long, twenty-two feet nine inches beam, and four feet five inches hold, with engines twelve by thirty-six inches. Capt. Al Gray was her first master. She was purchased from the Nixon estate in 1892 by J.R. Peters and M. S. Donahue, and for the past two years has been run by Capt. C. E. Hansen. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.356.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Eureka (steamer)
Built by the Columbia River Shipbuilding Corporation in 36 days from the keep laying to the trial trip in May of 1919. 8800 ton burden. Dean Collins, Stars of Oregon.,p. 103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett
The whaleback City of Everett was launched at Everett in 1894 but was not completed until 1895. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.414.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (freighter)
The 59-foot freighter City of Everett, powered with a 40 horse power gas engine, was built at Tacoma. The vessel was later converted to steam and operated by the Skagit River Navigation & Trading Co. as the Stanwood. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 385.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (steamer)
Built in Everett in 1900. 134 feet long. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p.205. Whaleback Steamer the City of Everett Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 424. Maritime memories the City of Everett built for the Seattle to Everett run, Marine Digest. November 2, 1985, p. 6. (il). History of the City of Everett, rebuilt as a ferry, renamed Liberty. Marine Digest. November 9, 1985, p. 5. Transformation of the City of Everett, Marine Digest. November 16, 1985, p. 6. Final transformation into waterfront restaurant, first as Golden Anchors on the Duwamish River, then as Four Winds on Lake Union, Marine Digest. November 23, 1985,p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (steamer)
A vessel famous in the ealry steel ship building indsutry of the Pacific Northwest, the whaleback steamer City of Everett, built in Everett in 1894 departed from Santiago, Cuba, October 7, 1923 and was never heard from again. She was presumed to have foundered at sea with the loss of all hands, and was so listed among the losses of American vessels for the fiscal year 1924. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (steamer)
The 134-foot City of Everett was built by N. C. Peterson of Everett to replace the stern-wheel steamer Greyhound on the Seattle - Everett run. The City of Everett proved to be a long-lived vessel, continuing in passenger service as the Liberty through World War I and later as a steam and diesel ferry under the names Liberty and Ballard. Retired from active service some years ago, she is still afloat on Lake Union, Seattle, as the Four Winds Restaurant. xxxx, p. 60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (steamer)
The largest craft of any description ever set afloat in the Northwest was the whaleback City of Everett, which was completed at Everett early in 1895 at a cost of nearly $300,000. This steamer, the material for which was brought out on the C. W. Wetmore, is three hundred and sixty-one feet long, forty-two feet beam, and twenty-six feet six inches hold, with engines twenty-four, thirty-eight and sixty-four by forty-two inches, turning a fourteen-foot propeller. She has four Scotch boilers eleven by twelve feet. While steaming in ballast she draws about fourteen feet aft and eleven feet forward, and when loaded has a draft of about twenty feet six inches. Her carrying capacity is 4,200 tons, beside 375 tons of fuel. The entire hull is constructed of steel, the plates being nine-sixteenths of an inch in thickness at the bottom, with double keel plates, the outside one being thirteen-sixteenths of an inch. The frame is composed of keel and keelson, with five rider keelsons on either side. Each frame is of angle s
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (steamer)
The famous whaleback steamer City of Everett built in 1894 by the American Steel Barge Co. at Everett was reported lost off the Caroline coast when she was rammed by the British steamship Kensington while towing the Standard Oil Barge No. 38 and abandoned by her crew. Captain B. J. Bates reported upon arriving at Wilmington, North Carolina, on March 4, 1912, that the City of Everett sank five minutes after the collision. She was salvaged, however, and continued in the service of the Standard Oil Company as a tanker for aother decade becoming a mysterious casualty of the sea with the loss of all hands in 1923. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 212-13.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Everett (steamer)
In addition to the new steel steamer Kulshan, which was completed and placed in service in 1910, and the Sioux, launched December 31, 1910 and placed in service the following year, the Puget Sound Navigation Co. purchased the propeller steamer City of Everett of 1900 and the stern -wheel steamer Telegraph of 1903, along with the other assets of the Seattle-Everett Navigation Co., a subsidiary of the Columbia River & Puget Sound Navigation Co. headed by Capt. U. B. Scott. This left only the famous Flyer among the Scott boats in competition with the Green-Peabody steamers on the Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 175.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Flint
Famed City of Flint arrives in Tacoma harbor, The Tacoma Times. July 10, 1940.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Honolulu
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century p. 54, 71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Honolulu (1)
See PRINCESS ALICE.
Citation:
City Of Honolulu (2)
See FRIEDRICH DER GROSSE.
Citation:
City Of Honolulu Ii, 1927
1930. (Steamer) - Undaunted by the loss of the first City of Honolulu in 1922, the Los Angeles Steamship Company (LASSCO) continued to provide service between Hawaii and Los Angeles. In 1926 LASSCO bought from the Shipping Board another ex-German liner, the Prinzess Alice, which the company renamed the City of Honolulu, in spite of what had befallen the first vessel with this name. After extensive renovation work, the City of Honolulu II made the first voyage on the Los Angeles-Hawaii route in June 1927 and operated successfully, at least in the initial years. On 25 May 1930, while the ship was docked in Honolulu harbor, a fire broke out, and although all available fire-fighting equipment was rushed to the scene, the ship continued to blaze for twelve hours and was judged a total loss by the company. Later, however, the ship was able to reach California under her own power but never returned to service and was laid up and finally scrapped in 1933. Rene de la Pedraja. A historicla dictionary of the U.S. Mercha
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Honolulu, 1922 (steamer)
The Los Angeles Steamship Company (LASSCO) established regular service between Los Angeles and Hawaii in the fall of 1922 with vessels bought from the Shipping Board. The City of Los Angeles, a former German liner, inaugurated the service on 11 September and was followed by the City of Honolulu (the former German liner Friedrich der Grosse) on 23 September. The City of Honolulu reached Hawaii safely, but on 12 October during the return voyage and 600 miles from the coast of California, a fire broke out in the early hours of the morning. The flames spread rapidly, and at 6:00 A.M- the captain sent an SOS; although the fire appeared to be under control, the vessel began to list heavily to the port side and the captain decided to abandon ship. While the orchestra played, the efficient crew lowered the boats with all the passengers, and by 10:00 A.M. the last of the crew had safely departed the City of Honolulu. Fortunately the sea was calm and smooth, no lives were lost, and by mid-afternoon the first rescue shi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston
The Northern Pacific Railway, a major factor in steamboat operations on Puget Sound for a decade, retired from the field in May, 1899, turning over the Victoria route, formerly served by the City of Kingston, to the Washington & Alaska Steamship Co. of Dodwell & Co., the Tacoma-Seattle-Port Townsend mail contract being likewise transferred to Dodwell & Co. The railway began operating steamers on Puget Sound in 1889, the old Washington Steamboat Co. being purchased from Capt. D. B. Jackson and associates, Capt. Jackson assuming the duties of general manager of the new rauroad-owned Puget Sound & Alaska Steamship Co. The City of Kingston was then brought out from the East Coast making the voyage by way of MageUan Straits in the creditable time of 61 days, followed shortly by the new City of Seattle. Walter Oakes, son of President Thomas F. Oakes of the Northern Pacific, took up residence at Tacoma as secretary and later superintendent of the steamship company, leaving to join Charles Peabody and others in formi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston (ferry)
The little diesel ferry City of Kingston, rebuilt from the wrecked Sound freighter Rubaiyat, was sold by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. to Capt. William P. Thornton and renamed Lake Constance on the Seabeck - Brinnon crossing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1934, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 430.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston (steamer)
The City of Kingston built in Wilmington, Delaware in 1884 was originally intended for the Hudson Bay River Trade. The three decked, steel hull, propeller steamer measured 246 ft in length with a beam of 33.5 ft and a 12 ft hold. She had stateroom accommodations for 300 and could carry another 900 passengers. In 1890 Captain D.B. Jackson purchased the large steamer from Cornell Steamboat Co. for the Puget Sound & Alaskan Steamship Co. He was so impressed by the handling and appointments of the City of Kingston that he contracted for a sistership, City of Seattle, to be built on the same plan. Captain Melville Nichols brought the steamer around Cape Horn to Port Townsend after her purchase in 1890. For the next decade the City of Kingston ran service between Victoria, British Columbia, Port Townsend, and Seattle. In the middle of the night on April 24, 1899, the City of Kingston was on her final approach to Tacoma. Simultaneously, the Northern Pacific steamship Glenogle pulled away from a Tacoma pier to begin
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston (steamer)
Captain James Griffiths Shipping Activities in the Pacific Northwest, The Sea Chest. X (March 1977). Built in New York in 1884. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p.205. James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait., p. 284. Roland Carey, West Point collision of steamers recounted, Marine Digest May 19, 1984,p. 11+ This was the collision with the Mary F. Perley on November 10,1894. Marine Digest. LVII (January 20, 1979). PM, December 1890, p. 292. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. p. 364. West Coast Trade. Annual Edition , 1899 p. 27. City of Kingston disaster here recalled, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 5, 1953.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston (steamer)
The passenger steamer City of Kingston had left her Seattle dock on her usual Victoria passenger and express run. At 2:07 on the morning of the 5th she was abeam of Point Wilson, where she plunged into a heavy sea which completely engulfed her to the pilot house; Capt. Samuel Clements, knowing the seas were heavier at this point on account of the shoal water than in the open strait maintained steerage way and managed to get clear of the point He found the seas still too heavy to admit of his proceeding to Victoria or of putting about for Port Townsend, his only course being to work on a slow bell with the wind on his starboard bow putting him into the lee of Protection Island, where the steamer remained until the gale abated. The night was totally dark, with objects not discernable at even short distances and when the positions of the passenger steamer and the helplessly drifting ship are calculated as of 2:15 that morning, neither knowing of the proximity of the other, it seems probable that they were within
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston (steamer)
One of the most sensational of the marine mishaps of 1.899, although fortunately not accompanied by loss of life, was the sinking of the passenger steamer City of Kingston at Tacoma in April. The Northern Pacific ocean steamship Glenogle was departing her Tacoma pier for a trans -Pacific voyage before dawn on April 24 as the City of Kingston, also operated by the railroad company, was coming in at the termination of her regular run from Victoria, Port Townsend and Seattle. The larger vessel swung in the tide and struck the passenger steamer. The pilots of both steamers knew the crash was coming and the distress calls of their whistles brought horrified citizens of Tacoma from their beds. The Kingston was cut clear in two just aft of the boilers and sank in a few minutes. Her wooden upperworks fortunately broke loose and remained afloat, with the result that not a single life was lost, although most of the passengers and many of the crew had been asleep just before the collision. Capt. James Hutcheson of the G
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Kingston (steamer)
The City of Kingston was built at Wilmington, Del., in 1884, for the Hudson River trade. She was bought in 1889 by Capt. D. B. Jackson, and her performances since have demonstrated the wisdom of the purchaser, for a more economical steamer, size and speed considered, has not yet appeared on the Sound. The Kingston is two hundred and forty-six feet long, thirty-three feet five inches beam, and twelve feet hold, net tonnage 816. She has three decks and is elegantly fitted up with stateroom accommodations for over three hundred passengers. She was brought from the East by Melville Nichols, captain; W. A. Coffin, first officer; William Andtsjer, second officer; W. J. Green, chief engineer; C. H. Wolford, first assistant; Harry R. Dann, second assistant; W. C. Hogan, steward; Nicholas Van Patton and James Martin, quartermasters, Her actual running time from New York to Port Townsend was sixty-one days, and on her way out she stopped two days at the Barbadoes and four at Rio Janeiro, where she coaled. She came thro
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Latona (steamer)
The steamer City of Latona, length sixty feet, beam twelve feet, was built for the Lake Union trade. She is at present owned by M. F. Kunkler. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Latona (sternwheeler)
Built on Lake Union in 1890. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Limerick
The "City of Limerick" was built in 1855 by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow for British owners, as the "African". She was purchased by the Inman Line of Liverpool in 1863 and renamed "City of Limerick". Her details were - 1,529 gross tons, length 281ft x beam 34.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She started her first voyage for the Inman Line on 29/5/1863 when she sailed from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1870 she was rebuilt to 2,536 gross tons, lengthened to 331.1ft and fitted with compound engines by G.Forrester & Co, Liverpool. She started her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailing on 20/5/1874 and was chartered to the American Line for their Liverpool - Philadelphia service in July 1875. She made her sixth and last voyage on this route in August 1876 and then made a single round voyage in November 1876 for the Inman Line between Bordeaux and New York. Again chartered to the American Line, she resumed Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings in January 1877, making her fifth and last voyage on this service in May 1878. She resumed Liverpool - New York voyages for Inman on 3/7/1878 for three round voyages, the last commencing on 25/10/1879 and was then sold to the Thistle Line of London. She started her first London - New York voyage on 26/3/1880 and left London on her last round voyage on 5/12/1881. Sailed from New York on the homeward passage on 8/1/1882 and went missing with the loss of 43 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.240-1] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 June 1998]
City Of Lincoln
See SOLIS .
Citation:
City Of Long Beach (passenger Vessel)
The twin-screw passenger vessel City of Long Beach, built at San Pedro in 1906 by Charles Fulton for excursion service, and fitted with two gasoline engines of 200-horsepower, was brought to Puget Sound and operated for a time as an opposition boat on the Seattle -Port Angeles run, later passing to the Puget Sound Navigation Co., and long in that service, both as a passenger and ferry vessel. Her unsatisfactory gas engines were removed following her arrival on the Sound, being replaced with two triple-expansion steam engines (9, 14V2, 25 x 16), developing 750 horsepower. Her name was also changed to City of Angeles, her tonnage being listed at 258, with dimensions of 128.1 x 21.3 x 8.6. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Long Beach (steamer)
A new company known as the Port Angeles Transportation Co. was formed at Port Angeles in June by Peter Grubb and associates and the Angeles Brewing Co., purchasing the gasoline-engined City of Long Beach, which had been brought up from California in 1909, from the Stetson estate at Seattle, the vessel having been laid up for some time at Eagle Harbor. With her name changed to City of Angeles she was placed on the Port Angeles-Seattle run, but the unpredictable behavior of her early gasoline engines made her schedule a thing of great uncertainty. Following a costly conversion to steam, she resumed her run the following summer after a layup of five months, being purchased shortly afterward by the Puget Sound Navigation Co., who used her on various Sound routes. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966.. p. 218.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Lordsburg (steamer)
City of Lorxisburg, 3,545-ton Shipping Board steel steamship 324 feet long, built at Baltimore in 1920, purchased from the govemment by James Griffiths & Sons and assigned to the Coastwise Steamship & Barge Co. as the James Griffiths. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Los Angeles
See GROSSER KURFURST.
Citation:
City Of Manchester
The "City of Manchester" belonged to the British owned Inman Line, and was built in 1851 by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow. She was a 2,109 gross ton ship, length 265.3ft x beam 37.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. Launched on 14th Jun.1851, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Philadelphia on 26th Jul.1851. She started her last voyage on this service on 20th Dec.1854, and in 1855 was chartered by the French and used as a Crimean War transport. She resumed Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings on 3rd Aug.1856, and commenced her last voyage on this route on 6th May 1857. On 24th Aug.1857 she left London for Calcutta as an Indian Mutiny transport and on 22nd Dec.1858 started Liverpool - New York sailings. In 1862, after 48 North Atlantic sailings, she was fitted with new boilers and started her final voyage between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh), Halifax and New York on 28th Jan.1871. Later the same year, she was sold, her engines were removed and she operated as a sailing ship until 1876, when she was wrecked. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.238-9] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 September 1998]
City Of Mecca
See NUBIAN.
Citation:
City Of Mukilteo (ferryboat)
Built in Seattle in 1927. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 174, 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Nanaimo (steamer)
Built at Vancouver in 1891. Named Bowena and Cheam. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story, p. 341.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Nanaimo (steamer)
The Canadian Pacific B. C. coast service was augmented in 1905 by the purchase of the rail and steamship lines of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Co. from the Dunsmuir coal interests. Included in the sale were the wooden passenger steamers City of Nanaimo and Joan, the tugboats Czar and Escort No. 2, and the barge Georgian. The City of Nanaimo normally ran on the passenger route between Victoria, Nanaimo and Comox, with intermediate calls at the Gulf Islands, while the Joan normally ran between Vancouver and Nanaimo. By the acquisition of this service, the C. P. R. was able to enter the lucrative Nanaimo run. The City of Nanaimo was built by Mc Alpin and Allen at Vancouver in 1891 for the Mainland & Nanaimo Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. of New Westminster, and was acquired by James Dunsmuir on a mortgage foreclosure in 1896. She was a wooden vessel of 518 tons, 159 x 32 x 9.4, powered by a reciprocating engine of 750 horsepower and capable of a speed of 11 knots. She was operated briefly during the gold rush un
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of New York (1)
The "City of New York" was a 2,360 gross ton ship, built in 1861 by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow for the Inman Line. Her details were - length 336ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 158-cabin and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/4/1861, she sailed from Liverpool on 11/9/1861 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage started on 24/2/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York and on her homeward journey, when approaching Queenstown in the early morning of 29th March 1864, she struck the sunken reef known as Daunt's Rock, and became a total loss. There were no casualties. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,pps.224/240]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 January 1998]
City Of New York (2)
The second "City of New York" was a 2,642 gross ton ship built by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow in 1865. Length 321ft x beam 39.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched as the "Delaware" for Richardson, Spence & Co, Liverpool on 25/2/1865, she went to Inman Line the same year and was renamed "City of New York". On 7/6/1865 she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1871 she was rebuilt to a length of 375.2ft and 3,523 gross tons and on 4/4/1871 resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service. In September 1876 she was chartered to the American Line and completed three round voyages between Liverpool and Philadelphia, and the following year was fitted with compound engines. She was then chartered to the Guion Line and on 8/6/1878 commenced the first of 2 round voyages between Liverpool - Queenstown and New York. On 19/12/1882 she commenced her last voyage for the Inman Line when she left Liverpool for New York and in 1883 went to the Allan Line and was renamed "Norwegian". Fitted with new compound engines, she commenced Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 12/6/1884, Glasgow - New York sailings on 20/11/1891 and Glasgow - Boston sailings on 4/7/1896. Her last Glasgow - New York voyage commenced on 28/4/1900 and her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 23/5/1903. She was scrapped the same year in Holland. [ North Atlantic Seaway , by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.241] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 January 1998]
City Of New York (3)
The "City of New York" was an iron built, 3,019 gross ton, screw propulsion steamer with a speed of 14 knots. She was built in 1875 by Roach, Chester, PA for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co.and sailed on her first voyage from San Francisco to Kandavau (Fiji) and Sydney on 24th April 1876. On 26th October 1893 she was wrecked on Point Bonita, San Francisco Bay. The company ran a service between San Francisco, Fiji, Honolulu and Australia / New Zealand ports and from 1879, advertised in the London Times "An overland route from Britain to Australia, New Zealand, China, etc, via New York and San Francisco in connection with the Anchor Line from London or Glasgow to New York. Through tickets are available". [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 March 1998]
City Of New York (4)
See NEW YORK (2).
Citation:
City Of New York (steamer)
The Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) ordered the City of New York and the sister ships, the City of San Francisco and the City of Sydney, to inaugurate in 1875 a new PMSS route from San Francisco to Australia. The three ships were iron steamers with screws and compound engines but were smaller than the much larger City of Tokyo and City of Peking, which the PMSS operated between San Francisco and the Far East. The Australian route offered little cargo, and consequently PMSS shifted the City of San Francisco to the route between Panama and San Francisco. On 16 May 1877 the City of San Francisco was wrecked on Tartar Shoal, near Acapulco, Mexico, but without any loss of life. When PMSS abandoned the Australia service in 1885, it transferred the City of Sydney and the City of New York to its other routes. The former continued in service until it was laid up in 1910, but on 26 October 1893 the latter ran into the rocks of Point Bonita right inside San Francisco Bay. The captain did not want to delay his sail
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Nome (motorship)
The 2,169-ton wooden motorship City of Nome of 1919, Capt. H. G. Wigsten, caught fire while taking on fuel at Aberdeen June 3 after loading a lumber cargo, was grounded and burned out. She was owned at the time by Flood Bros. of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Olympia
Built at Olympia in 1898, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Olympia (tug)
A 51 -ton steam tug, the City of Olympia, 56.4 x 16.9, was built by Keton Brothers at Olympia for Alaska service, making a few trips to Port Simpson and Skagway, passing to Pacific American Fisheries in 1900 and used as a cannery and fishtrap tender at Fairhaven. In 1906 she received a new (9, 18 x 14) compound engine, which was later removed and placed in the new tug Nile, the hull of the City of Olympia being sold to the Lillico Launch & Tug Co. of Seattle, who fitted her with gasoline engines and renamed her Arab. Later receiving a 180-horsepower diesel engine and another new name, Dividend, she eventually became a unit of the Bellingham Tug & Barge Co. fleet, and is still in commission at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Panama (steamer)
The old iron steamer City of Panama of 1873, rerigged from a coal barge to a five-masted schooner during World War I and owned by Thomas Crowley, was sold to South American owners for conversion to a motorship. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 307.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Panama (steamer)
Despite the fact that a storm of public indignation had been aroused by the tragic loss of the Portland - San Francisco steamer Columbia, it being generally considered that she was worn out and unseaworthy, the Harriman interests, in a classic example of the public be damned attitude common to many transportation companies in that era, replaced her on the run with an even older and more decrepit vessel, the ancient City of Panama. Built at Chester, Pennsylvania in 1873, her iron hull was uncompartmented and her wheezy compound engine gave her a top speed of about eight knots. She was originally in service in the Pacific Mail Company's route between New York and Aspinwall, on the Isthmus of Panama, later being placed in coastwise passenger service on the Pacific. In recent years she had been engaged in freighting coffee from Central America to San Francisco. During one of the strikes at San Francisco against the Pacific Mail Co. she was tied up for some time along the waterfront as a floating dormitory for s
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Panama (steamer)
In August [1875] the new steamship City of Panama, Captain Seabury, D. E. Griffith, first officer, made her initial trip to Victoria and the Sound. She had been built at John Roach's yard a few months before, and in command of Seabury ran north for several years. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.235.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Papeete
Edward Hungerford. Wells Fargo, p. 155.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Papeete (barkentine)
City of Papeete, barkentine of 389 tons and 370M capacity, was built at Fairhaven by Bendixsen in 1883 for the Tahiti packet line of J. G. Berude, San Francisco. In 1901 she was bought by the Alaska Codfish Co., San Francisco, and in 1912 was cut down to a baldheaded schooner. Her last codfishing voyage was in 1928, since which year she has been laid up in San Francisco Bay near the company's plant, and it would take a lot of refitting to get her to sea again. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Papeete (barkentine)
City of Papeete, barkentine of 389 tons and 370M capacity, was built at Fairhaven by Bendixsen in 1883 for the Tahiti packet line of J. G. Berude, San Francisco. In 1901 she was bought by the Alaska Codfish Co., San Francisco, and in 1912 was cut down to a baldheaded schooner. Her last codfishing voyage was in 1928, since which year she has been laid up in San Francisco Bay near the company's plant, and it would take a lot of refitting to get her to sea again. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. Mar. 15, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Paris
See PHILADELPHIA.
Citation:
City Of Pekin
W. Henry Barneby. Life and Labour in the Far West, 1884., p. 84.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Portland (schooner)
The well -known peacetime yard of Saint Helens Shipbuilding Company established in 1912 as a subsidiary of Charles R. McCormick Lumber Co. and operating three ways, was incorporated as a separate concern in 1916, work then being under way on the 1,791-ton five-masted bald-headed auxiliary schooner City of Portland, a twin-screw vessel with two 320-horsepower Bolinder oil engines. She was designed and her construction supervised by J. H. Price and she was launched October 15, 1916 as the largest single-deck wooden vessel ever built in the United States to that time, having a lumber carrying capacity of 2,000,000 board feet. Following her completion she was placed under charter to the U. S. Shipping Board. Gordon Newell, World War I ship buidling, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 280.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Puebla (steamer)
Steamship City of Puebla, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 368.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Puebla (steamer)
The City of Puebla was an iron steamer of 2,980 tons, built at Philadelphia in 1881 for Ward Line service between New York and Havana, on which run she held the speed record for some time. Her dimensions were 320.6 x 38.6 x 16.6 and she was fitted with a com- pound (40, 86 x 60) engine developing 2,300 horsepower, with steam at 115 pounds pressure from four single-ended Scotch marine boilers. Following her establishment on the Puget Sound-San Francisco route in 1889 she attained the speed record for the San Francisco to Victoria run, making the voyage in 50 hours and later reducing that time to 48-1/2 hours. Among her well-known masters in Pacific Coast service were Captains Debney, Jepsen, C. J. Hanna and Thomas Reilly. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Puebla (steamer)
The steamship City of Puebla was placed on the Puget Sound route in 1889 in command of Captain Debney, who was for many years master of the State of California. A. H. Kress was chief engineer, and in October the steamer made the fastest passage on record between San Francisco and Victoria, covering the distance in fifty hours. This time was reduced by the same steamer a year later to forty-eight and one-half hours. The City of Puebla is three hundred and twenty feet six inches long, thirty-eight feet six inches beam, seventeen feet hold, and is still on the Victoria route. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.368.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Quincy (steamer)
Steamer City of Quincy. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 259. Built at Portland in 1878, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Quincy (steamer)
The former Lewis River steamer City of Quincy, built at Portland in 1878, was dismantled on the Snohomish River. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Quincy (steamer)
The steamer City of Quincy was launched at Portland in 1878 for the Lewis River trade, making her trial trip November 12th. She was built by Buchanan Brothers, and the following year went on the Dayton route in command of Capt. I. B. Sanborn, with Richard Oakley, purser. Capt. W. S. Buchanan took charge of her in 1882 and remained with her until June, 1882, when she was sold to Puget Sound parties for the Skagit River traffic. Her first master on the Sound was Daniel Benson, who was succeeded by Captains Denny, Bailey, Gatter, Sinclair, Parker and others. Among her engineers were Charles H. Grinwald and I. J. Honian. The Quincy was one hundred and ten feet long, twenty-two feet beam, and four feet six inches hold, with engines twelve by forty-eight inches. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.259.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Renton (steamer)
City of Renton, length forty feet, beam ten feet, depth three feet five inches. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.414.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Renton (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 146.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Rio De Janeiro
Passenger steamship, American flag, struck foul ground at the entrance to the Golden Gate February 22, 1901, and went to the bottom claiming an estimated 129 lives of passengers and crew. Valencia, passenger steamer, American, stranded in thick weather near Pachena Point, Vancouver Island, January 22, 1906. Somewhere between I 1 7 and 126 lives were lost in the harrowing hours that followed.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Rio De Janeiro (steamer)
Passenger steamship, American flag, struck foul ground at the entrance to the Golden Gate February 22, 1901, and went to the bottom claiming an estimated 129 lives of passengers and crew. Valencia, passenger steamer, American, stranded in thick weather near Pachena Point, Vancouver Island, January 22, 1906. Somewhere between I 1 7 and 126 lives were lost in the harrowing hours that followed.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Rio De Janeiro, 1878
1901. (Liner) - The City of Rio de Janeiro, completed in 1878, was one of five ships the shipbuilder John Roach constructed in his vain attempt to make the United States and Brazil Mail Steamship Company successful venture. The City of Rio de Janeiro was an iron screw steamer with compound engine and capable of twelve knots, and although she was not big for the time, just like her sister vessels, she was too large for the barely incipient trade between the United States and Brazil. Roach and his partners took heavy losses in the United States and Brazil Mail Steamship Company, and when the service was suspended in 1881, Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) bought the City of Rio de Janeiro at a giveaway price. The City of Rio de Janeiro performed well in the transpacific service for nearly twenty years. in the morning of 22 February 1901, the captain of the City of Rio de Janeiro was anchored outside San Francisco Bay, waiting for the fog to clear in order to enter the bay; the visibility improved, but fifte
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Rome (1)
The "City of Rome" was built in 1881 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for the Inman Line. She was a 8415 gross ton vessel, length 560.2ft x beam 52.3ft, clipper stem, three funnels, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 271-1st, 250-2nd and 810-3rd class passengers. Launched on 14/6/1881 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown [Cobh] and New York on 13/10/1881. She made 5 round voyages and was then transferred to Henderson's Anchor Line, and made her first voyage for them from Liverpool - Queenstown - NY commencing 25/8/1882. On 4/10/1890 she left Liverpool on her last voyage on this service and was transferred to the Glasgow - Moville - NY run, commencing 7/5/1891 and was rebuilt to accommodate 75-1st, 250-2nd and 1,000- 3rd class passengers. In September 1898 she was used to repatriate 1690 Spanish troops from Portsmouth, USA to Santander, Spain after the Spanish - American war. On 26/9/1901 she left Glasgow on her last trip to Moville, NY and back to Glasgow and was scrapped in Germany in 1902. She was considered by many to be the most beautiful steamer ever built.[E-mail from Ted Finch to Karin Corbeil - 1 September 1997 (compliments of Karin Corbeil)]
Citation:
City Of Rome (2)
The CITY OF ROME that sank the S-51 was a coastal passenger steamer of the Savannah Line. She was named for the city of Rome in the State of Georgia, not the one in Italy. She was built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden, New Jersey in 1911 as the SUWANNEE of the Merchants & Miners Line, and was sold to the Savannah Line in September 1917. She was sold back to Merchants & Miners in 1928 and renamed SOMERSET, and was broken up at Baltimore in 1938. For Merchants & Miners she ran between Philadelphia, Baltimore, Savannah, and Jacksonville, Florida. For the Savannah Line she ran between Boston and Savannah. 3648 tons enrolled length 309 ft., breadth 46 ft. 170 passengers only carried cargo after July 936 Jacksonville steamboat and steamship historian Ed Mueller is currently working on a history of Merchants & Miners. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 October 1997]
City Of Sacramento (ferry)
The City of Sacramento, one of the largest automobile ferries in the world, was also purchased for the mushrooming Seattle - Bremerton traffic. This was originally the noted East Coast express steamer Asbury Park of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, which was brought to the West Coast in 1918 by Capt. Fred Warner and Chief Engineer Samuel Sutton for the Monticello Steamship Company's Mare Island route. Built in 1908 by the Cramp yard, the 3,016-ton steel speedster with dimensions of 297 x 50 x 15.5 had been used in commuter traffic between New York and New Jersey coast points. At that time she was a coal burner, her two four-cylinder triple-expansion engines (23, 37;/2, 43, 43 x 30) and nine boilers providing her with 5,900 horsepower and a speed in excess of 20 knots. Following her arrival she was converted to oil fuel, the number of boilers was reduced, and she was changed from a two-stacker to a single-stacked vessel. In 1922 she was converted to carry automobiles. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Sacramento (ferry)
Two well-known Puget Sound ferries emerged in new roles during 1953, both undergoing such complete renovation that they were practically unrecognizable. The steam ferry City of Sacramento (ex - Asbury Park) was turned over to Yarrows at Esquimalt, stripped to the hull and tanks, and completely rebuilt as the streamlined motor ferry Kahloke for the Horseshoe Bay (Vancouver)-Nanaimo route of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. (Black Ball Line Ltd.) As the Kahloke she was fitted to carry 1,000 passengers and 100 automobiles, with six automobile lanes on her 275-foot car deck. Her original steam engines were removed and replaced by four V - 16 General Motors diesel -electric engines, each rated at 1,750-horsepower, this propulsion system being similar to that of the company's Chinook. The handsomely appointed vessel proved capable of a 19-knot service speed for her five dally round trips across the Gulf of Georgia. Capt. Douglas Reynolds, former Canadian Pacific master, was marine superintendent for the Black Ball Ca
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Sacramento (ferryboat)
Built in Philadelphia in 1903. Formerly the Asbury Park. Laid up in 1950. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 250, 259, 271, 278-79, 310.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Salem
Steamer City of Salem taking on freight at a river landing, Quarterdeck Review. V (Summer, 1977).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Salem (steamer)
The steamer City of Salem, the finest Willamette steamer yet floated, was built, making her trial trip October 21, 1875. The success of this steamer was but a continuation of that enjoyed by the Ohio. She could carry an immense load on very shallow water, and when light her master asserted that all she needed to run on was a heavy dew. In February, 1876, she ascended the Santiam as far as Jefferson. In July, 1878, her engines were replaced by larger ones, those of the City of Salem being transferred to the Ohio, and when she was again in service she was commanded by Capt. E. W. Spencer, J. W. Newkirk, purser, Perry Scott, engineer. Captain Sanborn was also master of the steamer in 1878, and James D. Miller ran her in 1880. In 1881 she was purchased by William Reid, better known as Dundee Reid, who used her in connection with the Oregonian Railroad. Capt. J. P. Coulter handled her for a short time, and George Raabe was in charge for six years. She was thoroughly overhauled in 1884, and the following year, whil
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego
City of San Diego in the Northwest sealing fleet, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
A Canadian schooner, 48 tons, built at San Francisco in 1871. Lost with all hands somewhere south of Cape Flattery in 1902. Some of her wreckage was found on the beach at Ozette, Washington. This vessel was one of the better Imown units of the Pacific sealing fleet during much of her career. She caught seals until 1895 and came under the British (Canadian) flag in 1893. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
(two-masted schooner) Reg. No. 100645 Engines: Two 3-cylinder 80 Owner: Northern Freighters Ltd., 627 Vancouver Block, Vancouver. Became the first Canadian rum running ship on April 15, 1922. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
The year 1883 marked the beginning of an important epoch in the sealing business, with the entrance of the first schooner into Bering Sea. The pioneer craft in this disputed territory was the American City of San Diego, in charge of Captain Cathcart and Daniel McLean. She left San Francisco, March 29th, with three hunters, entered Bering Sea and took 900 seals, landed at Hall Island and killed a few polar bears, and arrived at Victoria with her catch October 11th. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.427.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
The latter, in command of Capt. George Wester, went over to Copper Island, near which the McLean Brothers met with misfortune. Capt. Dan McLean made a raid on the island, and was surprised by a party of Russians, who opened fire, wounding McLean. The crew with him were unhurt and took to the boats, reaching the schooner in safety with the exception of one man, Talbot, who was so frightened that he fell overboard and drowned. Sail was made and the schooner got away from the dangerous locality as rapidly as possible. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.436-7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Francisco (dinner Excursion Boat)
Nichols Brothers, Freeland, builds vessel to resemble the turn of the century boat from Nickum and Spaulding design, Marine Digest. (October 6, 1984), p. 3. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Francisco (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle
Built at Philadelphia in 1889. 250 feet long. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle
Morgan, Puget's Sound, p. 299.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle
Completes record of 57,000 miles in 14 months by thirty voyages. Tacoma Daily Ledger November 8, 1989, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle
The veteran Alaska steamship City of Seattle was completely remodeled and refurnished in 1914 at the plant of the Seattle Construction & Drydock Co., more than $100,000 being expended in the work, which included the installation of two new boilers, new cargo-handling equipment and the replacement of the wooden upperworks from her main to upper decks with steel. The City of Seattle remained a coal burner, oil fuel being still difficult to obtain in Alaska ports. She resumed service to southeastern Alaska late in March in charge of Capt. Thomas Johnson, who had commanded the vessel for the past three years. C. B. Harland was chief engineer, H. J. Allen, first officer, and H. O. Johnson purser. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (alaska Crab Boat)
This vessel sank northwest of Kodiak Island in September of 1981. She was a 96 foot steel ship. Submerged crabber raised from 180 feet of water after three years. Salvaged by Alaska Diving Service of Ketchikan, National Fisherman. (February, 1985), p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (bng, P. 282)
This vessel sank northwest of Kodiak Island in September of 1981. She was a 96 foot steel ship. Submerged crabber raised from 180 feet of water after three years. Salvaged by Alaska Diving Service of Ketchikan, National Fisherman. (February, 1985), p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (crabber)
Submerged Alaska crabber raised after three years. Sank September, 1981 off Northwest Coast of Kodiak Island in 180 feet of water. National Fisherman. February, 1985, West Coast Focus section, p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (iron Steamer)
This vessel had three decks and two masts 1957 tons. 244.6 x 40 x 15 feet. 59 crew and 234 passengers. 12.4 knots. Built in Philadelphia in 1890. Prior to 1916 she was operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Between 1916 and 1921 she was operated under the Admiral Line flag in the Alaska trade. Sold in 1921 and operated on the Atlantic Coast. Scrapped in 1937. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (sidewheeler)
NM, p. 31. February, 1891. PM, p. 292. December, 1890. Built at Portland in 1888. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steam Ferry)
The steam ferry City of Seattle, 272 gross tons, 121.5 x 33.2 x 8.6, was the first double-ended vehicle ferry in use on Puget Sound. She was a side-wheel vessel with two 16 x 60 single cylinder engines of 135 horsepower each, raising steam in a single return-tube boiler five fc@et, six inches in diameter and 22 feet long, with a working pressure of 100 pounds. She was in operation between the foot of Main, and later Madison Streets, Seattle, to West Seattle, from the time of her completion until 1911. In 1913 she was sold to the Martinez & Benicia Ferry Co. and towed to California by the steam schooner William Chatham. During World War 11 she was extensively rebuilt by the government and is now the property of Alexis Tellis of Sausalito, registered as a yacht. Although still under her original name and driven by side-wheels, her steam engines hax,e been replaced by diesel power. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
James Bashford, Harbor gossip, Tacoma Daily Ledger. March 15, 1937.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The famous old Alaska Flyer of gold rush days, the passengers steamship City of Seattle, was sold on the East Coast by the Miami Steamship Co. and scrapped at Philadelphia, where she had been built in 1890. The old steamer had been out of service for several years and was towed from New York to the wrecking yard. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The famous old Alaska Flyer of gold rush days, the passengers steamship City of Seattle, was sold on the East Coast by the Miami Steamship Co. and scrapped at Philadelphia, where she had been built in 1890. The old steamer had been out of service for several years and was towed from New York to the wrecking yard. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The famous steamship City of Seattle, the old Alaska Lightning Express of gold rush days, was sold by the Pacific Steamship Co. to C. L. Dimon of Jacksonville, Florida, for the Miami Steamship Co., returning to the East Coast for a new career in coastwise passenger service which was to last for many years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The City of Seattle and City of Kingston, brought to the Pacific Northwest in 1890 by Capt. D. B. Jackson for the Puget Sound & Alaska Steamship Co., were the most magnificent inland passenger vessels to serve the area during the 19th century. The City of Seattle, of steel construction below the main deck, of 1,957 tons, with dimensions of 244.6 x 40 x 15, and driven by a 2,500 horse power triple expansion engine, was built at Philadelphia to Capt. Jackson's specifications at a cost of a quarter of a million dollars. Although a splendid ship, she was too expensive to operate during the hard times and from 1894 until the beginning of the gold rush she was out of service, while the City of Kingston handled the company's Puget Sound-British Columbia service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 14.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The steamer City of Seattle, in Pacific Coast Steamship Co. service, struck a rock near Eagle Harbor, sustaining damages amounting to $ 9,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The large sidewheel ferry-boat City of Seattle was brought around from Portland, where she had been constructed by John F. Steffen. Her dimensions are: length, one hundred and twenty-five feet five inches; beam, thirty-three feet two inches; depth of hold, eight and one-half feet. She is still running between the Puget Sound metropolis and West Seattle, Capt. W. I. Waitt serving as pilot. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The Kingston's sister ship, the City of Seattle, built at Philadelphia under orders from D. B. Jackson, was completed in May, 1890, at a cost of $225,000. Capt. Melville Nichols, who had made such a successful voyage with the Kingston, returned East and brought the new steamer to Seattle. With him were Robert Turner, chief engineer; Charles E. Ames, first officer; and F. A. Woodman, second officer. Since her advent on the coast Captain Nichols and Engineer Turner have been in charge, except at intervals when she has been handled by Captains Edward Clements and George Roberts. The City of Seattle is two hundred and forty-four feet six inches long, forty feet beam, and fifteen feet hold, net tonnage 912. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The steamer, City of Seattle was a popular Seattle-Alaska passenger steamer grounded in Tongass Narrows, near Ketchikan, August 15, 1913. Refloating efforts are underway here and the vessel, which was built at Philadelphia, came off her perch with only $1,200 damage to her hull.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Seattle (steamer)
The side-wheel ferry steamer City of Seattle, built at Portland in 1888, and the first vehicle ferry to operate on Puget Sound, was sold by the Oregon & Washington Ferry & Navigation Co. to the Benicia & Martinez Ferry Co. and was towed to California by the steam schooner William Chatham. The Oregon & Washington Ferry & Navigation Co., Capt. Dana Brown, manager, was the subsidiary of the West Seattle Land & Improvement Co., which had operated the ferry service primarily to carry prospective customers across Elliott Bay to view property which the company had for sale there. As the land was bought up and the extension of the street railway system made the ferry operation less attractive, the company suspended service for some months in 1913, arousing a great outcry from the citizens of West Seattle. Service was resumed in mid-June with the ferry West Seattle only, and the route was then taken over and operated (at a continuing loss) by the Port of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Sellwood (steamer)
The Sellwood Real Estate Company launched the City of Sellwood at Portland. She was a very fast propeller seventy-two feet long, sixteen feet beam, and five feet hold, with a pair of ten by twelve inch engines, and threw a bigger swell than an ocean steamship. She ran between Portland and Sellwood in charge of Capt. Charles Yarneberg, who was succeeded in 1886 by Capt. J. N. Fisher. In 1889 the steamer was purchased by John A. Devlin, who renamed her the City of Astoria, and Captain Babbidge operated her between Westport and Astoria. She was afterward sold to Shoalwater Bay parties and is still running out of South Bend. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 308.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Shelton (steamer)
City of Shelton, 190 tons, 99.8 x 20.5 x 6, with 13 x 60 non- condensing engines, was built at Shelton in 1895, replacing the Willie on the Shelton-Olympia route. For some time after the arrival of S. G. Simpson she was used as a spare boat, and in 1912 she was sold to the American Tug Boat Co., of Everett, but was not used, being laid up in Dead Water Slough on the Snohomish River, where she went to pieces about 1930. Willie, the pioneer boat on the route was built in 1883 at Seattle for Capt. W. H. Ellis, intended for the Nooksack River trade and named after his son. She was purchased by the S. Willey Steam Navigation Co. for the Shelton-Olympia run, remaining for two years as spare boat following the arrival of the City of Shelton, and was then transferred to the Fraser River in 1897. On her meager hull, 67 feet long with 15-foot beam, were piled two full houses, topped by a pilot house on the boat deck. She was also noted for her enormous whistle and constant list to port. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events o
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Shelton (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Sitka (schooner)
The small two -masted schooner City of Sitka, bound for Wrangell from Sitka, foundered off Cape Omaney March 8 with the loss of the three men on board. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 40.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Skagway (steamer)
The old hull of the government snagboat Skagit was rerifted for merchandising purposes and towed north as the City of Skagway, being set up on the beach at Skagway with space avahable for business enterprises on six months lease, all rooms being steam heated.Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Stanwood
Built at Stanwood in 1892. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Stanwood
The City of Stanwood, owned by the Stanwood Navigation Company, burned to the water's edge at Port Susan, January 21st, while on her regular trip from the Stillaguamish River to Seattle. She had a full cargo of oats and hay, and the fire was not discovered until it had gained so much headway that it could not be extinguished. The steamer was valued at about $10,000 and was insured for $5,000. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.420.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Stanwood (steamer)
Robert Airey constructed the handsome little steamer City of Stanwood at Stanwood, running her between there and Seattle. She was one hundred and one feet long, twenty-four feet three inches beam, and five feet three inches hold and performed excellent service until January, 1894, when she was destroyed by fire at Port Susan. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.399.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Steilacoom (ferry Boat)
Thirty-five car ferry built by Mr. Skansie of Gig Harbor, BPC, II, p.127. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 126, 129.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Steilacoom (ferry)
The small ferry City of Steilacoom, operated between Tacoma and Fox Island by Pierce County, was re-engined with a new Caterpillar diesel. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 585.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Sydney (barkentine)
The iron six-masted barkentine City of Sydney (the former Pacific Mail Line steamship of 1875), in layup since 1924, was sold to Japanese buyers, but found to be too rotten to sail to Japan. The Star of Iceland was substituted and City of Sydney was burned for scrap in California. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929- 1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Sydney (steamer)
The old iron steamship City of Sydney of 1875 was purchased for $18,000 by L. A. Pederson of the Bristol Bay Packing Co. She had been retired and sold for scrap six years earlier, but had not been broken up. Pederson spent $ 100,000 converting her to a six -masted barkentine, she and the E P, Sterling (ex-Everett G. Griggs, being the only vessels of this rig in the world). After a few voyages in offshore trade she joined the Alaska cannery fleet, serving Pederson's Bristol Bay cannery. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1916, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 265.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma
Built as the Batavia in the British Isles in the 1880s. Sold tothe Northern Pacific Company and placed in the silk trade running from the Orient to Tacoma. Used during the Alaska gold rush and after sold to the Russian government. Seized by the Japanese in 1905. Tacoma News Tribune. December 30, 1926.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (ferry)
Automobile ferry service began on the Narrows route between Tacoma and Gig Harbor with the completion of the 124 foot steam ferry, the City of Tacoma. The ferry had a capacity of 35 automobiles and 300 passengers. The City of Tacoma made her maiden voyage from the Tacoma Municipal Dock late in December, 1921, carrying invited guests and then entered her assigned service from a ferry slip at Point Defiance. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1921-22, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 324-25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (ferryboat)
Local ferry became more curse than blessing, Peninsula Gateway May 30, 1984. Name changed from the City of Vancouver January 28, 1918, William P. Bonney, History of Pierce County. 1213-16. William P. Bonney, History of Pierce County, II, 732, 787. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 123-24.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (sidewheeler)
Built at St. John's Oregon in 1909. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p.206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (steam Ferry)
The steam ferry City of Tacoma, built only three years earlier, was found to be inadequate for the Tacoma-Vashon Island-Gig Harbor traffic, although the ferry Gloria, rebuilt from the Sound steamer Florence K., was operated with her on the run by the Tacoma Ferry Co. of A. M. Hunt & Sons under lease to Pierce County. The City of Tacoma was lengthened 34 feet at the Tacoma plant of the Western Boatbuilding Co., giving her a capacity of 50 automobiles in place of her original limit of 30. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 351.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (steam Ferry)
The steam ferry City of Tacoma, operated across the Narrows from Point Defiance, Tacoma, to Gig Harbor by the Washington Navigation Co., was re-engined at the Skansie Bros. yard in Gig Harbor, receiving two 180-horsepower diesels to replace her original steam engines. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 386.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (tuna Clipper)
City of Tacoma tuna clipper makes final test, Tacoma News Tribune. May 17, 1965.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (tuna Seiner)
Plans made for biggest tuna seiner, The Tacoma News Tribune. January 21, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tacoma (tuna Seiner)
City of Tcoma tuna clipper makes final test, The Tacoma News Tribune. May 17, 1964.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Tokyo (liner)
1875-1908. In 1875 the City of Tokyo and the City of Peking became the first screw steamers with iron hulls to provide regular service between San Francisco and the Far East. Earlier in 1873 the Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) had received similar steamers for the route between Panama and San Francisco but continued to operate wooden side-wheelers with single expansion engines in the transpacific trade. PMSS added more steamers with screws and iron hulls to this route but did not completely replace the wooden side-wheelers until the early 1880s. The City of Tokyo and the City of Peking were the largest American pas senger vessels in active service (Tate 1986) in 1875. They had iron hulls and single screws, and their compound engines could attain a maximum speed of fourteen knots. They still had a full set of back-up masts to rely on sails in case of engine failure. Carrying Chinese passengers had become extremely profitable for PMSS, and each ship had space for 1,500 Chinese in steerage class and acco
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Topeka (iron Steamer)
Two deck vessel with two masts. 1057 tons.198 x 35.2 x 18 feet. 54 crew and 161 passengers. 11 knots. Built in 1864 at Chester, Penn. Before 1916 operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Between 1916 and 1920 assigned by the Admiral line to the narrow gauge route between Portland and San Francisco. Operated by LASSCO between 1923 and 1931. Withdrawn from service and eventually sold. Scrapped in 1933. When owned by LASSCO the vessel was named Waimea.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Topeka (steamer)
Among the well -known vessels which ended their careers by other than shipwreck was the famous old Pacific coastwise steamship City of Topeka which, as the Waimea, was sold for scrap after serving interisland routes from Honolulu. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, W.H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 425.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Topeka (steamer)
The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's City of Topeka was badly holed as a result of striking a rock in Wrangell Narrows March 29, the cost of salvage and repairs being $ 20,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 52.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Topeka (steamer)
The City of Topeka was built at Chester, Penn., in 1884 for some Boston people, but was sold a few years afterward to the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fee Railroad and sent to the Coast about 1886. She is one hundred and ninety-eight feet long, thirty-five feet beam, and twelve feet hold. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.368.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Topeka (steamer)
The Steamer sank alongside her dock at Seattle on September 5, 1904 (U.S. National Archives Record Group 41:891, United States Steamboat Inspection Service Recordsl9O4:30).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Vancouver (ferry)
The side-wheel ferry City of Vancouver, laid up upon the completion of the interstate highway bridge across the Columbia at Vancouver, was purchased by Pierce County and operated by it as the City of Tacoma transporting workers to and from the shipyards. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 297.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Vancouver (ferry)
The sidewheel ferry City of Vancouver was built by the St. Johns Shipbuilding Co. at St. Johns for service across the Columbia River at Vancouver, the highway bridge not having yet been built. Of 460 tons, her dimensions were 142.2 x 34.7 x 8.5, with two 16 x 54-inch noncondensing engines working at 190 pounds pressure. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Victoria (ferryboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p. 206. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 197-98.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Victoria (liner)
The fine old Chesapeake Bay liner City of Victoria of 1893, following use as a barracks ship in Alaska and later layup at Scow Bay, Whidbey Island, was sold to the Victoria Salvage Co. of Everett and dismantled at Kennydale on Lake Washington. The hull ws then towed to the beach north of Edmonds, where it was burned by Arvid Franzen a veteran ship breaker. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 557.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Victoria (steamer)
The one - time Edmonds - Victoria steamer City of Victoria was ordered sold early in the year to satisfy claims totaling $343,000. The vessel was bid in by the Bank of California, one of the principal libelant, for $ 10,000, and was resold in the fall to the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. for conversion to a floating barracks to house employees at a $3,000,000 Naval air base construction project at Sitka. The former Queen of the Chesapeake, badly deteriorated after a decade in layup, was towed to the Lake Union Drydock & Machine Works for survey by Mc Githrie & McDonald, after which she was thoroughly renovated at the Harbor Island plant of her new owners. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 473.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Vienna
See THESSALONIKI.
Citation:
City Of Washington
The "City of Wahington" was built in 1855 by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow for the Inman Line of Liverpool. This was a 2,381 gross ton ship, length 319ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 1/8/1855, she sailed in September of that year from Liverpool to Marseilles, where she was chartered to the French government and used as a Crimean War transport. On 5/11/1856 she commenced her first Liverpool - Philadelphia voyage and after this one voyage, inaugurated Inman Line's Liverpool - New York service, leaving Liverpool on 31/12/1856. In November 1864 she was reconditioned and fitted with new boilers after having completed 63 N.Atlantic round voyages. In 1869 she was rebuilt to a length of 358ft and 2,870 tons and on 5/6/1869 commenced her first voyage after alterations from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh), Halifax and New York. She was wrecked near Cape Sable on 7/7/1873 due to a defective compass, with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.239] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 January 1998]
Clan Mcdonald (freighter)
The other, the Clan McDonald, is a freighter ninety-five feet long, twenty-four feet seven inches beam, and five feet five inches hold, and is now owned by Lilly, Bogardus & Co. of Seattle. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clara Foss (tug)
New tugs added to the Northwest towing fleets included the Clara and Claudia Foss, 80 x 25-foot twin-screw tugs of 1,700 horsepower similar to the earlier Catherine Foss, by Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland for the Alaska service of Foss-Alaska Line, which in 1971 extended its route from southeastern Alaska to Bethel, St. Michael, Nome, Kotzebue and the Bristol Bay cannery ports. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.97.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clara Foss (tugboat)
The CLARA FOSS, named for Clara Berg Wright, niece of Thea Foss, was an updated version of the CLAUDIA and CATHERINE, the first two C -class tugs. She was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland to handle container-barges for the Foss Alaska Line run to Southeastern Alaska, but eventually, as the barges increased in size, she lost out to the big ocean class tugs. She is eighty feet in length with a twenty-five foot beam. Michael Skalley, The Clara Foss, Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 281.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clara Foss (tugboat)
The CLARA FOSS, named for Clara Berg Wright, niece of Thea Foss, was an updated version of the CLAUDIA and CATHERINE, the first two C -class tugs. She was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland to handle container-barges for the Foss Alaska Line run to Southeastern Alaska, but eventually, as the barges increased in size, she lost out to the big ocean class tugs. She is eighty feet in length with a twenty-five foot beam. Michael Skalley, The Clara Foss, Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 281.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatawa (ferry)
Clatawa and the Port Gamble-Port Ludlow ferry route, sold by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. to Mrs. Agaton (Bertie) Olson, who formerly operated on Deception Pass. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.448.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatawa (ferry)
Clatawa and the Port Gamble-Port Ludlow ferry route, sold by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. to Mrs. Agaton (Bertie) Olson, who formerly operated on Deception Pass. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.448.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatawa (ferry)
The recently converted Sound ferry Clatawa was sold by the Washington Route to the Sound Ferry Lines for operation from Edmonds. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior,1966 p. 365.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatsop Chief (steamer)
The Clatsop Chief, a small sternwheeler, with a scow in tow, was cut in two by the steamship Oregon near Willow bar on the Columbia, February 28, 1881, and Henry Aminous, captain of the scow, Andrew Ray, fireman, and John Sonney, deckhand on the steamer, were drowned. The Chief was in charge of Capt. W. E. Mitchell and Engineer W. S. Holmes, the latter having a miraculous escape. There were no side doors from the engine-room, and the steamer sank immediately, so that he was obliged to feel his way along the steam pipe under water until he reached the gangway. The steamer was afterward raised and lengthened. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 290.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatsop Chief (steamer)
The Clatsop Chief, a small sternwheeler, was built at Skipanon, Oregon, below Astoria, in 1875, to run between Astoria and Clatsop Landing, and, as she was not adapted to the trade, was sold to Portland parties, Capt. F. B. Jones of that city operating her for many years. She came prominently before the public in 1881 as the victim of a collision in which she was cut in two by the steamship Oregon. Captain Jones used her exclusively as a towboat, thus earning the money with which he built other more pretentious steamers. She was fifty-eight feet long and thirteen feet beam originally, but when rebuilt was lengthened twenty-six feet. She was retired from service in 1889. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.233.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatsop Chief (sternwheeler)
February 28, 1881, Sternwheeler built at Skipanon in 1875. The steamer Oregon (which seemed to resent the presence of other ships on the river) rammed and cut the Clatsop Chief in half at the Willow bar, sending the vessel and the ship she towed immediately to the bottom. Four drowned. Engineer W. S. Holmes went down with his ship, but felt his way along the engine room steampipes to the gangway, then along the earlings to a door and managed to come to the surface. W. E. Mitchell captained the ship at the time of the accident. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia (fish Boat)
The British Columbia fish boat Claudia of Vancouver was sunk late in April in collision with the Alaska Steamship Co. motorship Ring Splice 150 miles north of Ketchikan. The three-man crew of the fishing craft were removed to the freighter before their vessel went down in deep water. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 590-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (towing Vessel)
Foss Launch & Tug Co. continued its fleet replacement program with several new towing vessels entering service. The Martinolich Shipyard in Tacoma completed two 80-foot vessels, Claudia Foss and Martha Foss. Claudia was fitted with twin screws driven by Caterpillar engines of 1,700 total horsepower, while Martha is a single-screw tug fitted with a 1,425-horsepower Caterpillar and 90-inch diameter Kort nozzle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (tug Boat)
New tug launched for Foss, Tacoma News Tribune. February 25, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (tug)
New tug launched for Foss, The Tacoma News Tribune. February 25, 1968. (Keel laid for 80 foot towboat at Martinolich on December 1, 1967.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (tugboat)
The CLAUDIA FOSS named for a daughter-in-law of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell, was the first C-class tug built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland for Foss. The CLAUDIA and later the CLARA, were built to the design and plans of the time-tested CATHERINE FOSS. The three boats were intended for medium coastwise towing and general towing in Puget Sound. The tug was completed in 1968 and is 84 feet long with a 25 foot beam. Her major service is on Puget Sound having made some trips to both California and Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Claudia Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (tugboat)
The CLAUDIA FOSS named for a daughter-in-law of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell, was the first C-class tug built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland for Foss. The CLAUDIA and later the CLARA, were built to the design and plans of the time-tested CATHERINE FOSS. The three boats were intended for medium coastwise towing and general towing in Puget Sound. The tug was completed in 1968 and is 84 feet long with a 25 foot beam. Her major service is on Puget Sound having made some trips to both California and Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Claudia Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clifford J. Rogers (container Ship)
The first vessel in the world designed and built as a container ship, the former White Pass & Yukon motor vessel Clifford J. Rogers of 1955, having been replaced by the larger Frank H. Brown and sold to Greek owners as the Drosia, sank on December 13 in the notorious Bermuda Triangle with the loss of eight lives. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clifton (1)
See ATALANTA (2).
Citation:
Clifton (2)
See HERTHA.
Citation:
Clipper (freighter)
The 75-foot diesel freighter Clipper of 180 horsepower was built at Tacoma for operation at Ketebikan by John Smeland, and the 68 -foot diesel freighter Doric of 135 horsepower at Seattle for 0. B. Hanney, also of Ketchikan. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 385.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coho (ferry Boat)
Owned by the Black Ball Transportation Company. Generally operated between Port Angeles and Victoria. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 307-09.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coho (ferry)
On September 12 the Black Ball Transport ferry Coho suffered a similar mishap while approaching her Port Angeles terminal on a crossing from Victoria. The big motor vessel crashed into the Angeles Gravel & Supply pier, toppling two small fish processing buildings and two motor vehicles into the water. There were no injuries and, although about $100,000 in damages were inflicted on shoreside installations, the Coho continued in service virtually unscathed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colabee (freighter)
Colabee, 8,800-ton steel freighter built for the Shipping Board in 1920 as the Pagasset, purchased by Oliver J. Olson & Co. from N. Gravem & Sons, East Coast shipbrokers. This vessel unusually large for the Olson coastwise fleet, was renamed Betsy Olson and placed in service with the George Olson and Mary Olson carrying salt north to the Hooker Electrochemical plant and Pennsylvania Salt Mfg. Co. at Tacoma, returning south with lumber cargoes. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cold Harbor (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coldbrook (freighter)
The veteran freighter COLDBROOK grounded on Middleton Island, Alaska, June 16, 1942 while loaded with military supplies. The scene of the wreck was about 75 miles south of Cordova, Alaska. The Hog Island type freighter, garbed in wartime colors, was built in 1919 and was of 5,104 tons. She became a total loss.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colfax
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 136, 145-46, 153, 165, 185.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colfax (steamer)
At Seabeck, on Puget Sound, the steamer Colfax, a towboat, was launched and was about the only addition to the steam fleet on the inland sea in 1865. She was a sidewheeler, with machinery from the old steamer Caledonia, owned by the Washington Mill Company, and was registered at Port Angeles, December 15th, with Marshall Blinn, master, although Capt. John T. Connick took command of her soon afterward and ran her for several years. The dimensions of the Colfax were: length, one hundred and twenty-one feet; beam, eighteen feet seven inches; depth of hold, six feet eight inches. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
College Widow (freight Boat)
The College Widow, a 30-ton passenger and freight boat, 60 feet in length, was built by Hinton Electric Co. at Victoria for the Victoria Gulf Islands service of Holland & Lamphere. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Collingsworth (freighter)
The Hog Island freighter Collingsworth, also operated for the government by American Mail, was torpedoed January 9 with eight killed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 519.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Collingwood (hms Flagship)
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 49, 69, 75, 75, 80, 81, 96. Friendly visit to the Columbia, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 454.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (ferry)
The year's most spectacular mishap was probably that of the luxurious new $20 million Alaska ferry Columbia, which struck the West Francis Rock as she was northbound through the narrow Peril Strait just north of Sitka. The rock ripped open about 100 feet along the starboard hull of the 418-foot vessel, which was carrying about 300 passengers and 58 vehicles through choppy water and high winds in mid-October. It was reported that the tidal currents were even worse than usual in the already restricted and dangerous passage. Following the collision the Columbia was taken into a nearby harbor, where the damage was assessed and the determination made to proceed to Sitka, where passengers and vehicles were picked up by the smaller ferry LeConte. The Columbia then returned to Seattle under her own power for drydocking and repairs at the Lockheed yard where she was built. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (ferry)
The year's most spectacular mishap was probably that of the luxurious new $20 million Alaska ferry Columbia, which struck the West Francis Rock as she was northbound through the narrow Peril Strait just north of Sitka. The rock ripped open about 100 feet along the starboard hull of the 418-foot vessel, which was carrying about 300 passengers and 58 vehicles through choppy water and high winds in mid-October. It was reported that the tidal currents were even worse than usual in the already restricted and dangerous passage. Following the collision the Columbia was taken into a nearby harbor, where the damage was assessed and the determination made to proceed to Sitka, where passengers and vehicles were picked up by the smaller ferry LeConte. The Columbia then returned to Seattle under her own power for drydocking and repairs at the Lockheed yard where she was built. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (ferryliner)
A new flagship for the Alaska Marine Highway System, the 418-foot, $20 million Columbia, was launched by Lockheed at Seattle early in May and was ready for service a year later, replacing the foreign-built Wickersham, which had been operating on a temporary waiver of the Jones Act. Classed by the Coast Guard as a seagoing vessel rather than a ferry, the Columbia resembles a luxury cruise liner, described as follows by Seattle Times maritime editor Glen Carter prior to her maiden voyage from Seattle: You get the idea Alaska's newest passenger vessel, the Columbia, is special when you spot what looks like a golf practice green on her afterdeck. Or maybe a croquet lawn. It's a 50-foot-square green carpet. Nobody knows for sure what it's for. Passengers probably will lounge there in chairs. She's due in Juneau from Seattle today on her first run. The $20 million Lockheed-built Columbia is a dazzler inside and out. She is more than a ferry. You get the feeling you're in a new hotel. The parking garage is on two de
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (frigate)
1,726 tons, 175' x 45' x 14'. Built at Washington Navy Yard, 1836; burned at Norfolk, 1861; raised and sold, 1867. Armament: 4 8 shell guns, 25 32-pdrs., 22 42-pdrs. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974.. p. 14.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (full Rigged Vessel)
The ship Columbia was built in 1773 by James Briggs, at Hobart's Landing, on North River. She was a full-rigged ship of 212 tons burden, two decks, and mounted ten guns. Capt. John Kendrick was an experienced officer, about forty-five years of age when he took command of the Columbia. He had done considerable privateering during the Revolution, and after the war had been in charge of several merchant vessels. After his second trip from this coast he was trading between the Sandwich Islands and Boston, and was accidentally killed at Hawaii about 1800. - Columbia's crew: First mate, Simon Woodruff; second mate, Joseph Ingraham; third mate, Robert Haswell; boatswain, John B. Cordis; clerk, Riebard S. liowe; surgeon, Dr. Roberts; astronomer, J. Nutting; mate on the sloop, Davis Coolidge. E. W. Wright, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961., p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (full Rigged Vessel)
The Columbia was a full-rigged ship of 212 tons burden, with two decks and ten guns. She was out of Boston, and her master was Cap- tain Robert Gray. He ascended the river for some fifteen miles and spent several days taking on fresh water and trading with the Indians who swarmed about his ship in canoes. On May 19, he dropped down to the mouth of the river, went ashore, raised the American flag, planted some coins under a large pine tree and formally took possession in the name of the United States. He named the river Columbia after his ship. Harry Sinclair Drago. The Steamboaters. New York: Brinhall, 1967, p. 176.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia Chief (barge)
The first, the Columbia Chief, launched at Steffen's yard in November, carried on her initial trip 767 tons of wheat to Astoria. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia Eagle (freighter)
A bizarre drama involving mutiny and hijacking took place aboard the Columbia Steamship Company's Victory ship Columbia Eagle in March. Two long-haired and scruffy crew members, Albin Glatskowsky, 20, and Clyde McKay, 23, took over the bridge about 100 miles off the Cambodian coast, held Capt. Donald A. Swan at gunpoint and forced more than half the crew to take to the lifeboats. The Portland-based freighter, carrying munitions to Thailand, was then ordered into Cambodian waters and anchored near the port of Sihanoukville. The two hijackers were granted political asylum in Cambodia. The vessel was released by Cambodian authorities after a delay of several days, which entailed a loss of about $125,000 to her owners. A Federal grand jury subsequently issued indictments in absentia against the two young men, charging more than 20 counts of mutiny on the high seas, assault with deadly weapons, transporting kidnapped persons in foreign commerce and wilfull neglect of duties. If the mutineers returned to United Sta
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia River Lightship Number Fifty
Built by Union Iron Works of San Francisco. Placed in service off the mouth of the Columbia in 1892. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 401. Looking back, Marine Digest. September 23, 1989, p. 30. Vessel carried ashore inside McKenzie Head on the north entrance to the Columbia River in November of 1899. Later refloated. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 159. Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., 167-174, 184.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbus California (cargo Vessel)
Columbus California calls at Tacoma; one ofthe two Columbus line vessels carrying freight between Tacoma and Australia\New Zealand, Marine Digest. August 2, 1986, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colwell (freighter)
The small propeller freighter Colwell, 57 feet in length, was built at Ilwaco and was operated for some time by Albert Burchan at St. Helens. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Comanche (freighter)
The steel freight steamer Comanche of 1913 was equipped with passenger accommodations, replacing the Utopia of the Strait of Juan de Fuca route. Efforts were also made to operate her as an automobile ferry on the Port AngelesVictoria crossing during the summer season, assisting the Sol Duc, but the attempt was not successful. It was necessary to load the automobiles in the lower deck freight spaces by means of the Barlow marine elevator with which the Comanche was equipped. This device worked excellently in loading freight, but it was found that it took 45 minutes to load a single automobile by this method. Neither the patrons of the makeshift ferry or her master, Capt. Oliver Niewenhuese, were happy with the experiment. Some disagreement ensued between Joshua Green and Charles Peabody as to which vessel of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. fleet should be converted to a bona fide ferry to replace the Sol Duc and Comanche, Capt. Green recommending the Waialeale and Mr. Peabody the Sioux. After numerous trial tri
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Comfort (hospital Ship)
The 430-foot former Navy hospital ship Comfort was rebuilt at the Todd Dry Docks in Seattle as a deluxe cruise liner for the New York-Florida-Cuba service of the Ward Line. The vessel was built originally in 1906 for this line as the Havana by the Cramp yard and received her former name upon completion of the reconstruction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 386.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Commodore (fishing Trawler)
The Commodore, another Marco Milestone, vessel started in 1982 as an anchovy purse seiner, finished as a Bering Sea dragger in 1987, National Fisherman. (September, 1987), p. 37-38. Marco of Seattle recently christened new trawler with unique features, Marine Digest. (June 20, 1987), p. 30-31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Concordia (ferry)
The small freight and passenger vessel Concordia was built at Tacoma, entering service in 1931 to replace the steamer Vashona on the Tacoma - Quartermaster Harbor route of the Vashon Navigation Co. Of 77 tons, slightly less than 65 feet in length, she was fitted with a 90-horsepower diesel engine. The Vashona, now too large for the dwindling passenger traffic on this historic route, passed to the Anderson Steamboat Co. for excursion service and is still afloat as the Columbia Queen. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Concordia (ferry)
The small freight and passenger vessel Concordia was built at Tacoma, entering service in 1931 to replace the steamer Vashona on the Tacoma - Quartermaster Harbor route of the Vashon Navigation Co. Of 77 tons, slightly less than 65 feet in length, she was fitted with a 90-horsepower diesel engine. The Vashona, now too large for the dwindling passenger traffic on this historic route, passed to the Anderson Steamboat Co. for excursion service and is still afloat as the Columbia Queen. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Condor (hms Sloop Of War)
On December 2 the British sloop of war Condor departed Esquimalt for Honolulu. Commanded by Captain C. Slater, she carried a complement of 130 officers and ratings, although Victoria sources claimed she had embarked an additional 10 men as supernumeraries just prior to sailing. The Condor was a 180-foot iron propeller steamer of 980 tons built at Sheerness in 1898. Her primary armament consisted of 10 four-inch rapid-fire guns and four three pounders. In addition to her triple-expansion engine, which drove her at a 13-knot speed, she was fitted with auxiliary sails. A full gale struck the Northwest soon after her sailing and wreckage of the Condor was later found on the West Coast of Vancouver Island. The exact cause of the tragedy along with the loss of the collier Matteawan ...remains among the many sea mysteries of the North Pacific. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1901. W. H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Condor (sloop Of War)
British war ship (sloop of war) vanished off Cape Flattery, December 2, 1901 enroute to Honolulu from Esquimalt claiming every man aboard, the death toll ranging from 104 to 140, the Admiralty setting it at 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Condor, Hms (frigate)
British Naval frigate vanished with all hands en route to Honolulu from Esquimalt, December 2, 1901. She is believed a victim of a gale off Cape Flattery the night of December 2. One report claims she carried 140 victims to a watery grave, another reports only 104. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Confidence
CONFIDENCE, of London, two hundred tons, John Gibson, Master. She sailed from Southampton the last of April <1638>, 'by vertue of the Lord Treasurers warrant of the 11th of April, 1638.' [Footnote: Colonial Papers, America and West Indies, v, 375.]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Christopher Brooks - 16 October 1997]
Confidence
Property of John Stevens, Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, I, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Confidence (cutter)
The new U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Confidence of 5,000 shaft horsepower, arrived from the Coast Guard's Curtis Bay, Maryland yard during the summer to take station at Kodiak. The 210-foot vessel, with streamlined superstructure and without a funnel, is powered by two 5,000-horsepower gas turbines for high speed operation and two 1,500-horsepower diesels for normal cruising. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Congress (u.s. Frigate)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., I, p. 583. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 26, 80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Constance (hms Frigate)
The third annual frigate to go north to Vancouver's Island was H.M.S. Constance under Captain G. W. C. Courtenay, sent by Rear Admiral Phipps Hornby to investigate any cases of aggression reported by the Hudson's Bay Company officers. Captain Courtenay was the first Captain to take his ship into Esquimalt harbour and drop anchor in the forest-clad basin, with nothing to mark the entrance from seaward. Frederick Victor Longstaff, Esquimalt Naval Base: A History of Its Work and Its Defenses. Vancouver, B.C.: Clarke & Stuart Co. Ltd. 1942., p.11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Constance Chandler (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Constellation (u.s. Aircraft Carrier)
Connie due in for Bremerton overhaul, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 18, 1982. The Constellation a glacier of a ship, Marine Digest. October 18, 1986, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Constitution (frigate)
2,200 tons, 175' x 43' x 14'. Built in Boston, 1797; still on Navy List. Armament: 44 guns.Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Constitution (u.s. Frigate)
Sailed with the Tonquin. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 78. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., I, p. 168. All Tacoma to welcome noted ship, Tacoma Daily Ledger. June 15, 1933, p. A-1. Old Ironsides visits Tacoma, Tacoma News Tribune. June 14,15,16,17,19,20,22, 1933. (All articles on page 1 of each newspaper. Local firm replaces Constitutions mast, Marine Digest. March 29, 1986, p. 6. McFarland Cascade fashioned 58 foot mast to replace the one damaged when Hurricane Gloria blew into Boston Harbor. (il). M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legen on Puget Sound., p. 53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Conway (frigate)
In 1822, H.M. frigate Conway under Captain Basil Hall anchored at San Blas on March 28th. Captain Hall tells of the state of transition in New Spain from under the Crown of Spain to that of a new republic, for the Mexican Federal Republic was proclaimed on October 4th, 1823. Frederick Victor Longstaff, Esquimalt Naval Base: A History of Its Work and Its Defenses. Vancouver, B.C.: Clarke & Stuart Co. Ltd. 1942., p.9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coquina (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corozal (fish Packer)
Length 72 ft. Built 1929, (fish packer) beam 15 feet. Harbour Boat Builders, Vancouver. Reg. No. 156609 Engine: One 300-HP 6-cylinder diesel. Owner: General Navigation Co. of Canada, 1048 Hamilton St., Vancouver, 1929. Captain Malcolm K Savage. Operated on East Coast out of Belize, British Honduras. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corrales (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 84-85, 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
County Of Linlithgow
Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
County Of Linlithgow
Four master on way to load grain. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 173. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers.. Alternate name LINLITHGOWSHIRE.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Courtney Ford (brig)
The C. A. Hooper brig Courtney Ford, commanded by Capt. 0. B. (All Hands and Feet) Lindholm, was the first vessel to reach St. Michael, arriving coated with ice from trucks to waterline, on June 14, 1899, Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 47.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Courtney Ford (brigantine)
The Courtney Ford, a brigantine of 401 tons, was built at Benicia in 1883 by Capt. Turner for J. J. McKinnon, San Francisco. She was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. March 22, 1941, p.2 Mr. Lyman later reported that the Courtney Ford was wrecked at Glen Island, Alaska, September 7, 1902.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Courtney Ford (brigantine)
The Courtney Ford, a brigantine of 401 tons, was built at Benicia in 1883 by Capt. Turner for J. J. McKinnon, San Francisco. She was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. March 22, 1941, p.2 Mr. Lyman later reported that the Courtney Ford was wrecked at Glen Island, Alaska, September 7, 1902.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Courtney Ford (schooner)
The Courtney Ford (originally a skysail brig, but rerigged late in 1901 as a three -masted schooner) was wrecked September 7, 1902 on Glen Island, Izembek Bay, her hull being still fairly intact after more than 60 years on the beach. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 84.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Craig Foss was built as the Major Henry J. Conners in New Orleans by the Lester Alexander Company in 1943 for the United States Army for work along the Gulf Coast. Foss purchased the tug in September 1955 and she began service in February 1956 in Puget Sound and Alaska. The Craig Foss was sunk November 7, 1965 in Alaska's Cook inlet. Michael Skalley, The Craig Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss (tug)
Craig Foss, 90 - foot tug of 600 - horsepower (built at New Orleans in 1942 as the U. S. Army Major Henry James Connor. Captain Everett Gudgel capsized and sank in Cook Inlet in November while working on a pipeline from offshore drilling platforms. The crew was removed by other boats working in the vicinity. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss (tug)
By early June, the Olympia Reserve Fleet, which had once harbored nearly 200 mothballed merchant vessels, was down to 11 ships and was in the process of being phased out completely. On June 1 the tug Craig Foss made towing history when she removed three of the remaining vessels, the Knot-type motor vessels Anchor Hitch, Clove Hitch and Sailor's Splice, and delivered them to Seattle in a single triple-tow for delivery to Taiwan shipbreakers by a Japanese tug. The next two weeks saw a steady parade of ghostly gray ships plodding toward shipbreakers'yards at the ends of towlines. On June 12 the Japanese seagoing tug Freesia picked up two of the remaining four, the West Linn Victory and Clouis Victory, to be towed directly to Taiwan. Shortly thereafter the Shelley Foss removed the last two ships, Waltham Victory and Kingston Victory, and for the first time in 26 years Budd Inlet was empty of anchored ships. They had served their country well...some in four wars...but their day had passed. Gordon Newell, Maritime
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss (tugboat)
Four thousand horsepower single screw with variable pitch propeller ocean going tug, Marine Digest. LVII (October 21, 1978). Tug Craig Foss nearly sinks in storm off Coos Bay March 9, 1986, Marine Digest. (March 15, 1986), p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss. (2) (tugboat)
The CRAIG, number LT-648, built for the Water Division of the Army Transportation Corps during World War II at Tamp Marine Corporation yards at Tampa, Florida, began her Army career towing on the Atlantic Coast and then shifted to the Pacific until laid up about 1950 in the California reserve fleet. She was declared surplus in March 1960 and put up for sale in July 1965. Foss purchased her as they had been on the lookout for a sizable tug to put on the Honolulu lumber run and the LT-648 appeared to be the answer. She was towed to Seattle and kept in mothballs until 1966 when repowering and rebuilding was begun. The tug is used along the Northwest Coast of North America including Alaska. After periods of intense work and lay-ups the Craig Foss was still in service when Mr. Skalley wrote his book in 1981. Michael Skalley, The Craig Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crefeld (1)
I have details of a "Crefeld", belonging to North German Lloyd, but no confirmation that it sailed to Buenos Aires. I know that NGL had a previous ship with this name on the S.America service up until 1914 but she was handed to Spain after the Great War and renamed. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 March 1998]
Crefeld (2)
The steamship CREFELD (II) was built by the Flensburger Schiffbaugesellschaft (ship #360) for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 23 December 1921. 9,573 tons; 150,87 x 18,51 meters (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 4 masts; screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 12.5 knots; passenger accommodation: 350 in middle class, 364 in 3rd class (cabins), 370 in dormitory deck; crew of 164 (192 in 1926). Built on prewar freighter-designed hulls, and intended for the North American emigrant service, but diverted to the South America service when the United States introduced immigration quotas. June 1922, maiden voyage, Bremen-South America. June 1928-24 May 1930, reopened Bremen-Montreal service (9 roundtrip voyages); 35 passengers in 1st class, 212 in 3rd class. June 1930, first of two roundtrip voyages, Bremen-Halifax-Galveston. 1934, rebuilt as a freighter by Seebeck Werft; 8,045 tons, crew of 57. 26 August 1939, at Massawa, Eritrea. 4 April 1941, scuttled, but failed to block the harbor. 4 June 1943, raised to clear the harbor [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995), vol. 2, p. 24; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 573]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 March 1998]
Crosline (ferry)
The motor ferry Crosline of 1925 was sold by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. and was placed under Canadian registry to augment the North Vancouver ferry service, carrying thousands of workers across the inlet to and from the booming Burrard Dry Dock. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 509.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crosline (ferry)
Crosline, diesel ferry, sold to the Canadian government in 1942 for wartime service in British Columbia, repurchased by the Washington State Highway Department for use on the Tacoma Narrows crossing, was transferred back to American registry after passage of a special act of Congress, thus resolving a difficulty which had precipitated something of a political crisis in the state. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 545.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crosline (ferry)
The most publicized if not the most important transfer of a vessel in 1948 was that of the wooden motor ferry Crosline which had been in service in British Columbia waters and was purchased for a return to Puget Sound operation by the Washington State Highway Department. With the Sound ferry situation already an object of political controversy, it was inevitable that any such transaction would be closely scrutinized. A great furor was generated when it was dis- covered belatedly that a special act of Congress would be required to transfer the vessel back to American registry before she could be used between American ports. This was eventually accomplished and the Crosline was turned over the following year for use by the Vashon Ferry District. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crosline (ferry)
Two new diesel ferries for Puget Sound operation were launched within a few days of each other in June, the 65 -car Crosline being built by the Marine Construction Co., Seattle, for the Crosby Direct Line, and the Kitsap by the Lake Washington Shipyards, Houghton, for the Mtsap County Transportation Co. The Crosline, designed by L. H. Coolidge for the Alki Point-Manchester route, was 150 feet in overall length with a 48-foot beam and was powered by a 750-horsepower Sumner heavy oil engine. The Kitsap was 158.9 x 48.1 feet and was powered with a 600-horsepower Washington-Estep full diesel. She was designed by Capt. John L. Anderson, who succeeded Lyman Hinkley as president of the Kitsap County Line, for service on the Fauntleroy - Vashon - Harper route. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 367.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crosline (ferry)
The Odin later towed the 153-foot wooden ferry Crosline to Coos Bay, the vessel having been sold by Washington State Ferries to the Port of Coos Bay for use as a floating gift shop and restaurant at its new marine park. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.191.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crown City (ferry)
The 228 x 46-foot open-deck ferry Crown City, built in 1954 for the San Diego-Coronado run and replaced by the new San Diego bridge, was purchased by Washington State Ferries and transferred to Puget Sound for operation on the Mukiteo-Columbia Beach route as the Kulshan. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crown City (freighter)
The World War I Shipping Board freighter Crown City, being operated by the American Mail Line in Army transportation service, on September 1 struck an uncharted rock near Sledge Island, Nome. The vessel was loaded with foodstuffs, mobile machinery, quonset huts, clothing, coal, ore, gasoline, airplane parts and lumber (on deck). Attempts to salvage the cargo by lighter were unsuccessful, due to adverse weather conditions. During the winter the ice pack did further hull damage, flooding most of the holds. The water in the holds then froze solidly. The valuable cargo would doubtless have been entirely lost had it not been for a most noteworthy salvage project undertaken by Father Tom Cunningham, a priest of the Catholic Diocese of Fairbanks whose knowledge of sea and ice conditions in the Nome area was remarkable. After a long delay in receiving the approval of military authorities, who were unwilling to concede that a priest might also be a qualified marine salvage master, he was assigned a work party of soldi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crown Of England (steamer)
The British steamship Crown of England, which had been in the coal trade out of Nanaimo for the past year, was wrecked on Santa Rosa Island in November, 1894. She was en route from San Diego to Nanaimo in ballast, went on the rocks during a dense fog, striking at two o'clock in the morning, and was soon battered to pieces by the sea. All hands reached the island in safety, and John Poole, first officer, and five of the crew went to Santa Monica and telegraphed for assistance. The tug Fearless, Capt. Dan H. Haskell, was sent to the scene, and the wreck was afterward purchased by San Francisco parties, who succeeded in saving a large portion of the machinery. The Crown of England was a 1,600-ton iron steamship built in 1890, and was well known in the north as the first steamer chartered by Samuel Samuels & Co. to run between the Orient and Seattle. Not making a success of this trade, she was chartered by John Rosenfeld & Co. of San Francisco and for the past year had been in the coal traffic. At the time of the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crusader (fishboat)
Sturdy ship and Tacoma experts who built her, The Tacoma Times. February 19, 1938.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Crusader (fishing Boat)
Sturdy ship and Tacoma experts who built her, Tacoma Times.February 19, 1938.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cy Peck (ferry)
The Canadian motor ferry Cy Peck (ex-Daily), providing automobue and passenger service between Swartz Bay and Saltspring Island, had her 21 - year - old Fairbanks - Morse diesel replaced by a new eight-cylinder engine of the same make giving her a 10 1/2 knot service speed on the 35 -minute crossing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 585.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cynthia Olson (freighter)
June 9, 1952 Lumber freighter, 3117 tons, 310', built at Fiensberg, Germany in 1935. The ship, working for Oliver Olson & Co., bumped so heavilv upon the Coquille River bar that she sprung her plates and eighty per cent required replacement. The ship was rescued from total loss by the efforts of the Salvage Chief, one of the most famous salvage vessels in the world. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cynthia Olson (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 86, 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Daisy (fishing Vessel)
63-foot fishing vessel Daisy struck the north jetty at Coos Bay while attempting to cross the bar in heavy weather in February. The owner-skipper, J. N. Rock of Newport, and J. L. Heath were able to jump to the jetty and were rescued, but the third crew member, Glenn B. Long, was drowned. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Daisy Freeman (steam Schooner)
October 11, 1912 Steam schooner. Struck Columbia bar and salvaged
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dale M.hunt (fireboat)
A new fireboat for Ketchikan, the 42 - foot Dale M. Hunt with 100 - horsepower Hall - Scoff gasoline engine, was placed in service at that Alaska port in 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dale M.hunt (fireboat)
A new fireboat for Ketchikan, the 42 - foot Dale M. Hunt with 100 - horsepower Hall - Scoff gasoline engine, was placed in service at that Alaska port in 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Danish Prince (of 1894)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
Citation:
Dart (fishing Vessel)
The 60-foot fishing vessel Dart, built at Caledonia, Washington in 1911, struck rocks near Buoy 7 on Coos Bay on October 17, 1974. Although the Coast Guard pulled her off, it was found that she had broken her back and she was subsequently scrapped. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Campbell (fireboat)
A steam fireboat of steel construction, the David Campbell, was built at Portland for the fire department of that city. Of 242 tons, 1 17.5 feet in length, with machinery developing 1,200 horsepower, the Campbell remained in service until 1928. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (1) (tugboat)
The DAVID FOSS named after a great grandson of Theodore, was fifth in the series of sister-tugs, commonly known as D boats. This tug was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1967. The versatile D's performed equally well towing logs on Puget Sound, petroleum barges in Southeastern Alaska, or assisting in offshore oil support work. The DAVID's active duty began on June I 9th when she headed for Cook Inlet to work as a utility tug. She worked out of Anchorage until the freeze-up in October dictated her return to Seattle. After several years service in Alaska the David Foss sank on January 11, 1975 in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Michael Skalley, The David Foss (1) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256-57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (1) (tugboat)
The DAVID FOSS named after a great grandson of Theodore, was fifth in the series of sister-tugs, commonly known as D boats. This tug was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1967. The versatile D's performed equally well towing logs on Puget Sound, petroleum barges in Southeastern Alaska, or assisting in offshore oil support work. The DAVID's active duty began on June I 9th when she headed for Cook Inlet to work as a utility tug. She worked out of Anchorage until the freeze-up in October dictated her return to Seattle. After several years service in Alaska the David Foss sank on January 11, 1975 in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Michael Skalley, The David Foss (1) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256-57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (tug)
The 1,200-horsepower tug David Foss began taking on water in the stern as she tended an oil rig about four miles off Kasilof in ice covered Cook Inlet in early January and sank in about 60 feet of water. The six men aboard escaped in a liferaft without injury and were later air-lifted to Anchorage. The three-year-old $1 million tug was not salvaged. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.198.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (tugboat)
First of a new class of Foss Tugs, The Marine Digest. November 1, 1980. p. 11-12. Super D Class vessel. Foss ad with David Foss against a Seattle skyline. Marine Digest. January 31, 1981. p. 19. Marks first year of service, Marine Digest. October 3, 1981, p. 7. (il). Two tugs, the Oregon and the David Foss join the Grays Harbor towboat wars, The Marine Digest. September 28, 1985, p. 21-22.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dean Foss (tug)
Dean Foss, 72 feet in length and fitted with two 600-horsepower engines and twin screws, was completed by Albina Engine & Machine Works and dispatched to Alaska on her maiden voyage towing a 110 x 30-foot three-story production plant and dormitory structure to be mounted on a drill rig of Cook Inlet Drilling Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dean Foss (tugboat)
The DEAN FOSS named for Andrew Dean Hager, grandson of Henry Foss, was sixth in the series of D-class tugs built by the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon, and designed by Foss for intermediate towing, range and horsepower. Upon arrival in Seattle from the Portland shipyard in early May 1968 and after quickly passing a second inspection, she started right out on the Seattle to North Vancouver rail-car barge run but was later transferred to work in Southeastern Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Dean Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dean Foss (tugboat)
The DEAN FOSS named for Andrew Dean Hager, grandson of Henry Foss, was sixth in the series of D-class tugs built by the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon, and designed by Foss for intermediate towing, range and horsepower. Upon arrival in Seattle from the Portland shipyard in early May 1968 and after quickly passing a second inspection, she started right out on the Seattle to North Vancouver rail-car barge run but was later transferred to work in Southeastern Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Dean Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Deborah Foss (tugboat)
The Deborah Foss was built in 1965 at the Albina Shipyard at Portland Oregon for Foss service on Puget Sound. She is 66 feet in length with a 24 foot beam. The propulsion is a Caterpiller (Twin) 1,200 horsepower engine. She had served in Southeast Alaska but is classified as a Sound tug. Michael Skalley, The Deborah Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Decatur (sloop Of War)
The United States sloop of war, Decatur, should be mentioned here because of the fact that she went aground on Bainbridge Island during the Indian War of 1855-56; and also because of the fact that her's was the second ship-repairing work to be accomplished in Port Blakely Harbor-the harbor which was to become world renowned for its shipbuilding and ship-repairing industry. (The first ship-repairing job in this harbor was done by Vancouver's men in 1792.) Fortunately, repairs were completed and the Decatur was able to get off the reef (named Decatur Reef because of this incident) in time to save the settlers at Seattle from being massacred. Elsie F. Marriott Bainbridge through bifocals.Seattle: Gateway Printing Company, 1941, p. 183-202
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Decatur (sloop Of War)
The United States fleet attracted to the Sound by the Indian war included the revenue cutter Jeff Davis, the steamers John Hancock, Massachusetts and Active, and the sloop-of-war Decatur, the latter vessel taking the more prominent part in the battles between the Indians and the whites. The Decatur was officered as follows: J. S. Sterret, commander; T. G. Dalles, master; E. Middleton, A. K. Hughes, A. J. Drake, T. S. Phelps, lieutenants; J. J. Jones, purser. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.61.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Deep Sea (fishboat)
Bering sea fishing opportunity becons Tacoma built boat, The Tacoma Times. April 30, 1947. Tacoma built fishing boat leads field, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 10, 1947.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defender (schooner)
The Defender, a four-masted schooner of 446 tons and 575 M capacity, was built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven in 1896 for George U. Hind, San Francisco. She was taken over by Hind, Rolph & Co., when that firm was organized. In February, 1920, the Defender sailed from Aberdeen, Wash., for Suva, but on April 10 got ashore on Ongea Reef in the Fijis, and could not be floated. The lumber cargo was sold for $23,500, but the wreck brought only $1050. John Lyman,Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.March 29, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defender (schooner)
The Defender, a four-masted schooner of 446 tons and 575 M capacity, was built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven in 1896 for George U. Hind, San Francisco. She was taken over by Hind, Rolph & Co., when that firm was organized. In February, 1920, the Defender sailed from Aber- deen, Wash., for Suva, but on April 10 got ashore on Ongea Reef in the Fijis, and could not be floated. The lumber cargo was sold for $23,500, but the wreck brought only $1050. John Lyman,Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.March 29, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defender (schooner)
The 446-ton four-masted schooner Defender, built by Bendixsen in 1896 and long active in the Northwest lumber trade, was also lost while on a voyage from Aberdeen with lumber, going ashore on Nukusongea Reef in the Fiji Islands while en route for Suva. The cargo was sold for $ 23,500 and the wreck for $ 1,050 as scrap. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 312.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defender (tug)
The 48 -ton steam tug Defender, 64 feet long, was built at Astoria, equipped with 130-horsepower compound engines and operated for a number of years by the Knappton Towing Co. of Astoria. xxx, p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defender (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1900. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 53, 55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (2) (steamer)
The 93 foot propeller steamer Defiance (2) was built by Matthew McDowell at Tacoma, replacing the Dauntless on the Seattle Tacoma West Pass route, the latter vessel being sold to Moe Brothers for Bainbridge Island service. xxxx, p. 60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (ferry)
New Ferry starts on Gig Harbor run today, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. April 3, 1927. p. A-10. (il). Defiance converted to seafood processor. Marine Digest. June 29, 1985, p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (ferry)
The 165-foot wooden ferry Defiance of 1927, in service on Olympic Ferries' Port Townsend-Whidbey Island route until late in 1971, was sold to Ebb Tide Seafoods of Everett for conversion to a freezing and processing vessel for crab, fish and shrimp in the Alaska area. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.119.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (fishboat)
Fishing boat to sail soon, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 25, 1947.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (fishing Boat)
Fishing boat to sail soon, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 25, 1947.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (motor Lifeboat)
The 36-foot, 40 horsepower motor lifeboat Defiance was assigned to the Bandon lifesaving station in 1912. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Defiance of 1897 burned while loading copra in the Solomon Islands, Capt. Clark and the crew reaching shore safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 330.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (schooner)
Peter Mathews at Hoquiam delivered the 604 -ton four masted schooner Defiance to the E. K. Wood Lumber Company. With dimensions of 179.8 x 37.7 x 13.7, this was the largest sailing vessel to be built in the Pacific Northwest that year. She was initially commanded by Capt. Blum. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (schooner. )
Defiance, four-masted schooner of 604 tons and 725 M capacity, was built at Hoquiam, Wash., in 1897 by Mathews & Hitchings for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co. of San Francisco. While loading copra at Faisai, Solomon Islands, on January 23, 1922, the Defiance took fire and was burned to the water's edge, Capt. Clark and his crew getting ashore safely. Managing owner of the schooner at that time was given as Ernest Johnson, Portland, Ore. John Lyman,Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.March 29, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (schooner. )
Defiance, four-masted schooner of 604 tons and 725 M capacity, was built at Hoquiam, Wash., in 1897 by Mathews & Hitchings for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co. of San Francisco. While loading copra at Faisai, Solomon Islands, on January 23, 1922, the Defiance took fire and was burned to the water's edge, Capt. Clark and his crew getting ashore safely. Managing owner of the schooner at that time was given as Ernest Johnson, Portland, Ore. John Lyman,Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest.March 29, 1941..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (steamer)
Launched Airil 13, 1901. 93 foot vessel. Built by Crawford and Reid of Tacoma. Renamed Kingston in 1913. The Colorful Career of the Steamer Defiance, Marine Digest. March 16, 1985, p. 11+ (il). Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (tug)
Two other powerful welded-steel diesel tow boats were completed at Portland, the Defiance, 133 tons, 80.6 x 23 x 7.6, with 1,200-horsepower diesels for the Tidewater Transportation Co., and the Invader, 141 tons, 85 x 24 x 7.5, also of 1,200-horsepower for the same owners. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 472.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defiance (tug)
The river Tug Defiance, built in 1939 by Albina Engine & Machine Works for Tidewater-Shaver Barge Lines was thoroughly modernized and renovated as the Idaho for long-distance river towing and harbor work. The 85 x 25-foot towboat is powered by twin Caterpillar diesels of 1,500 total shaft horsepower and was fitted with the now familiar raised pilot house to provide a pilot's eye level of 35 feet above the waterline. She operates on the Columbia and Snake Rivers to Lewiston for Shaver Transportation Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.188.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Deimos (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century,p. 90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Delftdyk (motorship)
The Dutch motorship Delftdyk returned to Pacific Northwest waters in November, reviving the Pacific Coast European refrigerator ship service which had been pioneered jointly in 1920 by the Holland - America and Royal Mail Lines. She was operated in post -war service in this trade in conjunction with the steamship Duivendyk, formerly the Vancouver of Hamburg - American Lines. The Delftdyk was well known in the North Pacific, having been built originally for the refrigerator trade between Pacific Coast ports and Europe via the Panama Canal. In addition to a large refrigerated cargo capacity, both vessels carried passengers, the Delftdyk having accommodations for 30 and the Duivendyk for 35, all in upper deck rooms with private bath. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1946, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Delftdyke
The "Delftdyke" was a 10,220 gross ton ship, built by Wilton, Schiedam in 1929 for Holland America Line's Rotterdam - Vancouver cargo-passenger service. Her dimensions were length 509ft x beam 65ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14.5 knots. There was accommodation for 30 cabin class passengers. On 10th May 1940 she was bombed off Flushing, and again at Peterhead in Sept.1941 which put her out of service for a year. In Jan.1950 she was damaged by a mine at the mouth of the Weser, was rebuilt with new engines, funnel, bridge and bows, and renamed "Dongedyk". She resumed service to Vancouver in 1952 and in June 1966 was sold to Toshin Trading Co, Kobe, renamed "Tung Long" for a voyage to Kaohsiung, where she was broken up. Her sister ships were "Damsterdyk" and "Dalerdyk" [Holland America Line, a 120th Anniversary Celebration in Postcards by Peter C.Kohler, published by Ship Pictorial Publications, The Cabinet, High Street, Coltishall, Norfolk ]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 December 1997]
Delight (freighter)
Built at Tood, Seattle. 7,500 ton freighter. DTW, September 15, 1919, p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Delores Foss (tugboat)
The Delores Foss was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland as the fourth of eight D class tugs designed for towing on Puget Sound and Alaska. The vessel is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. Her primary service has been in Southeastern Alaska and when Mr. Skalley's book was written she was still in service. Michael Skalley, The Delores Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 246.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Delores Foss (tugboat)
The Delores Foss was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland as the fourth of eight D class tugs designed for towing on Puget Sound and Alaska. The vessel is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. Her primary service has been in Southeastern Alaska and when Mr. Skalley's book was written she was still in service. Michael Skalley, The Delores Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 246.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Deneb (landing Craft)
American, converted landing craft, enroute to Alaska, was driven ashore four miles south of Ocean Park on May 15, 1950, when the main water pump failed. She was salvaged and towed to safety by Fred Devine's 3600 h.p. Salvage Chief, of Portland. The Deneb's master was John Niemi. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Deneb (landing Craft)
American converted landing craft was driven ashore four miles south of Ocean Park on May 15, 1920. Towed to safety. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Derblay (freighter)
The Shipping Board freighter Derblay was also acquired and placed in Alaska service without change of name. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diamond Head (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diana (sloop Of War)
In 1812, Captain Ricord, commanding Russia sloop-of-war Diana, took aboard seven Japanese, six of whom were seamen recently shipwrecked in a junk on the coast of Kamchatka in the hope of exchanging them for seven Russians whom the Japanese were holding. Brooks reported the Diana was unable to land but he didn't mention why, so the ship returned to Kamchatka, reaching there on October 12. The following summer, on August 16, again in Diana, a second voyage was undertaken and a successful landing was made at Kunashie Bay on the 20th Island in the Jurilles. The two governments exchanged their men which included Russian sea captain Golovnin. (Vasilii Mikhailovich Golovnin later wrote a major book about his experiences.) Bert Webber, Wrecked Japanese Junks adrift in the North Pacific Ocean. Fairfield: Ye Galleon Press, 1984. p. 51-52.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diane Foss (tugboat)
The Diane Foss was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1966 as number three in the D class of eight tugs. The tug was delivered at Seattle on May 28, 1966 for service on Puget Sound. The ship is 66 feet in length with a 24 foot beam. The Diane Foss has performed some service in Alaska but mostly out of Seattle. Michael Skalley, The Diane Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diane Foss (tugboat)
The Diane Foss was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1966 as number three in the D class of eight tugs. The tug was delivered at Seattle on May 28, 1966 for service on Puget Sound. The ship is 66 feet in length with a 24 foot beam. The Diane Foss has performed some service in Alaska but mostly out of Seattle. Michael Skalley, The Diane Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ditto (fishboat)
The Alaska fish boat Ditto was rammed and sunk in southeastern Alaska waters in September by an unidentified vessel said to resemble a cannery tender. The larger vessel continued at full speed as the five-man crew of the Ditto struggled in the icy waters. Two, including the boat's master, Alex Didrickson, were drowned, the remaining three being picked up by the fish boat Shamrock. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 565.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dixie Queen (freighter)
Dixie Queen, 60 -foot freighter of 60 horsepower was built at Bellingham in 1912; Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dodo (fishboat)
The Dodo, a steam fishing vessel of 10 tons, 33.5 feet in length was built at Potlatch, Washington, and still operated as a pleasure boat and one of the few remaining small steamers on Puget Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dodo (fishboat)
The Dodo, a steam fishing vessel of 10 tons, 33.5 feet in length was built at Potlatch, Washington, and still operated as a pleasure boat and one of the few remaining small steamers on Puget Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dolly (skiff)
Walter O'Meara. The Savage Country, p. 258, 265, 267, 290.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dolphin (fish Packer)
The 96 -ton fish packer Dolphin 92 feet in overall length, built at Astoria in 1886 and subsequently converted to gasoline power, was purchased by the Foss Launch & lvg Co. and rebuilt as the tug Martha Foss, receiving a 240 horsepower Ingersoll-Rand dieSel3. During this year the Foss interests withdrew from the passenger launch business which had once been the firm's principal occupation, and disposed of the launches Foss No. 3, Foss No. 10 and Fossberg. Gordon Newell, Marine Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dolphin (fishing Steamer)
Two Puget Sound gasoline fishing schooners, the Dolphin and Carrier Dove, were lost in Canadian waters within 24 hours in February, 1912. The Dolphin, with three men aboard, was totally wrecked after going ashore at Plumper Pass on February 23, 1912.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Don Jose Figueras (freighter)
The only serious accident to befall an offshore merchant vessel in Northwest waters was a fire which broke out in the forward holds of the 466-foot Filipino freighter Don Jose Figueras at sea 950 miles northwest of San Francisco. Much of the cargo was composed of such flammable items as clothing, toys and such craft items as baskets and wooden carvings and the fire spread rapidly, the forward section of the vessel glowing red hot as the crew took to the lifeboats and were picked up by rescue ships which were standing by. A damage control party from the Coast Guard cutter Yocona boarded the burning freighter and got the worst of the flames under control, after which the cutter took her in tow. Water pumped into the holds caused the sodden cargo to shift and the vessel took a 32 degree list. Upon the arrival of the tug Salvage Chief, the Yocona returned to station and the fire-gutted cargo vessel was towed to Port Angeles, where she was anchored in sheltered waters at the eastern limits of the harbor. Due to th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna (fishboat)
American fish boat, 20 tons, wrecked with the loss of her three crew members, near Ocean Park, April 14, 1944. Wreck was removed from the beach via the overland route. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna (fishing Boat)
American twenty ton fish boat wrecked near Ocean Park on April 14, 1944. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Donna Foss was one of ten Miki-class tugs built for the Army Transporation service. She was completed in the Barbee Marine Yard at Kennydale, Washington in 1944. She was declared surplus by the government in 1946 and was acquired by Foss. She operated in Coastwise and Alaska towing until September 25, 1970 when she was sold to Philippine interests. One year before that in June of 1969 the Donna Foss became the Anna Foss and at the beginning of the Philippine venture was renamed the Bruin. This vessel was decommissioned in mid 1978 at Manila. Michael Skalley, The tug Donna Foss (1), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second DONNA FOSS arrived at Foss-Seattle from the Portland builder's yard in late September 1969, seventh in the series of D class boats. Built by the Albina Shipyard the Donna Foss is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. The vessel is used primarily on Puget Sound towing although she has been to Alaska many times. Michael Skalley, The Donna Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 267.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second DONNA FOSS arrived at Foss-Seattle from the Portland builder's yard in late September 1969, seventh in the series of D class boats. Built by the Albina Shipyard the Donna Foss is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. The vessel is used primarily on Puget Sound towing although she has been to Alaska many times. Michael Skalley, The Donna Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 267.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (tug)
Another of the intermediate sized D boats, Donna Foss of 1,500-horsepower, was completed at the Albina yard in Portland, joining the Dorothy, Deborah, Diane, Delores, Dean and David. The old Miki type tug Donna Foss was renamed Anna Foss upon completion of the new steel vessel. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Francisca (bark)
The four masted bark off the Strait of Juan De Fuca after 1900. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dorothy Foss (tug)
The tug Dorothy Foss, 72 feet long and 24 feet beam, was launched last week at Albina Engine and Machine Works, Inc. for Foss Launch and Tug Company's service in Cook Inlet, Alaska. The boat will have a loaded draft of about 7.5 feet when the fuel tanks are filled with 22,000 gallons of oil. Power is provided by a pair of 500 hp Caterpillar diesel. After outfitting, the $250,000 tug will go to Seattle, then to An- chorage, according to Bill Wood, marine superintendent of the Foss company. She will be used for towing barges and drilling equip- ment for Pan-American Oil Co., one of the major companies drilling wells in the Kenai Peninsula, Wood said. The modern new tug for the big Fcss fleet will be equipped with all of the latest mechanical and electronic devices. Designed by Ed Monk, Seattle naval architect, the tug was named for the wife of Roland Foss, Fairbanks, Alaska. Albina will lay down the bottom plates for an 80-foot tug for Ha- waiian Tug & Barge Co. in about a week, according to Claude F Butler, ch
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dorothy Foss (tugboat)
The Dorothy Foss was built in 1963 by the Albina Shipbuilding Company of Portland, Oregon. Her length is 66 feet with a 24 foot beam. She is one of eight D-Class vessels built for Foss and was the first built for Foss from keel up since 1958. Although used in Alaska for work at Cook Inlet much of her service has been on Puget Sound. When the Foss book was written in 1981 the tug was still in service. Michael Skalley, The Dorothy Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 233.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dr. Martin (ferry)
The gas-engined former Lake Washington passenger ferry Dr. Martin was purchased by the Northern Commercial Co. for the St. Michael -Holy Cross mail route. She had received a new 80-horsepower Mianus diesel prior to the sale. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 355.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Drafna
The Drafna was owned by Hans Kir & Co in Drammen. Master was Hartvig Eckersberg. She had a burden of 185,5 Norwegian Kommerselester, measures: 102,5 x 27,2 x 17,8. Drafna is said to have been a very solid built ship.When Drafna ones hit solid rock, and was stuck, the insurance company wanted to send down a diver to check for damages. One of the owners them said that they would be welcome to do so, if they wanted to se if the rock had been damaged. Agents were shipbroker Bang in Drammen, and the ship captain. Drafna was used for freight of timber from Canada. Condemned in Queenstown in 1890 on passage from Quebec to Liverpool with timber. Drafna sailed in 1849, 1850, 1852 and 1853 with emigrants from Norway to America. It is possible that she also made a crossing with passengers in 1848. [From The Solem and Swiggum Ship Index - [E-mail from Ann Helgeson - 9 June 1998]
Citation:
Drew Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Drew Foss was built by the Foss Company at their Tacoma yard in 1929. The tugboat was powered with a Caterpillar 325 horse engine. She was built following the plans of the Foss 11. Her primary service was on Puget Sound but was declared surplus on December 19, 1975 when her engine was removed. In 1977 she was cold to British Columbia interests and was named the Beverly Ann II. (Michael Skalley. Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 77.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Drew Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second DREW, fourth and last in her class of new Foss ocean tugs, was completed and ready for service at New Iberia, Louisiana by the McDermotte Shipyard Group in March 1977. The tug is 120 feet long with a 34 foot beam. Her primary service is Ocean towing and Coastwise Towing. Michael Skalley, The Drew Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 294.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Drexel Victory (freighter)
January 21, 1947 A victory ship of 10,500 tons gross, 7607 net. Launched 4/7/1945 by Kaiser at Richmond, Ca. Outbound for Yokohama, the ship struck the Columbia bar and began breaking between holds 4 and 5. Captain Canute Rommerdahl did his best for Olson & Co. and the U.S. Maritime Commission, but his ship drifted and sank due west of buoy #6, a quarter mile out in 210', losing a grain cargo of more than 5,000 tons. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duchess Of Albany
This British ship was stranded at Bonilla Point, B. C., in 1888. No details. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duchess Of Argyle (bark)
A British four-masted bark, 1,700 tons, inbc)und to Burrard Inlet from Liverpool, wrecked in fog five miles southeast of Port San Juan, near Sombrio Point, October 11, 1887. Commanded by Captain H. E. Heard. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duchess Of Bedford
The "Duchess of Bedford" was built by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1928 for Canadian Pacific SS Ltd. She was a 20,123 gross ton ship, length 601ft x beam 75.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 580-cabin, 480-tourist and 510-3rd class. Launched on 24/1/1928 by Mrs Stanley Baldwin, the wife of the British prime minister, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 1/6/1928. On her second westbound crossing, she set a new record of six days, nine and a half hours from Liverpool to Montreal. In July 1933 she was in collision with an iceberg in Belle Isle Strait, but sustained only slight damage. Five days before the declaration of war in 1939, she was chartered for a trooping voyage to Bombay, and on 5/1/1940 resumed Liverpool - St John NB - Halifax voyages, being used on the Eastbound crossings to ferry Canadian troops to Britain. In August 1940 she commenced the first of three voyages to Suez via Freetown and Cape Town. In November 1941 she left Liverpool on a 5 month voyage which took her to Singapore with 4000 Indian troops and 40 nurses. Arriving at the end of January 1942, she embarked 875 women and children for evacuation to Batavia, Java. Although attacked on several occasions, she was not seriously damaged, and arrived at Liverpool on 2/4/1942. After two trips to Cape Town, she sailed from Liverpool for Boston on 7/8/1942 and on 9th August, sighted a U-Boat and sank her by gunfire. She was later used in the North African landings and shot down an enemy aircraft in November 1943. Later used in the Sicily and Salerno landings and various trooping voyages, and prisoner of war repatriations. On 3/3/1947 she arrived at Glasgow to be refitted to carry 400-1st and 300-tourist class passengers, her speed increased to 20 knots, and was renamed "Empress of France" in October 1947. She resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 1/9/1948 and in 1958 was fitted with new streamlined funnels and her accommodation altered to carry 218-1st and 482-tourist class passengers. She started her last Montreal - Liverpool crossing on 30/11/1960 having made 310 round voyages on the North Atlantic, and on 19/12/1960 sailed from Liverpool for Newport, Monmouthshire where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1317-18][Canadian Pacific - 100 years by George Musk] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 April 1998]
Duke Of Buckingham
The "Duke of Buckingham", built in 1880 for the Ducal Line by Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow. She was a 3,123 gross ton ship, length 384ft x beam 38.3ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. She sailed from London on her first voyage to Suez, Batavia, Brisbane and Newcastle, NSW on 4th December 1882 and stayed on this joint service with British India Stem Nav. Co until 1886. In December 1886 she was chartered to the Huntington Line and sailed between London, Havre and Newport News(arrived 13/1/1887). In Feb.1887 she started her first Liverpool - Newport News voyage and made her last sailing on this service in March 1888 (arr. Newport News 3rd April). She then went back to the Australia route and made her last sailing to Brisbane on 25/8/1900. In 1900 she was sold to Macbeth & Grey and in 1902 was resold to Italian owners. She was broken up at Genoa in July 1903.[orth Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber, p.171-176] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1174-5] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 April 1998]
Duke Of Westminster
The "Duke of Westminster" was built in 1882 by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for the Ducal Line. She was a 3,726 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 40.3ft (121,91m x 12,28m), one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st class, plus 3rd class passengers. Launched on 27th April 1882, she was used for the joint service with British India Steam Nav.Co between London, Suez, Batavia and Brisbane. She started her first voyage on this service on 2/7/1883 and her last on 26/6/1902. Between 1886-88 she was chartered to the Huntington Line and made several voyages between London or Liverpool and Newport News. In 1903 she was sold to Italian owners, renamed "Westminster" and was scrapped at Genoa in September 1903. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber, p.171-176] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1174] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 April 1998]
Duncan Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Duncan Foss began her career as a U.S. Navy harbor tug built by th Victory Shipbuilding Corporation of Newport Beach, California. She was 63 feet in length with an 18 foot beam. A name change was made in October 1969 when the Duncan Foss (1) became the Elaine Foss. She was operated by Foss on Puget Sound until December 29, 1971. A major overhaul was planned but instead she was placed in dead storage. She was sold to Canadian interests and was renamed Cumshewa Chief. Sold some time later she was renamed Tania Too for service in the area around Bella Bella, B.C. Michael Skalley, The Duncan Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 172.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duncan Foss (towing Vessel)
Duncan Foss, 1,500 horsepower, eighth of the 72 x 24-foot Foss Launch & Tug Co. D boats, by Albina at Portland for Alaska barge service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.76.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duncan Foss (tug)
Duncan Foss, 63 x 17.8-foot steel tug rebuilt by the Foss Launch & Tug Co. at Tacoma from a Navy tug brought from Honolulu and fitted with a 450 horsepower Nordberg diesel. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 586.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dupont (freighter)
The DuPont, a 65-foot explosives freighter of 75 horsepower, was built at Manitou Beach, Seattle, by the Astoria Iron Works for the DuPont Powder Company in 1912. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duwamish (fireboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. Veteran Seattle fireboat soon to retire, Marine Digest. March 17, 1984, p. 11+ Fireboat Chief Seattle to replace Duwamish, Marhine Digest. October 20, 1984,p.11. Nothing on the Duwamish except that she will be declared surplus. Veteran Fireboat Duwamish to be preseved on the waterfront with backing of Ivar,Marine Digest. November23, 1985.p.4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duwamish (fireboat)
A waterfront fire at Seattle on July 29 practically destroyed the handsome pier building of the Grand Trunk Pacific, resulting in the loss of four lives and injuries to nearly a score of persons. Both land fire companies and the fireboat Duwamish fought the blaze, which was one of the most stubborn and spectacular in the city's history. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.247-248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
E. F. Purdy (steamer)
The former, in command of her owner, Capt. W. K. Merwin, was in Sullivan Slough, a few miles from La Conner, loading hay, and a little after midnight, April 9th, completed her cargo and backed away from the dock. Before she had gone three lengths, a blaze was discovered in the fire-room, and the inflammable nature of her freight rendered all efforts to subdue the flames futile. The engineer threw the throttle wide open, then came out through a window, and with the rest of the crew reached shore in safety. The wheels continued to revolve for about fifteen minutes after the steamer grounded, but as the tide went out, leaving the vessel almost high and dry, she burned down to the keel. The officers of the steamer were W. K. Merwin, captain; H. A. Soper, mate; John A. Williamson, chief engineer; John H. Skinner, steward and H. B. Campbell, purser. The Purdy was valued at about $15,000 and was uninsured. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
E. L. Bartlett (ferry)
Several new passenger and automobile ferries appeared on the scene, the most notable of which was the E. L. Bartlett, latest addition to the Alaska Ferry System fleet, which arrived at Seattle during the summer after a 6,600-mile voyage from the builder's yard (Jeffboat, Inc.) in Jeffersonville, Indiana. The 193-foot vessel, certified to carry 165 passengers and 38 automobiles, is propelled by diesel engines and twin screws and fitted with a bowthruster for added maneuverability. Designed by Philip F. Spaulding for service between Cordova, Valdez and Whit- tier, the Bartlett was fitted with hinged ramps at both bow and stern to allow for the 20-foot tidal range encountered in Prince William Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
E. T. Short, The Wreck Of The Steamer Pacific, T
The famous six-masted barkentine E. R. Sterling, operated since 1910 by Capt. E. R. Sterling and commanded by him on this voyage, was caught in a violent gale off the Falkland Islands on July 4 while en route from Australia for the United Kingdom with wheat after being idle at Adelaide for well over a year. Her main and mizzen masts were lost. Two months later, while in the latitude of the Cape Verdes, another storm took away her foremast, fatally injuring the mate, Roderick Mackenzie. The baitered barkentine finally reached St. Thomas under jury rig on October 15 and was taken in tow by the Dutch tug Indus, reaching the Thames on January 28, 1928 with her cargo intact, 286 days out from Adelaide. The once smart vessel was little better than a wreck, and after discovering the prohibitive costs of repairing and rerigging her, Capt. Sterling reluctantly sold her to Sunderland shipbreakers, where she was dismantled for scrap. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eagle (fishboat)
The 28-ton gasoline fishing vessel Eagle, buut ordy the previous year, stranded and broke up September 12 in Barkley Sound, the five -man crew escaping safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Earl Foss (tug Boat)
The Earl Foss was built as a Landing Craft Mechanized (LCM) in 1944 at the Walsh Construction Company works at Jersey City, New Jersey. She was 46 feet long with a beam of 14 feet. She was acquired by Foss in January, 1951 and worked mostly around Chambers Creek and Commencement Bay. On February 10, 1968 the Earl Foss experienced engine trouble and her machinery was removed in the fall of 1968 and she was later scrapped. Michael Skalley, The Earl Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Earl Of Dalhousie
Raising the Earl of Dalhousie, The Overland Monthly. (March, 1888), p. 232.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Earl Of Sefton
From my own databases which includes references from St. John Ships and Their Builders by Esther Clark Wright, I have the following on EARL OF SEFTON: Year - 1854. Name - EARL OF SEFTON. Rig - ship. Tons - 1082. Builder - John McDonald & Co Liverpool. Disposal - 1854. Remarks Built in 1854 by John McDonald & Co. in St. John New Brunswick in 1854 sold to Charles Moore and Robert Carlyle in Liverpool in 1854, she was wrecked in 1859. Also from Frederick W. Wallace, the following information Vessel Name: EARL OF SEFTON. Rigging : ship. Tonnage : 1126. Length : 179.50. Beadth: 32.20. Depth : 22.10. Date Built : 1854. Location Built.: St. John. Province Built : New Brunswick. Country Built: Canada. Builder's Name : J.McDonald. Reason Closed : sold. Date Closed : 1855. Place Closed : Liverpool. Data Source: Frederick W. Wallace - Record of Canadian Shipping 1786-1920
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gery Swiggum - 12 February 1998]
Eastern Prince (of 1896)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
Citation:
Eclipse (fully Rigged Ship)
The old Downeast full-rigged ship Eclipse, 1,594 tons, 221.7 x 40.3 x 24.3, built at Bath, Maine in 1878 for G. S. Dearborn, foundered at sea January 1 1 while on a voyage from Newcastle for San Francisco. The survivors reached Honolulu in an open boat, in pitiable condition, three of the men having died of hunger and thirst. Following the loss of the Eclipse the New York Shipping Illustrated published the following interesting account: Many strange things befell the Eclipse before she went to Davy Jones' locker. One of the most mysterious occurred several years ago, within 100 miles of where the Eclipse was lost. The ship, coal-laden, was bound from Newcastle, N. S. W., for Honolulu. She lost the trade wind December 1, and the next day opened up with one of those scorchingly hot calms for which the Pacific is noted. During the forenoon watch there was the faintest suspicion of a breath of air and a Promethean heat hung over the vessel. Every available sail, even to three skysails, was set to woo the sulky,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ed Wynn (fireboat)
A 65-foot wooden fireboat built in 1942 for the Army was acquired by the Federal Bureau of Prisons and assigned to McNeil Island Federal Penitentiary as the Ed Wynt. Fitted with three diesel engines, one for propulsion and two for pumping, the fireboat had a capacity of 4,000 gallons of water per minute. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 518.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith (fishing Schooner)
The fishing schooner Edith, was lost on Waadah Island at Neah Bay, May 8, 1910. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910., p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith (freighter)
The steamship Edith, in the freight service of the Alaska Steamship Co., southbound from Nome, loaded a heavy cargo of copper concentrates at LaTouche Island in late August, and then proceeded toward Tacoma. Shortly after leaving the island, the Edith ran into heavy weather which caused her semi-liquid cargo to shift and placed the steamer in imminent danger of capsizing. The crew of 37, under Capt. C. B. McMullen, abandoned the vessel on August 30 and were picked up shortly afterward by the steamship Mariposa, northbound. The Mariposa put a line aboard the Edith, but as the big freighter continued to sink lower in the water the line parted and efforts to tow her were abandoned. It is probable the vessel foundered in the Gulf of Alaska later that night. The 2,369-ton iron vessel was the former British steamship Glenochil of 1882 which had been brought around during the early Klondike gold rush days. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.257.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith F.
See JUNO.
Citation:
Edith Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Edith Foss was built as a combination tug and passenger vessel in New Orleans in 1919 and was operated by the U.S. Navy. Purchased by the R.J. Ultican Tugboat Company of Gig Harbor she was rebuilt in 1928. She was renamed the Rustler and later the Dauntless and when purchased by the Foss Company became the Edith Foss on September 26, 1946. When sold in 1969 to Mexican interests she left the Pacific Northwest as the Rustler. Michael Skalley, The Edith Foss (2), Foss Ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 139-140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (3) (tug)
The Edith Foss was originally a U.S. Army tug T-118 built at Newport Beach, California in 1944 for War service. She was purchased by Pacific Tow and Salvage Company and Long Beach in September of 1957 and given the name Pacific P.T. and S. After some work on Puget Sound the vessel was transferred to Foss on August 12, 1960. The vessel worked on Puget Sound and worked until April 1979 when she was sold to Alaska interests and given the name Mavis Lynn. Michael Skalley, Edith Foss (3), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (tug Boat)
Foss Launch and Tug Company now serving the Columbia River with tugs Edith Foss and Benjamin Foss, Marine Digest. April 20, 1985. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (tug)
The Edith Foss, formerly the Grays Harbor tug Rustler, returned to that port, being sold by Foss Launch & Tug Co. to the Hubble Towing Co. The name Edith Foss was transferred to the former Alaska Packers Association tug Chilkat, a 115-foot vessel built at San Francisco in 1901. The 82-foot Dauntless (built at New Orleans in 1919 for the U. S. Navy) returned to Foss ownership within about a year and for a time there were two Edith Foss designations in the fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (tug)
The Army tug LT-239, formerly the Edith Foss, was rammed and sunk by the steamship Victoria of the Alaska Steamship Co. December 4 in the Alaska Inside Passage. The 15 Army crew members of the tug were removed, arriving in Seattle without a dime to their names just as their first furloughs in two to three years were about to begin. A collection was taken up along the Seattle waterfront, replacing part of the $3,000 in personal funds lost in the sinking. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 521.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (tugboat)
The Edith Foss was built in San Francisco in 1901 as the steam cannery tender Chilkat for use in the Alaska trade. She had a length of 115 feet with a 24 foot beam. She was purchased by the foos Launch and Tug Company on January 21, 1942 and became the Edith Foss. Her major work was in Alaska and on December 4, 1943 while bound for Seattle she was rammed by the Alaska Steamship Company vessel Victoria and sank near Prince Rupert. Michael Skalley, The Edith Foss (1), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Effie Afton (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 594.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Efin (freighter)
American, river freight boat, 196 tons, was destroyed by explosion and fire at 9:30 p.m. after departing Ilwaco for Astoria, May 11, 1937. The fire was caused by a fuel tank explosion. Capt. Alfred Babbidge and his crew of ten took to the lifeboat and ivcre picked up half clothed by the motor lifeboat from Cape Disappointment. Among the crew was a woman cook. The Efin burned to the water's edge and her remains drifted to Sand Island. The vessel built at St. Helens, Oregon, in 1914, was owned by Babbidge 8c Holt, of Portland. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Efin (river Freight Boat)
Exploded May 11, 1937 off of Ilwaco. Built in 1914 at St. Helen's Oregon. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ehrenfels (steamer)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 25, 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eiko (fishboat)
The 45 foot fish boat Eiko which sank last October in 175 feet of water in Dodd Narrows, near Harmac was raised last week by two amateur salvage men from Nanaimo, Marvin Sjogrem and David Dickinson, assisted by Amby Charmley. The site of the wreck was located by an oil slick and Dave Dickinson was able to reach it by skin diving. The vessel was then brought to the surface and successfully docked at Nanaimo. It was formerly owned by R. D. Harley of Nanaimo. (The Marine Digest. March 9, 1963), p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elaine Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Elaine Foss (1) was built in St. Helens, Oregon in 1925 as the Larch for the U.S. Light House Service as a buoy tender on the Columbia River. She was purchased by the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredge Company in 1935 and was renamed the Loyal. The Foos company purchased the vessel in 1945 and after a major refit worked out of Seattle for the next twenty years. She was sold to the Annette Timber Corporation of Ketchikan and was renamed Trinity. On February 6, 1972 she sank near Prince of Wales Island in a storm. Michael Skalley, The Elaine Foss (1) Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elberfeld
See HERCYNIA.
Citation:
Electra (fishboat)
American fish boat, 72 tons, stranded on Clatsop Spit, inside the river bar, January 26, 1944. All hands were rescued. The Coast Guard cutter Nemaha attempted several times to pull the craft to safety, but was unsuccessful. A year later only the Electra's mast remained above the sand and surf. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Electra (fishboat)
Stranded on Clatsop Spit on January 26, 1944. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Electra (fishboat)
The 72 -ton commercial fishing vessel Electra, 68 feet in length, built at Seattle in 1927 and owned by C. B. Samuelson of that port, stranded on Clatsop Spit inside the Columbia River bar January 26. All hands were rescued and the Coast Guard cutter Nemaha made several attempts to refloat the diesel-powered craft. These were unsuccessful and she was soon engulfed by the shifting sands of the river entrance. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 521.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elf
Built in Tacoma in 1902. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elf (tugboat)
Early Olson Tugboat Company vessels in the City Waterway about 1912, Tacoma News Tribune. March 19, 1961, p. A-16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elfin (freight Boat)
Elfin, 196-ton gasoline powered river freight boat of 100 horsepower, at St. Helens, operated by Babbidge & Holt of Portland on the Astoria and Ilwaco route. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elfin (freighter)
May 11, 1937 Diesel freighter, 196 tons, 84' in length. A total loss due to an engine room fire. Captain Alfred Babbidge and 10 of her crew were rescued by C G Cape D lifeboat. *Erria 12/20/1951 Motor, cargo, passenger vessel of the Danish East-Asiatic Line. In the road at Astoria with a fire caused by an electrical short. Within 10 minutes after the first fire alarm, Captain M. Agge ordered the 450'ship cleared of her passengers. Out of the 83 crew and 31 passengers, eight passengers in cabins and three crewmen in #5 hold died. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984. p. 163-65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elfin (freighter)
May 11, 1937 Diesel freighter, 196 tons, 84' in length. A total loss due to an engine room fire. Captain Alfred Babbidge and 10 of her crew were rescued by C G Cape D lifeboat. *Erria 12/20/1951 Motor, cargo, passenger vessel of the Danish East-Asiatic Line. In the road at Astoria with a fire caused by an electrical short. Within 10 minutes after the first fire alarm, Captain M. Agge ordered the 450'ship cleared of her passengers. Out of the 83 crew and 31 passengers, eight passengers in cabins and three crewmen in #5 hold died. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 163-166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elfin (freighter)
The Elfin, a 196-ton motor freighter, destroyed by explosion and fire May 11, 1937 after departing Astoria for Ilwaco, Capt. Alfred Babbidge and his crew of ten (including a woman cook), being picked up by the Coast Guard motor lifeboat from Cape Disappointment Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elfin (freighter)
The Elfin, a 196-ton motor freighter, destroyed by explosion and fire May 11, 1937 after departing Astoria for Ilwaco, Capt. Alfred Babbidge and his crew of ten (including a woman cook), being picked up by the Coast Guard motor lifeboat from Cape Disappointment Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elfin (steamer)
The small Lake Washington passenger steamer Elfin, built at Pontiac in 1891 by E. F. Lee, was rebuilt to greater capacity, the pilot house being placed on the upper deck. The 54.5 - foot craft was also repowered with a new compound (6, 12 x 10) engine. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966,p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elias Howe (freighter)
Two men of the Elias Howe were killed when a torpedo struck the engine room September 24 off Aden. Capt. J. W. Dickover and the rest of the crew were picked up safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 520.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elijah Swift
The ELIJAH SWIFT was not a ship but a bark, a 3-masted vessel, the fore- and mainmasts square-rigged, the mizzenmast (the sternmost mast) rigged fore-and-aft. She was built at Falmouth, Maine, in 1847, and was registered at the Port of New York on 24 January 1848; she was 371 tons [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 197]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships List by Michael Palmer - 29 March 1998]
Elisif (schooner)
The Norwegian auxiliary schooner Elisif, Capt. Edwin Larsen, owned by the Swenson Trading Co. of Seattle, departed Puget Sound on an Arctic trading expedition in July, 1928 and in the fall of that year was caught in the ice and imprisoned until the summer of 1929, when she resumed her voyage, but was again caught in the ice off the Siberian coast in August, her hull being damaged so severely that it was necessary to beach her to prevent sinking. Her 20 -man crew reached Little Diomede Island in two launches, where they were picked up by the Coast Guard cutter Northland, which carried them to Nome. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 403.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eliza Ladd (ferry Boat)
The steam ferry-boat Eliza Ladd was sold to Capt. Thomas Callahan aild Michael O'Neil. Her new owners rebuilt her as a sternwheel scow and under the name Margey operated her in the freighting business until 1890, when she was bought by Hall & Myrick of Seattle, who in turn disposed of her to Stetson & Post. She is still in service on the Sound and is owned by A. 0. Benjanmin of Seattle. E.W. Wright, Marine business of 1885, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895.]., p. 329.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elk (ferry)
The 67-foot motor ferry Elk with 100-horsepower F-M ofl engine was built at Gig Harbor in 1921 by Skansie Bros. for service on the Steilacoom-Longbranch Island route under contract to Pierce County. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1921-22, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ella Frances
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p. 354.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ella Francis (bark)
The bark Ella Francis, Captain Hull, from Port Orchard for San Francisco, was abandoned, February 5th,[ 1866] eighty miles southwest of Cape Classett. The bark sailed from Port Orchard, January 4th, with two hundred thousand feet of lumber and ninety piles for A. P. Glidden, and met with a succession of southerly gales until January 16th, when, in latitude 43 and longitude 125, she met with an unusually severe hurricane. While scudding before it under bare poles she sprang a leak, which continued to gain on them until February 5th, when, with six feet of water in the hold and the crew exhausted after twelve days at the pumps, they were forced to abandon her and were picked up by the British ship Egeria, Captain Evans, off the Farallones, February 15th, and transferred to the pilot-boat Fanny, which took them to San Francisco the next day. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiqua
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellen Foss (tug)
The Ellen Foss, a former government tug built during World War II, was thoroughly renovated and modernized at the Seattle yard. Her power was more than tripled, from 1,225 to 4,000 horsepower, with the installation of a new turbo-charged General Motors diesel. She also received new auxiliary engines, generators, anchor windlass and towing winch and complete electronic equipment. Following trials she was dispatched to Honolulu towing the seagoing lumber barge Koko Head. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellen Foss (tugboat)
Foss Company's one and only ELLEN was originally the LT-57, built by the Army Transport Service for coastwise and ocean towing, though starting out life on the Great Lakes. She shifted from fresh to salt water shortly after her break-in runs. After war service the vessel was placed in the reserve fleet at Clatskanie, Oregon until purchased by Foss in August of 1962. She has operted along the Northwest Coast and in Alaska and occasionally to Hawaii. She was in service when Mr. Skalley's book was written. Michael Skalley, The Ellen Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 227.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellen Foster
An American ship, 996 tons, was wrecked in Neah Bay, Washington, December 22, 1867. Commanded by Captain Anderson, the vessel was in ballast, bound for Utsaladdy, Washington, from Callao, for a cargo of lumber. Vessel was victim of a hurricane from the east southeast inside the strait. She ran for Neah Bay, anchoring in nine fathoms. The blow continued and she dragged across the reef and sank. Crew made shore in ship's boat. They were later taken to Port Townsend by the tug Cyrus Walker. The Foster was a swift clipper ship, built at Medford, Massachusetts, in 1852, for J. & A. Tirrell of Boston. A bronze cannon recovered from Neah Bay in the 1920s was believed to be from the Ellen Foster. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellen Foster
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 139.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellen Foster
The American ship Ellen Foster, Captain Anderson, from Callao for Utsalady, was wrecked in Neah Bay in December. The vessel sighted Cape Flattery at 9:00 A.M., December 21st, but a strong east wind kept her from making any headway until the next morning, when she caught a light northeaster which sent her twenty miles up the Straits by noon. Here she encountered a hurricane from east southeast and ran for Neah Bay, anchoring in nine fathoms of water; but both anchors would not hold her, and she dragged to the reef, striking at 3:00 P.M. and beginning to break up at once. The crew reached shore in the life boat and on the twenty-ninth were taken to Port Townsend by the tug Cyrus Walker. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elsie (steam Ferry)
The small side-wheel steam ferry Elsie May, crossing the Columbia at Wallula, was rebuilt as gas side-wheeler of 26 tons, 54 feet in length. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elsie Branford (gas Schooner)
The gas schooner Elsie Bradford was damaged November 6, 1911, by a gravel scow she was towing and foundered near Nanaimo, Capt. Bradford and the crew escaping in a skiff. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 196.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elsie Foss (tug)
The Elsie Foss was built for the United States Army in Portland in 1953. Twin to the Elmer Foss the vessel is 53 feet long with a 14 foot beam. The vessel was sold to Foss in September of 1957 and worked in supplying the DEW line stations in Alaska. In 1962 the Elsie was towed to Seattle and redeveloped into a crew boat for work on Cook Inlet. In May of 1977 she was sold to Dan Calusen of Kenai, Alaska for private use, Michael Skalley, The Elmer Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 194.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elwha (ferry)
Grounded in San Juan Islands, Tacoma News Tribune. October 2, 1983.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emil Kirdorff
The EMIL KIRDORF was one of 4 nearly identical vessels by Marinewerft Wilhelmshaven (ship #66) for the A.G. Hugo Stinnes between 1921 and 1923; launched 25 February 1922, delivered 2 August 1922. 5,695 tons gross/3,426 tons net; 124.89 x 16.41 x 7.21 meters/409 ft 9 in x 53 ft 10 in x 23 ft 8 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); 1 funnel, 2 masts; single screw, triple expansion and low pressure turbine; 3 cylinders, 64.13 cm (25 1/4 in), 104.14 cm (41 in), and 167.64 cm (66 in), stroke 125.09 cm (49 1/4 in), 305 nominal horsepower, service speed 11 knots; steel construction, 1 deck and shelter deck, forecastle 49 14.93 meters (49 ft); cargo capacity 11,603 cubic meters (410,000 cubic feet) grain; accommodation for 50 passengers in 1st class; crew of 72. Ran originally in Stinnes's South American service. November 1926, acquired by HaPAG (Hamburg-America Line). First on HaPAG's East Asian service, later transferred to the South American service. 1928, new turbine, service speed increased to 12 knots. 1932, sold to Serv. Mar. Romania, Braila, and renamed ARDEAL. 11 June 1942, torpedoed by Soviet U boat A 5 in the Black Sea, and beached. 1945, refloated by the Soviets and repaired in Odessa. 1948, returned to Romania (managed by Sovromtransport). 1963, scrapped in Romania [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie, Bd. 2: 1907-1926 (Herford: Koehler, 1980), pp. 150-151 (photograph); Duncan Haws, Merchant Fleets in Profile, vol. 4: The ships of the Hamburg America, Adler and Carr Lines (Cambridge: Patrick Stevens, 1980) p. 143, no. 519 (silhouette)].-
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 23 September 1998]
Emily F. Whitman (schooner)
The schooner Emily F. Whitman was wrecked at Nushagak in 1912. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emily Farnum
The American ship Emily Farnum, 1,194 tons, sailed from San Francisco for Departure Bay, November 12, 1875, in command of Captain Austin, with nine passengers, nineteen crew, and one hundred tons of railroad iron. She had fine weather until the sixteenth, when a heavy southeast gale raged, during which the cargo shifted and the ship lost considerable canvas. On the eighteenth the wind increased, accompanied by squalls and snow, and at midnight land was reported dead ahead. An attempt was at once made to stay the ship, which failed, and she was again hauled to the wind, but, in endeavoring to weather Destruction Island, a heavy sea drove the vessel toward the rocks, and at 12:30 she struck heavily. The port anchor was let go and the main and mizzen mast cut away. An effort was also made to launch the boats, but they were destroyed by the force of the waves. The foremast was then cut away, forming a bridge to the rocks to the leeward. At 2:00 A.M. the vessel parted amidships, the top part of her house, to which
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emily Farnum
The American ship Emily Farnum, 1,194 tons, sailed from San Francisco for Departure Bay, November 12, 1875, in command of Captain Austin, with nine passengers, nineteen crew, and one hundred tons of railroad iron. She had fine weather until the sixteenth, when a heavy southeast gale raged, during which the cargo shifted and the ship lost considerable canvas. On the eighteenth the wind increased, accompanied by squalls and snow, and at midnight land was reported dead ahead. An attempt was at once made to stay the ship, which failed, and she was again hauled to the wind, but, in endeavoring to weather Destruction Island, a heavy sea drove the vessel toward the rocks, and at 12:30 she struck heavily. The port anchor was let go and the main and mizzen mast cut away. An effort was also made to launch the boats, but they were destroyed by the force of the waves. The foremast was then cut away, forming a bridge to the rocks to the leeward. At 2:00 A.M. the vessel parted amidships, the top part of her house, to which
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emmett Felitz (sealing Schooner)
At Seattle the sealing schooner Emmett Felitz, fifty feet long and seventeen feet beam, for the Neah Bay Indians, who have since operated her as a sealer. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.393.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emperor Of Port Mcnicoll
Name of Nootka, Canadian Adventurer and Iquites. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w p. 344.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empire Helford
See LITUANIA.
Citation:
Empress Of Asia (liner)
More well-known vessels in peacetime trade from Northwest ports were lost as a result of enemy action in 1942. The largest of these was the 16,908-ton quadruple-screw mail liner Empress of Asia, formerly in the Vancouver-Oriental service of the Canadian Pacific, which was sunk by Japanese aircraft off Singapore on February 5. (Late in 1951 the underwriters rights in the wreckage were purchased by the International Salvage Association, Ltd., who removed the wreckage for scrap.) Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 510.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Asia (liner)
The Canadian Pacific Railway continued to operate its splendid trans-Pacific liners Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia, and these were joined in 19@2 by two additional steamships, the Empress of Canada, built by Fairfield, and the Empress of Australia, formerly the German liner Tripitz. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 318.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Asia (liner)
The two great C. P. R. trans -Pacific liners Empress Of Asia and Empress of Russia, taken over as armed merchant cruisers in 1914, had been returned to company service in 1916 and maintained regular commercial sailings throughout 1917. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1917, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966., p. 289.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Asia (liner)
By far the finest of the new vessels to enter service to the Pacific Northwest in 1913 were the splendid new Canadian Pacific trans-Pacific liners Empress of Russia and Empress of Asia, both with dimensions of 570 x 68 x 42 (their overall length being 600 feet), fitted with four steam turbines of 19,000 shaft horsepower driving quadruple screws, and six double-ended and four single-ended coal fired boilers. These handsome three-funnelled steamships were the first large liners to be built with cruiser sterns. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p224. The Empress of Asia, 16,908 tons, was launched by the same company on November 23, 1912, leaving Liverpool on her maiden voyage June 14, 1913. She was also requisitioned for armed patrol service the following year, returning to company service from 1916 to 1918, and again following the end of hostilities. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p22
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Australia
See DE GRASSE.
Citation:
Empress Of Australia (liner)
The Empress of Australia, built by Vulcan in 1914, was also a three-stacker with two masts, but her Teutonic design presented a bulkier silhouette than that of the British-built Empresses. She was also noticeable for her elliptical stern, being the only liner of the post -war C. P. R. fleet to be so designed. She was a 22,000-ton vessel with dimensions of 590 x 75 x 42, with an overall length of 615 feet. Her six turbines and twin screws gave her a cruising speed of 18 knots. She carried 1, 100 passengers and a crew of 520. As the Tripitz she had been fitted with a special royal suite for the Kaiser and it was said that he had selected this splendid new liner to be his royal yacht for the triumphal cruise he hoped to make after the German victory' It is ironic that, although she never served under the German colors, she was commissioned a royal yacht in later years, carrying the British King George V and Queen Elizabeth to Canada in 1939.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine Histo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Britain (1)
The "Empress of Britain" was built for the Canadian Pacific Line by Fairfield Shipbuilding, Glasgow in 1906. She was a 14,189 gross ton vessel, length 548.8ft x beam 65.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 310-1st, 470-2nd and 750-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/11/1905 she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec on 5/5/1906. Both the "Empress of Britain" and her sister ship, the ill-fated "Empress of Ireland" were the fastest ships on the Canada service at the time. On 22/7/1912, she rammed and sank the SS Helvetia in fog off Cape Magdeleine in the lower St Lawrence River. In 1914 she was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser and joined Admiral Stoddart's squadron in the S.Atlantic. She later patrolled between Cape Finisterre and the Cape Verde Islands. In May 1915 she was recommisioned as a troop transport and carried more than 110,000 troops to the Dardanelles, Egypt and India as well as Canadian and US expeditionary forces across the N.Atlantic. On 12/12/1915 while passing through the Straits of Gibraltar, she collided with and sank a Greek steamer. In March 1919 she resumed the Liverpool - St.John NB service for one round voyage and was then converted from coal to oil fuel and her passenger accommodation was modernised. On 1/9/1920 she returned to the Liverpool - Quebec service and in Oct.1922 commenced running between Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec. In 1924 she was renamed "Montroyal" and her accommodation altered to carry 600-cabin and 800-3rd class passengers, returning to the Liverpool - Quebec service on 19/4/1924. In 1926 her accommodation was again altered to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class and she made eight trips a year through 1926 and the following year was transferred to the Antwerp - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec route. She commenced her final voyage from Antwerp on 7/9/1929 and was then laid up after making a total of 190 round voyages on the North Atlantic. On 17/6/1930 she was sold to the Stavanger Shipbreaking Co. and was scrapped. The owner of the Sola Strand Hotel bought the lounge from the shipbreakers and incorporated it into his hotel as the Montroyal Ballroom. The beautiful woodwork is still a feature of this building which now houses the Norwegian School for Hotel Management. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1309] [Canadian Pacific by George Musk]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 November 1997]
Empress Of Britain (2)
The turbine ship EMPRESS OF BRITAIN (II) was built for the Canadian Pacific Line by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow (ship #530), keel laid 28 November 1928, launched 11 June 1930. 42,348 tons; 231,8 x 29,7 meters (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts, cruiser stern; quadruple-screw propulsion (single-reciprocating steam turbine engines), service speed 24 knots (maximum 25.5 knots); passenger accommodation: 465 in 1st class, 260 in tourist class, and 470 in 3rd class; crew of 740. 27 May 1931, maiden voyage, Southampton-Cherbourg-Quebec. May-June 1931, record passages, Cherbourg-Father Point (both ways). May 1936, passenger accommodation: cabin, tourist, 3rd class. 17 June 1939, transported King George VI and Queen Elizabeth from St. John's, Newfoundland, to Southampton after their Canadian tour. 2 September 1939, last voyage, Southampton-Quebec (100 roundtrip voyages on the North Atlantic). 25 November 1939, troop transport. 26 October 1940, bombed and set on fire by German aircraft 70 miles northwest of Ireland; taken in tow by the Polish destroyer BURZA; 28 October 1940, torpedoed twice by German U-Boot U32 at 55.16 N 09.50 W; 49 dead [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 3 (1979), , pp. 1298 (photograph) and 1319, vol. 5 (1980), p. 1835 (photograph);; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation,Bd. 3: 1924-1935 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), pp. 166-167 (photograph)].. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 March 1998]
Empress Of Canada
The turbine ship EMPRESS OF CANADA was built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow (ship #528), and launched for the Canadian Pacific Line on 17 August 1920. 21,517 tons; 191,10 (199,02) x 23,74 meters/627 (653) x 77.9 feet (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts, clipper stern; twin-screw propulsion (steam turbine, single-reduction engines), service speed 18 knots, 20 maximum; passenger accommodation: 488 in 1st class, 106 in 2nd class, 238 in 3rd class, and 926 in steerage (Asian voyages); crew of 530. 5 May 1922, maiden voyage, Falmouth-Suez Canal-Hong Kong-Vancouver; then in the Vancouver-Yokahama service. 1 November 1928, sailed Vancouver- Glasgow; single-reduction steam turbine engines replaced by double- reduction steam turbines. 28 August 1929, 1 roundtrip voyage, Southampton-Cherbourg-Quebec. 18 September 1929, sailed Southampton- Cherbourg-New York-Panama Canal-Vancouver; returned to Vancouver-Yokahama service. 29 November 1939, troop transport. 14 March 1943, bound from Durban to England, torpedoed and sunk by the Italian submarine LEONARDO DA VINCI, at lat 01 13 S, lon 09 57, approximately 400 miles south of Cape Palmas, West Africa; 392 lives lost [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 2: 1913-1923 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), pp. 146-147 (2 photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 1318]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 March 1998]
Empress Of Canada (liner)
By the end of 1939 the historic British Columbia Naval Base of Esquimalt was on a full -time war footing, with tremendous expansion of its facilities under way. Young men from all parts of Canada poured in for training and staid Victoria became a lively Navy town. The Canadian Pacific trans - Pacific liners Empress of Canada of 1922 and Empress of Japan (2) of 1930 were requisitioned by the Admiralty as troopships and refitted for their wartime roles at Esquimalt, the name of the latter vessel being changed to Empress of Scotland (2) following Japan's entry into the war. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Canada (liner)
The Canadian Pacific trans -Pacific liner Empress of Canada was torpedoed and sunk March 13 by a German submarine in the South Atlantic while on a voyage from Durban, South Africa for the Urilted Kingdom in trooping service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 519.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Canada (liner)
Canadian Pacific Railways, having received back its splendid trans -Pacific liners Empress of Russia and Empress of Asia (late in 1919), launched the twin-screw turbine liner Empress of Canada at the Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Govan in August, 1920. This 21,516ton vessel with dimensions of 625 x 78 x 42 entered service 21 months later. No additions were made to the railway company's B. C. coast fleet in the immediate post-war years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 308.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Canada (liner)
The Empress of Canada, launched at Govan in 1920, was a vessel of 21,516 tons with dimensions of 625 x 78 x 42, her twin screws being driven by eight geared turbines of 26,000 shaft horsepower, giving her a speed of 20 knots. She had accommodations for 1,650 passengers and carried a crew of 560. Although larger than the Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia, she was designed along similar lines, with cruiser stern, straight bow, three funnels and two masts. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 318.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Canada (liner)
The Empress of Canada returned to Vancouver late in 1929 after having been re -engined by the Fairfield yard, her speed being notably increased. The two vessels in 1930 inaugurated a Honolulu service, stopping there on their outward voyages to the Orient and returning direct. The Empress of France had substituted for the Canada during her absence. A pair of handsome sister-ships, Princess Elizabeth and Princess Joan, also arrived at their home port of Victoria from Oreat Britain in 1930 for the C. P. R. coastal service, also products of the Fairfield yard. These 365-foot three-funnel vessels were driven by twin screws and quadruple -expansion engines giving them a service speed of 16V2 knots. First used in the famous C. P. R. midnight sailings between Victoria and Vancouver, they also became known to thousands of tourists as the last of the, C. P. R. steamers to operate on the winter Seattle-Victoria run. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seatt
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Canada (steamer)
A most spectacular marine mishap occurred in 1929, although it was fortunately not one resulting in fatalities or heavy damage. Inbound from the Orient during the season of October fogs, the steamship Empress of Canada strayed from her course and grounded on Albert Head, her bows shoving over the rocks and almost into a farmer's pasture, scattering his cows in a state of great surprise and agitation. She remained fast for two days, with much concern that a southeasterly gale might come up, in which case she would doubtless have been lost. Fortunately the weather remained favorable and the Salvage King and other vessels were successful in towing her off. Following repairs at the Esquimalt graving dock she returned to her trans -Pacific run. As a result of this accident the Canadian government subsequently erected a lighthouse and fog signal at Albert Head. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 404.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of China
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.
Citation:
Empress Of China
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., I, p. 145. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 16. Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. vii. Royal Mail Steamer, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 383.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of China (liner)
The three original Empress liners of the Canadian Pacific's trans -Pacific mail service, although now veterans of well over a decade of the most demanding service, still performed superbly. In July the English mails reached Vancouver late, the Empress of China being held at her pier three days and two hours beyond her scheduled sailing time. This amazing ship then proceeded to make up three days time on the voyage to Hong Kong, where she arrived seven hours and 37 minutes within her contract time. The splendid Empresses could not afford to let down, for in July the first of the new Pacific Mail liners, offering competitive service from San Francisco, went into commission. The Korea salied from Yokohama on her second eastern crossing with orders to omit the usual call at Honolulu and make every effort to capture the Pacific speed record. She arrived at San Francisco on October 28, having covered 4,537 miles in 10 days, 15 hours, 15 minutes, maintaining an average speed of 17.8 knots. This was the highest avera
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of China (liner)
The Empress of China was caught in a typhoon two days out of Yokohama in December, losing some of her upperworks and a lifeboat, which was smashed by a heavy sea. Two seamen were caught by a sea which swept her decks and, although saved from going overboard, they later died of the injuries sustained in the accident. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 84.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of China (liner)
The first loss among the three original White Empresses of the Canadian Pacific trans -Pacific service occurred in 1911 with the stranding of the Empress of China on Mera Reef, Tokyo Bay, on July 27, 1911, the accident taking place near the scene of the Dakota's loss in the spring of 1907. The liner was steaming at three-quarter speed through fog when she struck. As soon as word of her plight reached Yokohama, her port of destination, the cruisers Aso and Soya were dispatched to her assistance by the Japanese ministry of marine, the warships taking off her passengers and mails. The Empress was refloated in December after determined efforts which included the dredging of a new channel to deep water. She was not returned to service, however, being sold in September of the following year by the underwriters to Sasso Shojiro, a copper and brass dealer of Yokohama, for $65,000 for scrapping. Although the yachtlike Empresses were still handsome and dependable vessels, they had long since been exceeded in size and
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of France (1)
The first "Empress of France" was built by Wm Beardmore & Co Ltd.,Glasgow in 1913 as the "Alsatian" for the Allan Line. She was an 18,481 gross ton ship, length 571.4ft x beam 72.4ft, two funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 18 knots. She was the first North Atlantic liner with a cruiser stern. There was accommodation for 287-1st, 504-2nd and 848-3rd class passengers. Launched on 22/3/1913 as the "Alsatian" she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John NB for the Allan Line on 17/1/1914. On 22/5/1914 she commenced her first Liverpool - Quebec voyage and on 17/7/1914 started her last voyage on this service. On 7/8/1914 she became an Armed Merchant Cruiser and joined the 10th Cruiser Squadron patrolling off the Shetland Islands. She became flagship for Admiral De Chair and later for Vice Admiral Tucker and was one of the first ships to be fitted with the new wireless direction finding apparatus. After the squadron was retired in 1917, she was returned to Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, who now managed the combined Allan line and Canadian Pacific fleets. On 28/9/1918 she commenced her first voyage from Liverpool to Canada and after a second voyage on this service, was refitted at Glasgow. She was renamed "Empress of France" on 4/4/1919 and on 26th Sept. that year commenced her first voyage under her new name from Liverpool to Quebec. On 3/5/1922 she commenced sailing between Southampton, Cherbourg and Quebec and on 31/5/1922 between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and Quebec. In 1924 she was converted from coal to oil fuel, and in July 1926 her accommodation became 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class and was altered again Jan.1927 to 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On 29/9/1927 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec voyage and on 8/9/1928, her last Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec voyage. On 31/10/1928 she left Southampton for Suez, Hong Kong and Vancouver and subsequently sailed on the Pacific until 17/10/1929 when she left Hong Kong for Liverpool. She started her final voyage from Southampton to Cherbourg and Quebec on 2/9/1931 and in Sept. of that year was laid up in the Clyde. She was scrapped at Dalmuir on 20/10/1934. In total, she had made 99 Atlantic voyages, 5 trans-Pacific, and 8 cruises as well as her war service. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1313] [Canadian Pacific - 100 years by George Musk]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 November 1997]
Empress Of France (2)
See DUCHESS OF BEDFORD.
Citation:
Empress Of India
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.
Citation:
Empress Of India (liner)
The Canadian Pacific liner Empress of India, not the fastest of the three white sisters of the railway company's trans - Pacific fleet (Empress of Japan was holder of the Blue Ribbon of the Pacific), received much acclaim in 1896 when she was popularly credited with having won a race with the United States cruiser Olympia, which had attained a speed of 21.69 knots on builder's trials in 1894. About 5:00 p. m. on January 22 the Olympia left Kobe for Nagasaki, the Em- press of India leaving for the same destination at 9:25 p. m. The next day, in beautiful weather, the liner overhauled and passed the cruiser, the achievement being duly noted in her log. The Empress was engaged in her frequent occupation of making up time with the English mails, while the Olympia, in those long-vanished days of stringent naval economies, was steaming at reduced speed with boiler pressures well below the maximum. There is little reason to believe the Olympia could not have passed the Empress of India had her commander been so incl
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of India (liner)
In March the C. P. R. liner Empress of India, on a regular trans-Pacific voyage in charge of Capt. Marshall, encountered what was probably the most severe storm she was ever to meet with; much of her bridge was carried away and considerable damage done to her upperworks and boats, but she was thoroughly capable of weathering almost anything the ocean had to offer and, as usual, delivered her mails at Vancouver on time. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of India (liner)
In the British Columbia Historical Quarterly, January, 1940, W. Kay Lamb writes of the Empress liners, In the course of years they established a record for adherence to schedule which has probably never been equalled on the seven seas. Though the mail contract called for only a twenty-eight-day service, the Canadian Pacific increased this to a departure every twenty-one days between April and September, which raised the number of sailings to fifteen per year. Yet for no less than fifteen years - from 1891 to 1906 - no Empress ever missed a sailing or was ever penalized for the late arrival of her mails. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 43
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of India (royal Mail Steamship)
The new and the old, Canadian Pacific Railway's Royal Mail Steamship Empress of Indian passing the wreck of the steamer Beaver near Vancouver, in 1890. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Empress of India at the docks at Vancouver. PM (October, 1891), p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of India (steamer)
The steamship Empress of India first of the Canadian Pacific Railway's Royal Mail line to the Orient, arrived at Vancouver, April 28th, in charge of Capt. O. Marshall. The dimensions of the India, as well as of her sister ships, the Empress of Japan and Empress of China, are, length four hundred and eighty-five feet, beam fifty-one feet, depth of hold thirty-six feet, gross tonnage 5,700. They were built by the Naval Construction & Armament Company at Barrow-in-Furness, James Fowler superintending the construction of the machinery. The Empress of India sailed from Liverpool, February 7th, with a large party of excursionists bound around the world, going first to Gibraltar, thence to Naples and Marseilles, through the Suez Canal, stopping at Ceylon and Colombo, then across the Bay of Bengal to Penang, thence to Singapore, China and Japan, and from there across the Pacific. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Ireland
The "Empress of Ireland" was involved in one of the worst peacetime shipping disasters of all time. She was a 14,191 gross ton ship, built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co.Ltd, Glasgow in 1906 for the Canadian Pacific Railway Co, which later became CP Ships. Her details were - length 548.9ft x beam 65.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 310-1st, 470-2nd and 750-3rd class passengers. She was a sister ship to the first "Empress of Britain". Launched on 27/1/1906, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec on 29/6/1906. She made a total of 95 round voyages on the North Atlantic service, but on 29/5/1914, she was sunk in collision. The collision occurred at approx 2.30am when most of the 1,054 passengers and 413 crew were asleep. A few hours out of Quebec, while in the St Lawrence River, she was rammed and sunk by the 6,000 ton Norwegian collier "Storstad". In less than 15 minutes the liner sank with the loss of 1014 lives, including a large contingent of Salvation Army delegates who were on their way to a conference in the UK, and within four miles of the riverbank. Over 400 were saved by the "Eureka" and the "Lady Evelyn". There was much conflicting evidence given at the subsequent enquiry, but it was established that the two vessels had sighted each other when more than three miles apart, before fog descended rapidly. When next seen, the collier, having altered course, was only feet away and collision was unavoidable. In 1964, the wreck was located by skin divers and many items from the wreck were salved and are now preserved at the Musee Maritime Bernier, L'Islet, Quebec. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1309] [Canadian Pacific 100 years by George Musk}
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 November 1997]
Empress Of Japan
Capt. Samuel Robinson, master of the C. P. R. transPacific liner Empress of Japan, retired in 1931. He was captain of Empress of Australia in 1923 when she was tied up at Yokohama during the great earthquake of that year, he and his officers and crew performing valiant rescue work. Empress of Japan, in April, had reached Victoria from the Orient breaking all speed records for the North Pacific crossing from Yokohama and carrying the King and Queen of Siam, the ruler being on his way to the eastern United States for an eye operation. Also on board for that memorable voyage was General Sir Arthur Currie, chancellor of Canada's famed McGill University, who was once a country school teacher at Sidney, near Victoria, and later a Victoria real estate salesman before entering World War I service and rising to command of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 410.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan
Capt. Samuel Robinson, master of the C. P. R. transPacific liner Empress of Japan, retired in 1931. He was captain of Empress of Australia in 1923 when she was tied up at Yokohama during the great earthquake of that year, he and his officers and crew performing valiant rescue work. Empress of Japan, in April, had reached Victoria from the Orient breaking all speed records for the North Pacific crossing from Yokohama and carrying the King and Queen of Siam, the ruler being on his way to the eastern United States for an eye operation. Also on board for that memorable voyage was General Sir Arthur Currie, chancellor of Canada's famed McGill University, who was once a country school teacher at Sidney, near Victoria, and later a Victoria real estate salesman before entering World War I service and rising to command of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 410.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan (2) (liner)
Although new construction was light during this period, a few notable vessels made their appearance at Northwest ports in 1929 and 1930. The most important was the 26,000 -ton twin-screw turbine liner Empress of Japan (2), launched by Fairfield at Govan in 1929 and completed in 1930 for the trans-Pacific service of the Canadian Pacific. This splendid three-stacker, propelled by six turbines of 30,000 horsepower at a r-rwsing speed of 24 knots, compared favorably with any of the Atlantic liners and was the undisputed queen of the Pacific, being the largest, fastest and most luxurious vessel operating from a Pacific Coast port, and maintaining that record until the advent of the postWorld War II liners of the P. & 0. - Orient Lines. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan (liner)
With the arrival of the large new liners at Vancouver the last of the gallant pioneer Empresses, the slim, clipperbowed Empress of Japan was laid up, having been in commission for a generation with her original engines and boilers, having crossed the Pacific 315 times, and having held the speed record on that ocean for 22 years. It seems fair to say that the exploits of the first Empress of Japan on the Pacific deserve to take a place in maritime history with those of the legendary Mauretania which defended the Blue Ribbon of the Atlantic for a similar period of years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 318.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan (liner)
The long idle Pacific greyhound of the 1890's, Empress of Japarn was scrapped at North Vancouver, her graceful figurehead being enshrined at Stanley Park, Vancouver, where it may still be seen. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 376.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan (liner)
On January 1, 1911, it was noted that the Empress of Japan had completed her 100th round voyage between British Columbia and the Orient. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Japan (royal Mail Steamship)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 390.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Russia
The "Empress of Russia" was built by Fairfield & Co, Govan in 1912 for Canadian Pacific, she was a 16,810 gross ton ship, length 570ft x beam 68ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 284-1st, 100-2nd and 800-steerage class passengers. Launched on 28.8.1912, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for Hong Kong on 1/4/1913. She then commenced sailings to Vancouver via Shanghai, Nagasaki, Kobe, and Yokohama. On 22.8.1914 she was requisitioned at Hong Kong and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. Used to blockade German merchant ships in the Philippines, and later transferred to the Indian Ocean. On 13.11.1914 she met the Australian cruiser HMAS Sydney and took aboard 230 survivors from the German cruiser "Emden" and was later used for patrol duties in the Red Sea. She was paid off at Bombay in October 1915 and returned to Hong Kong for refit before being returned to the Pacific service on 12.2.1916. In 1918 she was requisitioned again and used to transport US troops across the Atlantic, and finally left Liverpool on 12.1.1919 for Havre, and Suez to Hong Kong. She then returned to the trans Pacific service and made 310 crossings before being again requisitioned in 1940 as a troopship. She was used on the UK - Freetown - Cape Town - Suez route and returned via Cape Town - Newport News and Halifax to bring Canadian troops to England. In 1943 she was used to support the North Africa landings and later the same year made a special voyage to Gothenburg to exchange prisoners of war. After various trooping duties, she was laid up at Gareloch until June 1945 when she was sent to Barrow in Furness to be refitted for the repatriation of Canadian troops after the war. However, on 8th September she was gutted by fire, declared a total loss and scrapped. [Canadian Pacific-100 Years by George Musk] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 March 1998}
Empress Of Russia
Again war service of various types claimed vessels well known in Northwest maritime trade. Another of the beautiful three-funneled white Empresses of the Vancouver-Oriental service Empress of Russia, was requisitioned late in the year after completing her 307th crossing and departed from the Pacific, never to return. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Russia (liner)
The two great new Empress liners, still under construction for the Canadian Pacific trans - Pacific service, had the interesting misfortune of being in collision with each other at Glasgow prior to their completion. The Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia were at the fitting-out dock of the Fairfield yards when a heavy gale struck the area in December. The Empress of Russia broke her moorings and drifted afoul of her sister. Both vessels were considerably damaged about the upperworks. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Russia (liner)
By far the finest of the new vessels to enter service to the Pacific Northwest in 1913 were the splendid new Canadian Pacific trans-Pacific liners Empress of Russia and Empress of Asia, both with dimensions of 570 x 68 x 42 (their overall length being 600 feet), fitted with four steam turbines of 19,000 shaft horsepower driving quadruple screws, and six double-ended and four single-ended coal fired boilers. These handsome three-funnelled steamships were the first large liners to be built with cruiser sterns. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p224. The Empress of Russia, 16,810 tons, was launched by the Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. at Govan August 28, 1912, leaving Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Vancouver via Suez, Hong Kong and Yokohama on April 1, 1913. She arrived at Victoria from Yokohama on June 7, having taken eight days, 18 hours, 31 minutes, Yokohama Breakwater to William Head - a record which stood for nine years. The f
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Russia (steamship)
The Canadian Pacific steamship Empress of Russia of the former trans -Pacific fleet was swept by fire on September 8 while being refitted for commercial service at Barrow-in Furness near Liverpool. P. F. Cooke, an engineering officer, and Leslie J. DUlon, ship's electrician, were killed. Fifteen fire companies fought the fire for nine hours before it was brought under control, and the liner was so badly damaged she was subsequently broken up for scrap at the same port. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H.W.McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 527.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Empress Of Scotland
See KAISERIN AUGUSTE VICTORIA.
Citation:
Enetai (ferry)
Three of the older Washington State Ferries vessels, displaced by the arrival of the new super ferries, were sold during 1968. These were the steel-hulled Enetai and Willapa (ex-Santa Rosa and Fresno of 1927), which had been running-mates on the Seattle-Bremerton route and the wooden Leschi of 1913. The Enetai was sold to Donald Clair of Oakland (Marine Diesel Supply & Equipment Co.), for $21,768 to replace the Chippewa, which had been badly damaged by fire. The Willapa went to the Gentry Development Co. of Martinez, California for $22,222. Jim Poor of Cordova was high bidder among the 16 who made offers on the Leschi and purchased her for $20,190. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.45.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Erawan (freighter)
The 461-foot Sunderlund-built British freighter Erawan and the new 485-foot Japanese container ship Sun Diamond collided in the early morning hours of September 25 at the mouth of Burrard Inlet. The Sun Diamond was outbound from Vancouver for Seattle, while the Erawan was inbound in ballast. The Japanese vessel struck the Erawan amidships, tearing out a large section of her hull on the starboard side between holds 3 and 4 and rupturing fuel tanks which spilled more than 100 tons of bunker oil into English Bay, some of it contaminating nearby beaches. The two vessels were locked together for an hour with the tug Gulf Jean holding them from drifting ashore. At a later hearing it was determined that radical change of course to port by the Erawan was the direct cause of the collision, but that both vessels were moving at excessive speed, the Sun Diamond was cutting too close to the Point Grey bell-buoy, leaving insufficient sea-room for an inbound vessel to pass to starboard, neither vessel sounded whistle signal
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Erik Foss (tug)
The Erik Foss was built in 1908 at Bandon, Oregon, by J. H. Price and was given the name Gleaner. She was 97 feet in length with a 23 foot beam. She worked for the Gardiner Mill Company of Gardiner, Oregon and perhaps other owners and was sent to San Francisco for towing work there. After several changes in ownership the Gleaner worked for the War Shipping Administration during World War II and was eventaully purchased by Foss and given the name Erik Foss. In May of 1976 the vessel was drydocked and put into lay-up. In March of 1977 she was sold and was regiven the name Gleaner by her new owners. Michael Skalley, The Erik Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 183.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Erik Foss (tugboat)
Maritime memories, built in 1908, acquired by Foss in 1952, The Marine Digest. June 29, 1985, p. 6. This vessel was sold in 1979 and later renamed Gleaner. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ernest F Ladd (tug)
This addition to the B. C. towing fleet typified the dramatic post-war progress in this industry north of the international boundary. Lloyd B. Gore purchased the 119-foot Mikimiki tug Ernest F. Ladd of 1,200-horsepower, built at Quincy, Mass. in 1944 for the U. S. Navy, and added her to his Young & Gore Tugboat Co. fleet as the Lloyd B. Gore. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 563.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ernest H. Meyer (freighter)
The Ernest H. Meyer (launched by Albina at Portland in 1918 as the Danish Skjold and taken over by the Shipping Board as Point Lobos), last operated by the Portland Steamship Co., sold to L. G. Gray & Co. of San Francisco and renamed Morlen. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ernest Reyer (french Bark)
Wrecked at the mouth of the Quinault River, December, 1901, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 22.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ethomas Crosby, Up And Down The North Pacific Coas
Four master in the Columbia River. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eugene F Moran (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eureka (freighter)
The Eureka, (the Portland-built former Shipping Board Glendoyle of 1919), sold by the Hammond Lumber Co. to the Transpacific Steamship Co. and placed under Panamanian registry. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eureka (freighter)
The steel freighter Eureka left San Francisco August 16 with a volatile cargo consisting of 250 tons of blasting powder, 200 tons of gasoline, a large quantity of oil and 56 large carboys of nitric acid. Off Mendocino Head, about two o'clock on the morning of August 19, beset by 50-mile winds and heavy seas, the vessel was set on fire by a carboy of acid which broke loose from its lashings on deck and smashed. In a flash the ropes securing the rest of the acid containers were in flames and the carboys adrift on the deck, the flames fanned by the high wind. The crew, led by Capt. G. Golightly and Chief Mate William Reed, battled the flames on deck, choked by the fumes of hot nitric acid, aware of the cargo of explosives stored just below. They succeeded in getting the carboys of acid overboard and the flames extinguished, bringing the Eureka safely into Bellingham seven days later. Probably few vessels have had a narrower escape from complete disaster. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H. W. McCurdy Ma
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Euterpre (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Evergreen State (ferry)
The Evergreen State, Washington State ferry failed to reverse her engines and rammed the Anacortes ferry slip in July causing damage to six cars and to the wingwalls of the pier. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ewa (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century,p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Expo Spirit (hovercraft)
New Expo Flight Takes off, Marine Digest. May 31, 1986, p. 19-20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F
3 (Submarine) - Another notable development in the evolution of vessel construction in the Northwest was the completion by the Seattle Construction & Drydock Co. early in the summer of 1912 of two F Class submarines, the F- 3 and F- 4, for the United States Navy. Both submarines successfully passed their tests in June, attaining surface speeds somewhat in excess of 14 knots on the mile run and of slightly better than 13 knots for the 24-hour endurance trials. The craft were given diving tests to a maximum of 200 feet, carrying crews of only eight picked men for the deeper dives. Although meeting the standards of that time, the F boats, equipped with gasoline engines, were soon made obsolete by the rapid emergence of the diesel engine in the next few years, and their service with the fleet was limited. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. A. Kilburn (steam Schooner)
The passenger-carrying steam schooner F. A. Kilburn, a 997 ton wooden vessel with 1,000 horse power (Fulton) triple-expansion engine built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven, Calif. in 1904, was sold by the Maritime Investment Co. of San Francisco to the North Pacific Steamship Co. for Portland- San Francisco service, this company also acquiring the 484-ton steam schooner Eureka, also fitted for the passenger and general cargo trade, built by William Muller at Wilmington, Calif. in 1900. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. A. Warner (steamer)
The Lake type Shipping Board 2,333-ton steel steamship F. A Warner, built at Ecorse, Michigan in 1918 as Cotton Hand was sold by the Pacific States Lumber Co. of San Francisco to the Coos Bay Lumber Co., being renamed Lumberman. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. B. Jones (steamer)
The 143 -foot sternwheel steamer F. B. Jones, built at Portland in 1901 and one of the units of the Willamette & Columbia River Transportation Co. fleet taken over by the Shaver interests, was abandoned at Portland. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. B. Jones (steamer)
The 143 -foot sternwheel steamer F. B. Jones, built at Portland in 1901 and one of the units of the Willamette & Columbia River Transportation Co. fleet taken over by the Shaver interests, was abandoned at Portland. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. B. Jones (steamer)
F. B. Jones, 303-ton freight and towing steamer, 143 feet in length, by T. Ellingson for the Willamette and Columbia River Transportation Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1901. W. H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 69.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1901. W. H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 69.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. B. Jones (steamer)
The stern-wheel steamer F. B. Jones, while on a night run on the lower Columbia in November, was rammed and sunk by the tank steamer Asuncion, being later raised and repaired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 137.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. B. Jones (sternwheeler)
1907 Sternwheel, 303 tons, 143' long, built at Portland in 1901. Rammed and sunk by tanker Asuncion on lower Columbia River; abandoned at Portland in 1937. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. D. J. V. 104 (tug)
F.D.J.V. 104 and F.D.J.V. 105, unusual shallow-draft pusher type tugs, designed by E. A. Drake and built by Benson's Shipyard, Coal Harbor, for Foundation-Dravo Joint Ventures. The 40 x 16-foot vessels, powered by twin 340-horsepower diesel engines, were designed to handle self-dumping earth fill barges at the High Arrow Dam project on the upper Columbia River and were transported to the site in sections for reassembly. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XX.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. E. Lovejoy (freighter)
The most notable vessel to be added to the inland freight fleet of Puget Sound, the welded steel diesel F. E. Lovejoy, was launched from the Reliable Welding Works yard at Olympia in April for the Puget Sound Freight Lines. The new craft, with an overall length of 178.4, beam of 36 and molded depth of 15 feet, displaced 1,500 tons when fully loaded (800 tons) arid was powered by a six -cylinder direct reversible Fairbanks-Morse diesel developing 1,200 horsepower at 300 revolutions per minute. On her trials in July she maintained an average speed of 11.4 knots with a displacement of over 1,000 tons. Loading was accomplished by a 10-ton marine elevator providing access to the two cargo decks and gasoline lift - trucks of three - ton capacity designed to pick up loaded lift boards on the pier, drive them onto the elevator, and stow them in the cargo spaces. Two large king posts with cargo booms just forward of the bridge provided cargo-handling facilities for lumber, pipe and other commodities not adaptable to l
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. E. Lovejoy (motor Vessel)
Another colorful era of Northwest shipping history ended in June when Puget Sound Freight Lines' motor vessel F. E. Lovejoy, last of a fleet of inland freightboats which once numbered in the scores and plied the length and breadth of Puget Sound, was placed in layup on Lake Union. She was moored alongside her old running-mate, the Indian, and the Warrior, which had been converted to a barge. All three had been displaced by tugs and more modern barges, and the company's fleet of 175 trucks on shore. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.94.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. G. Reeve (passenger Boat)
F. G. Reeve, wooden passenger and freight steamer, 87 tons, 101.7 x 22.5 x 6.4, with 325-horsepower triple-expansion engine, by John Martinolich, Dockton, for the Washington Route of Capt. F. G. Reeve; the engine of this steamer was originally in the Inland Flyer (later the Mohawk), which was dismantled in 1916, the hull serving for a time as a fish receiving barge at Neah Bay. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H. S. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. M. Slade (schooner)
The four-masted schooner F. M. Slade of 1900, after stranding on the Peruvian coast in December near the termination of a voyage from Grays Harbor, was sold to Peruvian owners and placed back in service as the Helvetia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p225.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. Missler
The F. Missler is one of the more famous "ghost" ships in emigration/immigration lore. No ship by that name existed. The confusion stems from the fact that F. Missler was a 19th century travel agent operating out of Bremen who established a good working relationship with the North German Lloyd shipping line. Probably your best bet is to obtain a list of vessels arriving at Quebec on the date in question, determine which of those took on passengers in Bremen and search the respective lists to find your relation. -
Citation: [Posted to the ShipsList by Allyn Brosz - 30 March 1998]
F. P. Armstrong (steamer)
The well known navigator of the Columbia's headwaters, Capt. Arm- strong, built the stem-wheeler F. P. Armnstrong, 126 tons, 81 x 20 x 4, at Spillimacheen for Burns & Jordan. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. P. Green (schooner)
An exciting episode occurred at Port Angeles in 1862. The schooner F. P. Green, Capt. Edward Howard, was seized by Deputy Collector Moore. Howard had just bought the schooner in San Francisco, and intended to have her papers changed at Port Angeles; but, as he arrived late at night, the Deputy Collector told him to come up in the morning. Before daylight the Shubrick was alongside and towed the schooner to the cutter Joe Lane, then lying in the harbor. Captain Howard was informed that the schooner had been confiscated, and ordered ashore. Bonds were offered but were refused. As Howard was the owner of the schooner and cargo, he determined to secure the vessel; so that night about eleven o'clock he quietly borrowed the custom-house boat and sculled out to the craft, locked the marshal in the cabin, woke the crew, slipped the cable, and set sail for Victoria, where he waited for the return of Collector Smith, who was in Washington, the Deputy Collector at Port Angeles meanwhile offering a reward of $1,000 for t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. S. Loop (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner F. S. Loop of 1907, following numerous changes of ownership, passed to Dr. W. J. Ross, the pet food manufacturer of Long Beach, California. Her steam engine replaced with a Liberty gasoline aircraft engine of World War I vintage, she was placed in operation off the Baja California coast canning sea lions for dogfood under a concession from the Mexican government. Her weird power plant, operating through an elaborate arrangement of reduction gears, was able to move her, but the fuel bills were said to be of such an appalling nature that she was actually operated in the dogfood trade under a pair of square sails from yards on her fore and mainmast; thus ending her career as what might be described a motor brig. She was laid up at San Francisco the following year and subsequently sold to Mexican owners as a barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 455.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. S. Loop (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner F. S. Loop, from Astoria for San Pedro, sprung a leak off the California coast and was towed to Eureka in a waterlogged condition. She was declared a constructive total loss, but was sold by the underwriters the following year and returned to service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. S. Loop (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner F. S. Loop of 1907, following numerous changes of ownership, passed to Dr. W. J. Ross, the pet food manufacturer of Long Beach, California. Her steam engine replaced with a Liberty gasoline aircraft engine of World War I vintage, she was placed in operation off the Baja California coast canning sea lions for dogfood under a concession from the Mexican government. Her weird power plant, operating through an elaborate arrangement of reduction gears, was able to move her, but the fuel bills were said to be of such an appalling nature that she was actually operated in the dogfood trade under a pair of square sails from yards on her fore and mainmast; thus ending her career as what might be described a motor brig. She was laid up at San Francisco the following year and subsequently sold to Mexican owners as a barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 455.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. S. Loop (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner F. S. Loop, from Astoria for San Pedro, sprung a leak off the California coast and was towed to Eureka in a waterlogged condition. She was declared a constructive total loss, but was sold by the underwriters the following year and returned to service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. W. Bailey
The ship F. W. Bailey went ashore January 8th three miles south of Point Lobos while en route to Puget Sound to load lumber for Australia. She sailed out of the Golden Gate, but the wind failed soon after clearing the heads, and she was obliged to anchor. The holding ground was poor, and, despite the efforts of the crew, she soon went on the rocks. L. R. Dyer, captain, Thomas Adams, mate, William Randolph, John Torlando, Peter Simpson, John Conway, J. C. Fielding, Joseph Lynch, and George Kinkley, were lost. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.122.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. W. L. No.1 (coal Barge)
The Waterhouse Lighterage Co., a subsidiary of Frank Waterhouse & Co., sold the last of its big coal barges to the Washington Tug & Barge Co. in April. The 140 x 40 foot barges F. W. L. No. 1 and F. W. L. No. 2 were the largest barges of their type on the coast, having a capacity of 850 tons each. The Washington Tug & Barge Co., which had previously taken over the Waterhouse barges Pacific No. 8, Chesley No. 9 and Chesley No. 11, thus had a total fleet of 36 large scows and barges, the largest in the Pacific Northwest. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.240-241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.a. Kilburn (steamer)
Wooden steamer; 2 decks, 2 masts; 997 tons; 201.2 x 29.7 x 20 feet; 23 crew; passenger and freight. Built in 1904 at Fairhaven, California. Operated prior to 1918 by North Pacific Steamship Company on Portland to California route. Sold to Mexican Fruit and Steamship Company, 1918. Burned off American Shoals Light, Florida, June 14, 1918. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.e. Lovejoy
Puget Sound Freight Lines. Marine Digest. June 29, 1985, p. 17.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.g. Reeves
Built at Dockton in 1916. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.k. Gustin (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.m. Slade (schooner)
The F. M. Slade, a four-masted schooncr of 737 tons and 950 M capacity, was built at Aberdeen. Wash., in 1900 by McWhinney & Cousins, for the Slade Lumber Co. She sailed in December,, 1913, from Grays Harbor for Supe , Peru, but got ashore fifty miles from her destination and after being floated was sold to Peruvian owners who repaired her and renamed ehr the Helvetia. Under this name she is listed until about 1920 when she disappears from the registers. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.m. Slade (schooner)
The F. M. Slade, a four-masted schooncr of 737 tons and 950 M capac- ity, was built at Aberdeen. Wash., in 1900 by McWhinney & Cousins, for the Slade Lumber Co. She sailed in December,, 1913, from Grays Harbor for Supe , Peru, but got ashore fifty miles from her destination and after being floated was sold to Peruvian owners who repaired her and renamed ehr the Helvetia. Under this name she is listed until about 1920 when she disappears from the registers. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.s.redfield (schooner)
F. S. Redfield, three-masted schooner of 469 tons, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1887, and operated under their houseflag. About 1910 she was acquired by Capt. John Backland of Seattle, who installed a gas engine, and traded to the Arctic with her. The F. S. Redfield was wrecked with a property loss of $20,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.s.redfield (schooner)
F. S. Redfield, three-masted schooner of 469 tons, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1887, and operated under their houseflag. About 1910 she was acquired by Capt. John Backland of Seattle, who installed a gas engine, and traded to the Arctic with her. The F. S. Redfield was wrecked with a property loss of $20,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Factor (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 652.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fair America
Seized by the Spanish. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., I, p. 102. Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast., p. 131, 161, 162, 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fair Princess
See CARINTHIA.
Citation:
Fair Sea (cruise Vessel)
Sitmar Cruises planning eight round trip cruises to Alaska from Seattle in the summer of 1986 including sailings by the vessel Fair Sea, formerly the Cunard liner Carinthia, The Marine Digest. November 16, 1985. p. 5. Without new cruise law local terminal unneeded, Fairsea, Seattle's only home ported cruise ship will transfer to Vancouver, B. C. in 1989, Marine Digest. March 19, 1988, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fair Sky
See FAIRSKY.
Citation:
Fairfield (tug)
The tug Fairfield of the Tacoma Tug & Barge Co lengthened two feet, 10 inches at the Puget Sound Dry Co., Quartermaster Harbor, under the direction of Martinolich, the rebuild giving her more free-board and increasing her bunker capacity by 100 percent.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 120-121.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairfield (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
H.M. Delany, Pacific Coast Steamschooners, The Sea Chest. II (September, 1977). Built in Tacoma in 1889. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. E. T. Short, The Fairhaven, after many years, The Tacoma Times. November 22, 1934. Steamer Fairhaven over fifty years ago, The Tacoma Times. November 24, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
Built in Tacoma over fifty years ago, The Tacoma Times. November 24, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
The March gales on Puget Sound caught the stern-wheel steamer Fairhauen of the Island Transportation Co. while she was attempting to make a landing at Coupeville, and she was driven into the dock by a heavy sea, which smashed her bow and wrecked her pilot house. After she was extricated from the dock she was blown on the beach, where she suffered additional damage before being towed off by the steamer Camano. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
The stern-wheeler Fairhaven of the La Conner Trading & Transportation Co. in charge of Capt. Harry Green struck a rock while steaming through the fog near Utsalady on January 15, and sank in 10 feet of water. The Blekum Tug Company's Mystic, with two large scows, succeeded in raising the vessel, which was subsequently repaired and put back on the La Conner run. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 85.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
The 130-foot Fairhaven was built at Tacoma in 1889, operating as running-mate with the State of Washington, built at Tacoma the same year, in the Bellingham Bay service of the Pacific Navigation Co., later operating on the Seattle-Whidbey Island-La Conner route. Joshua Green, having placed the order for the stern-wheeler City of Denver with builder T. W. Lake for the account of the Colorado syndicate which was unable to meet its final payments, took her over and placed her on the same route, fitted out for passengers, in opposition to the Fairhaven. Captain Brown, veteran manager of the Pacific Navigation Co., had died and the company was under the management of a Tacoma attorney with limited experience in the highly competitive steamboat business. Capt. Green operated his boats with the utmost economy (Capt. William E. (Billy) Mitchell, later general manager of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. (from 1920 to 1928) got his start as mess boy on the Denver,- endeared himself to her owner when he proved that he cou
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
Nelson Bennett, who had large property interests on Bellingham Bay, constructed a fine sternwheeler at Tacoma and christened her the Fairhaven, in honor of his favorite town. The steamer was one hundred and thirty feet long, twenty-six feet five inches beam, and six feet two inches hold, and, after running under Bennett's management for a few months was purchased by the Pacific Navigation Company and alternated with the State of Washington on the Bellingham Bay route. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (steamer)
Nelson Bennett, who had large property interests on Bellingham Bay, constructed a fine sternwheeler at Tacoma and christened her the Fairhaven, in honor of his favorite town. The steamer was one hundred and thirty feet long, twenty-six feet five inches beam, and six feet two inches hold, and, after running under Bennett's management for a few months was purchased by the Pacific Navigation Company and alternated with the State of Washington on the Bellingham Bay route. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (sternwheeler)
The Puget Sound Navigation Company/La Conner Trading & Transportation Company owned the sternwheeler Fairhaven. She sank at Pier 2 but was later removed (Newell 1966:87, 89, Argonauts 1988).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairland
See CARINTHIA.
Citation:
Fairland (container Ship)
The following month the Sea-Land container ship Fairland, operating from Oakland and Seattle to Southeast Asia and the Far East with military cargo, was attacked twice within a week by Viet Cong rockets. The projectiles passed through the steel hull and bulkheads, but there was no major damage and no casualties. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.54.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairsea (1)
The motorship FAIRSEA was built by Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co, Chester, Pennsylvania (ship #188), and launched on 1 March 1941, as the C3 freight and passenger ship RIO DE LA PLATA, for the Moore-McCormack Line. 11,678 tons; 150 x 21,1 meters (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 1 mast, cruiser stern; 2-stroke single-acting engines; service speed 16 (maximum 17) knots. 4 October 1941-3 March 1942, fitted out as the escort carrier CHARGER for the U.S. Navy; vessel transferred to the Royal Navy. 15 August 1946, removed from active duty. 1949, purchased by the Alvion Steam Ship Corp (Panama), renamed FAIRSEA, and refitted as a passenger vessel; accommodation for 1,800 passengers in a single class. 1950, first voyage, Bremerhaven-Sydney. 30 April - 18 September 1953, 6 roundtrip voyages, Bremerhaven-Quebec. 6 December 1955, first voyage (for the Sitmar Line), Southampton-Sydney. 20 June 1957, first voyage, Greenock-Quebec. 4 August 1957, first voyage, Bremen-Greenock-Quebec- Montreal-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). August 1957, last voyage, Bremen-Havre-Southampton- New York. 1957/58, rebuilt and modernized in Triest: 13,432 tons; 1,460 tourist class passengers; registered for the Sitmar Line (Societa Italiana Trasporti Marittimi), Genoa. 1958, returned to the Southampton-Sydney service. 1968, registered in Panama for Passenger Liner Services Inc; 13,317 tons. 29 January 1969, bound from Sydney to Southampton, engine room fire 900 miles west of the Panama Canal; towed to Balboa by the U.S. freighter LOUISE LYKES; laid up. 6 August 1969, arrived at La Spezia in tow by the tug VORTICE; scrapped [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation , Band 4: 1936-1950 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1974), p. 222; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications). -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 February 1998]
Fairsea (2)
See CARINTHIA.
Citation:
Fairsky
The "Fairsky" was built by the Western Pipe & Steel Co, San Francisco in 1941 as the cargo vessel "Steel Artisan". She was taken over by the US Navy and continued under construction as the auxiliary aircraft carrier USS "Barnes". On 30th September 1942 she was handed over to the Royal Navy and renamed HMS "Attacker". Returned to the US Navy in 1946, she was laid up until 1952 when she was sold to Sitmar Line, Rome and reconstructed as a 7,800 gross ton cargo vessel, renamed "Castel Forte" and registered in Panama. In 1957 she was rebuilt as a passenger ship at New York and later Genoa. Renamed "Fairsky" in 1958 and registered in Liberia, she made her first Southampton - Sydney voyage on June 28th 1958. In 1959 she was renamed "Fair Sky" (two words) and in 1966 commenced Southampton - Eastbound round-the-world voyages. She was laid up at Genoa in 1972 and has probably been scrapped since, but I have no definite knowledge of her after this date. [Pacific Liners 1927-72 by Frederick Emmons] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.5] - Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 March 1998]
Citation:
Fairwind
See SYLVANIA .
Citation:
Fairwjoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris Of Nisquallyer (
NOAA vessel painted before departure to survey in SE Alaskan areas, Marine Digest November 7, 1981, p. 7+ (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairy (sidewheeler)
Arthur Denny. Pioneer Days on Puget Sound.D, p. 69. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 104. Built in San Francisco in 1852. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. Gordon Ross.Building a model of the Fairy, Marine Digest. March 8, 1986. p. 9-10. The ship exploded and sank October 22, 1857.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairy (steamboat)
Robert Frye Watt. History of Seattle. 1931., p. 145, 198. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 225. Used by Captian Warren Gove to transport passengers on Puget Sound. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 166-67. First steamer to Seattle BNG, p. 79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairy (steamer)
The first American-owned steamboat on Puget Sound appeared in 1853, when the little Fairy began running between Olympia and Seattle. Harry Sinclair Drago. The Steamboaters, New York: Bramhall House, 1967., p. 190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairy (steamers)
Two explosions took place in 1857, and the steamers in both cases were pioneers in their respective localities. The Fairy, owned by A. B. Rabbeson of Olympia, the first American steamer on Puget Sound, exploded her boiler October 22d, just as she was leaving the wharf at Steilacoom for Olympia, slightly injuring every one on board except the engineer, and seriously scalding Mrs. F. Kennedy, a passenger. The hull sank at the wharf immediately after the explosion, but on searching for it a few days later no trace could be found. It was discovered a week afterward floating fifteen miles above Steilacoom, but the machinery had disappeared. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.68.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Faithful Steward
FAITHFUL STEWARD ~ HMS Ship ~ 3 masts ~ GTon 350 ~ Length 150 ft. Built UK? 178? Registered UK Stranded, wrecked in storm 1785-09-02 ~ Rehobeta Beach, Monhoba Bank, Indian River inlets, Cape Henlopen, DE. From: Londonderry To: Philadelphia with gold? and passengers. Captain: Conl. McCausland ~ Lost: 181/249+?? Notes: poss. 1 September ~ Merchantman ~ poss. Capt. Wlm. McCasland ~ Lost: 200/270-360 ~ departed May 20th or July 9th via Newcastle UK. References: newspaper The Daily Universal Register of London UK ~ 1785-11-24; Maryland Gazette; Encyclopedia of American Shipwrecks by Bruce D. Berman 1972 (number of errors); Notebook on Shipwrecks, Maryland and Delaware Coast by H. Richard Moale 1990; Shipwrecks in the Americas by Robert F. Marx 1971/75/87 -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Sue Swiggum - 27 May 1998]
Falcon
Fishing department patrol vessel, sixty feet. R. Geddes Large. Drums and Scalpel, p. 38.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon
In 1910 the new Falcon was one of the most modern purse seiners on Puget Sound. ALF, p. 115.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (1)
The FALCON was a wooden side-wheel steamship, built by William H. Brown, New York, in 1848 for a group of New York and Boston businessmen. 891 17/95 tons; 244 ft 2 in x 30 ft 2 in x 21 ft 5 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); 1 deck, 3 masts, round stern, sharp tuck, billethead; 2 inclined engines built in 1846 by Hogg and Delamater, New York, for John Ericsson's ill-fated Hudson River steamboat IRON WITCH, and transferred to the FALCON; diameter of cylinders 5 ft, length of stroke 5 ft; diameter of paddle wheels 32 ft; 360 h.p. 10 September 1848, maiden voyage, New York-Savannah-Havana-New Orleans. Purchased by the United States Mail Steamship Co, and sailed from New York for Chagres on 1 December 1848. Remained in the New York-New Orleans- Chagres service until 1852. 1857, converted into a towboat. By 1859, her engines had been removed, and she was serving as a quarantine hulk at Hoffman's Island, New York, where in April 1866 she was used to remove the passengers who had arrived sick with Asiatic cholera on the National Line steamship VIRGINIA [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943), p. 225]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 6 July 1998}
Falcon (2)
I know nothing about the FALCON except that she was built by John Patten, Bath, Maine, in 1849. 813 tons; 157 ft 6 in x 33 ft 6 1/2 in x 16 ft 9 1/4 in (length x beam x depth of hold) [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), vol. 5, p. 3196]. She should not be confused with the well-known tea clipper of the same name, which was built by Robert Steele & Co, Greenock, Scotland, in 1859, or with the steamship of the same name, 891 tons, built in New York City in 1848. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]
Falcon (passenger Boat)
The Falcon, a 85 x 16-foot passenger and freight boat with 100-horsepower Eastern Standard engine, designed by L. H. Coolidge and built at Bellingham for the Bellingham-Anaeortes service of the Island Transportation Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (schooner)
The Falcon, a three-masted schooner of 205 tons, was built at Fairhaven by Bendixsen in 1882. Her first owner is given as H. R. Jacobsen, San Francisco, followed by Wright, Bowne & Co- Shortly after 1900 the Falcon was sold to Williamson. Balfour & Co., Valparaiso, the lessees of Easter Island and put under Chilean registery to operate in connection with her owners' sheep ranch on the island. She was still owned in Valparaiso as late as 1924. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (schooner)
The Falcon, a three-masted schooner of 205 tons, was built at Fair- haven by Bendixsen in 1882. Her first owner is given as H. R. Jacobsen, San Francisco, followed by Wright, Bowne & Co- Shortly after 1900 the Falcon was sold to Williamson. Balfour & Co., Valparaiso, the lessees of Easter Island and put under Chilean registery to operate in connection with her owners' sheep ranch on the island. She was still owned in Valparaiso as late as 1924. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (schooner)
C. A. Hooper of San Francisco (said by some authorities to be the prototype of Peter B. Kyne's Cappy Ricks) dispatched the schooner Falcon to St. Michael with freight and 52 passengers, in charge of Capt. 0. B. Lindholm (later to gain literary immortality as Kyne's two-fisted shipmaster, All Hands and Feet), the vessel sailing between solid pack ice and Yukon Flats, arriving in port ahead of all otherf,, sail or steam. Capt. Lindholm then returned to Grays Harbor, loaded a full cargo of piling for Dutch Harbor. sailed in November and completed the round voyage in +@'le record time of 46 days. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 37.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (steamer)
The steamship Falcon arrived at Portland November 8 with her cargo on fire. About 20 per cent of the cargo was lost before the fire was controlled. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (tugboat)
Tug men rescued victims of 11th street street car wreck, The Tacoma Sunday Ledger. January 3, 1926 P. 6 E. Proud lady at sixty-one, The Tacoma News Tribune. January 14, 1962. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falgout (coast Guard Vessel)
The Coast Guard ocean station vessel Falgout, a converted Navy destroyer escort with a complement of 160 officers and men, was transferred from the East Coast and assigned to permanent station at Tacoma, with the patrol cutter CC, 83527. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falke
The "Falke" and her sister ship "Albatross" were built in 1893-94 by Stettin shipbuilders for North German Lloyd, which at that time ran a service from Bremen and Hamburg to London, Hull and Leith. In order to finance the building of their new express liners to New York, they sold the UK trade and it's ships in 1897 to the newly formed Argo Steamship Co of Bremen. The "Falke" was a 1,083 gross ton ship, length 213ft x beam 30ft, one funnel, two masts, acccommodation for 20-1st and 35-2nd class passengers, but have no details of her later history. As far as I can tell, the Argo Line continued operations until 1966, when it withdrew and sold it's last passenger ships. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by A.Greenway] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]
Citation:
Falls Of Clyde
At Ketchikan in the early 1950s Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 127. William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 20-21, 22, 28, 29, 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falls Of Clyde (bark)
The iron four-masted bark Falls of Clyde was sold in 1922 by George W. McNear of San Francisco to General Petroleum Corp., having rounded out her 43-year career under sail upon her return to San Francisco earlier in the year. She was towed to Seattle, where her topmasts were removed, and thence to Ketchikan where she was moored at a pier to serve as a bulk oil and gasoline storage hulk. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falls Of Clyde (square Rigger)
Reprieved at the last minute from an ignominious fate, the neglected hull of the once famous square rigger Falls of Clyde is to be towed to Honolulu for conversion into a museum ship. Efforts by Los Angeles and Seattle to raise funds to purchase the ship failed and she was reported by Capt. A. F. Raynaud, Seattle marine surveyor to be on the verge of being taken to British Colum- bia to be sunk as part of a breakwater. Built in 1878, the vessel moored at Kennydale, has had a colorful career as an Australian bride ship and a sailing oil tanker. Her figurehead is presently a part of the McCurdy collection on display at the Seattle Museum of History & Industry. The Matson Navigation Co., which once operated the vessel is reported to have put up the initial funds to save the ship. She once operated under the Matson banner. Falls of Clyde saved from breakwater fate, The Marine Digest. XLI (June 8, 1963), p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falmouth
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, 139. W.H.H.Hall. The private letters...of Captain Hall., p. 45.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falmouth (sloop Of War)
Brought Governor Gaines to Oregon in 1850. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 468. Used to transport Oregon Territory officials from San Francisco. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 314.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falstria
Ed Garrison, The Danish ship Falstria, along Tacoma's waterfront, The Tacoma Ledger. May 6, 1951. Line Falstria calls at the Tacoma Smelter to load 3100 pigs of copper, The Marine Digest. May 12, 1951.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fama (bark)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 34, 49, 57. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., I, p. 422 Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., I, p. 183
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie (steamer)
In 1912 the steamer Fannie caught fire and sank off Everett (Gibbs 1955).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie (steamer)
The North Pacific Lumber Company at Portland built the sternwheel steamer Fannie, one of the best towboats that had yet appeared. She was one hundred and forty-two feet five inches long, twenty-eight feet four inches beam, and six feet six inches hold, with engines sixteen by seventy-two inches. Capt. Thomas Crang and Chief Engineer H. J. Winterbotham were first in charge, and in 1888 Capt. Frank Grounds was master. He was succeeded a year later by H. T. Groves, who has since commanded, H. Coates serving for a long time as engineer. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.347.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie (steamer)
In 1912 the steamer Fannie caught fire and sank off Everett (Gibbs 1955).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Adele (schooner)
Fannie Adele, a three - masted schooner of 234 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1883 by Dickie Bros., and owned for many years by J. J. McKinnon of that port. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2. Mr. Lyman reported in a supplement that the Fannie Adele was burned at San Francisco on May 23, 1904.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Adele (schooner)
Fannie Adele, a three - masted schooner of 234 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1883 by Dickie Bros., and owned for many years by J. J. McKinnon of that port. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2. Mr. Lyman reported in a supplement that the Fannie Adele was burned at San Francisco on May 23, 1904.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Lake (steamer)
The Fannie Lake met her fate in the same way, but little over a fortnight later, within a few yards of the place where the E. W Purdy burned. She was in charge of Alexander Wood, captain, George Benson, mate, and Alexander Riddel, engineer, loaded twenty-five tons of hay at Dr. Calhoun's place, and was waiting for the tide. Shortly after midnight, April 26th, the watchman saw a slight flame amidship just aft the boiler. He gave the alarm immediately, but the crew had barely time to escape. The mate and a deckhand were a short distance down the slough with a scow load of hay which they expected to tow to Seattle. Nothing was saved from the steamer. The Fannie Lake was owned by Capt. S. T. Denny, Joshua Green, Frank Zickmund and Peter Falk, was valued at about $5,000 and insured for $4,000. She was built in 1875 and was always a money-maker. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Patton (steamer)
The People's Transportation Company further reinforced their fleet with the Fannie Patton, which was the successor of the old Onward, and was launched at Canemah, August 25, 1865. Capt. George Jerome took charge of the steamer, and, with the exception of a few years when she was commanded by Captains Pease and J. D. Miller, remained with her until she finally wore out. She was of very light draft, drawing only fifteen inches without a load, and did a very good business on the upper river. In 1874 she passed into the hands of the Oregon Steamship Company, in 1879 into the Oregon Steam Navigation Company's fleet, and in August, 1880, was stripped and converted into a barge. Her dimensions were: length, one hundred and thirty-one feet; beam, twenty-six feet six inches; depth of hold, four feet. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Troup (steamer)
The steamer Fannie Troup was launched at East Portland, September 29, 1864. James Clinton built the hull, and W. H. Troup superintended the equipment. A number of Vancouver people were interested with Troup and Turnbull, and the steamer was intended to replace the Vancouver on the Vancouver route. She commenced running late in the fall, in command of Capt. James Turnbull, and subsequently made trips to Kalama and to the Cowlitz, the Turnbulls, father and son, and Captain Troup retaining control until 1870, when the steamer passed into the hands of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company. The following year the Vancouver Transportation Company operated the new Vancouver on the Cowlitz in opposition to the Fannie Troup, and the liveliest kind of a steamboat war was precipitated. Captain Babbidge ran the latter and Captain Kerns the former. The Vancouver was eventually worsted and went on the Vancouver run, which she was permitted to retain unmolested. The Fannie Troup continued on the lower river in command of Capt
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Troup (sternwheeler)
Sternwheeler, 229 tons, 124' long, built at Portland in 1864 by James Clinton and W. H. Troup, owned by OSNC. Captained by John W.Babbidge, she wrecked on the Cowlitz in 1874. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Troupe (steamer)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 143.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny
On Thursday, March 19th, the British ship Fanny, formerly the Vortigern, 896 tons, Captain Arthur, owned by Rosenfeld & Bermingham of San Francisco, loaded 1,330 tons of coal at Nanaimo and sailed for the Bay City in company with the Hawanan bark Rosalie, which was loaded with 150,000 feet of lumber from Burrard's Inlet for the Hawanan Islands. The Rosalie was in tow of the Isabel, Captain Pamphlet, having left Burrard's Inlet on Wednesday afternoon. On the way down the Fanny was taken in tow, and the vessels proceeded in the following order: Isabel, Fanny and Rosalie. When nearly opposite San Juan a gale struck the fleet. The Rosalie's hawser parted; she drifted astern, and, after beating about until 5:00 A.M. Friday, stranded on Discovery Island. The Fanny had gone but a short distance when her hawser also parted, and, before her sails could be set, she drifted in the same direction. Both vessels beat heavily all night. The Rosalia, being oil the south side of the island, received the full sweep of the wind
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (purse Seiner)
Purse seiner at Iceland, The Tacoma Times. October 29, 1945.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (purse Seiner)
Tacoma built purse seiner in Iceland, The Tacoma Times. October 29, 1945.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (schooner)
The Fanny, a two-masted schooner of 170 tons, old measurement. was built at San Francisco in 1861 by Domingo Marcucci for Charles Hare and Turner & Rundle, and cost $13,000. In June, 1862, Capt. Horatio N Turner was registered as her whole owner, and the Fanny was sold to foreigners in Hongkong in May, 1863. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (schooner)
The Fanny, a two-masted schooner of 170 tons, old measurement. was built at San Francisco in 1861 by Domingo Marcucci for Charles Hare and Turner & Rundle, and cost $13,000. In June, 1862, Capt. Horatio N Turner was registered as her whole owner, and the Fanny was sold to foreigners in Hongkong in May, 1863. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (sloop)
American sloop, was dismasted and waterlogged off Shoalwater Bay, in 1864. Her crew took to the boats and were later picked up at sea. The wreck capsized and became a menance to navigation. Her remains were rammed and sunk by the steamship Pacific. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (sloop)
Dismasted and waterlogged off Shoalwater Bay in 1864. Rammed ans sunk by the steamship Pacific. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 165. Royal Bensell. All quiet on the Yamhill. The Civil War in Oregon., p. 125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (sloop)
The sloop Fanny, dismasted off Shoalwater Bay while on her way from San Francisco to Victoria, and afterward sunk by the steamship Pacific, which was attempting to rescue the crew. This she finally succeeded in accomplishing, landing them at Victoria. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.144.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1874, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Dutard
Schooner. The Fanny Dutard, a three-masted 170 tons, old measurement, was built at San Francisco in 1882 by G. White. She was owned by B.C. Genereaux and later by Hans Madison of San Francisco, and in 1905 was bought by J. A. Matheson of Anacortes, Wash., and put in the Bering Sea codflshery. She was withdrawn in '9 in favor of the off -shore lumber and copra trade, but resumed fishing the next year. Her last voyage was in 1930; then she was laid up for a time in Lake Union, Seattle, but has been operated recently as a barge by the Ketchikan Packing Co. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Dutard (schooner)
The Fanny Dutard, a three-masted 170 tons, old measurement, was built at San Francisco in 1882 by G. White. She was owned by B.C. Genereaux and later by Hans Madison of San Francisco, and in 1905 was bought by J. A. Matheson of Anacortes, Wash., and put in the Bering Sea codflshery. She was withdrawn in '9 in favor of the off -shore lumber and copra trade, but resumed fishing the next year. Her last voyage was in 1930; then she was laid up for a time in Lake Union, Seattle, but has been operated recently as a barge by the Ketchikan Packing Co. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Dutard (schooner)
The three masted schooner Fanny Dutard was withdrawn from the codfishery by Matheson Fisheries and chartered to Capt. J. E. Shields for off shore cargo service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 298.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Dutard (schooner)
The three-masted schooner Fanny Dutard of 1882, in the codfishing fleet of J. A. Matheson since 1919, was laid up in Lake Union following the 1930 season and saw no more service under sail.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Dutard (schooner)
The Fanny Dutard, three-masted schooner of 266 tons, built by White at San Francisco in 1882, was purchased by J. A. Matheson for codfishing in the Bering Sea, while the Blom Codfishing Co., organized at Tacoma, acquired the three-masted schooner Falcon, a 205-ton vessel built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven, Calif. in 1882, and placed her in the Bering Sea fishery trade from Puget Sound in conjunction with a new fishing station at Eagle Harbor, Nagai Island. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1905, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 112.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Hare (schooner)
The Fanny Hare, a two-masted schooner of 163 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1867 by John Daly and cost $22.000. About 1880 she was sold to owners in Nicaragua,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Hare (schooner)
The Fanny Hare was a two masted schooner of 163 tons was built at San Francisco in 1867 by John Daly and cost $22,000. About 1880 she was sold to owners in Nicaragua, and a few years later was bought by a flrm in Callao, who renamed her the Jose Pozzo, and were still listed as owners in 1921. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Hare (schooner)
The Fanny Hare, a two-masted schooner of 163 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1867 by John Daly and cost $22.000. About 1880 she was sold to owners in Nicaragua,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Hare (schooner)
The Fanny Hare was a two masted schooner of 163 tons was built at San Francisco in 1867 by John Daly and cost $22,000. About 1880 she was sold to owners in Nicaragua, and a few years later was bought by a flrm in Callao, who renamed her the Jose Pozzo, and were still listed as owners in 1921. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Jane (schooner)
Fanny Jane, schooner, probably two-masted, of 120 tons, was built on Coos Bay, Ore., in 1869 by Jacob Sutherland for San Francisco owners. She disappears from registry about 1878. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Jane (schooner)
Fanny Jane, schooner, probably two-masted, of 120 tons, was built on Coos Bay, Ore., in 1869 by Jacob Sutherland for San Francisco owners. She disappears from registry about 1878. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Lake (steamer)
The steamer Fanny Lake, built at Seattle in 1875, burned on the Skagit River while passing the town of Sterling in command of her owner, Capt. John Hill, May 21, 1883, and all of the upper works were destroyed. She was afterward reconstructed and continued running for ten years, going up in smoke again in 1893 in Sullivan Slough, near La Conner. This last disaster ended her career.E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 315.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Lake (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1875. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fantome
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 288.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fantome (yacht)
The 1,260 ton diesel schooner yacht, Fantome, owned by A. E. Guinness, the British manufacturer of malt liquor, arrived on Puget Sound in April, 1939, undergoing voyage repairs and refitting at the Todd Seattle drydock. The Guinness family at this time had purchased the Marine Building in Vancouver, B. C., which it still owns.) With the outbreak of the war the Fantome was laid up in Portage Bay, Lake Union, the stately vessel with her tall masts and painted gunports becoming virtually a Seattle landmark throughout the war period and for some years afterward. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 473.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fantome (yacht)
Fantome, 257 -foot auxiliary schooner yacht, sold by the estate of A. R. Guinness to William and Joseph Jones of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fantome (yacht)
Fantome, fourmasted auxiliary ocean yacht, sold by Joseph and Wuliam Jones of Seattle to Sincennes-McNaughton Line, towing and salvage firm of Montreal, sailing June 13 under her own power for Montreal after a stay of almost 14 years on the Seattle waterfront. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Far West
Lloyd McFarling, Exploring the Northern Plains., p. 377, 384, 385, 386, 400.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farallon (steamer)
Steamer Farallon with a deck load of ice, ALF p. 126.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farallon (steamer)
The Farallon had been running north for several months and diverted a large amount of traffic from the Pacific Coast Steamship Company by cutting rates. The big corporation decided to remove her by the same method, and fares between San Francisco and Sound ports went as low as $5.00 cabin and $2.50 steerage. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.422.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farallon (steamer)
The steamer Farallon wrecked in Iliamna Bay, January 5, 1910. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910., p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Faralones (u.s.s)
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 305, 321.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Faransu Maru
See ILE DE FRANCE.
Citation:
Faraway (schooner)
The schooner Faraway*, Capt. George Trofutter, made a record for long passages, being out forty days from Astoria for Yaquina, and finally putting back to the starting point. *The Faraway, built at Essex, Conn., in 1848, was one of the smallest schooners that came out from the East before the people on this coast began to build their own vessels. She was sixty-seven feet long, twenty feet beam, and six feet five inches hold, registering seventy-seven tons. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.89.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Farquhar (tug)
The most serious loss of life in 1930 occurred in the sinking of two small commercial vessels. The tug Farquhar of the Pacific (Coyle) Navigation Co. foundered in January in a heavy storm on the Gulf of Georgia while towing a barge from Bellingham for Vancouver. Part of the wheelhouse was found on the beach at Stewart Island and the barge stranded at the north end of Saturna Island. Six men lost their lives in the foundering of the tug, which was built at Vancouver in 1908. She was in charge of Capt. Isaac Breeze, with Albert Gray, mate, S. Iveson, chief engineer and R. Ivey, second engineer. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fashion (steamer)
Plympton Kelly. We were not summer soldiers. 1972., p. 28, 52, 103, 109. Used between Portland and the Cascades. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 162-63, 165. W.H.H.Hall. The private letters...of Captain Hall., p. 45, 47, 110,115-16. Used during the Indian War at the Cascades, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971. II, p. 606.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fastnet (steamer)
The British tramp steamer Fastnet, which left Victoria for St. Michael July 17 towing the river steamers Mono of the Teslin Transportation Co. and Stickine Chief of the Stickine Navigation Co., lost both boats, the Mono in Clarence Straits and the Stickine Chief on August 1 off Yakutat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Faultless (steamer)
The Faultless, 102 feet long and of 400 horsepower, was built at W. Brown's New Westminster yard. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1905, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 114.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fauntleroy (brig)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 170. August Kautz. Northwest Journals of August V. Kautz, 1857-61, p. 43, 78, 79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fauntleroy (brig)
The brig Fauntleroy was the best known of the vessels, which visited the Northwest, in the United States geodetic service, and her labors extended over a wide range of territory. She made a survey of Gray's Harbor in 1860, and from there went to Coos Bay. Her work for the next few years was along the California shore, but in 1869 she returned North to make soundings in the harbor at Seattle. She then went farther up the Coast, but returned to Seattle in 1872, and in 1874 surveyed Commencement Bay. Capt. James L. Lawson was in command for nearly fifteen years, with the exception of a brief interval while she was in charge of Capt. Charles Willoughby. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Faustina (barge)
Faustina 495 x 85-foot self-unloading barge, completed by the Todd Seattle yard for operation as a phosphate rock and gravel carrier by Florida owners, listed as the largest vessel yet built at that yard. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorita
Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast., p. 50-53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite
Built at Chinook in 1881. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite
In 1869 the Favorite was built at Sooke by Captain Spring, who intended her for codfishing and trading. She was afterward used in the Honolulu traffic and also carried a few cargoes of lumber between Victoria and California ports. She proved too small for that purpose and in the spring of 1874 engaged in sealing, and has been employed continuously since. For several years past she has been commanded by Capt. Laughlin McLean, and until 1894 was the only British sealer unmolested by American cutters. She was then seized on the trivial pretext that her arms were not sealed, but was subsequently released. Captain Spring was very successful with the Favorite, and her work more than that of any other vessel demonstrated the possibilities of the industry. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.426.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (bng, P. 222)
In 1869 the Favorite was built at Sooke by Captain Spring, who intended her for codfishing and trading. She was afterward used in the Honolulu traffic and also carried a few cargoes of lumber between Victoria and California ports. She proved too small for that purpose and in the spring of 1874 engaged in sealing, and has been employed continuously since. For several years past she has been commanded by Capt. Laughlin McLean, and until 1894 was the only British sealer unmolested by American cutters. She was then seized on the trivial pretext that her arms were not sealed, but was subsequently released. Captain Spring was very successful with the Favorite, and her work more than that of any other vessel demonstrated the possibilities of the industry. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.426.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (passenger Boat)
The 13 - ton diesel - engined passenger boat Favorite was built by Frank Lowe at Marshfield for Coos Bay service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (schooner)
Northwest Sealing fleet. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (steam Tug)
The steam tug Favorite, which is still afloat on Puget Sound, was completed at Utsalady in 1869 by Grannan & Cranney, who built her for towing for the mill at Utsalady. Capt. Edward Nichols was her first master, and was succeeded by Capt. Chris Williams. She served as a tug until 1874, when P. D. Moore, the mail contractor, secured her, and she ran in the postal service with William Waitt in command. In 1876 the Puget Mill Company purchased the steamer for $14,950, and, with the exception of intervals when she has been laid up, she has been used as a towboat since. Other masters in charge were Doane, Williamson and Gove. J. C. Stanley, Williamson, Grinwald, Airey, and nearly all of the prominent tugboat engineers on the Sound, have worked on the steamer. The tug was last in the service of the Port Madison Mill, and for a long time has been idle at Port Madison. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York:
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (steamer)
The screw steamer Favorite, 13 tons, and gasoline -engine propeller Pastime were built by the Ellingson yard in Coquille for passenger service on the Coquille River. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 61.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (steamer)
The Favorite, 269 tons, 132 x 28.2 x 9.8, with two horizontal engines 16 x 60, was built at Utsalady, Washington in 1868 by Gren- nan & Co. as a towboat and tender for their Utsalady mill. In 1874 she was fitted for the Puget Sound-Victoria mail and passenger service by P. D. Moore of Olympia, being sold to the Puget Mill Co. and refitted as a tug two years later, subsequently passing to Meiggs & Gawley for log towing at theirPortMadison MUI, and to the Port Blakeley Mill Co. Ln 1890. Reboilered in 1907, and maintained with scrupulous neatness, she remained in regular service until 1913, being finally dismantled in Seattle in 1920. She was very similar in appearance to the old Politkofsky, being of about ten tons greater registry, and for many years carried one of the Politkofsky's famous Russian cannon and a large framed picture of her in the dining saloon. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (steamer)
The steamer Favorite was sold by D. B. Finch to Vanderbilt & Co. of Portland for $5,000. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.278.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (steamer)
The Favorite, a sixty-foot propeller, was built at Astoria for Capt. William P. Dillon, who used her on the Westport route until 1888, wlien she was purchased by Capt. W. F,. Warren, who handled her for a year and then disposed of her to Capt. J. J. Winant and M. G. Buckley. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1886, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 334.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (tug)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 320. Built at Utsalady in 1869. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. Passing of the historic tug, interned in 80 fathoms off mill site. Tacoma Daily Ledger. November 8, 1931, p. A-3. The Faithful Favorite buried 80 fathoms deep, The Tacoma News Tribune. December 27, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (tug)
One of the most historic of the remaining Puget Sound steam fleet, the old side-wheel tug Favorite of 1868, was dismantled in the West Waterway, Seattle, after lying idle there for some time. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (tug)
The tug Favorite, constructed at San Francisco in 1875, was brought to Yaquina by J. J. Winant for the Oregon Development Company, Winant remaining in charge until 1886, when he was suc- ceeded by James Robertson, E. A. Abbey, E. F. Wilson and Freeman Dodge. E.W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]., p. 321.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Favorite (tug)
The Favorite, pioneer tug of Tacoma Tug & Barge Co., was fitted with a 90-horsepower gas engine replacing her original 75-horsepower steam plant in 1912. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 300. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 357. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 641.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn (brig)
November 21, 1856 Brig,re-rigged from schooner. En route San Francisco-Coos Bay. Four died in the wreck. Captain Bunker, four crew and three passengers were rescued by the Indians. None of the valuable cargo was saved. Captain Tichenor gave the location as the Sinsclaw (Siuslaw), five miles south of Cape Perpetua and 19 miles north of Umpqua. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn (brig)
The brig Fawn, Captain Bunker, from San Francisco for Coos Bay, was dismasted in a southwest gale off Cape Perpetua, November 21st, the mate and three seamen losing their lives. The captain, four of the crew and three passengers were rescued by Indians in canoes before she struck. The accident happened at six o'clock in the evening, and at midnight the brig drifted ashore and was completely destroyed. The vessel was owned by the captain and a man named Macey, and contained quite a valuable cargo, none of which was saved. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.62.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn (schooner)
The Fawn was a Canadian schooner, 58 tons, wrecked near Carmanah Point, B. C., October 1905. Vessel was built at Chemainus, B. C., in 1892. For many years it was a Sealing vessel in the North Pacific. (Another account lists the wreck in February 1902, on the west coast of Vancouver Island.) Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn (schooner)
The small schooner Fawn, Seattle for Grays Harbor, drifted ashore bottom-up near Grays Harbor, the crew missing. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn (tugboat)
One of the work boats out of Tacoma which is making good is the Fawn, owned by the Tacoma Tug & Barge Company, and skippered by jack McCullough. The Fawn was built last spring by Taylor & Grandy, the Burton boat builders and constructors of a fleet of fine Puget Sound boats. The Fawn is 48 feet over all by 11.6 beam and 5.6 depth. The power is a 50 h. p. 3-cylinder Imperial engine. She is arranged with fuel capacity of 800 gallons and 'fresh water tank capacity of 1000. The Fawn is planked with 11/2 stuff with sheathing of 11/4 fir. The timbers are 3x3 inch bent oak. (Western Yacht and Launchman. II (February 15, 1911), p. 37.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fay And Bowen (gas Tug)
The small gas tug Fay and Bowen owned by F. M. Davis, pioneer Prince Rupert launch operator, fouled the line from a scow of sand, stranded and pounded bottom-up on the reefs of Ridley Island while en route from the Skeena River for Prince Rupert. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fay No. Four (steamer)
The Fay No. 4, a large gasoline sternwheeler of 179 tons, 136 feet in length, was built at North Bend and transferred to California the following year. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (fire Tug)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 419 West Coast Trade, 1904 Annual Edition p. 45. FT, p. 24. The Tacoma Daily News, May 1907 p. 36. Tacoma Will Now Have a Fireboat, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. March 30, 1900. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (oil Screw)
August 10, 1949 Oil screw, 68 tons, built in 1912. Burned on the Columbia below Longview. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (schooner)
The Fearless, a four-masted schooner of 736 tons and 900 M capacity; was built at Hoquiam in 1900 by G. H. Hitchings for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co., San Francisco. She traded under this ownership until January, 1923, when she was bought by the Whitney Bodden Shipping Company, Mobile and went through the Canal to Cuba with a lumber cargo from Bellingham. On November 25, 1927 the Fearless was wrecked without loss of life at Tambores, Cuba. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (schooner)
Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (schooner)
The Fearless, a four-masted schooner of 736 tons and 900 M capacity; was built at Hoquiam in 1900 by G. H. Hitchings for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co., San Francisco. She traded under this ownership until January, 1923, when she was bought by the Whitney Bodden Shipping Company, Mobile and went through the Canal to Cuba with a lumber cargo from Bellingham. On November 25, 1927 the Fearless was wrecked without loss of life at Tambores, Cuba. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (steam Tug)
The steam tug Fearless, which Capt. Robert J. Lawson had been operating at Coos Bay, was towing for a short time on the Columbia bar in the fall of 1873, in command of Capt. James Hill. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (steam Tug)
At Coos Bay the steam tug Fearless, built at San Francisco in 1874, made her appearance in command of Capt. James Hill, who remained with her for fourteen years, with the exception of two, when she was in charge of Capt. Robert Lawson and Capt. John Erickson. The Fearless was eighty-five feet long, twenty-two feet beam, and nine feet hold. She was employed at Coos Bay and the Umpqua, with occasional trips to the Columbia, until 1889, when she perished with all on board. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.234.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
November 20, 1889 Steam tug, 78 tons, 53'x 19.5'x 10'. Vessel also wrecked in 1873 when crossing the Coos bar. She was the oldest ship on the west coast connected with the Merchant Marine. Owned by North Bend Mill Co. and under Captain James Hill. The teak-hulled vessel was built in Shanghai in 1844 for use as an opium clipper and was rigged as a hermaphrodite brig named Star of China. She arrived at San Francisco in 1852 and was promptly seized for violation of revenue laws. She sold to General James M. Estill, who was part owner of the Hartford. He installed the engines of the latter into the Star of China and changed her name to Fearless. The ship performed any number of tasks, including carrying coal for Flanagan & Rogers'Westport Coal mine. Her loss was not discovered until the following day when debris washed up on the north spit of the Umpqua bar and a crewman crawled ashore. Unfortunately he died before revealing the cause of her demise. Captain Hill left a widow, formerly Annie Palmer of the Scottsbu
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The hull of the 71-foot steam tug Fearless, built at New Westminster in 1898, was purchased by Coastal Towing Co. Due to war shortages, two Mack Mariner gas engines were installed, with large reduction gears, but they proved unsatisfactory for heavy towing service and she was tied up until a diesel engine became available. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 509.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The 75-foot steam tug Fearless, built at New Westminster in 1898, was purchased in 1943 by Coastal Towing Co. and in 1944 was rebuilt, modernized and fitted with a diesel engine. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 517.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The tug Fearless, Capt. James Hill, was wrecked on North Spit, at the mouth of the Umpqua River, November 20th, while en route from Astoria to Coos Bay, and not a soul was left to give the details of her fate. At 3:00 P.M. the day of the accident she was seen off Upper Ten Mile, steaming slowly down the coast just outside the line of breakers, which were running very high, and at 6:00 o'clock her whistle was heard off the mouth of the Umpqua. At 6:45 she gave three sharp blasts in rapid succession, and nothing more was seen or heard of her until the broken pilot-house, a small boat, the stern and one side of the hull, and numerous other pieces of wreckage, floated up the Umpqua River on the incoming tide. The Fearless was old and tender, and the supposition is that she sprang a leak and was attempting to enter the river in order to save the lives of those on board. This theory is substantiated by the fact that she was off the mouth of the Umpqua for over an hour before the accident happened, and the captain h
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The tug Fearless is a Pacific Coast production and was built at the Union Iron Works, San Francisco, in 1892, under the superintendence of her master, Capt. Dan H. Haskell, for John D. Spreckels & Co., at a cost of $145,000. She is the most finely equipped and powerful tugboat in the world. Her dimensions are, length one hundred and fifty-three feet, beam twenty-six feet, and depth of hold sixteen feet six inches, with engines twenty, thirty and fifty by thirty-six inches, developing fifteen hundred horse-power and enabling her to make very fast time with heavy tows. She fulfilled the expectations of her builders on her first trip by towing a 2,200-ton ship from San Diego to San Francisco, a distance of 485 miles, in fifty hours. Owing to her size, power and speed, she has proved a valuable addition to the tugboat fleet, not only at the Bay City, but all along the Pacific Coast, where she has made a number of tows between the Columbia River, Puget Sound, San Diego and San Francisco and has also made several e
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The old tug Fearless of Raymond, retired about five years earlier and thought doomed to the boneyard, was given a new lease on life when she was sold to Rob Reistroffer of Tacoma and given a new engine and upperworks for service in pile-driver towing on Puget Sound. The 50-foot tug had operated on Willapa Harbor for more than sixty years following her construction at South Bend in 1904 by Dan Lauderback and Alma Smith, who were her skippers for many years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.44.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The Tacoma Tug & Barge Company's Fearless was equipped with Massie wireless telegraph early in February, being the first tug on the Coast to have wireless installed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 147.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fearless (tug)
The first bar tug in Oregon arrived this year in the service of A. M. Simpson. She was called the Fearless, and was built in Calcutta, coming to San Francisco as a full-rigged brig. Simpson bought the vessel, and after refitting sent her to Coos Bay in command of Captain Ironsides. John J. Jackson, who, with Joseph Burgess, had been piloting on the bar, joined the tug as pilot, and the casualties which had been of frequent occurrence in the past were much reduced in number. The Fearless was about 80 feet long, 24 feet beam, and 9 feet hold, was built of teak, and would probably have lasted many years had she not been wrecked. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Federalship (steamship)
Built in 1884 by G. Howaldt in Kiel, Germany. Length 222 feet beam 31 ft. Reg. No. 153023 Engine: 2-cylindersteam. Owner: Edward Thompson MacLennan, 416 W. Pender St., Vancouver. Ex Gertrude, later La Golondrina. Captain: S.S. Stone. Seized at sea early 1927 by U.S. Coast Guard, later released. Cargo was 12,500 cases. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feggen
See PHILIP DODRIDGE .
Citation:
Felice
Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 89. Buell and Skladal. Sea Otters and the China Trade., p. 83, 84. At Nootka, Buell and Skladal. Sea Otters and the China Trade., p. 99. Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 131. Gordon Speck. Northwest explorations, p. 114-15, 121-22. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 40-42. Voyage to Nootka. Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. 65. Aurel Krause. Tlingit Indians. American Ethnological Society., p. 22 Constance Skinner. Adventures of Oregon, p. 13, 15. Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast., p. 113-123, 143. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., I, 108, 110, 112, 115-16. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 57. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., I p. 92-95. C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., p. 125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Felix Roussel
See AROSA SUN.
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Feltre (italian Motor Ship)
Raised from the Columbia River at Portland. Agnes Rothery. Ports of British Columbia, p. 241-42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feltre (motorship)
A collision remarkably similar to that of the Welch Prince and Iowan of 1922 took place on the Columbia River on February 17 near Prescott, Oregon when the Italian motorship Feltre was rammed and sunk by the steamship Edward Luckenbach. The 450-foot cargo passenger liner came to rest on the river bottom. There were no casualties on either ,vessel. A $185,000 shipment of silver bars was removed from the Feltre's holds on the following day, and on March 18 she was raised in an outstanding salvage operation by the Pacific Salvage Co. She almost immediately sank again, however, and it was not until March 22 that she was raised again and taken to Portland, where she was libelled by the salvagers and sold for $55,000 to the Pacific American Fisheries Co. A subsequent $ 300,000 rebuilding at Portland, the largest marine repair job in that port's history to that time, resulted in her return to service as the Clevedon without doubt the finest vessel to operate in the Alaska cannery trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime even
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feltre (motorship)
A collision remarkably similar to that of the Welch Prince and Iowan of 1922 took place on the Columbia River on February 17 near Prescott, Oregon when the Italian motorship Feltre was rammed and sunk by the steamship Edward Luckenbach. The 450-foot cargo passenger liner came to rest on the river bottom. There were no casualties on either ,vessel. A $185,000 shipment of silver bars was removed from the Feltre's holds on the following day, and on March 18 she was raised in an outstanding salvage operation by the Pacific Salvage Co. She almost immediately sank again, however, and it was not until March 22 that she was raised again and taken to Portland, where she was libelled by the salvagers and sold for $55,000 to the Pacific American Fisheries Co. A subsequent $ 300,000 rebuilding at Portland, the largest marine repair job in that port's history to that time, resulted in her return to service as the Clevedon without doubt the finest vessel to operate in the Alaska cannery trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime even
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feltre (motorship)
The former Italian motorship Feltre, sunk on the Columbia River in 1937 and rebuilt at Portland as the Clevedon of Pacific American Fisheries, was also lost in Alaska early in 1942. The vessel had been taken over for Army transport service and was at Yakutat with a cargo of ammunition on January 12 when a fire of undetermined origin broke out on board. The steamship Taku got a line aboard the blazing ammunition ship and towed her out of the harbor. Shortly afterward she was completely demolished by the explosion of her cargo. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 512.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feltria
See URANIUM.
Citation:
Feltrie (motorship)
February 17, 1937. Italian motorship. Captain Mario Ranieri sailed on the Columbia near Prescott, Oregon, when the Edward Luckenbach rammed and sunk his ship. There seemed to have occurred a misinterpretation of whistle signals. The $185,000 cargo of silver was recovered almost before the ship settled in the mud. After repairs at a cost of $300,000, she sold to Pacific Fisheries for a mere $55,000. Re-named the Clevedon, the U.S. Army put her to work as a transport. At Yakatat, Alaska on January 13, 1942, she caught fire while carrying a cargo of munitions. The SS Taku towed her from the dock and shoved her ashore at a safe distance. The ship exploded, a total loss. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fenimore Cooper (pilot Boat)
Former New York pilot boat Skiddy, 95 tons. Purchased 1853; wrecked on Pacific Coast, 1859. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 206-08, 210- 211, 213, 217-18, 226-227, 229-230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fenis (steamer)
C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., p. 122, 125, 126. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 161. CHHO, II, p. 743. Used at low water times in Oregon. Formerly the Shoalwater and latter the Minnie Holmes.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferdinand De Lesseps
See STAD HAARLEM.
Citation:
Ferdinando Palasciano
See KONIG ALBERT.
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Fern (lighthouse Tender)
Fern, wooden steam lighthouse tender, 98.4 x 22 x 10 with triple-expansion (10, 17 1/2,28 x 18) engine of 300 horsepower,) at Winslow for assignment to the 16th District, U. S. Lighthouse Service, Ketchikan. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fern (steamer)
The former steam lighthouse tender Fern purchased by Capt. Peter Wold and fitted with a 300-horsepower diesel engine, was placed on the mail route between Seward and western Alaska ports. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 465.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fern (u.s.l.h.t)
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 110-112.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fern Glen
British ship, 818 tons, was cast ashore on Clatsop Spit, when Captain F. Budd, her master, mistook Tillamook Rock Light, for Point Adams Light, and ran his ship on the beach at 4 a.m. October 16, 1881. The vessel was enroute to Portland in ballast from Wellington, New Zealand, to load grain. The following day the twenty crew members were employed in removing the ballast to lighten the vessel's burden, but that evening a southwest gale arose and put the vessel in a serious situation. The steamer General Canby attempted to rescue the seamen, but was prevented from getting near the wreck by the heavy surf. Later the ship began to heel over when the ballast shifted, and the crew managed to launch a damaged lifeboat, and row to the side of the tug Columbia which was standing off the wreck. The Fern Glen, a ship of graceful lines was classed as a medium clipper, and was valued at $40,000. Captain Budd was criticized over the loss of his ship as the accident occurred in perfect weather on a starlight night. James Gi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fern Glen
Ran onto the beach at Clatsop Spit on Octber 16, 1881. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fern Glen (grain Vessel)
The British ship Fern Glen, the first of a quartet of grain vessels which perished within a month, was wrecked on Clatsop Spit, October 16, 1881. She was a comparatively small vessel of 818 tons, in command of Capt. F. Budd, with a crew of twenty men, bound from Wellington, New Zealand, for the Columbia River. The disaster was caused by the captain's ignorance of the presence of Tillamook light and of the corresponding change made in the color of the Point Adams light. She went ashore at 4:00 A. M. in good weather, and all hands remained with her through the day discharging ballast and expecting to get her over the spit. Their efforts were fruitless, and when a heavy southeast gale drove her farther up on the beach the distress signal was hoisted. The General Canby went to the rescue but was unable to render assistance. At 9:00 A. m. on the eighteenth she began to heel over and at 9:30 the ballast shifted. She soon began to part amidships, and at noon the crew succeeded in launching a boat in a damaged condit
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fern Glen (iron Ship)
October 16, 1881 Ship, British, iron, 818 tons. Captain F. Budd was unaware of the new Tillamook Light and the change of color in the Point Adams Light. As a result, he drove his ship directly into the Clatsop Spit. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (bark)
Built at San Francisco in 1887. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. The lost Ferndale, further particulars of the shipwreck above Gray's Harbor, The Weekly Ledger. February 5, 1892, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (bark)
The wreck report for 1892 opened with a disaster strikingly similar to that which had overwhelmed the bark Abercorn a few years before. The victim in this case was the British bark Ferndale, en route from Newcastle to Portland with a cargo of coal. The Ferndale was spoken fifty miles off the Columbia, January 26th, and was then standing in, but, in the heavy fog which prevailed during the following few days, she was caught in the northerly current. On the morning of the twenty-ninth a fearful gale came on, and she struck the beach at 3:30 A.M. about fifteen miles north of the entrance to Gray's Harbor. Being deeply laden she struck a considerable distance from shore and was soon battered to pieces. In attempting to reach land eighteen of the crew were drowned, and the remaining three were taken from the surf nearer dead than alive by Mrs. Edward White, residing near the scene of the disaster. Those losing their lives were Blair, captain; Gilby, first mate; Charles Wright, second mate; John Fraser, steward; Mo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (steamer)
The Ferndale, a one hundred and fifty ton propeller, was brought up from San Francisco and engaged in the Island trade. Her career on the Sound was brief, and while in charge of her owner, Capt. A. 0. Benjamin, she was destroyed by fire in December, 1890.E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 396.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (steamer)
The Ferndale, a one hundred and fifty ton propeller, was brought up from San Francisco and engaged in the Island trade. Her career on the Sound was brief, and while in charge of her owner, Capt. A. O. Benjamin, she was destroyed by fire in December, 1890. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ferndale (steamer)
The Ferndale, from San Juan for Port Townsend in command of her owner, Capt. A. O. Benjamin, burned in Richardson Bay, Lopez Island, December 15th. On leaving San Juan the steamer encountered a very heavy sea, to escape which she turned back. Shortly afterward an unusually heavy swell struck her and broke the guys of the smokestack, which went adrift, setting fire to the steamer, and before the flames could be extinguished her steam pipe broke, and she drifted helplessly on the south side of Lopez Island. Her cargo, consisting of five hundred barrels of lime, caught fire, and the vessel was soon consumed. Her anchors were let go before the lime was ignited, but failed to hold. The total loss of vessel and cargo was about thirty thousand dollars, with an insurance of nearly thirteen thousand dollars on the steamer. The twenty-one persons on board narrowly escaped a horrible death. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific North
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fernley (steamer)
An accident then considered unique, but to prove unfortunately common in later years befell the British tramp steamer Fernley, 2,471 tons, Capt. T. C. Macoubrey, Puget Sound for Taku Bar with a cargo of wheat, when in March she struck a submarine mine, a relic of the Russo -Japanese War, and was beached on the Japanese coast near where the steamship Manauense of the Northwestem Commercial Co. stranded some years earlier. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fernstream (motorship)
Norweigan vessel. Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 50.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feugot
On way to West Coast port for gain, early 1900s. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (freighter)
The Fidalgo, a stern -wheel freighter 110 feet in length, was built by A. S. Nelsen at La Conner to replace the Northern Light, whose engines were installed in her. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (steamer)
The Sound freight steamer Fidalgo was lost on the night of February 11 when she broke her moorings and went to pieces in a storm at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 343.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (steamer)
Capt. Harry Barlow, who in association with William Marmont operated the Star Steamship Co. in independent Puget Sound freight service, in 1909 perfected the Barlow Marine elevator, the first one being installed on the company's freight steamer Fidalgo. This device made it possible to load and unload freight directly to or from the elevator platform at any stage of the tide, doing away with the costly and time consuming labor of man handling loaded handtrucks up and down gangways. Captain Barlow soon sold out his interest devoting full time to the development and promotion of the elevator which in its basic form, is still used on Puget Sound freight vessels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (sternwheeler)
Part of the La Conner grain trade, the 110 ft, stern-wheeler Fidalgo capsized in a winter storm on February 1 1, 1923 (U.S. National Archives Record Group 41:50, Newell 1966:106, 343).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidelater (steamer)
The Fidelater, another famous coasting and jobbing steamship, arrived at Victoria in March, having come from England under sail, devoting one hundred and seventy-five days to the trip. She was refitted and put on the route between Portland and British Columbia ports, and her subsequent career under the British, Russian and American flags was eventful. She was finally confiscated by the United States Government for alleged fraud in securing American registry. After her collision with the Alexandria she was in command of Captain Erskine, and made her first voyage from Victoria to Portland in June, 1866, with forty-six passengers. Captain Erskine ran her to Alaska a few trips in 1867 in the service of the Russian-American Fur Company, who had bought her from the British owners. She adopted the American colors at the time of the Alaska purchase, and in 1869 was seized by the United States Government. In 1875 the vessel became the property of Goodall, Nelson & Co., who used her on the southern routes out of San Fr
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidelater (steamer)
The steamship Fidelater was confiscated by the Government for alleged fraud in connection with her enrollment under American colors at the time of the Alaska purchase. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.178.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidelity (schooner)
A three masted schooner of 192 tons was built at Eureka, California in 1882 for William J. Sweazey of San Francisco. She drops out of the register in 1890. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidelity (schooner)
A three masted schooner of 192 tons was built at Eureka, California in 1882 for William J. Sweazey of San Francisco. She drops out of the register in 1890. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fifield (steam Schooner)
February 21, 1916 Steam schooner, 160', 634 tons with 500 hp and twin screws. Captain C. Bakeman. Built for Estabrook of San Francisco. The first Fifield was destroyed on the ways by forest fire. Kruse & Banks launched her in 1908. She became a total loss on the south spit at Coquille. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Filipino
Henry R. Wagner. Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan De Fuca, p. 137.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Finback (barge)
Finback, steel self-propelled barge of similar design and specifications to the Sunnyvale built by Maritime Shipyards, Seattle for the Alaska Packers Association. The barge was 80 long, self propelled designed by H.C. Hanson with a twin screw 120 horsepower Caterpiller diesel engines. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Finland
The steamship FINLAND was built for the Red Star Line by W. Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia (ship #312), and launched on 21 June 1902. 12,760 tons; 182,9 x 18,3 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels, 4 masts; twin-screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 15 knots; accommodation for 343 passengers in 1st class, 194 in 2nd class, and 1,000 in steerage. 4 October 1910, maiden voyage, New York-Antwerp (U.S. flag). By January 1909, first voyage, Antwerp-New York (Belgian flag). 6 March-5 June 1909, 3 roundtrip voyages for the White Star Line (charter), Naples-New York. 21 January 1912-8 August 1914, Antwerp-New York (U.S. flag). 22 August 1914, first of 2 roundtrip voyages, New York-Liverpool. 21 November 1914, first voyage, New York-Naples-Piraeus. 24 March 1915, last voyage, Genoa- Naples-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). 30 April-October 1915, for the Panama Pacific Line (charter), New York-Panama Canal-San Francisco. 26 October 1915, first of 2 roundtrip voyages for the American Line (charter), New York-Falmouth-London. 19 January 1916-18 February 1917, 11 roundtrip voyages for the American Line (charter), New York-Liverpool. 1917, U.S. troopship. 28 October 1917, torpedoed 150 miles off the French coast; reached St. Nazaire; repaired. 1919, returned to the Red Star Line; passenger accommodation altered to 242 in 1st class, 310 in 2nd class, 876 in 3rd class. 28 April 1920-22 March 1923, resumed Antwerp-Southampton- New York service. April 1923, sold to the American Line. 1 June 1923-23 September 1923, 4 roundtrip voyages, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Hamburg (cabin and 3rd class only). November 1923, sold to the Panama Pacific Line. 1 November 1923, first voyage, New York-San Francisco. February 1928, sold to Hughes, Bolckow; scrapped at Blyth [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 84-85 (photograph). Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 856]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 August 1998]
Finnboston
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 124.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Finwale (tug)
The 150-foot steel Admiralty steam tug Finwale of 1,200 horsepower, built in Great Britain in 1915, was purchased by Hopkins Bros. of Hopkins Landing, B. C. for the west Howe Sound Mail run under the name Hopkins Brothers. She was delayed by boiler trouble in the Azores, with the result that her owners lost the government mail contract, and upon her arrival on the B. C. coast she was operated in log towing service in charge of Capt. Gordon Hopkins. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fir (u.s. Coast Guard Tender)
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 112. Budget cuts force decommissioning of Seattle based buoytender, Marine Digest. January 30, 1982, p. 3 (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fire Canoe (steamboat)
Tommy Thompson, Jr., a steamboat enthusiast and then a mechanical engineering student at the University of Washington, completed the conversion of a surplus Coast Guard surf boat into the 28-foot steamboat Fire Canoe. Powered by an ancient 40-horsepower steam engine builtin England and formerly in use on Lake Ontario, the tiny woodburner is still in use by Thompson in the San Juan Island area. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Firefly (steam Tug)
Ashore at the mouth of the Columbia River on February 24, 1854. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard,p. 165-66. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 341.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Firefly (tug)
February 24, 1854 Steam propeller tug, built at San Francisco in 1853 by Captain Hawkes. Vessel, towing logs from Youngs River to Welsh's sawmill, rounded the point and became caught in the ebb. She drifted with the tide until grounded near Point Stevens. High and dry, the Firefly lay there until an incoming tide swung the log raft, reversed its direction and, as it passed the tug at a furious rate, the tow line tightened and pulled the vessel in a scandalous, untug-like fashion across the flat and into deeper water off Tansey Point. Unable or unwilling to cast off the tow, Captain Hawkes, Purser Van Dyke Wiesenthal, Engineer Swasey and an Indian lad went to the bottom. Passenger Welsh climbed aboard the offending log raft, somehow managed to free it, and rode with the tide to Astoria where astounded citizens took him off before forming a rescue party. They raced to the scene of the disaster and found the tug in three fathoms of water, her smoke stack above the rising tide with her fortunate fireman sitting p
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Firefly (tug)
American steam tug, was carried ashore near Tansy Point while towing logs at the mouth of the Columbia, February 24, 1854, with a loss of four lives. The tug was enroute to Welsh's Sawmill from Young's River in command of Captain Thomas Hawks. As she rounded Smith's Point she was met by a strong ebb tide and was unable to make any headway against the currents. Her low power engine could not stand the strain and the tug was carried on the sands at Tansy Point with her tow drifting aii-nlessly behind. Hawks refused to cut his tow loose, fully expecting to get off on the next tide. The mountin surf, however, carried the log raft ashore and pulled the tug after it, causing her to capsize and sink, taking the Captain and three crew members to a watery grave. Aboard the tug was I. Welsh, owner of the mill for which the logs were destined. He was thrown clear of the wreck and managed to scramble up on the log raft. He succeeded in severing the hawser with his knife and was carried all the way to Astoria astride of t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Firefly (tug)
February 24, 1854 Steam propeller tug, built at San Francisco in 1853 by Captain Hawkes. Vessel, towing logs from Youngs River to Welsh's sawmill, rounded the point and became caught in the ebb. She drifted with the tide until grounded near Point Stevens. High and dry, the Firefly lay there until an incoming tide swung the log raft, reversed its direction and, as it passed the tug at a furious rate, the tow line tightened and pulled the vessel in a scandalous, untug-like fashion across the flat and into deeper water off Tansey Point. Unable or unwilling to cast off the tow, Captain Hawkes, Purser Van Dyke Wiesenthal, Engineer Swasey and an Indian lad went to the bottom. Passenger Welsh climbed aboard the offending log raft, somehow managed to free it, and rode with the tide to Astoria where astounded citizens took him off before forming a rescue party. They raced to the scene of the disaster and found the tug in three fathoms of water, her smoke stack above the rising tide with her fortunate fireman sitting p
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Firwood (steamer)
Other losses in other areas were: American wooden steamship Firwood, 1,045 tons, destroyed by fire off Peru late in December. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 312.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fischer Brothers (schooner)
The schooner Fischer Bros. was driven ashore and went to pieces October 23 on the rocks off Cape Rodney, Alaska. She hung up some distance off shore and a line was only carried ashore after many hours and extreme difficulties. All hands reached the beach, but Capt. A. M. Flagg, a highly respected shipmaster of Seattle, died later as the result of exposure. xxxx, p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fisgard
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 75, 80, 104. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p. 287, 414-15. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., I, p. 499. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 293. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 398. Joseph Thomas HJoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris of Nisqually. Memoris of Nisqually., p. 56-70, 87, 99, 101, 105.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fisher Lassie I (fish Packer)
Built in 1929 by John Stebbland, New Westminster. Reg. No. 155233 Length 61 ft. beam 18 ft. Owner: Robert Swanson, Exporter, 1845 E. Pender St., Vancouver. First trip Oct. 18, 1930, Captain J. McCulloch. Seized by customs about Jan. 20, 1932. Released on board. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fishing Fleet
May 4, 1880. One of the most tragic events that has occurred in the Pacific's Graveyard was the loss of the entire fleet of fishing craft and the drowning of two hundred fishermen in 1880. The disaster occurred when the local small fry fish boats from the Columbia and Shoalwater Bay were fishing off the mouth of the Columbia. With no advance warning, gale-like winds swept in from the southwest and turned the waters into angry chasms and mountainous swells. The helpless craft were overturned and swamped one after another and their contents swallowed in the tempest. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fishing Fleet Disaster
Fishingfleet disaster, May 4, 1880. A flash hurricane caught a fleet of 240 boats between the entrance to the Columbia River and Willapa Bay destroying most of the fleet and claiming somewhere between 200 and 325 lives.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fishing Vessel
The Olympic, first of a new class of combination fishing vessels designed and built by Marine Construction & Design Co. (MARCO), Seattle, was launched at that company's yard for Harold Hansen, Severin Hjelle and John Sjong. The 94 x 25foot vessel, powered by a 565-horsepower Caterpillar diesel, was especially designed for the sub-Arctic Pacific fishery, one of the most dangerous in the world. She was placed in service fishing Alaskan king crab for American Freezerships, Inc. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.43.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fishingfleet Disaster, May 4, 1880. A Flash Hurric
The Olympic, first of a new class of combination fishing vessels designed and built by Marine Construction & Design Co. (MARCO), Seattle, was launched at that company's yard for Harold Hansen, Severin Hjelle and John Sjong. The 94 x 25foot vessel, powered by a 565-horsepower Caterpillar diesel, was especially designed for the sub-Arctic Pacific fishery, one of the most dangerous in the world. She was placed in service fishing Alaskan king crab for American Freezerships, Inc. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.43.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fitzjames
The FITZJAMES was a 3-masted square-rigged ship, built in Richibucto, New Brunswick, in 1852, by John James Jardine, for his own account. 1206/1307 tons (old/new measurement), readmeasured in 1861 to 1195 tons; 186 x 32.5 x 22.7 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Build of hackmatack, birth, spruce, and pine; felted and sheathed with yellow metal; iron bolts. Sold in 1853 to Pilkington & Wilson (from 1857: H. T. Wilson & Chambers), owners of the "Liverpool 'White Star' Line of Australian Packets", predecessor, in name only, to the White Star steamship line, owners of the TITANIC. Put in the North Atlantic trade after a projected voyage to Australia was cancelled; sailed from Liverpool on 8 November 1853 for New Orleans. 15 June 1854, first voyage, Liverpool-Melbourne. 24 January 1866, sailed from Liverpool for Melbourne; 14 February 1866, put into Lisbon after springing a leak; condemned as unseaworthy [Roy Anderson, White Star (Prescot, Lancashire: T. Stephenson & Sons, 1964), p. 186]. The following additional information is taken from Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1853-1866: Master: 1853-1856 - I. Hoyt; 1857-1861 - Hamelton; 1861-1864 - W. Forsyth; 1864-1866 - Wardrop. Port of Registration: Liverpool. Port of Survey: 1853-1856 - Liverpool; 1857 - London; 1858-1859 - [not given]; 1860-1864 - Liverpool; 1864-1865 - London; 1865-1866 - Liverpool. Destined Voyage: 1853 - New York; 1854-1856 - Australia; 1857-1859 - [not given]; 1860-1861 - Australia; 1861-1863 - Callao; 1863-1864 - Quebec; 1864-1865 - South America; 1865-1866 - Australia. For additional information on the FITZJAMES, see also Dave Hollett, Fast passage to Australia: the history of the Black Ball, Eagle and White Star Lines (London: Fairplay, 1986). To determine whether any account survives of the voyage of the FITZJAMES on which your ancestor sailed, check Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs: a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters and all forms of voyage narratives 1788 to 1988, Roebuck Society Publications, 41, 47 (2 vols.; Yaroomba, Queensland: Ian Nicholson, [1990]-1993). Finally, if you have not already done so, you should check the website of the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. The ANMM's library publishes, and also maintains online, a series of very informative research guides, known as Pathfinders,which cover various aspects of Australian maritime history research, including No. 2: Sailing Ships ), which is of particular importance to your research.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 6 November 1997]
Fivaller
See CITY OF BALTIMORE.
Citation:
Five Brothers (crab Boat)
The 55 -foot crab boat Five Brothers, owned and operated by the Graham Brothers of Marshfield, Tony (the master), John, Sterling and Richard, which had been lying-to off the bar, also crossed in to the assistance of the stricken naval vessel YMS-1336. The two boats picked up 21 of the 29 officers and men who had been aboard the minesweeper, but five of these could not be revived. Towing the motor lifeboat, which had become disabled, and jammed with 16 survivors, five bodies, five Coast Guardsmen and her own crew, the Five Brothers remained offshore all night, finally landing safely at Port Orford at 4:00 p.m. the next day. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flamingo
The steamship FLAMINGO was built as the LEOPARD, by Brownlow, Pearson & Co., Hull, in 1858, on their own account, for the Baltic trade. 550/849/690 tons (net/gross/under deck); 223.1 x 28.9 x 16.5 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); iron construction, screw propulsion, 5 bulkheads. Official number: 20634; international code signal letters: N.B.W.M. Acquired by Thomas Wilson Sons & Co, for their feeder service from Hamburg to Hull, in 1877. (Despite what the Hamburg indirect passenger list appears to say, the FLAMINGO did not sail from Hamburg to Liverpool but from Hamburg to Hull, where the passengers boarded a train for Liverpool, where they transferred to another vessel for the journey to North America.) Re-engined by Earle & Co., Hull, and renamed FLAMINGO in 1879 [Lloyd's Register for 1858-1881]. The latest edition of Lloyd's Register to which I have access is dated 1881, and I have no record of this vessel's history since that date.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
Flamingo (fishing Vessel)
In November, the 85-foot fishing vessel Flamingo caught fire on Puget Sound off Point No Point. A ruptured fuel line fed the fire. The tug Dorothy Foss, in charge of Capt. Sam Emmerson and towing two empty chip barges from Port Townsend, sighted the flames and removed the two-man crew after notifying the Coast Guard by radio. Three Coast Guard boats responded and used their entire supply of foam, but were unable to control the fire and the Flamingo became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.87.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flamingo (steamer)
Steamer Flamingo unloading from halibut trip. ALF, p. 90. Crew of the Flamingo, ALF, p. 91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flatboat (keelboat)
February 2, 1851 The old keelboats and bateaux never enjoyed the honors due them as makers of Oregon history. Using sweeps, sails or paddles, these workhorses of the rivers carried immense loads hundreds of miles and, although hailed in eastern waters from Canada to Louisiana, they are seldom mentioned here. This particular vessel was owned and operated by McClure and Lemmons of Salem. The ship, caught in the narrows at Rock Islands, became a total loss. Her cargo consisted of 100 bushels of wheat, 1,000 bushels of potatoes, 100 bushels of oats, 400 lbs. of butter, 50 dozen eggs and 18 hogs, all bound for California. Undaunted by the wreck, Captain Lemmons later that day brought through two bateaux, each carried 250 bushels of wheat ... c'mon, you Mike Fink fans, top thatl Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flavia
See CAMPANELLO.
Citation:
Fleetwing (tug)
The little tug Fleetwing, operating on Puget Sound waters since 1920, was destroyed during a storm at Useless Bay, Whidbey Island in October. The 35-foot tug had been towing a dredge from Port Angeles to Everett when the heavy weather struck, and had anchored in the bay. Both tug and tow were driven ashore and the Fleetwing broke up in the heavy swells Owner-skipper Don Murphy of Everett and a deckhand swam and waded 50 yards to shore when the waves began breaking over the tug's wheelhouse. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LVI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood
The 80-foot passenger and freight boat Fleetwood, also powered by a semi-diesel engine, was built by Joseph Supple at Portland for operation between Astoria and Flavel. She was purchased before completion by King & Babbidge for the Astoria-Westport and was given the 100-horsepower oil engine at that time. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (passenger Boat)
The 80-foot passenger and freight boat Fleetwood, also powered by a semi -diesel engine, was built by Joseph Supple at Portland for operation between Astoria and Flavel. She was purchased before completion by King & Babbidge for the Astoria-Westport and was given the 100-horsepower oil engine at that time. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (steam Tug)
The steam tug Fleetwood was sold in 1927 by the Fleetwood Tug & Barge Co. of Grays Harbor to the Schafer Bros. Lumber Co. for general log and barge towing with the motor tug Hoquiam. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (steamer)
Built at Portland in 1881. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 284. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 121, 154. Steamer Fleetwood, fastest ship on the Sound, Tacoma News Tribune. January 28, 1979. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (steamer)
The propeller Fleetwood, a wooden passenger steamer 111.5 feet in length built at Portland for Capt. U. B. Scott in 1881, passing to Capt. Z. J. Hatch, who employed her on the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia route. In 1889 she made a record trip from Olympia carrying a steam fire engine from that city to Seattle at the time of the great fire which totally destroyed the waterfront and business sections; abandoned on the beach near Quartermaster Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 43
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (steamer)
Capt. U. B. Scott launched his first propeller, the Fleetwood, at Portland, April 23, 1881 and entered into vigorous competition with the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company. The Fleetwood was built to run in connection with the Gold Dust, which was taken above the Cascades iii March, and made her trial trip May 28th, covering the distance between Vancouver and Portland in fortynine minutes, and making the entire run from the Cascades in three hours and sixteen minutes. The Oregon Railway & Navigation Company put the Dixie Thompson on the route to the Cascades and the Hassalo on the middle river, and carried passengers through to The Dalles from Portland for fifty cents. The rate war went merrily on for several weeks, the new line apparently having the best of the situation, but in August it was crippled by the sale of the Gold Dust to the big company. Captain Scott, thus left without a connecting boat, cast about for a new route for the Fleetwood and in September started her to Astoria, where he soon demonst
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (steamer)
The Oregon Railway & Navigation Company were having considerable trouble on the Astoria route with Captain Scott's steamer Fleetwood. The Hayward and Bonita were kept at the heels of the little propeller continually, leaving the freight business to be handled by the Willamette Chief and Dixie Thompson. Capt. Richard Hoyt was master of the Hayward until March, at which time he was appointed steamship pilot, and Clark W. Sprague took the steamer and ran her until October, when she was sent to the Sound. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1882. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 292.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (steamer)
The Steamer Fleetwood had earned money and fame on the Columbia, was taken to Puget Sound in November, making the run from the Columbia bar to Neah Bay in twenty-four hours, encountering a terrific gale on the way. George D. Messegee handled her on the trip, and she narrowly escaped destruction. In the midst of the heavy gale and high seas, which kept her propeller out of water about half the time, her house caught fire near the boiler, but the flames were extinguished before any great damage was done. The Fleetwood commenced running between Olympia and Seattle, where she met with a reception fully as generous as that accorded her when she first appeared on the Columbia. She also encountered her old Columbia River rival, the Hayward, and there was spirited competition between the two steamers. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1886, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 335-36.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fleetwood (tug)
The Fleetwood, 75 -foot steam tug built at Aberdeen in 1902, sold by the WUson Tugboat Co. of Grays Harbor to Capt. H. C. Endreson, for continued operation there. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flood Tide (fishing Vessel)
The first of a new class of 104-foot combination fishing vessels, an outgrowth of the earlier 94-footers designed by Marine Construction & Design (Marco) of Seattle, was delivered by that company to Ricaventura Fishing Co. The Flood Tide, fitted with a 675-horsepower GM diesel, was equipped with experimental gear aimed at future semi-automated operation in the king crab fishery. Although rigged for crab fishing, she was designed for easy conversion to engage in other fisheries. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flora (keelboat)
Don Berry. Majority of Scoundrels., p. 297-98.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flora (troller)
March 26,1954 Troller. Wrecked just outside of Peacock Spit. Two dead. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence
The Florence was an American ship, 1,684 tons, vanished with all hands off Cape Flattery in 1902. Vessel was bound for San Francisco from Tacoma. She was owned by California Shipping Co., and was built at Bath, Maine, in 77, by Coss & Sawyer. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence
The 1,684-ton wooden ship Florence, Bath-built in 1877 and owned by the California Shipping Co. of San Francisco, went missing with all hands while on a voyage from Tacoma for Honolulu. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 83.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence (bark)
November 18, 1875 Bark, 430 tons, built at Bath, Maine in 1836. The Duncan family were gathering firewood on the beach and found the name plate of the ship. A few days prior, Captain S. A. Dayton and his crew of eight had abandoned the ship in a fierce gale some 20 miles south of the Umpqua. They were bound Port Discovery-San Francisco. Most of the bodies of the dead crew were found near Cape Perpetua. The wooden vessel and her cargo proved a total loss to owner Isadore Burns. The name plate Florence was nailed to a post; the area has been known as Florence ever since. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence (bark)
The bark Florence, a veritable floating coffin, foundered November 17th about forty miles off the Umpqua River. She sailed from Port Discovery, November 3, 1875, with 300,000 feet of lumber, and on the sixteenth was caught in a heavy southeast gale and began leaking so badly that at 3:00 A.M. on the seventeenth the crew were forced to abandon her. They took to the boats, and, as water was scarce, they attempted to land near where the brig Fawn had gone ashore a few years before. In steering through the breakers the boat capsized, and, with the single exception of seaman Daniel Deary, all were drowned. The crew of the Florence on her last trip was as follows: S. A. Dayton, captain; Anderson, first mate: Carey, second mate; Malcolm Grant, William Duncan, McPherson, Welch, Deary, an unknown Norwegian from Tacoma, seamen; and the Chinese cook. Captain Dayton was well known on the Coast, having been first in command of the old bark Glympse in the forties, and afterward of many others. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'P
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence (bark)
The bark Florence, a veritable floating coffin, foundered November 17th about forty miles off the Umpqua River. She sailed from Port Discovery, November 3, 1875, with 300,000 feet of lumber, and on the sixteenth was caught in a heavy southeast gale and began leaking so badly that at 3:00 A.M. on the seventeenth the crew were forced to abandon her. They took to the boats, and, as water was scarce, they attempted to land near where the brig Fawn had gone ashore a few years before. In steering through the breakers the boat capsized, and, with the single exception of seaman Daniel Deary, all were drowned. The crew of the Florence on her last trip was as follows: S. A. Dayton, captain; Anderson, first mate: Carey, second mate; Malcolm Grant, William Duncan, McPherson, Welch, Deary, an unknown Norwegian from Tacoma, seamen; and the Chinese cook. Captain Dayton was well known on the Coast, having been first in command of the old bark Glympse in the forties, and afterward of many others. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'P
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 51.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1904. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence E. Walton (steamer)
A fine steamer named the Florence E. Walton was constructed at Coos Bay in 1860 for the coasting traffic. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence Henry (steamer)
At Ballard the sternwheeler Florence Henry, seventy feet long and eighteen feet beam, for Capt. T. H. McMillan, in twenty-five days, by John J. Holland. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.398-9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence Henry (sternwheeler)
Built at Ballard in 1891. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence J
Florence J., 80-foot oil distribution boat with 80-horsepower Frisco Standard gas engine, Dockton, replacing the Rene of Capt. Judy in Union Oil service on Puget Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence K (steamer)
Built in Tacoma by Crawford and Reid in 1903. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208. Florence K started life as a mosquito fleet steamer, ended it as a quick little ferry called Beeline, The Marine Digest July 27, 1985, p. 7. The Beeline, Marine Digest. August 3, 1985, p. 8 (il). Also known as the Gloria.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence K (steamer)
The propeller passenger steamer Florence K., 143 tons, 93 feet, was built at Tacoma by Crawford & Reid for Capt. Ben P. Kunkler and E. L. Franks to replace the burned Eagle on the Seattle Fagle Harbor run. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence Nightingale
The 1943-44 Lloyd's Register of Shipping gives the following details : FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE ex. Mormacsun-1942. Call sign : WHLG. Official # : 240541. Rigging : 2 decks and shelter deck; decks electrically welded; longitudinal framing at bottom and at decks; cruiser stern; fitted for fuel oil; equipped with Direction Finder, Gyro-compass and Echo Sounding Device; water ballast. Tonnage : 7,773 tons gross and 4,585 tons net. Dimensions : 469 feet long, 69.6 foot beam and holds 29.2 feet deep. Forecastle 39 feet long. Built : in 1940 by Moore Dry Dock Co. in Oakland, CA. Propulsion : 2 steam turbine double reduction geared to a single screw shaft. Engine built by DeLaval Steam Turbines Co. in Trenton, NJ . Owners : Moore-McCormack Lines Inc. Port of registry : San Francisco Flag : U.S.A. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 1 October 1998]
Florence S (steamer)
The 75-foot stern-wheel steamer Florence S., built by Moran at Seattle in 1898 for the Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. and owned and operated by Capt. Sid Barrington during the 1900 season, capsized and sank July 20 in Thirtymile River between Lower LeBarge and Hootalinqua in Yukon Territory. There were about thirty passengers aboard, two of whom, and the steward, Walter Monaster of Skagway, were drowned. Capt. Barrington, having been continuously on duty for 24 hours, had turned the helm over to the British captain (required by Canadian law on all American vessels operating on Canadian inland waters) before the accident, and was exonerated of responsibility in the subsequent investigation. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 64.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florencia (brig)
The Florencia was a Peruvian brig, that encountered gale off Cape Flattery, December 8, 1860, and was on her beam ends for three hours. The captain, cook, and a passenger were drowned. She waterlogged wreck drifted and the remainder of the crew escaped. The vessel was en route to Callao from Utsaladdy, Washington, With a cargo of lumber. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florencia (brig)
The Peruvian brig Florencia, from Utsalady for Callao, encountered a gale off Cape Flattery, December 8th, and was on her beam ends for three hours. The captain, cook, supercargo, and Dr. L. B. Bailey of Victoria, were drowned. The vessel drifted into Nootka Sound, and the rest of the crew escaped. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.96-7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florida
Built by Societa Esercizio Bacini, Rive Trigoso, Italy for Lloyd Italiano of Genoa, this was a 5,018 gross ton ship, length 381.4ft x beam 48.1ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 25-1st and 1,600-3rd class. Launched on 22nd June 1905, she started her maiden voyage on 18th Sept.1905 when she left Genoa for Naples and Buenos Aires. After this voyage she commenced Genoa - Palermo - Naples - New York sailings on 15th Nov.1905. On 23rd Jan.1909 she collided with and sank the White Star liner "Republic" in dense fog off the US coast. Although receiving a badly damaged bow, she managed to reach New York and was repaired. This was the first occasion when wireless telegraphy was used to summon assistance at sea. Her last Genoa - Palermo - Naples - New York voyage started 20th Apr.1911, and her first class accommodation was downgraded to 2nd class. Sold to Ligure Brasiliana of Genoa the same year, she was renamed "Cavour" and was used for Genoa - South America sailings. In 1914 she went to Transatlantica Italiana and was sunk in collision with the Italian Auxiliary Cruiser "Caprera" on 12th Dec.1917 near Armevilla. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1344] -
Citation: [Posted to The Ships List by Ted Finch - 12 October 1998]
Florida (ferry)
One of the old Hatch steamers, the former Old Bay liner Florida of 1907, renamed Calistoga following her transfer to San Francisco in 1924, was also purchased by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. but was resold soon afterward and did not make the voyage north. The franchise of the Washington Navigation Co. for the operation of ferries between Tacoma and Tahlequah, Vashon Island, was purchased by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. No vessels were involved in the transaction, the former Skansie ferries being employed in the revived Tacoma Narrows crossing and the south Vashon Island route being handled by smaller units of the existing Puget Sound Navigation Co. fleet which were replaced on other routes by the added San Francisco boats. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 491.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Floridian (steamer)
This American steamship (freighter), 6,765 tons, collided with SS Admiral Fisk, near Umatilla Lightship, September 1, 1928. The Floridian went down in deep water. Her crew of 40 were all rescued. The vessel was built at Sparrows Point, Maryland, in 1915, and was ovaed by the American Hawaiian Steamship Co., who used her in intercoastal trades. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flosie (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flottbek
This German ship, 1,972 tons, went on beam ends between Flattery Rocks and White Rock, south of Cape Flattery; was miraculously pulled free bY tug and towed to port for repairs. Owned by Knohr & Burchard, Hamburg. Built in 1891 in Newcastle, England. Accident occurred, January 13, 1901. The First officer and 12 crewmen took to boat for help and rowed all the way to Neah Bay, almost exhausted from hunger and exposure. captain Shoemaker, master. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flottbek
German ship in trouble south of Cape Flattery in January of 1901. Later repaired. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (launch)
The 35-foot steel tunnel-stern launch Flyer, with 25-horsepower Ferro engine, was built by Capt. E. G. McFarlane and J. R. Glover at Asotin, operating further up the Snake River than any previous boat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
Lost on Coeur d'Alene Lake, by fire in 1938. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
E.T.Short, After many years, The Tacoma Times. October 31, 1934. Pat Winkler, Along Tacoma's waterfront, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 24, 1960, p. B-2. Steamer Flyer at drydock at Quartermaster Harbor Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 342. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 207. Launched at Portland. Used mainly on the Tacoma to Seattle run. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest p. 113-15, 117. BNG p. 295. Morgan, Murray. C. Puget's Sound. p. 272. The Flyer, Coast Magazine. (March, 1907), p. 194. Famous sound steamer is to be burned at junk. Covered 1,368,740 miles in 39 years of service, The Tacoma News Tribune. May 16, 1929. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 147-49, 152-53, 162, 165, 185.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
The famous old Seattle - Tacoma steamer Flyer, a veteran of 28 years of service and nearly two million miles of travel, was extensively rebuilt at Seattle, emerging as the Washington. Following wartime service, she was retainedby the Puget Sound Navigation Co. for another decade as a spare boat and in special excursion service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 297.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
The funeral pyre that burned the Henry Villaed was shared by the legendary Sound speedster Flyer, sold in her old age as the Washington by the Puget Sound Navigation Co. to the same firm of shipbreakers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
But for the fact that both steamers were proceeding under a slow bell at the time, a marine disaster with great loss of life would have been the result of a collision on the foggy morning of December 6 between the Tacoma - Seattle steamer Flyer and the Bellingham Bay Transportation Company's Bellingham (formerly the Willapa), towing the same company's steamer Dode. Within five minutes after the Flyer pulled away from her dock near the foot of Madison Street, Seattle, the Bellingham had crashed into her, tearing away a large section of her port side abreast of the engine room. The Dode, her momentum unchecked, then took her turn at butting into the unfortunate Flyer, inflicting lesser damage. Disabled, the Flyer then drifted into the German ship Chile at a buoy in the harbor, the steamer smashing her prow. Boats from the revenue cutter Manning removed about 40 passengers from the Flyer, after which the battered steamer was gotten under control and taken to her dock. Capt. William Williamson was in command of t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
The fast Seattle- Tacoma steamer Flyer, operated by Capt. U. B. Scott, was rammed on August 20 by the heavy freight and passenger steamer Utopia, Capt. John O'Brien, off Brown's Point. The Flyer's passengers were transferred to the Utopia, which towed the disabled passenger steamer to Tacoma for drydocking and repair. The Utopia was enroute to Tacoma with a cargo of gold and silver ore. One of her 18-man crew was killed in the accident. There were no casualties on the Flyer. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
The Columbia River & Puget Sound Navigation Co. was incorporated in February, 1891, with Capt U. B. Scott, president, John Leary, vice president L. B. Seeley, second vice president E. W. Creighton, secretary-treasurer, the other directors being E. A. Seeley and Z. J. Hatch, the interest of Capt Hatch being taken over by the other members shortly after the organization of the firm. The new company absorbed the steamers Fleetwood and Bailey Gatzert then being operated on Puget Sound by Capt Hatch and Leary respectively, and the Telephone, operated on the Columbia and Willamette Rivers by Capt Scott, and immediately placed an order with the Johnson yard at Portland for the Flyer's construcfion. She was designed to be the fastest propeller steamer in the Northwest and was so ftne-lined that when she was launched, without the weight of her engines and boilers, she immediately capsized. She was sponsoned out to give her added stability, a step which was expected to adversely affect her speed, but apparently did not
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
The inauguration of augmented Seattle-Tacoma service by the fast new steel steamers of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. (the Chippewa replaced the Sioux as running-mate to the Indianapolis in May) was the final shot in that company's battle to take over the lucrative passenger service between Washington's then two largest cities from the famous old wooden Flyer of Capt. Scott's Columbia River & Puget Sound Navigation Co. Although successful in almost every such contest in which it engaged, the Puget Sound Navigation Co. found even its finest modem steamers unable to oust the gallant little F@yer from the route she had served with such remarkable dependability and speed since 1891. The big Indianapolis, commanded by Capt. Howard Penfield, with Chief Engineer Bert Thornton in charge of the engines, had attempted to outrun Capt. Scott's little wooden speedster the previous summer. The Flyer, in charge of Capt. Everett B. Coffin and Chief Engineer Ansell B. Hill, although four minutes behind the Indianapolis on her
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
Their Puget Sound business is handled by the steamers Fleetwood and Flyer, the latter being the fastest propeller ever constructed in the Northwest. Her keel was laid in Portland, March 31st, and she left for the Sound, November 13th, in charge of Graves, captain; Thomas Neill, pilot; Thomas Devlin, chief engineer; A. J. Taylor, purser; George Murray, steward. Capt. Harry Struve was first in command after she reached Seattle and handled her on the Seattle and Tacoma route. He was succeeded by Capt. John Jordison, who has since remained in command, with Samuel Sutton, chief engineer; Thomas Short, first assistant; Henry Carter, pilot; A. J. Taylor, purser. The entire upper works of the steamer were destroyed by fire in 1892, but she was rebuilt with larger and finer cabins and was again on the route in June, 1892. Her record since that time is rather a remarkable one. She has been almost continually making four round trips a day between Seattle and Tacoma, covering the distance of twenty-eight miles in less th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flyer (steamer)
A serious mishap involved the Seattle-Tacoma steamer Flyer on the morning of May 19, 1912. She had arrived at Colman Dock shortly before noon of the bright Sunday morning in charge of Capt. James Burns, with Al Hunt, engineer, discharging her passengers from Tacoma as a crowd of several hundred waited impatiently to board her for the return trip. The Flyer's gangplank was run out to one of the slips or chutes on the lower deck of the wharf which were ordinarily used for loading and unloading freight. These slips were hung so that the outer end could be raised or lowered according to the position of the tide. A worm gear mechanism was used for this purpose, the threads of the worm fitting into a large cog wheel, and supposedly self locking. As the mass of humanity on the dock surged aboard the steam in the fashion peculiar to ferry boat commuters to this day, the cog slipped, dropping the gangway straight down, throwing more than fifty persons headlong into the bay. As Captain Burns saw the accident, he inst
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Cloud (clipper Ship)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 111. American ship launced in 1851. Currier and Ives print. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers.. p. 30. Willis Thornton. The Nine Lives of Citizen Train. 1948., p. 17-19.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Cloud (troller)
On August 15, the 31-foot troller Flying Cloud was sunk in collision with the fishboat Restless C. II, the two men on board being taken off by the latter vessel. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Dutchman (steamer)
The Flying Dutchman was withdrawn from the Fraser in 1862, and Capt. William Moore found a new field for steamboating on the Stickeen River, where gold had been discovered. He made the first trip up this stream, towing a barge and carrying one hundred and twenty-five passengers. Moore cleared $14,000 with his steamer in the first seventy-two days of the excitement. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.111.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Dutchman (steamer. )
The Flying Dutchman was a small sternwheeler built by William Moore for the Fraser River trade, in the fall of 1860, but owing to a delay in receiving her machinery, which came up from San Francisco on the old bark Vickery, did not make her trial trip until January 21, 1861. She was ninety-three feet long, seventeen feet beam, with 12 x 36 inch engines, and was speedy for that period. Moore and his sons ran her for a few years with indifferent success, and in 1864 sold an interest in the vessel to Capt. Delaware Insley, a well known character in Fraser River steamboating. The Flying Dutchman soon afterward became financially involved and was taken to the American side and purchased by one of the mill companies. But little work was performed by the steamer in these waters, and the engines were removed and placed in the steamer Linnie, one of the first sternwheelers constructed on the Sound. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Mar
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Enterprise (steamer)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Fish
Wilkes Expedition member. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington.. II, p. 178, 183. BNG p. 7. Richard Montgomery. White Headed Eagle, John McLoughlin, p. 276.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Fish (pilot Boat)
Former New York pilot boat Independence, 96 tons, 85' x 22' x -. Sold at Singapore, 1842; became opium smuggler. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 19, 21-23, 25-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Princess (jet Foil)
Ex Flying Princess on way to Hong Kong as jetfoil Urzela, Marine Digest. February 13, 1982, p. 11+ (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flying Venus
The ship Flying Venus, from Port Ludlow with a cargo of lumber for Hobson's Bay, Australia, was wrecked on Perhyn Island in November and became a total loss. The crew were saved. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foam (schooner)
The small two -masted schooner Foam stranded April 1 and became a total loss near Unga. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 52.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Folia
See PRINCIPE DI PIEMONTE.
Citation:
Fonduco
Sou'wester. III (Autumn, 1968), p. 44-46.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forager
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 107.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Force (tug)
The first fiberglass covered tug built in British Columbia, the 28-foot shallow draft diesel - powered Force of 165 - horsepower, was built at Sterling Shipyards, Vancouver, for harbor service by the Dolmage Towing Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 586.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forerunner (troller)
Forerunner, 50 x 16-foot ocean troller with 350-horsepower diesel engine, by Nelson Log Bronc Co. at Coos Bay for Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Thorne of Charleston, Oregon as the largest all-steel fishing vessel built on Coos Bay to that time. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Friend
Forest Friend, also operated by the Grays Harbor Motorship interests, loaded lumber on Puget Sound for Noumea, then proceeded to Newcastle for coal and on across the Pacific to Callao, returning to Puget Sound the following year. Forest Dream, out of Vancouver, B. C. with lumber, having been libelled by her crew in Australia, was sold at auction in Newcastle late in the year and went under the Swedish flag, never to return to the Northwest. Gordon Newell, Marine Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 372.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Friend (barkentine)
In October the barkentine Forest Friend, Capt. Alex. Zugehoer, lifted a cargo of 1,550,000 feet of lumber for San Pedro at Taylor's Mill at the south end of Lake Washington near Renton. She was the first ocean vessel to berth at this extremity of the lake, Taylor's Mill having previously lightered its cargoes to vessels moored in Lake Union or Elliot Bay. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 338.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Friend (barkentine)
The barkentine Forest Friend, having been sold following a voyage to Australia, passed to the Massey Mort Shipping Co. of Adelaide and was transferred from Newcastle for operation from the former port. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Friend (barkentine)
The barkentine Forest Friend was sold for debt at Esquimalt and entered upon a long period of inactivity at Vancouver. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Friend (tug)
The Forest Friend was taken over for barge service by Island Tug & Barge Co., which also purchased the former Canadian government steamer Lillooet for conversion to a tug. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 464.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Home (schooner)
The Forest Home, a four-masted schooner of 763 tons and 950 M capacity, was built by H. E. Heuckendorff at Marshfield, 0regon in 1900. She was owned by Swayne & Hoyt, San Francisco, and later by the McCormick Lumber Co.; in 1918, James Jerome, San Francisco, took her over. In 1922 she made a voyage to Alaska, salmon packing; and was subsequently sold to New Zealand owners and renamed the Holmwood, as which she was listed in 1930. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Home (schooner)
The Forest Home, a four-masted schooner of 763 tons and 950 M capacity, was built by H. E. Heuckendorff at Marshfield, 0regon in 1900. She was owned by Swayne & Hoyt, San Francisco, and later by the McCormick Lumber Co.; in 1918, James Jerome, San Francisco, took her over. In 1922 she made a voyage to Alaska, salmon packing; and was subsequently sold to New Zealand owners and renamed the Holmwood, as which she was listed in 1930. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Home (schooner)
The former Northwest four-masted schooner Forest Home, under New Zealand ownership for many years as the Holmwood, was shelled and sunk by a German raider in Australian waters in 1941. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest King (schooner)
The steam schooner Forest King, idle at Seattle under ownership of the Todd Co. since 1930, was sold to the newly organized Southland Steamship Co. of Seattle and placed briefly in the California-Puget Sound trade under Capt. Alex Zugehoer, formerly of the ocean tug Roosevelt. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1934, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 430.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest King (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Forest King, idle at the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co., Seattle, since completing an Alaskan voyage the previous May, was sold with the other assets of the short-lived Southland Steamship Co. to the Matthewson Shipping Co. of Seattle. She was shortly resold to East Coast owners, who renamed her Alice Tebb, and sank off the coast of Georgia in 1940. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest King (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Forest King, idle at the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co., Seattle, since completing an Alaskan voyage the previous May, was sold with the other assets of the short-lived Southland Steamship Co. to the Matthewson Shipping Co. of Seattle. She was shortly resold to East Coast owners, who renamed her Alice Tebb, and sank off the coast of Georgia in 1940. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest King (steamer)
The brisk post-war lumber market which developed in 1922 resulted in the return to service of a number of the sailing schooners and barkentines which had been laid up for varying lengths of time. Among these were the fivemasted barkentines Forest Dream and Forest -Pride, owned by the Grays Harbor Motorship Corporation and operated with the steamer Forest King as the Forest Line by Albert Schubach of Seattle and associates. Although the two big barkentines retained masts, spars and canvas and made occasional coastwise voyages under sail, they were more frequently used as barges in tow of the Forest King. The Forest Line was a unique operation in that Capt. W. A. Magee served as general manager of the company as well as master of the Forest King, directing business activities and fleet disposition by wireless from his command. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 320.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest King (steamer)
The Forest King was one of the results of hopeful plans to convert wooden Shipping Board hulls to steam schooners for the coastwise lumber trade and was, in fact, the only one of the Shipping Board's Lake Union fleet of incompleted wooden carriers (sometimes affectionately known as Wilson's Wood Row) to be successfully rebuilt and operated as a steam schooner. The Ferris type hull, built by the Grant-Smith-Porter yard in southwest Washington, was purchased from the government by the Grays Harbor Motorship Corporation, having been towed to Seattle and moored in Lake Union after launching and before completion. The hull was towed to Grays Harbor, where it was completed as a steam schooner at the company's Aberdeen yards, with machinery and deckhouses aft instead of amidships as in th-, case of the Ferris type steamships. The machinery was installed at the same yard. She went into commission in the summer of 1920, loading a full cargo of lumber on Grays Harbor for Peruvian and other west coast ports of South A
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Maid (schooner)
The Forest Maid was another Puget Sound built vessel which appeared in 1870. She was a centerboard schooner of about one hundred and sixty tons register, and was launched with her rigging complete. Captain Edwards, late of the Deacon, took charge and operated her in the redwood lumber trade. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.188.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Pride (barge)
The barge Forest Pride the former wooden five-masted barkentine whose last active service had been in the raising of the Islander, was sold early in the year at marshal's auction to McGinitie & McDonald of Seattle, who resold her within a short time to Gibson Bros., Ltd., British Columbia loggers, who operated her as a log barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 464.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Pride (barkentine)
The five -masted barkentine Forest Pride and the ocean barge Griffson were purchased by Curtis Bros., Seattle house movers, the former from the Lake Union Dry Dock & Machine Works, the latter from James Griffiths & Sons. The two vessels were used by this firm in the first successful effort to raise the long -sunken hulk of the steamship Islander. Rumors of huge sums in raw gold aboard the vessel's strongboxes had led to numerous attempts to salvage her, but when the 33-year-old wreck was finally beached the results proved far from profitable. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: :Superior, 1966,, p. 431.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Pride (barkentine)
A little more fortunate were a number of the wooden schooners and barkentines of the American flag lumber fleets. On the day Pommern departed Tacoma, the barkentine Forest Pride was taken out of Lake Union and towed to Tacoma to load lumber for Australia, making the voyage in charge of Capt. Nels F. Anderson, who had his wife and two small sons aboard with him. She made a second voyage later in the year. Gordon Newell, Marine Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Prince (barge)
The following month the big B.C. Forest Products log barge Forest Prince went ashore on Long Beach on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, and was also refloated in a noteworthy salvage effort. A submerged reef off the beach and heavy swells forced the salvage tug Sudbury II to remain at least a mile offshore. About a half million feet of logs were removed from the barge by her own cranes, while Canada Ropes Ltd. undertook a three-day crash program to manufacture a 6,200-foot line of nylon and polypropylene. The four-ton cable, made fast to the salvage vessel's towline, was carried to within a mile of the beach by Sudbury II, at which point the helicopter picked up the end and towed it through the surf to the barge. On the high tide of January 25, the Sudbury II took up the slack on the long cable and exerted the full thrust of her 3,800-horsepower engines to draw the barge off the beach virtually undamaged. Island Tug & Barge marine superintendent Fred Skinner and port captain Roy Blake supervised the salvage
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen
The Forest Queen, a Puget Sound built vessel, performed the remarkable feat of making eleven round trips between San Francisco and the Sound in the following time: twenty-six, thirty-one, thirty-one, eighteen, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, thirty-two, thirty-four and twenty-four days respectively. She was commanded by Captain Burns. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen (bark)
The Forest Queen, a bark of 511 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1869 by Hiram Doncaster from designs by Middlemas, and cost $60,000. The bark was owned during most of her career by Charles Nelson, San Francisco, and drops from registry shortly before 1900. In 1877 she hung up the remarkable record of making 11 consecutive round trips between San Francisco and Puget Sound under Capt. Burns, the best voyage taking 18 days, the poorest 34, and the average 27 days, gross time. Since the owners of a vessel in those days customarily rewarded a master who made the trip in less than a month by buying him a suit of clothes, Capt. Burns was probably the best-dressed man on the Pacite that year. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen (bark)
March 1898 Bark, 511 tons, built by Hiram Doncaster at Port Ludlow in 1869. Bound from Tacoma for San Francisco, Captain Basely, his crew of nine, 500,000 feet of lumber, 107,000 feet of laths and the ship vanished. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen (bark)
American bark, 511 tons, Captain Basely, vanished with all hands (11) off Cape Flattery in March 1898, bound to San Pedro from Tacoma with 500,000 feet of lumber and 107,000 lathes. This vessel was built at Port Ludlow, Washington, in 1869, by Hiram Doncaster , and was one of the fastest, most economical, and most profitable carriers in coastwise trades. Last owned by Charles Nelson of San Francisco. In 1877, she hung up the remarkable record of 11 consecutive round trips between Puget Sound and San Francisco, under Captain Burns-the best voyage taldng 18 days, the poorest 34. Average was 27 days gross time. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen (bark)
The Forest Queen, a bark of 511 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1869 by Hiram Doncaster from designs by Middlemas, and cost $60,000. The bark was owned during most of her career by Charles Nelson, San Francisco, and drops from registry shortly before 1900. In 1877 she hung up the remarkable record of making 11 consecutive round trips between San Francisco and Puget Sound under Capt. Burns, the best voyage taking 18 days, the poorest 34, and the aver- age 27 days, gross time. Since the owners of a vessel in those days customarily rewarded a master who made the trip in less than a month by buying him a suit of clothes, Capt. Burns was probably the best-dressed man on the Pacite that year. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen (bark)
The 511 -ton bark Forest Queen, Capt. Basely, from Tacoma March 4 for San Pedro with 500,000 feet of lumber and 107,000 laths was lost at sea with her 10-man crew and posted missing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 42
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest Queen (bark)
Puget Sound again exhibited her unsurpassed facilities for fine marine work by increasing the coasting fleet with the barks Forest Queen and Tidal Wave. The former was built at Port Ludlow, and registered five hundred and eleven tons, with the following dimensions: length, one hundred and seventy-two feet; beam, thirty-seven feet; depth, thirteen feet six inches. The other was launched at Port Madison in April. Her dimensions were: length, one hundred and sixty-one feet; beam, thirty-seven feet; depth, thirteen feet seven inches; registered tonnage, net, five hundred and seventy-three tons. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest T. Crosby (steam Tug)
Harry Crosby, after briefly operating several tugs with his Monitor, contracted with the Cook & Lake shipyard at Ballard to build a new steam tug, the Forest T Crosby, which made her trial run in December. Of 83 tons, with dimensions of 74 x 20.3 x 9.7, she was rifted with the 300horsepower triple-expansion engine (11, 15, 25 x 16) from the wrecked steamer Dode, and was given a Scotch boiler designed to pass Canadian inspection, it having been noted that sales of several American vessels to Canadian owners had fallen through due to the failure of their boilers to pass Canadian inspection. The Crosby, however, did not change flags, having remained a unit of the Washington Tug & Barge Co. to the present time. Capt. James Newman was her first master. Capt. Crosby had pioneered the use of multiple barge tows between Puget Sound and British Columbia, such tows having been considered dangerous to handle in the narrow channels and strong tidal conditions met with in that service. The Crosby proved most successful in
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest T. Crosby (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1912, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forester (brig)
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 18-19. Peter Corney. Voyages in the Northern Pacific...1813-1818., p. 38-40, 71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forester (schooner)
The Forester, a four masted schooner of 663 tons and 900M capacity, was built at Alameda in 1900 by Hay & Wright for Sanders & Kirchmann, San Francisco. She was laid up at San Francisco after 1921, first at Government Island in the Oakland Estuary, but about 1935 was towed around to Suisun Bay, and beached on the mud-flats below Antioch. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forester (schooner)
The Forester, a four masted schooner of 663 tons and 900M capacity, was built at Alameda in 1900 by Hay & Wright for Sanders & Kirchmann, San Francisco. She was laid up at San Francisco after 1921, first at Government Island in the Oakland Estuary, but about 1935 was towed around to Suisun Bay, and beached on the mud-flats below Antioch. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850- 1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forester (schooner)
Capt. Otto Daeweritz, 83, a native of Czechoslovakia and a veteran sailing ship master of the Pacific Coast, died in 1947 aboard the schooner Forester at Crockett, Calif. Capt. Daeweritz had commanded the 184-foot four-master, in which he owned a one third interest, since her completion in 1890 by Hay & Wright. She was largely engaged in the lumber and copra trade to the South Sea Islands. When the Forester was laid up in 1932 he bought out his partners' interest and continued to live aboard, first in Oakland Creek and later in Carquinez Straits. The vessel remained as the last intact topmast schooner on the coast. Following the death of Capt. Daeweritz, the Forester was taken over by Charles Fitzgerald and much of her gear was removed by the crew of the Balclutha and taken to the San Francisco Maritime Museum. The hull is still visible alongside the Southern Pacific Right of Way at Crockett. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 547-48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forester (steam Tug)
The steam tug Forester, 39 tons, 58 feet, with 200-horsepower engine, was built at Hoquiam for the Forester Tug Boat Co. of Aberdeen, while the stern-wheel passenger and freight steamer Harbor Queer4 86 feet long with engines of 180 horsepower, was built by W. H. McWhinney at Aberdeen for service on the Chehalis River and Grays Harbor, later being converted to a towboat by the Allman-Hubble Tug Boat Company. Gordon Newell, Marine events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forfar
See MONTROSE (2).
Citation:
Forfarshire (british Bark)
Vessel will load lumber, making first visit to Tacoma, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. June 1, 1905, p. 3. Will soon begin voyage, taking lumber for Chile, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. July 2, 1905, p. 3. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forrest (brig)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forrester
The first authenticated instance of a shipwrecked Japanese coming close to the American shore appears in 1813 when the British brig Forrester (Captain John Jennings) picked up a captain and two seamen from a dismasted junk which was carrying a cargo of timber. The location was slightly northwest of Cape Flattery, Washington, at 49 0 N. by 128 0 W. The junk was 18 months at sea having been blown off course between Yezo (Hokkaido) and an unnamed port on one of the Japanese islands to the south. Of 35 men to start the voyage, Captain Jennings discovered 32 corpses in the hold. The survivors had undergone harrowing experiences. For weeks they had lived on raw beans and rain water plus, quoting Wildes, an occasional resort to more loathsome fare [as their shipmates] died of hunger and exposure-cannibalism again! Twice during the drifting the waifs sighted the American shoreline but each time they were swept back out to sea by a storm. When the Forrester took them aboard, the three survivors were very weak and ve
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forrester (towboat)
Additional small vessels built in the Pacific Northwest in 1914 included the 200-horsepower, 159-ton stem-wheel towboat Forrester, 96 feet in length, by Charles Dushan at Mt. Vemon for the American Tug Boat Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forrester (tug)
The former Grays Harbor tug Forrester was purchased by American Tug Boat Co. of Everett, and the former Columbia River tug George W. was acquired by the Pacific Tug Boat Co. of the same port. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forsaken (steamer)
The 47 ton steamer Forsaken was only one year old when she caught fire in the Snohomish River channel and was run aground to let burn (St raub 1979, Gibbs 1955, Wright 1961:390, 406).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forsaken (steamer)
On Puget Sound the steamer Forsaken burned December 16th while aground on the flats at the mouth of the Snohomish River. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.406.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forsaken (steamer)
The 47 ton steamer Forsaken was only one year old when she caught fire in the Snohomish River channel and was run aground to let burn (St raub 1979, Gibbs 1955, Wright 1961:390, 406).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Bragg (schooner)
The steam schooner Fort Bragg, a wooden lumber carrier of 705 tons built at Fairhaven, California in 1910, missed the Coos Bay bar in the fog and struck the south jetty September 7, becoming a total loss, although her crew escaped. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 419.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Bragg (steam Schooner)
September 14,1932 Steam schooner, 705 tons, wood, built at Fairhaven in 1910 by Price. Under Captain John Samuelson, the ship piled up on the south jetty of Coos Bay bar in a heavv fog. She drifted helpless onto the sand 500' inside the jetty where, while her forlorn crew stood bv, thousands of people looted the stranded ship. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Camosun (steamer)
Canadian steamship (freighter), 7,126 tons, torpedoed and shelled by an enemy submarine off Cape Flattery, June 19, 1942. Vessel was built by Victoria Machinery Depot and was under operation of the Ministry of War. She was on bareboat charter from the War Shipping Administration; operators were T. & J. Brocklebank. When hit amidships (portside), the vessel was outbound with plywood, zinc, lead, and general cargo. Badly damaged and down by the head, she somehow remained afloat and was towed in and later beached off Neah Bay. Salvage tugs aided her and temporary repairs were made. She was then taken back to Victoria's Yarrows Yard, at Esquimalt, unloaded, repaired, and reloaded her for another try. He vessel was commanded by Captain T. S. Eggleston. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Fraser (steamer)
The little upper Fraser River stern-wheeler, Fort Fraser, was rebuilt, her length being increased from 56 to 65 feet and her beam from 11.8 to 16, and renamed Doctor by the Fort George Lumber & Navigation Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort George (bark)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 35-36, 44, 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Hearne (motorship)
An interesting vessel from one of the historicwooden shipyards of Nova Scotia was completed and brought to Vancouver, the motorship Fort Hearne having been designed for the western Arctic Ocean service of the Hudson's Bay Co. Her hull was unusually strong, having foot -square oak ribs spaced only a few inches apart. With a length of 150 feet and beam of 30 feet, the vessel was powered by a 480 - horsepower diesel engine built by the Vivian Engine Works of Vancouver. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 561.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Langley (passenger Ferry)
The Fort Langley, a 60-foot passenger ferry of 3.6-foot draft was completed by B. C. Marine Railway for Brown, Hedley & Walker of New Westminster for competition with B. C. Electric Railways to upper Fraser River points. The 80-passenger boat, with a capacity of five tons of light freight, was fitted with a 75-horsepower Gardner oil engine which burned either coal oil or No. 3 distillate.' Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Mercer (steamer)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 188.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Vancouver (steamer)
Hudson's Bay Company vessel. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest p. 104.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fort Yale (steamer)
Union Bar on the Fraser River, two miles above Hope, was the scene of a terrible steamboat explosion on the afternoon of April 14, 1861. The steamer Fort Yale, Capt. Smith B. Jamieson, while passing this point was blown to pieces, instantly killing five men and wounding several others. The destruction of the boat was so complete that it seems a miracle that any one escaped. Among the passengers was Capt. William Irving, of the rival steamer Colonel Moody. Captain Irving was in the pilot-house a few moments before the accident occurred, and when the dinner bell rang offered to steer while Captain Jamieson went below. Jamieson laughingly remarked that he would not trust his boat in the hands of an opposition pilot, so Irving left him and, in company with Messrs. Langley, Stevens, Vale, and Landvoight, Dr. Oliver, Captain Grant, H. S. Alley, purser Barnard and bartender Barry, seated himself at the table. A moment later the explosion occurred. Everything above the deck was razed, and, as the dismantled wreck flo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forte
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 113, 117-120, 126.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forthbridge (steamer)
The British steamship Forthbridge, enroute from Seattle for Taku Bar, was destroyed by fire at sea off the Japanese coast on January 25, 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forthbridge (steamer)
The British steamship Forthbridge, enroute from Seattle for Taku Bar, was destroyed by fire at sea off the Japanese coast on January 25, 1936. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortuna
The Hamburg schooner FORTUNA was built in Finkenwerder by Wriede in 1839 (Bielbrief 29 November 1839). 48 Commerzlasten, 64 x 23.6 x 11 Hamburg Fusse (1 Hamburg Fuss = .28657 meter) length x beam x depth of hold. Owner: 1839-1847 - Johann Christian Pflugk; 1847 -24 Oct 1850 - Johann Christian Pflugks Erben; 24 Oct 1850-12 Jun 1852 - Friedrich Pieper; 12 Jun 1852-31 Jan 1854 - David Pieper; 31 Jan 1854-1862 - Hans Pieper (David Pieper's father). Master: 1839-1849 - J. J. Kruger; 1840-1850 - J. Vil; 1851-1852 - J. Witt; 1852-1855 - F. Pieper; 1855-1856 - D. Pieper; 1857-1860 - J. F. Kock; 1860-1862 - F. Pieper. Voyages: 1839/1840 - Plymouth/Sunderland; 1840 - Le Havre; 1840 - Hull/Middlesborough; 1840 - New Ray/Malaga; 1840/1841 - Bilbao/Cap Haitien; 1841 - Dublin/Alicante; 1842 - Leith/St Davids, Scotland; 1842 - Hull; 1842/1843 - San Jose, Guatemala/Liverpool; 1843 - Newcastle upon Tyne/St Uebes (Setubal); 1843/1844 - Sierra Leone; 1844/1845 - San Jose, Guatemala/Alicante; 1845/1847 - La Plata/intermediate ports/Stockton; 1847/1850 - La Plata/Antwerp/intermediate ports/New York; (1849)/Aux Cayes, Haiti; 1851 - Para; 1851/1852 - St Thomas/Santo Domingo; 1852/1856 - Rio Grande do Sul/Antwerp/intermediate ports/Penryn, England; 1857/1861 - Buenos Aires/intermediate ports/Cardiff; 1861/1862 - St Uebes (Setubal)/intermediate ports/Falmouth/ intermediate ports ... The FORTUNA was wrecked on (Grand) Turk Island, in the Bahamas, in 1862. [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol 2, pp. 109-110, 113]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 23 October 1998]
Fortuna
Built in Seattle in 1906. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortuna
Built at Okhotsk. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 22. Wrecked. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortuna (schooner)
The Fortuna, a two-masted schooner of 145 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1886, probably by Bendixsen, for R. McKay, San Francisco. In 1906 she was bought by the Blom Codfish Co., Seattle; and passed in 1914 to the Northern Codfish Co. She fished subsequently under charter to other companies until 1917, when she went back to the lumber trade. and was sold to Peruvian owners. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortuna (schooner)
The Fortuna, a two-masted schooner of 145 tons, was built at Fair- haven, Calif., in 1886, probably by Bendixsen, for R. McKay, San Francisco. In 1906 she was bought by the Blom Codfish Co., Seattle; and passed in 1914 to the Northern Codfish Co. She fished subse- quently under charter to other companies until 1917, when she went back to the lumber trade. and was sold to Peruvian owners. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortuna (schooner)
The two -masted schooner Fortuna of 1886, a veteran of the codfishery, was sold to Peruvian owners. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 292.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortuna (schooner)
Another indication of progress in marine propulsion was the purchase from S. V. B. Miller of Seattle of 10 Evinrude outboard motors by the owners of the codfishing schooner Fortuna, Capt. Peter Nelson. The portable motors were used to power the schooner's dories, the development soon ending the traditional and back-breaking ash breeze method of propusion. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortune (minesweeper)
Two 158-foot former Royal Canadian Navy wooden minesweepers, Fortune and James Bay, were sold as surplus to Offshore Marine Services Ltd. of Vancouver for seismic oil exploration service off the British Columbia West Coast. Both vessels were built in British Columbia yards in 1954, Fortune by Victoria Machinery Depot and James Bay by Yarrows, Ltd., also at Victoria. Powered by twin 2,400-horsepower diesel engines and fitted with gear easily converted to the new service, the Fortune was at work within a short time in charge of Captain Bill Earnshaw, while James Bay was held in reserve status for a time and then sold to Seattle owners. She is currently operated by the Greenpeace Foundation. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortune (schooner)
The Fortune, one of the new additions to the Puget Sound codfishing fleet was a two-masted schooner of 145 tons, built at Fairhaven, Calif. in 1886 and acquired by the Blom Codfish Co. for the 1906 season. xxxx, p. 123.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fortune (steamer)
The passenger steamer Fortune, 81 tons, 107 feet in length, was built at the Anderson Steamboat Co. yard for Capt. Anderson and the Seattle Street Railway Co. and placed in service on Lake Washington, being christened by Daisy Johnson, 13 - year - old daughter of E. E. Johnson of the Seattle Machine Works who built her compound engines. The steamer was rebuilt as an automobile ferry in her later years, remaining in service on the lake until 1938, when the approaching completion of the first floating bridge put an end to steamboat service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 119.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forty
NINE (Steamer) - Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 271. Built by Leonard White and Colville Landing. Murray C. Morgan. The Columbia, p. 129-131. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forty
NINE (Steamer) - Capt. Leonard White, who made himself famous in marine annals as commander of the first steamer which ran on the Columbia above The Dalles, again distinguished himself in 1865 by building and running a steamboat several hundred miles above the mouth of the river, and farther inland than any steamer had yet ventured. She was constructed on the upper Columbia at Little Dalles near the forty-ninth parallel, and in accordance therewith was christened Forty-nine. Captain White had been unable to agree with Captain Ainsworth as to the amount of salary which should be paid a good swift-water steamboatman, and inaugurated his new enterprise, hoping to enjoy a repetition of the fortunemaking period of steam navigation on the Columbia above The Dalles. That his dreams were not realized can be well understood when it is known that the Forty-nine had no successor for nearly twenty years, and, while she made a little money at the start, could have done fully as well on a route nearer civilization. The For
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forty
NINE (Steamer) - Another steamer running well into the interior of British Columbia in 1866 was the Forty-nine, constructed at Little Dalles the preceding year by Leonard White. She left Little Dalles, April 15th, on her first trip with seventy-three passengers and a light cargo of freight, reached Fort Shepherd the next day, left there at noon and made the run across lower Arrow Lake. On the morning of the eighteenth the steamer cleared the narrows, but found the lower end of the upper lake full of ice and had some difficulty in making her way through it, but entered the river on the nineteenth. Carnes Creek was passed on the twenty-second, and Death's Rapids were reached on the twenty-fourth, at which point the passengers were discharged, and the steamer started down the river, returning in less than one-fourth the time occupied in going up. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: An
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forty Nine (steamer)
In 1865, at Colville Landing, Washington, on the Upper Columbia, Captain White set something of a record, even for himself, by building a small stern-wheeler and equipping her with a second-hand engine, with the boilers out of the old Jennie Clark, the first stern-wheeler seen in Oregon, and from which Captains Ainsworth and Kamm had put together their fantastically rich and powerful Oregon Navigation Company. Fittingly, White named his boat Forty-Nine. A gold strike in the Big Bend had brought several hundred mad men to Colville Landing, all anxious to get to the diggings at once. It was December, no time to undertake such a voyage, but White col- lected the fares and told them to get aboard. One-way passage was $25; freight $200 a ton. Few men would have dared to face that wild stretch of the Columbia at any time of the year. For ten days, in which he never left the wheelhouse, Captain White brought the Forty Nine through the Little Dalles and Little Rock rapids on lines and got through floating ice in Lowe
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forward
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 140, 146-47,194,199,201,211-13.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forward (gunboat)
The latter was sent up to Cape Mudge to recover some stolen property from the Hydah Indians, and when its mission was declared the Indians became so hostile that a skirmish ensued, and the commander of the Forward dropped a few shells among their canoes and camps before they surrendered their position. Many of their canoes were ruined and several of the tribe killed and injured. It was a lesson they had long needed, and its wholesome effect endured for several months. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forward (gunboat)
The other was the British gunboat Forward, which for years had led a prosaic life, looking after British interests in Northern waters. She was bought by Millard & Beedy of Victoria for $7,000 and was taken to San Francisco by Captain Sutton, and in the Bay City fitted out as a Central American gunboat. Soon after leaving port she turned pirate, and, flying the Salvadorean flag, in command of the notorious Viscayno, bombarded and looted the city of Guaymas and seized the coasters San Pablo and Colima. The Mexican Government asked assistance from both the United States and Great Britain, and vessels were sent out to capture the privateer. After plundering Guaymas she started up the Teacapan River, where she was soon followed by a detachment from the United States steamship Mohican. As it was thought she would go but a short distance, the Mohican did not follow, but sent six boats with a twelve-pound howitzer and eighty-eight men, who pursued her for forty miles and at last found her hard aground, with nearly al
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forwood (steamer)
The steamship Forwood, which arrived at Victoria from England by way of San Francisco, entered the coasting trade, but after making a few trips to San Francisco abandoned the field. The Forwood was a British tramp steamer of seven hundred tons burden, two hundred feet long, twenty-six feet beam, sixteen feet depth of hold, and was in command of G. P. Lock; D. McKay, first officer; W. G. Lock, second officer; H. C. Lock, third officer; George Greives, chief engineer; Robert Hill, assistant; J. Mair, purser; William Ray, steward. While passing through the Straits of Fuca on her third trip from San Francisco to Victoria a quantity of gunpowder, used in firing salutes, exploded, killing H. C. Lock and William Ray. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.86.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss #2 (scow)
1931 Scow, 495 tons. Lost while under tow near Tillamook Head. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 114 (barge)
The 213-foot oil barge Foss 114 sank in the Strait of Juan de Fuca in July while under tow from Anacortes for Seattle with about 600,000 gallons of diesel fuel. As the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Point Bennett was patrolling the area of oil spill, the barge rose to the surface, damaging the cutter's bow before sinking again. The barge was located on the bottom after a five-day search by the Coast Guard cutter Winona using sonar, Foss tugs using Simrad and Magtrometer, and M.V. Wakema using Sea Scanner equipment. Stan Eike, a hard-hat diver made the perilous dive to verify the location of the barge at a depth of 235 feet. On August 5, Eike and Capt. Ronald McIntosh of Foss descended in the McCrea diving bell to survey the condition of the barge and the amount of oil seepage. The bell became fouled during the survey, but was freed with the aid of the diving tender vessel and the survey was completed. The Canadian submarine Pisces III was used on September 2 with Capt. McIntosh, John Lindberg and the operator aboard
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 118 (barge)
Three of the large seagoing barges operating in Pacific Northwest waters broke away from their towing vessels and were stranded. The barge Foss 118, one of the largest railway car barges in the Northwest, broke adrift from the tug Erik Foss in a February storm off Ebey's Landing, Whidbey Island while carrying 20 lumber-laden box cars. Four cars were knocked off by the gale-force seas and smashed beyond repair, but the barge was later refloated and repaired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LVI.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 17 (tug)
The Foss 17 was built in 1903 in Ballard as the Harold C. She operated as part of the Crosby Towboat Company and was sold to Delta Smith of Olympia for lower Sound work. She was purchased by the Foss Company in January of 1926 and became the Foss 17. She was retired from Foss on December 21, 1964 but was purchased the next year and became the yacht EDNA. The name of the vessel was later changed by a new owner to the BILLYRAY and still later the SEA ROAMER. Still later she became the Frederick J and in 1981 became the Tortuga. Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety years of Towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 61.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 209 (barge)
In late September the barge Foss 209, a converted Navy LST, loaded with a $2 million cargo consisting of cement, mobile homes and general cargo and in tow of the Leslie Foss, overturned in the Gulf of Alaska and became a total loss. Under an Environmental Protection Agency permit, the barge was towed to deep water some 60 miles off shore and sunk by explosives. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 21 (tugboat)
The Foss 21 was built by the Tacoma Tug and Barge Company in 1900. as the Fearless. She was eighty feet in length with a nineteen foot beam. She was sold to Foss in February of 1925 and became the Foss 21 which worked Puget Sound and along the Washington Coast most of her career. She was purchased as the Fearless on June 13, 1966 and was sent to Alaska. Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety years of Towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 252 (barge)
Foss 252, a 317 x 56-foot combination barge capable of carrying 24 railway cars on deck and 4,500 tons of caustic soda in tanks below, was completed at Seattle, replacing the Foss 250, which inaugurated rail service to Alaska in 1954 and had logged about 700,000 miles on the run to southeastern Alaska for Ketchikan Pulp Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 265 (barge)
Foss Launch & Tug Company, its Puget Sound, Alaska and offshore trade expanding dramatically, was in the midst of a barge-building program at both Pacific and Gulf Coast yards. The 1,200-ton tank barge Foss 265, completed in January by Todd's Seattle yard, was followed by two 210-foot deck barges from Albina Engine & Machine Works, Portland, two 178-foot deck barges from National Steel & Shipbuilding in San Diego, and the 5,300-ton chemical barge Foss 260, built by Gunderson Bros. to transport caustic soda, chlorine, sodium chlorate and sulphuric acid from Bellingham to southern California. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XVIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 343 (barge)
Foss 343, 343 x 76-foot roll on-roll off barge, built at Alameda, California for Foss Launch & Tug as part of a $10 million equipment expansion program by that company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 8 (tugboat)
The Foss 8 was built by the Wrang Shipyard of Bellingham in 1935. It was built with a 140 horse power Cummins engine and was 32 feet long with a beam of 11 feet. Known first as the Yamoto the tug was sold to Foss on July 25, 1938. After local port work she was laid up in 1972 and sold for work in Alaska where she is known as the Lou Ann. (Michael Skalley, The Foss 8, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Eleven (tugboat)
The Foss Eleven was built by Foss in 1927 and planned for harbor work primarily around the Tacoma harbor. She had a caterpiller 230 horse power engine and as retired by Foss in 1974 when she was sold to Bellingham interests. The Foss Eleven was then called the Pamela J and worked for many years out of Blaine as a fishing boat. Michael Skalley, Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Fifteen (tug)
The Foss 15 was built in 1902 at Tacoma. She carried a 240 horsepower engine and was 63 feet in length with a sixteen foot beam. Her primary service was on Puget Sound and she was laid up by Foss on August 12, 1970. She was sold to Olson Brothes of Tacoma on April 29, 1971 and they renamed her Karlyn. She was later sold again and became the Skookum Cache and finally was given the name under which she was built, ELF, in 1978. Michael Skalley, Foss Ninety years of towboating Seattle, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Nine (tugboat)
Built in Astoria in 1907 as the Violet. Worked as a Tacoma Habor daybout and was sold September 11, 1968 to be used for a fireboat by the city of Renton and was renamed Snoopy. After several years Renton declared her surplus and she was drydocked on Hylebos Waterway in Tacoma. Michael Skalley, Foss Ninety years of towboating Seattle, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Nineteen (tugboat)
The Foss 19 was built in San Francisco for use by the U.S. Government as the Steamer Wigwam patrolling the fishing areas of Alaska. She was later called Osprey and in the early 1920s was sold to Foss. She worked for Foss on Puget Sound until May 14, 1965 when she was sold and renamed the Kiowa and was used in Alaska. Michael Skalley. Foss 90 years of towboating. Seattle 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No 6 (tug)
The tug Foss No. 6, 50 feet, 50-horsepower gas engine, by the Foss Launch & Tug Co., Tacoma. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H. S. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 12 (tug)
The first vessel to be built for the Foss company designed exclu- sively for towing, the Foss No. 12, was built by Robert Crawford at Gig Harbor from plans drawn by Andrew Foss. The design was similar to that of the small Crowley motor tugs at San Francisco, the pilot house standing above and behind the low trunk cabin housing the engine, making it possible for one man to operate the engine, pilot the craft and handle the towline, providing he were sufficiently nimble. The 14-ton tug, 43 x 14 x 5.3, was equipped with a 75-horsepower N & S gasoline engine similar to that of the Fossberg. The Foss No. 12 was used to replace the Fossberg in turning the Seattle-Tacoma steamers of Joshua Green's Puget Sound Navigation Co. fleet at the Tacoma Municipal Dock. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 16 (tug)
The Foss Launch & Tug Co. of Tacoma, having taken over the fleet of the Olson Tug Boat Co. of Tacoma and the Rouse Towing Co. of Seattle, was emerging as a major operator of tugs and barges, and was a leader in the trend toward the conversion from steam to diesel power. Its Foss No. 16, Capt. Oscar Rolstad, the former Olson steam tug Olympian, recently converted to motor power, made the trip from Anaeortes to Tacoma with eight sections of logs in 36 hours early in the year, establishing one of the best towing records by the smaller workboats of the Sound at a time when four other tugs bound for Tacoma lost their tows as a result of heavy winds. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 336.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 18 (tug)
The tug Foss No. 18, in Army service was rammed and sunk by a transport near the entrance to the Lake Washington Ship Canal at Seattle in December. One of her crew, Frank Banzak, was drowned. The tug was later raised and repaired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 520.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 18 (tug)
The continued phasing out of wooden tugboats from the fleets of the major Pacific Northwest towing companies resulted in the sale of the well-known Foss No.18, built at Alameda in 1892 as the coal-burning steamer Alice. She was purchased by one of her former skippers, Capt. Roy Durgan, who resold her to James King of Marysville for conversion to a yacht. Many well-known Puget Sound towboat skippers commanded the Foss No. 18 during her many years of outstanding service in the green and white fleet, including Capt. Durgan, who had charge of her for three years, and Capts. Jim Henshaw, Milt Ness, Wany Keezer, Ray Halstead, Walter Stark and Sam Stout. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 2 (scow)
American scow, 495 tons, parted her hawser while under tow and drifted ashore, near Tillamook Head, where she was dashed to pieces in the year 1931. The scow was built at Seattle in 1926. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 9 (tug)
A much larger and more powerful gasoline tug, the Foss No. 9, was built at Seattle later in the year; this being a 45-ton craft, 64 x 21 x 3.8, fitted with engines of 200 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss No. 9 (tug)
Two more veteran Foss tugs, replaced by new steel vessels, were sold for new careers. Foss No. 9, built at Astoria in 1907, was transferred to the city of Renton and thoroughly refitted as the fireboat Snoopy. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.66.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Sixteen (tug)
The Foss Sixteen was built in 1916 at Gig Harbor with a 40 horse power gasoline enginer. She was 45 feet long and had a beam of 11 feet. She worked in Tacoma Harbor until 1933 and wwas sold in March of 1936 for $35.00. The tug was renamed Jerry and ended her career operating on the upper Columbia River. Michael Skalley, Foss Ninety years of towboating Seattle, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Sixteen (tug)
The Foss Sixteen was built in Tacoma in 1908 with a 200 horsepower engine. Working primarily on Puget Sound this 63 foot ship was operated by Foss until November 22, 1963. She was built by James Reid as the coal burning steam tug Olympian and was operated until 1964 when she was dismantled and abandoned. The hull eventually ended up being used by the Diver's Institute of Seattle. Michael Skalley, Foss Ninety years of towboating Seattle, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Twelve (tug)
The Foss 12 was built in Gig Harbor, Washington in 1914 with a Cummins 140 horse power engine. She served until December 2, 1966 when her machinery was removed. On July 4, 1967 she was towned out into Commencement Bay and set afire as part of Tacoma's Independence Day celebration. Michael Skalley, Foss Ninety years of towboating Seattle, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss. Number Eighteen (tugboat)
Built in Alameda, California in 1892. Was known as Alice until renamed in 1919. Maritime memories, Tug Alice later Foss 18, The Marine Digest. October5,1985,p. 6 (il). Hull still floats at Anacortes marina after retirement in 1970, Marine Digest. October 12, 1985, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss. Number Two (scow)
This scow was dashed to pieces in 1931 near Tillamood Head. It was built in Seattle in 1926. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fossberg (gas Scow)
The 15 ton gas scow Fossberg burned and sank April 24, 1926 at the Milwaukee log dump (U.S. National Archives File 893, McClellan 1954:112).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fossberg (tug)
New gasoline tugs included the 15 -ton Fossberg, 64 x 12foot dual -purpose passenger, freight and towing vessel, built at Gig Harbor for the Foss Co. of Tacoma. Her 100 horsepower engine made her the most powerfull motor towing vessel on Puget Sound, aside from the cannery-owned tug tenders. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foster
Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 76.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foundation Franklin
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foundation Lillian (tug)
Ocean going tug. Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 12.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fox Island (ferry)
Non-military transfers of ownership included the motor ferry Fox Island, sold by the Washington Navigation Co. of Tacoma and Gig Harbor to the Horluck Transportation Co., which was hard-pressed for additional tonnage in meeting the passenger demands of its local ferry service between Port Orchard and Bremerton. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 508.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fox Island (ferry)
The ferry route between Port Townsend and Ke stone, Whidbey Island, was purchased from the Puget Sound Navigation Co. by Olympic Ferries, Inc., organized by Capt. Oscar Lee, H. J. Carroll and A. C. Grady. The 20 -car motor ferry Fox Island, in wartime service in the Bremerton area by the Horluck Transportation Co., was purchased by the new firm and placed in service in charge of Capt. Lee. The route was last in use in 1943 and it was necessary to construct new landing facilities at Keystone, the old ferry slip having been destroyed by storms during its period of disuse. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 546.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fram (steam Tug)
The steam tug Fram, 17 tons, 43 feet long, was built by Capt. K. Bull at Hoquiam, powered by compound engines of 75 horsepower and operated on the Chehalis River and Grays Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 119.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
France (1)
The French ship "France" was a 3,200 gross ton ship, built by Chantier de Penhoet, St Nazaire in 1864 for Compagnie Generale Tranatlantique (French Line). Her details were - length 346.6ft x beam 44ft, straight stem, two funnels, two masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, side paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 1/10/1864, she made her maiden voyage in 1865 from St Nazaire to Vera Cruz. On 2/8/1872 she started a single round voyage between Havre, Brest and New York (last North Atlantic voyage by a French Line paddle steamer). On 29/9/1872 she left Brest for New York but her engines broke down off Cherbourg and she had to turn back to Havre. In 1874 she was lengthened to 395.2ft, 4,648 tons by A.Leslie & Co, Hebburn-on-Tyne, converted to single screw propulsion with compound engines by Maudslay, Sons & Field, London, and had a third mast fitted. She was also fitted with accommodation for 279-1st & 2nd class and 510-3rd class passengers. She resumed Havre - New York sailings on 7/11/1874 and on 22/3/1884 commenced her last voyage on this service. She then started St Nazaire - Panama voyages on 6/12/1884 and on 20/12/1886 was damaged by fire at sea. She arrived at Fort de France, Martinique on 24th December and then proceeded to St Nazaire, where she was reconditioned between February and June 1887. In 1895 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and was finally scrapped at Cherbourg in July 1910. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.653] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 April 1998]
France (2)
The British vessel "France" was built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool in 1867 for the National Line. She was a 3,572 gross ton ship, length 385.6ft x beam 42.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 80-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4/6/1867, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 13/10/1867. On 4/2/1874 she commenced her first voyage from London to New York and between 1874-1896 continued this service except for 5 voyages from Liverpool. She was rebuilt to 3,723 tons in 1874 and was fitted with compound engines by J.Jones & Sons, Liverpool in 1880. On 17/1/1896 she started her last London - New York voyage and was sold the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.613] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 April 1998]
France (3)
The "France" was built by Chantiers de l'Atlantique, St Nazaire between 1957-1962 for the French Line (Compagnie Generale Transatlantique). Her details were 66,348 gross tons, overall length 1035.2ft x beam 110.9ft, two funnels, one mast, four screws and a speed of 34 knots. There was accommodation for 500-1st and 1,550-tourist class passengers. Launched on 11/5/1960, she left Havre on her maiden voyage for Southampton and New York on 3/2/1962. Later that year, her four bladed propellers were replaced by five bladed. On 4/5/1967 she made her first sailing from Havre to Southampton and Quebec for the International Exhibition (one round voyage). On 13/7/1967, she started her first voyage from Havre - Southampton - Quebec - New York and on 4/10/1968 made her last sailing on this route (3 round voyages). On 14/10/1971 she started her first voyage Bremen - Havre - Southampton - New York and on 5/9/1974 commenced her last New York - Southampton - Havre voyage. On 12/9/1974 she anchored off Havre owing to the crew's refusal to enter port as a protest against the impending lay up of the ship. On 10/10/1974 she finally entered port and was laid up on 7/12/1974.She left Havre for Bremerhaven on 18/8/1979 for conversion to a one class cruise ship for the Norwegian Caribbean Line. She was completely renovated, her tonnage increased to 69,379 tons, her two outer propellers removed to give her a speed of 21 knots, her hull painted white and her name changed to "Norway". She was then the largest passenger ship in commission.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 November 1997]
France (bark)
Harold Underhill, Masting and Rigging., p. 29.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frances (sloop)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 134.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frances (steamer)
ALF,p. 95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frances (yacht)
Frances, 250-ton diesel ocean-going yacht of 320-horsepower, 115 feet in length, purchased by Capt. A. Leppaluoto, head of the Inland Navigation Co. with headquarters at The Dalles Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frances And Louisa (bark)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 129
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francesca
The "Francesca" was built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow in 1905 for the Austrian company, Unione Austriaca. She was a 4946 gross ton vessel, length 359.8ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 50-2nd, and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 2/6/1905, she left Trieste on 27/8/1905 on her maiden voyage to Naples, Palermo and New York. She did 17 round voyages on this service, commencing her last run on 13/3/1908 and was then transferred to the South America service. In 1919 she went to the Italian Cosulich Line for whom she did one round voyage from Genoa - Naples - New York commencing 22/5/1919. I have no details after this until she was scrapped in 1926. She was probably laid up during this period.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 9 September 1997]
Francesco Crispi
See COLUMBIA (4).
Citation:
Francis Alice. (schooner)
Francis Alice, two - Masted schooner of 131 tons, was built at St. Helens, Ore., in 1881 by W. J. Stevens. Her first owner lived in Astoria; from 1883 to 1886 she was in the cod fishery for Nicholas San Francisco, and subsequently was sold to Alaskan interests . She was wrecked in 1905 in Alaskan waters, property loss being given as $15,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis Alice. (schooner)
Francis Alice, two - Masted schooner of 131 tons, was built at St. Helens, Ore., in 1881 by W. J. Stevens. Her first owner lived in Astoria; from 1883 to 1886 she was in the cod fishery for Nicholas San Francisco, and subsequently was sold to Alaskan interests . She was wrecked in 1905 in Alaskan waters, property loss being given as $15,000. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis H. Leggett
passenger-cargo steamer, American, foundered in a gale 60 miles southwest of the Columbia River September 18, 1914 with the loss of 65 lives, only two survivors. The vessel laden with railroad ties was en route to San Francisco from Grays Harbor.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis H. Leggett (schooner)
Less than a month later, shortly after midnight on the morning of September 18, the steel steam schooner Francis H. Leggett foundered in a raging gale fifty miles south of the Columbia River entrance. Of the 37 passengers and crew of 25 aboard the Leggett, only two were rescued. The vessel had left Hoquiam, deeply laden with lumber for San Francisco, in charge of Capt. C. Maro, and upon encountering the heavy seas off the Oregon coast, her deckload shifted and she capsized and sank. The Japanese cruiser Idzumo sighted the foundering steam schooner and dispatched a brief wireless message, which was intercepted by the Port of Portland station, the Portland-San Francisco liner Beaver, and the Associated Oil tanker Frank H. Buck. The warship, operating under wartime restrictions and searching for the cruiser Leipzig, made no effort to render assistance, however, and refused to give her location or any further details of the tragedy.* The tanker was the first to find the floating wreckage marking the spot where th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis H. Leggett (steamer)
This passenger-cargo steamer, American, foundered in a gale 60 miles southwest of the Columbia River September 18, 1914 with the loss of 65 lives, only two survivors. The vessel laden with railroad ties was en route to San Francisco from Grays Harbor.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis H. Leggett (steamer)
September 18, 1914 Steam schooner en route Grays Harbor-San Francisco. The vessel encountered difficulties in heavy weather when a deckload of ties canted off the deck of the 1606 ton ship. She listed to starboard and took great gulps of water down her torn hatch covers. Captain C. Maro had little time to prepare his passengers for what was to come. At the same time as the distressed 11 year old ship began to plunge to the bottom, the 3000 ton Japanese cruiser Idzumi happened by. Using the excuse they sailed on a search-and-destroy mission against the Leipzig of the Imperial German Navy, the warship refused to halt and aid the survivors and sent, instead, a garbled and misleading wireless as she steamed past. Out of the 37 passengers and 25 crew, only James Farrell of Seattle and George Pullman of Winnipeg survived. They were picked from the choppy seas by the Beaver and the Frank Buck. The ship is believed to have gone down in an area just south of the Columbia. A body, that of a woman, washed ashore on Manz
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis H. Leggett (steamer)
American steamship, 1,606 tons, foundered in a gale sixty miles southwest of the Columbia River September 18, 1914, with a loss of sixty-five lives. Only two were saved after a terrible ordeal in storm-tossed seas. The vessel carried a cargo of railroad ties, which several days later drifted ashore on the Tillamook and Nehalem beaches, along with some bodies. T0he revenue cutter Bear, the Japanese cruiser Idzimo, and the tanker Frank Buck answered the distress calls, but when they arrived at the scene, the Leggett had foundered. She was outbound from Grays Harbor for San Francisco. The steamer was built at Newport News in 1903 for the Hammond Lumber Company. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francis H. Leggett (steamship)
1606 ton American vessel sank in a gale sixty miles southwest of the Columbia River, September 18, 1914 with a loss of sixty-five lives. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francisco (brig)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 213, 340.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francisco (schooner)
Wrecked at Port Orford, North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 641.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francois Hennebique
The Francois Hennebique was dismantled and sunk as a dock at Newport, the superstructure serving as office and shops for the Yaquina Dock & Dredge Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Francois Lake Ferry (ferry)
The 56-ton motor ferry Francois Lake Ferry, 66 feet long, was built at Prince Rupert for the B. C. Department of Public Works and assembled for service across Francois Lake in the Chileotin country. She was later taken to Shushwap Lake and renamed for a rugged Swedish-born British Columbia cabinet minister, Rolph Bruhn. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1921-22, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank D. Stout (steam Schooner)
The St. Helens Shipbuilding Co. completed the 1,113-ton steam schooner Frank D. Stout for the Brookings Commercial Co. of San Francisco. Originally designed as a twin-screw motor vessel with Bolinder diesels, wartime shortages resulted in her being fitted instead with a 600-horsepower triple-expansion engine from Main Street Iron Works. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 290.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank H. Buck (tanker)
The Pacific Coast tanker fleet received a notable addition in 1914 when the Associated Oil Company's Frank H. Buck, built by Union Iron Works, San Francisco, as the largest tanker yet built in the United States, made her maiden voyage from Monterey to Portland. The Buck was also the first vessel built on the Pacfic Coast on the Isherwood, or longitudinal framing system. The 6,076-ton vessel had dimensions of 408 x 55.5 x 31.7 with a capacity of 62,000 barrels and a service speed of 11 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank Pargoud (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank W. Howe (schooner)
February 22, 1904 The schooner, with her cargo of railroad ties, was a total loss on the North Head of the Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank W. Howe (schooner)
American schooner, 573 tons, was carried ashore near Seaview, just north of North Head, February 22, 1904, after becoming waterlogged at sea. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank W. Howe (schooner)
573 ton American vessel. Carried ashore just north of North Head on February 22, 1904. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank W. Howe (schooner)
The schooner Frank W. Howe, Ballard for San Francisco with railroad ties, went ashore at North Head, Oregon February 22, broke in two and went to pieces.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 101-02.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frankfurt
The "Frankfurt" was built in 1869 for North German Lloyd of Bremen by Caird & Co, Greenock. She was a 2,582 gross ton ship, length 300ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 30-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18th Jun.1869 for the Bremen - New Orleans service, but she started her first voyage from Bremen to Havre and New York on 30th Jun.1870. She was laid up during the Franco-Prussian War and then between 1871-1874 was mainly employed on the New Orleans service, but also made six round voyages to New York during this period. In 1880 her engines were compounded and she commenced her last North Atlantic voyage between Bremen and Baltimore on 8th Mar.1882. Subsequently she sailed between Bremen and South America, starting her final voyage on 30th Sep.1893. In 1894 she was sold to Sir W. G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co, shipbuilders, in part payment for two new ships. Sold to Italian owners in 1895, she was scrapped in Italy in 1897. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.547] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 September 1998]
Franklin
The "Franklin" of 1871 was built by T.R.Oswald & Co, Sunderland for the German company, Baltischer Lloyd. She was an 1,878 gross ton ship, length 282ft x beam 36ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. I don't have any information on her passenger capacity. She was launched in June 1871 and commenced her maiden voyage from Stettin to Copenhagen and New York on 8/8/1871. On 6/8/1874 she sailed on her last voyage from Stettin to Copenhagen, Antwerp, New York(arr.15/7/1874) and Stettin. She made a total of 14 round voyages on this service. In 1874 she was sold to the Italian company, Rubattino of Genoa and renamed "Batavia". On 23/11/1877 she was wrecked on Capy Shoals near Marseilles.There was an earlier American vessel (1850) with the same name.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 November 1997]
Franklin
Don Berry. Majority of Scoundrels., p. 182-83. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p 119-122.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Franklin (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 14, 20, 111.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Franklin Adams (brig)
Voyages to Seattle. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 342. BNG, p. 57. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 119-122. Robert Frye Watt. History of Seattle. 1931., p. 69,77. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., II, p. 45.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Franklin K. Lane (liberty Ship)
The Tacoma News Tribune. April 29, 1943.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Franzisca
The Bremen bark FRANZISCA, built by by shipwright H[ermann] F[riedrich] Ulrichs, Vegesack/Fahr, and launched on 23 October 1845. 147 Commerzlasten/349 tons; 32,4 x 8,5 x 4,2 meters/106.3 x 28.5 x 13.8 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). The FRANZISCA was built for the bremen firms of Friedrich Leo Quentell (succeeded in 1857 by Wm. Eduard Quentell) and Friedrich Wm. Stallforth Wwe, each of whom held a 1/2 share, for the freight and passenger service to the United States (the voyage to Galveston was her maiden voyage). >From 1845 to 1861, her masters were A. Hagedorn, Tonjes Sturje (who in 1849 became harbormaster at Harburg, and founded there the "Erste Rhederei Gesellschaft zu Harburg"), and Mathias Raake. On 23 October 1861, the FRANZISCA was sold to Block, Lowe & Cons., Hamburg, who solder her in 1862 to Captain Dillwitz, of Rostock. On 23 October 1870, it was reported from Dunkirk that the North German bark FRANZISCA, Capt. Dillwitz., bound from Newcastle with a cargo of coal, had been seized a few days earlier by the French naval steamer DESAIX and brought into Dunkirk as a prize of war. Her later history and ultimate fate are not known [Peter-Michael Pawlik,Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 270-271, no. 15; Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 58]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 25 August 1998]
Fraser (destroyer Escort)
On February 19, 1953, the second of the Burrard-built Canadian Navy destroyer escorts, HMCS Fraser, was launched at the company's North Vancouver yards. This vessel, designated DE-233, was subsequently outfitted at Yarrows. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 585.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fraser River Lightship
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 163-64, 199.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fraser River Sand Heads Lightship
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., P. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred E Sander (schooner)
Fred E. Sander, three-masted schooner of 463 tons, was built by Hall Brothers in 1887 at Port Blakely and was another unit of their large fleet. In 1917 she was sold Peruvian owners, and was listed as the Lionelo of Callao in 1930. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred E Sander (schooner)
Fred E. Sander, three-masted schooner of 463 tons, was built by Hall Brothers in 1887 at Port Blakely and was another unit of their large fleet. In 1917 she was sold Peruvian owners, and was listed as the Lionelo of Callao in 1930. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred E. Sander (schooner)
The Fred E. Sander was also sold to Peruvian owners late in the year, being renamed Nuestro Padre, and later Lionelo. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p225.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred E. Sander (schooner)
The well-known three-masted schooner Fred E. Sander established a record of another kind when she reached Point Barrow on August 1, 1911 in charge of Capt. George Ekrem with 750 tons of supplies. This was eight days earlier than the previous record arrival at that far northern port. The Sander arrived on Puget Sound with a valuable cargo of furs and whalebone early in September. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred Gower (schooner)
February 22, 1901 Schooner missing. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred J. Wood (schooner)
Fred J. Wood, four - masted schooner of 681 tons and 800 m capacity, was built by G. H. Hitchings, Hoquiam, in 1899, for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co. In 1923 she was reported sold to Capt. E. Whitney, Mobile, who bought the Fearless and Resolute of the Wood fleet at that time; but the deal fell through. In July, 1923, the Wood sailed from San Francisco for Nome, Alaska; and was subsequently laid up, her register being abandoned in 1928. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred J. Wood (schooner)
Fred J. Wood, four - masted schooner of 681 tons and 800 m capacity, was built by G. H. Hitchings, Hoquiam, in 1899, for the E. K. Wood Lumber Co. In 1923 she was reported sold to Capt. E. Whitney, Mobile, who bought the Fearless and Resolute of the Wood fleet at that time; but the deal fell through. In July, 1923, the Wood sailed from San Francisco for Nome, Alaska; and was subsequently laid up, her register being abandoned in 1928. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred J. Wood (schooner)
In July Capt. Jorgen J. Jacobsen, well-known Pacific Coast sailing ship master, was stabbed to death while in command of the schooner Fred J. Wood on the high seas on a voyage from Portland to China. The murderer, the ship's Japanese cabin boy, was held in custody and delivered to the authorities upon the schooner's arrival at Honolulu. Mrs. Jacobson and the crew on watch at the time of the crime were also left as witnesses, the vessel con- tinuing her voyage in charge of the mate, Henry Meyers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 86.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred Tron (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers.,p. 457.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fredele Iv (schooner)
The 21 ton gasoline fishing schooner Fredele IV was sunk in collision with the barge Neptune in Seymour Narrows October 31, both without loss of life. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederich Engels (motorship)
The Soviet motorship Frederich Engels was libelled by Federal authorities at Seattle early in the year on the charge that she had succeeded in polluting a considerable portion of Puget Sound by indiscriminate dumping of large quantities of oil. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederick (barg)
April 14, 1914 A barge of 319 tons. Wrecked on the Siuslaw bar. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederick (barge)
The wooden barges Frederick, 319 tons, and Lawrence, 370 tons, were built by Kruse & Banks at North Bend for the Tidewater Mill Co. of Florence, Oregon. Mosquito fleet craft built in that area for bay and river service were: Acme, 23 tons, by Herman Larson, Florence, for Siuslaw River passenger service; Active, 12 tons, by Herman Bros., Prosper, as a Coquille River towboat; Bear, 10 tons, and Big Chief, by Max Timmerman at Marshfield and Prosper respectively, for Coos Bay and Coquille River passenger service (Big Chief later transferring to the Umpqua River as a towboat); Charm, 26 tons, by Herman Bros. at Prosper for Coquille River passenger service; and Rambler, eight tons, by John Mattson at Marshfield for Coos Bay passenger service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p225.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederick Bouchard (steamer)
The SS Frederick Bouchard, riding at anchor in the Astoria reserve moorings has been offered for sale for scrap by the U.,S. Department of Commerce. She is a Liberty type vessel. Two other Libertys from other reserve fleets will also be offered at the same time. Liberty ship Bouchard is for sale, The Marine Digest. XLI (August 3, 1963), p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederick K. Billings (steamer)
The Northern Pacific Railroad, which at the present time owns and operates several very pretentious steamers in the Northwest, in 1880 built their first vessel, the steamer Frederick K. Billings, which was launched at Celilo. Its dimensions were: length, two hundred feet; beam, thirty-seven feet; depth of hold, six feet, with engines twenty by ninety-six inches. Capt. W. P. Gray was put in charge, and the steamer was used as a transfer boat at Ainsworth until the completion of the bridge, afterward performing a similar duty at Pasco. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.273.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederick K. Billings (sternwheeler)
July 1900 Sternwheeler, 749 tons, 200'x 37'x 6', built at Celilo in 1880 and rebuilt several times. She finally foundered in the Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederico
See PALMERSTON.
Citation:
Fredonia (u.s.s)
Joins the Pacific Squadron, Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 320-21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fredrik
See MINONA.
Citation:
Free State Mariner (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 125, 168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Free Trade (barkentine)
The American barkentine Free Trade, three hundred and forty tons, Capt. J. G. Merriman, from Port Townsend for Sydney with a cargo of lumber, sprang a leak during a heavy southeast gale, October 21st, and became water-logged, stranding shortly afterward near Quillihute Rocks. The crew remained aboard for four days with nothing to eat, the seas breaking clear over the vessel. They finally abandoned her and with difficulty reached shore, only one life being lost in the attempt, that of Albert Thompson, seaman. The vessel was twelve years old and was valued at $10,000. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.264.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Free Trader (bark)
E.T. Short, After many years, The Tacoma Times. November 18, 1935. This was the second ship to load lumber at the Hanson and Ackerman Mill in Tacoma. The load was 320,000 board feet.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Freedom
See WITTEKIND.
Citation:
Freemont (barkentine)
The Freemont, which in early days was a well known steamship on the Northern route, reappeared at Seabeck in August [1866] as a barkentine, and in that rig continued in the lumber trade many years. Adams, Blinn & Co. were her new owners. E. W. Wright, The 'Brother Jonathan' and Other Notable Wrecks, Steamboating on Interior Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fremont (barkentine)
The fast developing motion picture industry claimed another of the old West Coast windjammers when the wooden barkentine Fremont was sold by the Union Fish Co. of San Francisco to the New York Film Company being permanently moored at San Pedro as a floating movie set. The Fremont, a familiar vessel for years in the Northwest codfishery, was one of the oldest of the active sailing vessels on the Coast, having been built at Philadelphia in 1850 as a steamship, rebuilt in 1861 at San Francisco as a bark for the lumber trade, and again rebuilt as a barkentine in 1877. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 217.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fremont (steamer)
Built in Maryland in 1901. 505 foot length. Maritime memories, the Fremont, first ship to provide direct service between Puget Sound and the Philippines in 1902. Sold in 1908 renamed Cristobal served Panama canal construction, Marine Digest. september 21, 1985, p. 6. Semi monthly trips to Oregon North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 408. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 167,170.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
French (concrete Steamship)
Three of those most unfortunate of all the World War I experiments in emergency shipbuilding, the concrete hulled steamships, ended their undistinguished careers early in the year. Although it was found possible to pour reinforced concrete hulls strong enough to withstand normal seas, the result was a structure of such an ungainly and massive nature that the engines designed to propel them were unable to give them much better than bare steerage way, providing tide and wind were favorable. The concrete hulls Coquhon, French and Hammond, converted to naval water tenders, were being towed from Califomia for the Bremerton Navy Yard in late January when heavy winds and seas were encountered. Two of the maritime monstrosities broke loose from the tug on January 25 and foundered about a hundred miles south of the Columbia River, while the Coquhon made it as far as Grays Harbor, where she too broke loose and was driven ashore the following day. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine Histo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fresh I (navy Hydrofoil)
Navy plans to auction fast moving hydrofoil, The Tacoma News Tribune. January 8, 1982. Built by Boeing.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fresno (barge)
In tow of tug Goliah in the 1920s, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fresno (barge)
The barge Fresno, originally the Bath -built wooden bark Fresno of 1874, last in use by the Tyee Whaling Co. and North Pacific Sea Products Co., was burned for scrap in April after being laid up in Lake Washington for some time. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 344.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fresno (bark)
On June 9 the wooden bark Fresno, 1,149 tons, Capt. Peterson, outward bound from Port Ludlow with lumber in tow of the Tyee, collided with the steel barkentine Alta, 1,380 tons, Capt. Thonegal, inward from Callao and under full sat before a spanking breeze. The damage to both vessels was considerable, requiring their drydocking and extensive repairs. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fresno (bark)
Another carrier familiar to the coastal lumber trade for many years made her last voyage under canvas when the wooden bark Fresno was sold by the Puget Sound Commercial Co. to Capt. I. N. Hibbard. She was converted by Hall Bros. at Winslow to a whale oil barge for service between the company's Alaska station and distribution points on Puget Sound and at San Francisco. The 1, 149 -ton Fresno was built in 1874 by William Rogers of Bath for Pope & Talbot and had been continuously under the ownership of that company and the Puget Sound Commercial Co., which was formed in 1877 to assume ownership of the Pope & Talbot vessels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friederick Der Grosse (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 54.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friedrich Der Grosse
The steamship FRIEDRICH DER GROSSE was built for Norddeutscher Lloyd by AGVulcan, Stettin (ship #231), and launched on 1 August 1896. 10.531 tons (the first German vessel over 10,000 tons); 159,4 x 18,29 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion, quadruple- expansion engines, service speed 14.5 knots; accommodation for 216 passengers in 1st class, 227 in 2nd class, and from 1,671 to 1,964 in steerage; crew of 175 to 222. 11 November 1896, maiden voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Australia. 4 April 1897, first voyage, Bremen-Falmouth (to take on passengers from the KONIGIN LUISE, whose rudder had broken)-New York. 1902, enclosed bridge added; 10,696 tons. 22 March 1903, first voyage, Naples-New York. 25 July 1912, last voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York (16 roundtrip voyages). 22 November 1913, last voyage, Bremen - New York. 21 January 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Australia (14 roundtrip voyages). 4 June 1914, first voyage, Bremen - Baltimore. 9 July 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Philadelphia- Baltimore. 3 August 1914, took refuge at the Norddeutscher Lloyd pier at Hoboken. 6 April 1917, seized by the U.S. Government; renamed HURON (transport). 1919, transferred to the U.S. Shipping Board; oil firing; chartered to the Munson Line, New York, for its New York-Buenos Aires service. 1 December 1921, leased to the Los Angeles Steamship Co; major rebuilding; renamed CITY OF HONOLULU. 23 September 1922, first voyage, Los Angeles-Honolulu. 12 October 1922, on return voyage, damaged by fire 575 miles from Los Angeles; all on board taken onto the U.S. Army Transport THOMAS, and the freighter WEST FARALLON. 17 October 1922, sunk by gunfire from the U.S. Coast Guard cutter SHAWNEE as a threat to navigation [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), pp. 167-168, no. 96 (photographs); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 18-19 (photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 559]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 104, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, Massachusetts 01970, - {Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 April 1998]
Citation:
Friendly (fish Boat)
Sank off the mouth of the Columbia River on August 15,1945. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p.166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friendly (fishboat)
This fish boat, 17 tons, foundered off the mouth of the Columbia, August 15, 1945. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friendship
August Kautz. Northwest Journals of August V. Kautz, 1857-61,p. 320-21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friendship (bark)
April 14, 1860 Bark. Four bodies recovered at the mouth of the Siuslaw River and another three miles north of the Umpqua River. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friendship (bark)
April 14, 1860 Bark. Four bodies recovered at the mouth of the Siuslaw River and another three miles north of the Umpqua River. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Friesland
The "Friesland" was a 7116 gross ton vessel built by J & G Thomson, Glasgow in 1889 for the Red Star Line. Her details were - length 437ft x beam 51.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 226-1st, 102-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. She sailed under the Belgian flag. Launched on 15/8/1889, she sailed from Antwerp for New York on her maiden voyage on 7/12/1889. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 10/1/1903 and was then transferred to the American Line under the US flag. She was refitted to carry 300-2nd class and 600-3rd class passengers and put onto the Liverpool - Philadelphia service, commencing 25/3/1903. She made her last voyage on this run in May 1911 and was then sold to an Italian company who removed two of her masts and renamed her "La Plata". She was scrapped in 1912.]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 1 October 1997]
Frisia
The "Frisia" was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1872 for Hamburg America Line. She was a 3,256 gross ton ship, length 349.5ft x beam 40.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the "Alsatia" but was launched on 20th Mar.1872 as the "Frisia". She started her maiden voyage on 21st Aug.1872 when she left Hamburg for Havre and New York and stayed on this service until starting her last voyage on 13th Sep.1885. In 1888 she was sold to R.L.Gillcrest of London and resold to Italian owners in 1889 and renamed "Temerario". In 1890 she went to Banco di Genova, Genoa and was renamed "Arno" and in 1892 came under the ownership of Navigazione Generale Italiana. She commenced a single round voyage between Genoa - Catania - Naples and New York on 6th May 1892 and in 1898 was converted to a coal carrier. In 1901 she became a coal hulk at Genoa and was scrapped in Italy in 1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.390-1] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 October 1998]
Frithiof (schooner)
Frithiof, two -masted schooner of 242 tons, was built by Holden in the Deane yard at Marshfield, Ore., in 1874 for Oloff Mattson, Owner and master. The schooner drops from registry in 1889. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frithiof (schooner)
Frithiof, two -masted schooner of 242 tons, was built by Holden in the Deane yard at Marshfield, Ore., in 1874 for Oloff Mattson, Owner and master. The schooner drops from registry in 1889. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frolic
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frolic
Capt. Lewis G. Haaven of Astoria launched a peculiarly constructed craft, which he christened the Frolic. It was nearly flat on the bottom and was designed to skim along the surface of the water with great speed. Unfortunately the new departure was a failure and had to be rebuilt to meet the approval of the inspectors. She was afterward sold to J. O. Hanthorn, the Astoria canneryman, and is still in use on the lower river. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frontier (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fs
790 (Freighter) - The shallow draft freighter, FS- 790, was launched late in 1952 and completed the following year. With a capacity of 1,400 tons of cargo, the FS- 790 could be readied to handle cargo in five minutes by switching on crane power supply and stripping the folding hatch covers, and could be completely unloaded in about six hours. The dimensions of this unique freighter were 223 (overall) x 38 x 19, with a mean draft at normal load of 12 feet nine inches. Diesel engines of 1,600-horse- power provided a loaded service speed of 12.25 knots, with an emergency cruising range of up to 10,000 miles. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 585
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulda
The "Fulda" belonged to Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow, she was a 4816 gross ton ship, length 429.8ft x beam 45.9ft, two funnels, four masts, iron construction, single screw, speed 16 knots. Accommodation for 120-1st, 130-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/11/1882, commenced her maiden voyage on 14/3/1883 from Bremen to Southampton and New York. On 14/3/1886 she rescued all the passengers and crew of the Cunard vessel "Oregon" which was sunk in collision near Long Island. She started her last voyage on this run on 7/10/1891 and was transferred on 24/10/1891 to the New York - Genoa service. Last voyage commenced 27/10/1898 and was chartered to Cie. Trasatlantica for Spanish troop repatriation. On 2/2/1899 she entailed serious damage while in drydock at Birkenhead after provisional sale to the Canadian Steamship Co. The deal was abandoned and she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 2 October 1997]
Fuller (u.s. Destroyer)
GSPN, p. 32.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fullerton (barkentine)
Fullerton, four-masted barkentine of 1554 tons, was by a considerable margin the largest sailing vessel built on the Pacific Coast prior to the World War. She was launched at Alameda, Calif., in 1902 by Hay & Wright for the Union Oil Co., San Francisco, and carried crude oil in bulk to that port from Southern California. In 1925 she was sold to the Monstads of Redondo Beach for a fishing barge, and her register was abandoned in 1927. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fullerton (barkentine)
Fullerton, four-masted barkentine of 1554 tons, was by a con- siderable margin the largest sailing vessel built on the Pacific Coast prior to the World War. She was launched at Alameda, Calif., in 1902 by Hay & Wright for the Union Oil Co., San Francisco, and carried crude oil in bulk to that port from Southern California. In 1925 she was sold to the Monstads of Redondo Beach for a fishing barge, and her register was abandoned in 1927. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 19, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulmar (tug)
The 95 x 25-foot tug Fulmar, with twin Caterpillar engines delivering 1,100 horsepower to a single screw, was purchased by Rivtow Marine Ltd. at Port of Spain, Trinidad, and brought around to British Columbia via the Panama Canal in charge of Capt. Hank Van der Zee, First Mate George De Vorge and Chief Engineer Frank Pruden. Aside from a collision with a whale off the coast of El Salvador the voyage was uneventful. The tug, built in 1958 at Georgetown, British Guiana for tanker berthing and drill rig handling, was renamed Rivtow Rogue. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.45.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (no. 1) (paddle Wheel Steamship)
2,475 tons, 156' x 56' x 20'. Built by Adam & Noah Brown, New York, 1814; exploded 1829. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (no. 2) (paddle Wheel Steamship)
1,200 tons 180' x 34' x 12'. Sidewheels 22' in diameter. Built at New York Navy Yard, 1837; captured by Confederates at Pensacola, 1861, burned 1862. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (schooner)
The steam schooner Fulton was converted to a barge on Willapa Harbor, where her remains are still visible in a tidal slough near Raymond. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 392.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (steam Schooner)
The Montesano Steamship Co. was incorporated late in the year by, Dr. F. L. Carr, Charles H. Clemons, W. H. Bush, George W. Ninemire, J. T. Durdle, Eldridge Wheeler and J. J. Johnson, the company purchasing the steam schooner Fulton for operation between Montesano, on the Chehalis River above Grays Harbor, to San Francisco. The Fulton was a 380-ton wooden steam schooner built by Hans D. Bendixsen at Fairhaven, California in 1898, of 605 tons, 152.7 x 33.5 x 11.4, with compound engine developing 250 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 122.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (steam Schooner)
The brief career of the Montesano Steamship Co. ended during the year and its steam schooner Fulton was sold to the Border Line Transportation Co. of Dodwell & Co., a shelter deck added and her tonnage increased from 380 to 605. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p226.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (steam Screw)
February 12, 1904 Steam screw. Ashore at Port Orford, one dead. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fulton (steam Screw)
February 12, 1904 Steam screw. Ashore at Port Orford, one dead. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Funstan (military Transport)
World War II veteran to be scrapped, The Tacoma News Tribune. August10, 1969, p. D-11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Funstan (transport)
World War II veteeran to be scrapped, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 19, 1969, p. D-11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Furnessia
The "Furnessia" of 1895 was built in 1880 by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for the Barrow Steamship Co. She was a 5,495 gross ton vessel, length 445.1ft x beam 44.8ft, two funnels, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 242-1st, 136-2nd and 981-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/10/1880, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville(Ireland) and New York on 17/2/1881. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 5/4/1883 (21 round voyages) and on 9/5/1883 was transferred to the Liverp[ool - Queenstown(Cobh) - New York run. She made 6 round voyages on this service, the last one commencing 1/11/1883 and on 7/12/1883 resumed the Glasgow - Moville - New York service. In 1891 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and her funnels reduced to one. On 17/11/1893 she was transferred from Barrow Steamship Co. to Anchor Line and in 1909 her accommodation was modified to 1st and 3rd class only. On 12/8/1911 she sailed from Glasgow on her final voyage to Moville, New York and Glasgow and on 22/11/1911 was scrapped at Barrow.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 31 October 1997]
Furst Bismarck
The "Furst Bismarck" was buit by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin for the Hamburg America Line and was laid down as the "Venetia" but launched as the "Furst Bismarck". She was a 8,430 gross ton ship, length 502.6ft x beam 57.6ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 420-1st, 172-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/11/1890, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 8/5/1891. On 27/3/1894 she commenced her first voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York and continued this service during the winter months until commencing her last Naples - New York voyage on 26/1/1902. She started her last Hamburg - Southampton - New York voyage on 5/11/1903. She was sold to Russia in 1904, converted to an auxiliary cruiser and renamed "Don". In 1906 she went to the Russian Volunteer Fleet, was renamed "Moskva" and from 13/5/1907 she ran between Libau, Rotterdam and New York. She made 4 round voyages, and in 1913 was sold to the Austrian Navy who renamed her "Gaea" and used her as a depot ship. Seized by Italy at the end of the Great War, she was rebuilt and renamed "San Giusto" for the Cosulich Line. In 1921 she made one round voyage from Trieste to Naples and New York and was scrapped in Italy in 1924.If you should order photos of this vessel, be sure to specify the date as there was a later "Furst Bismarck" belonging to Hamburg America Line, built in 1905.
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 October 1997}
Fury (roberts, P. 61)
World War II veteeran to be scrapped, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 19, 1969, p. D-11.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fusi Ayama
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., IV, p. 111.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fuso Maru
See LATVIA.
Citation:
G.e. Foster (steamer)
Halibut steamers. ALF p. 95.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gail (fishboat)
The 40 foot motor fishing boat Gail was rammed by the ocean freighter Anniston City off Grays Harbor in August. Her three -man crew was taken off safely and the boat was beached by the Coast Guard, but subsequently broke up in the surf. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Garfield (seiner)
The Garfield in 1910 was one of the most modern vessels on Puget Sound. ALF, p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gary Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Gary Foss was built in 1943 at the Reliable Welding Works at Olympia Washington for the U.S. Army. She was part of a series of sixteen identical turns for use in Army out-ports. She operated in Southeastern Alaska and was sold to Foss on November 12, 1948. Foss kept the vessel for a year and sold her to Pacific Tow and Salvage Company of Long Beach and they renamed her Pacific Rocket. The tug was later sold and renamed Bronco and still later became the tug Swinomish. Michael Skalley, The tug Gary Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gary Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Gary Foss was designed by H. C. Hanson and built at Winslow, Washington for the Alaska Gold Mining Corporation in 1935. Named Trojan the the vessel worked until 1956 when she was purchased by Foss and renamed by the Foss Company. Sold by Foss in September of 1976 the tug was sold to California interests and became the Pacific Jupiter beginning work in January, 1977. Laid up the next year the vessel was eventually sold for work on the Sacramento River. Michael Skalley, The Gary Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 189.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gem Of The Ocean (bark)
This American bark 702 tons, struck off Vancouver Island, eight miles southeast of Port San Juan, in August 1879 and became a total loss. Captain Hawse and his crew escaped and reached Port Townsend in a small boat. The vessel was bound from Seattle to San Francisco with coal. She was built as a clipper ship in 1852, at Medford, Massachusetts, by Hayden & Cudworth for William Lincoln of Boston. Last owned by McPherson & Witherbee, San Francisco. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gem Of The Ocean (bark)
The American bark Gem of the Ocean, Captain Hawse, from Seattle for San Francisco with coal, struck on the west coast of Vancouver Island, in August, about eight miles southeast of Port San Juan, and was reported a total loss. The captain and crew reached Port Townsend in a small boat. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.273.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Fairchild (bark)
The 1,427 -ton wooden bark General Fairchild, built at Freeport, Me. in 1874, was sold by W. E. Mighell of San Francisco to the Thlinket Packing Co. and was converted to a cannery barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Frisbee (steamer)
George R. Whidden of New Whatcom built the passenger steamer General Frisbee for the Monticello Steamship Co. of San Francisco, operated by Capt. Z. J. Hatch, formerly a well-known Puget Sound steamboat man. The General Frisbee was a 670-ton propeller with dimensions of 183.8 x 29.3 x 1 1.6. She was fitted with a four cylinder triple expansion engine (16, 25, 30, 30) and two return tube bouers delivering steam at 175 pounds working pressure, her machinery developing 1,000 horsepower. As in the case of many of the larger vessels launched at Northwest yards at this time, the General Frisbee was loaded with lumber and towed to San Francisco, where she received her machinery. In later years she returned to Puget Sound to run the Seattle- Bremerton route under the name Commander. xxxx, p. 60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Garfield (steamer)
The propeller General Garfield was launched at Rainier in 1881 and was purchased by the Shoalwater Bay Transportation Company, of which L. A. Loomis was president, C. A. Reed, secretary, and I. W. Cole, treasurer. After running a while on Shoalwater Bay she came back to Astoria, where she was operated by Fred G. Lewis. In 1887 she was taken to Tillamook by H. B. Johnson, who used her in the towing and passenger trade for two years and then sold her to the Truckee Lumber Company, who allowed her to lie on the mud flats for several months and then turned her over to George Woodruff and S. F. Snyder. She subsequently passed into the hands of E. A. Snyder, and is at present owned by Claude Thayer. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 286.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General J. Franklin Bell (mine Planter)
The steel steam mine-planter General J. Franklin Bell a 704-ton twin-screw vessel with triple-expansion engines and dimensions of 172 x 32 x 17, built at Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1919, was assigned to the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and stationed at Fort Worden. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 306.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Mifflin (steamer)
The steam fort tender General Mifflin of 1904 was purchased from the goverrunent by the Cary-Davis subsidiary of the Puget Sound Tug & Barge Co. She was amply powered with 600-horsepower oil-burning steam engines and it was planned to operate her in towing service, but she was not utilized for this purpose, being resold to the Alaska Steamship Co. the following year and entering upon a new and interesting phase of her career. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General Mifflin (steamer)
The steam fort tender General Mifflin 406 tons, 130 x 27 x 12. 1, was built at San Francisco and assigned to Fort Worden, as was the 2 12 ton Major. Evan Thomas, 105 x 20 x 6, built at Ballard. The latter vessel gained a place in seacoast artillery legend when, as she was towing a target for gunnery practice, a one - pound sub -calibre shell was neatly put through her pilot house roof by one of the batteries. After along Army career she became the Los Angeles motor tug Retriever. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General R. M. Blatchford
The "General R. M. Blatchford" was built at the Kaiser Shipyard, Richmond, Calif. for the US Navy. She was one of a class of C.4 type ships, 10,654 gross tons, length 523ft x beam 71.2ft, one funnel, two masts, engines aft and accommodation for 3,000 troops. Launched on 27th Aug.1944, she was commissioned number AP 153 on Jan.26th 1945 and commenced her maiden voyage from San Francisco to Manila on Mar.12th 1945. In June 1946 she was handed over to the US Army and made 28 voyages between Germany and the USA with displaced persons. Returned to the US Navy, she entered the Military Sea Transportation Service and was numbered T-AP 153. In Sep.1968 she was handed over to the Maritime Administration and laid up. Sold to Waterman Carriers Inc, New York in Jan.1969, she was rebuilt at Portland as a container ship, renamed "Stonewall Jackson" and entered commercial service in 1970. In 1973 she was renamed "Alex Stephens" and in 1979 went to the US Department of Commerce. On April 13th 1980, scrapping commenced by Chien Yu Steel Enterprises, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.4,p.106; vol.6,p.181] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 23 October 1998]
Citation:
General W.c.langfitt
The "General W.C.Langfitt" was one of a class of 30 ships, classified as C4-S-A1. They were 523ft in length x 71.2ft beam, 10,654 gross tons, turbine engines located aft, 17 knots and with accommodation for up to 3,000 troops and a crew of 256. Built by Kaiser, Richmond/Cal. Yard No.17, she was launched on July 17th 1944 and commissioned on Sept.30th as AP 151. She started her maiden voyage from San Diego to Eniwetok on Nov.10th. In June 1946 she was handed over to the US Army and rebuilt to 12,544 gross tons, making 9 Germany - USA voyages with displaced persons. Returned to the US Navy in 1950 and used in the Military Sea Transportation Service, number T-AP 151 until May 13th 1958 when she was laid up by the Maritime Administration in the reserve fleet in the James River. In 1968 she was sold to Hudson Waterways Corporation, New York and rebuilt as a 13,489 ton, 633ft long container vessel by the Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co, Baltimore. In Dec.1969 she entered commercial service as the "Transindiana".[Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.4, 1936-1950 by Arnold Kludas, ISBN 0-85059-253-4] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 June 1998]
George H. Williams (fireboat)
The steam fireboat George H. Williams, 194 tons, 105.5 feet long, with 175 -horsepower compound engine, was completed by the Wfllamette Iron & Steel Co. and placed in service by the Portland Fire Department. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
George Skolfield
The wooden ship George Skolfield, 1,313 tons, bunt at Brunswick, Me. in 1870 and sold in 1893 to the Alaska Packers Association of San Francisco as the first vessel of that fleet, was sold to the American Trading Co., stranded and was hulked in Japan in 1900. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
George W. Fenwick (steamer)
On July 29 the steamship George W. Fenwick arrived at Aberdeen to load 600,000 feet of lumber for the construction work on the Panama Canal, this being the first of many shipments of Northwest lumber which were dispatched from Grays Harbor for use in canal construction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 188.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Georges Bank (fishing Boat)
Sailing fishing boats; mixing business with pleasure, George Olafson, Prince Rupert, B.C. opts for aluminum forty-four footer, The National Fisherman. December, 1985, p. 34. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gifford
An incident typical of the treatment accorded seamen of that era was that of the crew of the four-masted British ship Gifford, lying at Port Townsend early in January and about to depart for a voyage around the Horn. The men, just in from a deep -water voyage, were prevailed upon by the keeper of a Tacoma sailors' boarding house to ship aboard the Gifford, with the understanding that they would be granted shore leave before she sailed. Once aboat the ship they learned that they would not be permitted to return ashore, although all their clothing and personal effects were still at the Tacoma Boarding house. The boarding house runner promised to send their seabags and chesta aboard and departed with $40.00 advance money from the British captain for each man. When the chests and bags were delivered they were found to contain old grain bags and rubbish. The advance money, which would be deducted from their pay, was also kept by the runner, although the men had only been at the boarding house two or three days and
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gifford (steamship)
The British steamship Gifford stranded at the mouth of the Fraser River early in January, going ashore at extreme high tide in thick weather. The Sandheads lightship had sprung a leak and was off station for repairs at the time. Salvage and repairs were costly. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gifford (steel Bark)
Stranded in Mussel Bay, San Francisco. September 25, 1903. Built by Scott and Company in 1892. Four masted steel bark, 2245 tons. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gig Harbor (ferry Boat)
Built in Gig Harbor in 1925. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208. Burns in a spectacular fire last night. The Tacoma News Tribune. June 10, 1929. BPC, II, 1216. Plan salvage of ferry boat, Tacoma Daily Ledger. June 11, 1929.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gladiator (fishing Schooner)
Two dorymen from the power halibut fishing schooner Gladiator, Billy Bragg and William Henry, narrowly escaped death off Cape Flattery when a large whale became entangled in their fishing gear and struck the dory with its flukes. The two fishermen, clinging to the wrecked dory, were rescued by John Green and Hans Jensen in another dory from the Gladiator which was commanded by Captain George Penny. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 210-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glafkos (freighter)
Zidell of Tacoma completed scrapping of the Greek freighter Glafkos a few weeks ago. The Park-type vessel is the one that stranded on Ampbitrite Point on the West Coast of Vancouver Island in 1962. She was claimed a total constructive loss after being towed to Victoria. (The Marine Digest. XLI (June 8, 1963), p. 27).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glen Fruin (bark)
The British bark Glen Fruin, coal-laden from Newcastle for Portland, was abandoned in a leaking condition off Barclay Sound, December 8th.[1880]. The vessel encountered heavy gales near the equator, which started her seams, and when nearing the Columbia southerly winds drove her northward out of her course. The crew reached King's Island, where they remained for a week, and were then taken to Victoria by the schooner Favorite. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.280.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glenafton (bark)
Ships that sail to the Port of Tacoma. British Bark Glenafton, 1109 tons register. West Coast Trade, 1897 Annual Edition p. 31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gloria (ferryboat)
County to fight private ferry, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. August 19, 1923, p. A-1.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Sea (clipper)
Built at East Boston in 1869. Photo of old sailing ship at Endolyne, south of Seattle, May 13, 1923. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 21. An old sailing vessel converted to a floating cold storage plant, ALF, p. 92. BNG, p. 294-95. Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 21. Figurehead. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 122. Casey Davison, Soundings, the Glory of the Sea, The Tacoma Times. November 10, 1939. The Glory of the Sea, The Sea chest. X (March, 1977). Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Sea (fishboat)
This motor vessel (fishboat), 46 tons, burned outside the breakwater at Neah Bay, November 2, 1951; a total loss. Built in 1926 at Gig Harbor, Washington. A veteran of the fishing banks the vessel was owned by John Maljich, Jr., of Tacoma, and carried an eight-man crew. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Seas
The remains of the splendid old Donald McKay shipGlory of the Seas were burned at Endoline, south of Seattle, on May 13. Nieder & Marcus, the Seattle shipbreakers, had purchased the hull the previous year but had waited for months in the hope that a patriotic effort generating in Boston might save and restore the famous vessel. They were willing to waive all profit showd Glory of the Seas be bought for preservation as a public maritime shrine. The effort was not successful, however, and the ship was resold to C. G. Tackaberry, who burned her for junk. And so ended an era. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 344.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Seas
The Glory of the Seas, purchased by Barneson & Hibberd, was drydocked at San Francisco, given new masts and spars, and entered in the coastwise lumber trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 121.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Seas
Probably the finest of the great American wooden sailing vessels, the Donald McKay-built Glory of the Seas also changed owners, being converted to a cannery barge for the Alaska fishery. She had made 22 voyages around the Horn before being used after 1886 in the coastwise coal trade between San Francisco and British Columbia, much of her service on the coast being under the command of Capt. Joshua Freeman, Capt. George Ekrem also commanding her on a couple of fast passages, as well as her slowest (31 days). Late in 1910 she was purchased by Capt. McDonald, an old South Sea Island trader, and Arthur Fellowes, who placed her under Uruguayan registry, along with the,bark Hesper, planning to use the old sailing vessels to carry cargoes of hardwood from Malekula in the Hebrides. The inhabitants of this island were unabashed cannibals, who had cooked and eaten several missionaries, as well as the crew of a French schooner, and Capt. McDonald planned to carry well - armed crews of 250 men to insure tranquility durin
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Seas (clipper Ship)
In March of 1926 G. A. McKay, son of the legendary clipper ship builder Donald McKay, visited Seattle and with his son, Hugh R. McKay, made a pilgrimage to the abandoned hulk of the Glory of the Seas, last of the great McKay sailing ships, on the beach at Endoline. Although the hull had been burned in 1923, it had not been entirely consumed, and the McKays obtained a number of relics from the charred remains. Gordon Newell, Marine Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 372.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Seas (fishboat)
The fishing boat Glory of the Seas, a 60 -foot motor vessel built at Seattle in 1920, was destroyed by fire at Neah Bay in October. Eight Coast Guardsmen who attempted to subdue the fire were burned when the fuel tanks exploded, spraying them with burning ofl. Four of the guardsmen were seriously injured. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 578.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glory Of The Seas (floating Cannery)
The salmon fishery was most active in 1912 the first floating canneries, Glory of the Seas and William H. Smith operating, and 19 new shore canneries built in southeastern Alaska. The Alaska pack reached 4,054,641 cases, from 87 canneries. British Columbia, with 57 canneries operating, packed 996,570 cases, and Puget Sound, with 21 canneries, 416,119 cases. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goddess Of Liberty (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 402.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Age (ferryboat)
Purchased in 1937 by the Black Ball Line from San Francisco the Golden Age was one of the wooden electrics which were built in 1926-1927. 226.8 x 40 x 15.9 feet they had three diesel engines supplying power to two electric drive motors. Upon reaching Puget Sound the Golden Age was renamed the Klahanie. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Alaska (fish Processor)
West Coast focus,302 foot processor ready for work,The National Fisherman, January, 1983, p. 6. (il). The 302 Golden Alaska to begin another new life; Tacoma ship finished refurbishing in May, The National Fisherman. August, 1985, p. 57. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (ferry Boat)
Purchased in 1937 as one of the wooden electric Ferryboats for use on Puget Sound by the Black Ball line. Built in 1926-1927 the Golden Bear was under tow of the Seattle tug Active when she encountered heavy weather after reaching Cape Blanco on the Oregon Coast. The ferry's pitching caused the towline to part and the vessel's entire superstructure subsequently collapsed. The crew was removed and the vessel taken into the lumber town of Empire wher she was stipped of machinery and disposed of. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line, p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (freighter)
1937 Diesel electric freighter under Captain Louis Van Bogaert. While struggling against high seas, her superstructure, along with several pipes, worked loose. Leaking fumes from the exhaust pipe sickened the crew and they soon became incapacitated. The Active towed the disabled vessel to Coos Bay; she was declared a loss and turned into a barge. She now forms part of a breakwater in British Columbia. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Cloud (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Dragon (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Eagle (fishing Boat)
Satiacum's boat auctioned for $82,000, Seattle Times. May 1, 1983. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Eagle (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Fleece
See LAKE NEPIGON.
Citation:
Golden Fleece (schooner)
The Golden Fleece, a two - masted schooner of 127 tons, was built on Humboldt Bay in 1875. She was owned first by J. H. Jacobsen, her master; and after 1885 by Wright, Bowne & Co., disappearing from registry in 1895.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Fleece (schooner. )
The Golden Fleece, a two - masted schooner of 127 tons, was built on Humboldt Bay in 1875. She was owned first by J. H. Jacobsen, her master; and after 1885 by Wright, Bowne & Co., disappearing from registry in 1895.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Forest (steamer)
The steamship Golden Forest, an Oceanic & Oriental Line freighter, was wrecked September 15 in Shellikof Strait. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 404.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Horn (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Kauri (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century,p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Mountain (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Poppy (ferry Boat)
One of six wooden electric ferry boats purchased by the Black Ball Line for use on Puget Sound. Built in 1926-27 226.8 x 40 x 15.9 feet with three diesel engines supplying power to two electric drive motors. Upon reaching the Pacific Northwest the name of the vessel was changed to Chetzemoka. As the Chetzemoka she sank off the Washington Coast in the Spring of 1977 while be towed to San Francisco. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden River (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Rod (fishboat)
The Golden Rod was a motor vessel (fishboat), 15 tons, foundered one mile south of Tatoosh Island, September 28, 1955. Was built in 1907 and owned by Harold Rogers, Port Angeles, Washington. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (ferry Boat)
One of four ferry boats arriving on Puget Sound after purchase by the Black Ball Line from San Francisco in 1937. As the Elwha she was sold in 1944 to a San Diego Company and in 1970 she was torn from her moorings by high winds and driven onto a breakwater, a total loss. Grahame F. Shrader. The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (ferry)
Another of the San Diego boats, the former San Francisco ferry Golden Shore and Puget Sound Navigation Co. Elwha, last operated as the Silver Strand, was purchased for $10 by an El Monte group for conversion to a diving barge for underwater research in Long Beach harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden State (ferry Boat)
One of six ferry boats purchased in 1937 by the Black Ball Line for use on Puget Sound. Only four made it, one being sold and another lost. The Gold State was a wooden hulled 226.8 x 40 x 15.9 foot vessel. She became the Kehloken when she arrived on Puget Sound. As the Kehloken she was sold in 1973 and six years later while moored at Kirtland was destroyed by fire. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden State (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Sun (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden West (freighter)
March 29, 1936 Motor freighter, 61.2'long and 72 tons, built at St. Helens in 1923. Owned and captained by William Crone of California Cargo Co. She was transporting general merchandise when thrown upon the rocks at the Coquille's north jetty. The crew was saved, the ship was not. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldfinch (tug)
The increasing success of the internal combustion engine led to the conversion of a number of older steam-powered craft to motor power, among them the 49-foot Everett tug Goldfinch of Capt. Pear Pearson, which received a 45-horsepower Atlas. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 191.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gov. Elisha P. Ferry (patrol Vessel)
The first patrol vessel built for the service of the Washington State Department of Fisheries, the Gov. Elisha P Ferry, was built at the Barbara Bros. Shipyard in Tacoma. A 38-ton craft, 56.2 x 14.3 x 6.5, she was equipped with 75-horsepower gasoline engines which gave her a speed of 12 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Elisha P. Ferry (patrol Boat)
The Washington fisheries patrol boat Gov. Elisha P. Ferry was sold to Whiz Fish Company of Seattle in 1933 becoming the trap tender Marquerite, and later cannery tender Rosalie. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 423.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Elisha P. Ferry (patrol Vessel)
Governor Elisha P. Ferry, 72-foot former Washington State fisheries patrol vessel, which had served during the war as the Army Q-48 and as a shipyard workers' ferry on Lake Washington, purchased by Freeman & Gibson, Seattle shipbrokers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 545.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Harry W. Nice (ferry)
Late in December the Puget Sound Tug & Barge Co. tugs Monarch and Wando arrived at Seattle, completing a tow of approximately 6,000 miles from Baltimore with the former Virginia State ferries Gov. Harry W. Nice and Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, purchased by the Washington State Toll Bridge Authority and placed in Puget Sound service as the Olympic and Rhododendron respectively. Both were steel double - enders built in 1946. The Olympic, 207 x 62, had a 1,400horsepower Fairbanks-Morse diesel, with an automobile capacity of 65 and accommodations for 600 passengers. The Rhododendron, 227 x 63, with two 805-horsepower Fair- banks -Morse diesels, handled 75 automobiles and 600 passengers. The Wando made the long tow in charge of Capt. Kelly Sprague, Fe@ Plank and Torsten Gastigivar, mates, and Wesley Oaks, chief engineer. Capt. Don Barbeau had charge of the Monarch with M. F. Christy and Soren Michelson, mates; Don McColloch, chief engineer. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grace Foss (2) (tugboat)
The GRACE FOSS was completed in 1968 at the Pacific Shipyard in Anacortes, and was number eight in the series of modern steel harbor tugs built for Foss and their operating companies. Two sizes of tugs were planned in the modernization and replacement program-in the 37-foot class five were built and four in the 42-foot series, including the GRACE. The Grace is 42 feet long with a beam of 14 feet. Her primary service is within Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Grace Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 264.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grace Foss (2) (tugboat)
The GRACE FOSS was completed in 1968 at the Pacific Shipyard in Anacortes, and was number eight in the series of modern steel harbor tugs built for Foss and their operating companies. Two sizes of tugs were planned in the modernization and replacement program-in the 37-foot class five were built and four in the 42-foot series, including the GRACE. The Grace is 42 feet long with a beam of 14 feet. Her primary service is within Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Grace Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 264.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grace Foss (tugboat)
The Grace Foss was built as the Ollile S in Astoria in 1911. She was brought to Seattle in 1918 and was then called Rosedale. She was sold to Foss in November of 1927 and continued working until December 17, 1954 when she sank but was raised and sold. In 1974 she sank again, at Gig Harbor. Michael Skalley, Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 69.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Graceful
See SOVEREIGN.
Citation:
Graf Waldersee
The "Graf Waldersee" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 for the Hamburg America Line and was one of four sister ships. This was a 12,830 gross ton ship, length 561.2ft x beam 62.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 162-1st, 184-2nd and 2,200-3rd class. Laid down as the "Pavia" she was actually launched on 10/12/1898 as the "Graf Waldersee" and commenced her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Boulogne and New York on 2/4/1899. In Autumn 1910 she was rebuilt to 13,193 gross tons and with accommodation for 408-2nd and 2,310-3rd class passengers. She started her first Hamburg - Philadelphia crossing on 28/10/1910 and her last Hamburg - New York - Hamburg voyage started on 27/6/1914. On 23/3/1919 she was surrendered to the US government under the war reparations scheme and was used to repatriate American troops from Europe and later as a naval transport. In 1920 she was ceded to Britain and managed by P&O Line until 1922 when she was sold to Kohlbrand Werft, Hamburg and broken up. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.405] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 January 1998]
Gratitude (relief Ship)
Gratitude, helping the world's needy. Park West Children's Fund vessel joins Spirit in Seattle, The Marine Digest. December 27, 186, p. 4. This vessel was formerly the Japanese Tuna boat, Saint Maruko.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Admiral (full Rigged Ship)
The American full rigged ship Great Admiral, Captain E. R. Sterling, Boston built in 1869 and for several years engaged in the Puget Sound lumber trade departed from Mukilteo for San Pedro on December 1, 1906. Offshore she was beset by heavy gales and began leaking badly, and by December 6 she was completely under water, being kept from going to the bottom only by the bouyancy of her lumber cargo. The crew, with Mrs. Catherine Martin, the wife of the first mate, huddled on top of the main cabin, the only area above water. The ship's cook and cabin boy died of exposure during the night, but the following morning the British square-rigger Barcore, outward bound from Puget Sound for Australia, sighted the wreckage and removed the survivors, transferring them on Christmas Eve to the inward bound Andrew Welch, which landed them at San Francisco. xxxx, p. 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Northern Five (fish Packer)
The Canadian fish packer Great Northern 5, owned by Francis Millerd & Co. of Vancouver, suffered an engine failure in mid-December during a violent storm off Estevan on the West Coast of Vancouver Island and was driven on the rocks north of Cape Cook. The engineer was drowned, but Capt George W. Skinner and his son Hugh reached shore. After walking two days with a badly injured leg, Capt. Skinner took shelter in a hollow log and his son continued the search for help for another five days. Finally, bleeding and delirious, he was sighted by a plane and his father was rescued by a Royal Canadian Mounted Police search party on January 6, 22 days after the wreck. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 475.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grecian Prince (of 1893 & 1899)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
Citation:
Green Toad (freight And Towboat)
The 31-foot gas freight and towboat Green Toad of 14 horsepower was built at Olympia for use on upper Puget Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p224.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffco (freighter)
The first private contract for steel cargo ships made in the Northwest following the close of World War I hostilities also involved vessels of the steam schooner type. J. F. Duthie & Co., in August and September of 1920, launched the 1,450-ton steamships Griffco and Griffdu for Capt. Griffiths' Coastwise Steamship & Barge Co., the former vessel being christened by Mrs. Albert V. Griffiths and the latter by Mrs. Stanley A. Griffiths, wives of Capt. Griffiths' sons. The vessels were 220 feet long, 40 feet beam and of a molded depth of 21 feet. Their triple-expansion (19, 32, 56 x 36) engines were aft. The Griffco was fitted with two water tube boilers and the Griffdu with two single-ended Scotch boilers, those of both vessels working at 200 pounds pressure and the engines developing 1,400 horsepower to provide a service speed of 1 1 knots. Although adapted to handle coal and ore cargoes, the new steamships initially entered the lumber trade to the West Coast of South America, towing lumber-laden barges from Pug
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffdu (steam Schooner)
The steel steam schooner Griffdu was sold by Capt. Griffiths to the Nelson Steamship Co. for Portland - San Francisco service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffen
"The Griffen" landed in the colonies on 23rd Nov 1675, founding Salem the first English speaking settlement on the Delaware River. John Fenwick, late major in Cromwell's cavalry was in charge. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Barbara Spadea - 23 January 1998]
Griffin (brig)
BLJM, p. 225, 227, 228, 234, 288, 290.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffin (tug)
The Griffin, a Lake Washington tug owned by S. L. Dowell, was fitted with a 50-horsepower Corliss in 1912.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffnip (barge)
As in the case of self-propelled cargo vessels, existing barges were refitted for more efficient and economical service, a case in point being the big Washington Tug & Barge Company chlorine barge Griffnip, carrying Hooker Chemical Company chlorine from Tacoma to British Columbia and Alaska in 21 railway tank cars and 1,900-gallon capacity hull tanks. This specialized carrier was fitted with a liquid transfer boom designed and built by Northern Line Machine & Engineering Company of Tacoma. This highly sophisticated device, capable of handling 160 gallons per minute while automatically compensating for tide, roll, pitch and draft, was credited with shortening the barge's round trip schedule by 24 hours. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XX.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffson
Barge would not budge, The Tacoma News Tribune. May 25, 1982.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Griffson (barge)
An incompleted Ferris type steamship at the Nilson & Kelez plant in Seattle was taken over and completed as the barge Griffson at Winslow. Her first voyage was from Portland to Balboa with 2,000,000 feet of lumber, in tow of the Griffco. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 306.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grosser Kurfurst
The steamship GROSSER KURFURST was built by F. Schichau, Danzig (ship no. 643), for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 2 December 1899. 13,182 tons; 177,05 x 18,90 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion (quadruple-expansion engines, 9,000 horsepower), service speed 15 knots; accommodation for 299 passengers in 1st class, 317 in 2nd class, 172 in 3rd class, and 2,201 in steerage; crew of 273. 5 May 1900, maiden voyage, under the Schichau flag, Bremen-Southampton-New York. (Norddeutscher Lloyd held a minority share until the ship passed her trials, at which time she purchaed Schichau's majority share.) 7 November 1900-17 January 1912, 9 roundtrip voyages, Bremen-Suez Canal- Australia (largest ship sailing to Australia). 3 March-20 May 1904, New York-Holy Land "Cruise of the 800". 9 October 1913, saved 105 from the burning Canadian Northern steamship VOLTURNO. 1912-1914, West Indies cruises from New York; she was to have been rebuilt as a cruising vessel in the winter of 1914-1915, but World War I intervened. 11 July 1914, last voyage, Bremen-New York (arrived 21 July); interned at Hoboken. 6 April 1917, seized by the U.S. Government at New York. 6 September 1917, renamed AEOLUS (U.S. Navy transport). 22 September 1919, transferred to the United States Shipping Board. 19 February 1920, leased to the Munson Line; passenger accommodations refurbished; fitted with oil firing (10 September, 4 men killed in an explosion during refitting). 1 December 1920, first voyage, New York-Buenos Aires. 1921, purchased by the Munson Line, but South America service dropped. 1 December 1921, chartered to the Los Angeles Steam Ship Co. June 1922, renamed CITY OF LOS ANGELES. 11 September 1922, after extensive rebuild, first voyage, Los Angeles- Honolulu. 17 August 1923, purchased by the Los Angeles Steamship Co for $100,000. 23 November 1923, began $106,000 rebuild: turbines, new boilers, renovated passenger quarters: 12,642 tons; 408 passengers in 1st class, 80 in 3rd class; crew of 231. 27 July 1928, $50,000 fitting out for line's first South Pacific Cruise. 8 October 1930, Los Angeles-Around South America cruise. 1 January 1931, Los Angeles Steamship Co purchased by Matson Navigation Co. 2 August 1932, laid up in Los Angeles Harbor; from 7 July 1933, in San Diego. 1935, during the California International Exhibition in San Diego, served as a casino, night club and hotel named "Show Boat". 24 March 1937, sailed from San Diego for Osaka (arrived 29 April); scrapped. Sources: Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995), vol. 1, pp. 232-234 (photographs); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 26-27 (photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 563. Also pictured in Clas Broder Hansen, Passenger liners from Germany, 1816-1990, translated from the German by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Pub., c1991), p. 48. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 March 1998]
Grosser Kurfurst (liner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 54, 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Growler (freighter)
The 139-foot freighter Growler, a converted naval patrol vessel owned by Growler, Inc., of Seattle and under charter to Harmon Brothers Construction Company of Palmer, Alaska, capsized during an early October storm while carrying construction supplies from Kotzebue to Bethel. All three men aboard were lost. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grub Stake No One (floating Grocery Store)
The Grub Stake No. 11 50 x 12 feet, built for H. H. Hurlbut and W.A. Coddington as a floating grocery store on Lake Washington and fitted with a two cylinder twenty horse power Atlas engine. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Guide (fishing Vessel)
Shortly after the Oregon coastal fishing vessels Guide and Columbia put out their gear to drag for bottom fish off Cape Arago in March, their gear became entangled. Before it could be cleared the 60-foot Guide heeled over and capsized, the three men aboard being rescued by the Columbia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.88.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf King (tug)
The ocean tug Gulf King, 125 feet in length and powered by two 1,800-horsepower Fairbanks Morse diesels was purchased from Gulf Mississippi Marine by America Tug Boat Co. and brought around to the West Coast for deepsea towing service under the new name Howard H. Her first two voyages were from Vancouver, Washington to Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands group towing two barges, each carrying 32 prefabricated housing units. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.44.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf Mariner (motor Vessel)
Gulf Mariner. (ex - HMCS Truro), 162 -foot freight and passenger motor vessel operated by Gulf Lines in Vancouver - Powell River service untu 1950, when new safety requirements forced her out of service, taken over on long-term charter by Frank Waterhouse of Canada (Union Steamships) and Straits Towing, Ltd., for operation as a combination freighter, tug and salvage vessel under Capt. Cecil Roberts. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 587.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf Master (tug)
A number of serious accidents befell vessels of the Pacific Northwest tug and barge fleets during 1967. In January the Gulf Master became the third small modern steel B.C. tugboat in recent months to sink suddenly with loss of life. Running light in the Gulf of Georgia near Sechelt in moderate weather, she went down so quickly that no distress call was broadcast, taking her five-man crew down with her in 100 fathoms of water.* *Soon after the sinking of the Gulf Master, the Canadian Merchant Service Guild reported that the Department of Transport had accepted a recommendation that steel tugboats be required to have watertight compartments. The recommendation was based on the Guild's investigation of 50 tugboat sinkings along the B.C. coast since 1958. Of the total, 21 were steel and 29 had wooden hulls, but the steel tug sinkings claimed 24 lives in contrast to only five crew members lost in the wooden tug sinkings. It was noted that some of the steel vessels vanished in a matter of seconds. Gordon Newell,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf Sally (tug)
Gulf Sally, 77 x 24-foot tug powered by two 1,400-horsepower GM diesels, designed by Robert Allan and built by Vito Shipyards (Vito Steel Boat & Barge Construction Ltd.) Vancouver, for Gulf of Georgia Towing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf Sally (tug)
Gulf Sally, 77 x 24-foot tug powered by two 1,400-horsepower GM diesels, designed by Robert Allan and built by Vito Shipyards (Vito Steel Boat & Barge Construction Ltd.) Vancouver, for Gulf of Georgia Towing. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gulf Stream (motor Vessel)
The motor vessel Gulf Stream, built in Massachusetts in 1915 as the Capt. F. E. Lewis steam yacht Stranger, recently purchased for local passenger and freight service in British Columbia waters by the Gulf Lines, Ltd. of Vancouver, crashed into Dinner Rock eight miles north of Powell River on October 11 while steaming at 14 knots. The 147-foot steel vessel climbed the rock at an angle of 45 degrees for one third of her length and then turned on her port side. The stern sank, trapping and drowning two women and three children in a submerged after cabin. Capt. Jack Craddock, the 22-man crew and the remainder of the 15 passengers aboard were removed by the fish packer Betty L., in charge of Capt. Bob West, and the vessel was later refloated. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest..p. 549.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair
The ocean business between Portland, Victoria and Puget Sound was handled in 1869 by the Gussie Telfair, a vessel with a history of more than ordinary interest. She was a Clyde built propeller of about four hundred tons burden, launched at Greenock in 1863 for a blockade runner, and made a number of successful voyages before she was captured by a United States vessel, taken to New York and sold to John T. Wright, who at once fitted her out and sent her to the Pacific Coast. Holladay & Brenham were at that time buying everything which threatened to interfere with their monopoly, and the Telfair soon fell into their hands and was started North on her first trip early in 1869 in command of Capt. Fred Bolles, who took her to Victoria. After he left her, Capt. N. L. Rogers was appointed master and ran her between Portland and Victoria, calling at Port Townsend, Seattle, Steilacoom and Olympia. Sherwood, Sholl and Hayes were in charge on the same route, and in 1872 Capt. T. J. Ainsley ran her between the Sound and
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair (steamer)
September 30,1880 Steam propeller, built at Greenock, Scotland, as the Gertrude. 350 tons, 156'x 21'x 1 1'. She served as a blockade-runner during the Civil War. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair (steamer)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 174. Morgan, Murray C. Puget's Sound. p. 155.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair (steamer)
The steamship Gussie Telfair ended a life of vicissitudes at Rocky Point, Coos Bay, where she was wrecked September 25th,[1880] soon after leaving Empire City for San Francisco. In January, 1880, after two years in the Coos Bay coal trade, she was sent to Honolulu, but, finding the island traffic unprofitable, had returned to the Coos Bay route only a short time before the accident happened. She was insured for $7,500, and the wreck sold for $550. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.280.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair (steamer)
The Gussie Telfair was hauled out at Laing's yard in Victoria, repaired at an expense of $10,000, and then sent to Portland to lay up, First Officer E. J. Moody remaining in charge. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair (steamer)
The Gussie Telfair, Capt. John Gardiner, was back on her old run in 1875, making trips from Portland to Neah Bay, Port Townsend, San Juan, Orcas Island, Victoria, New Westminster and Nanaimo. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.236.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gussie Telfair (steamer)
The old steamer Gussie Telfair was purchased in April by Frank Barnard & Co., who refitted her for the Coos Bay, Empire City and Marshfield trade. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.257.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (liner)
The H. F. Alexander, speed queen of the Pacific, lost her way in a dense fog on the Strait of Juan de Fuca while in bound with about 500 passengers from California on July 24. She struck the rocky shoals off Point WHson at the entrance to Admiralty Inlet, causing hull damage of about a quarter of a million dollars. Capt. Charles G. Hansen, John C. Freeman, senior second officer, Ottar Drotning, junior second officer, Samuel Hall, quartermaster, all on the bridge, and two able seamen on lookout testified that they did not hear the Point Wilson fog horn, although the lighthouse keepers insisted it was sounding. Apparently the radio beacon at Point Wilson was not picked up by the liner either. The officers of the Admiral Line flagship were cleared of blame at the subsequent investigation. The 535-type liner President Grant of the Dollar Line, diverted from San Fran- cisco to replace the damaged President Madison, carried coastwise passengers to Seattle in August to aid in handling the heavy traffic disrupted by
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (liner)
The year 1922 was not marked by major marine disasters to well-known Northwest vessels, although the Admiral Line's flagship H. F. Alexander narrowly escaped such an accident. On a northbound voyage August 7 she struck Cake Rock off the Washington coast at about 12:50 a.m., crumpling her bows back almost to the foremast. No lives were lost, although a number of passengers were shaken up, and her collision bulkheads held, preventing her sinking. The Admiral Schley, on the Portland run, responded to wireless messages from the flagship and successfully took off 317 passengers and about 135 of the crew, landing them at Seattle. Manned by a skeleton crew and with tugs standing by, the H. F. Alexander then proceeded to Seattle under her own steam, repairs being rushed to completion at a cost of almost a quarter of a million dollars. She was back on the run in two weeks. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 329.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (liner)
A historic event in sea communications occurred in May with the official tests of the radio telephone equipment installed aboard the steamships H. F. Alexander and Dorothy ALxander. Greetings, Capt. Bartlett of the H. F. Alexander, this is Capt. Harris of the Dorothy Alexander off Cape Blanco. How's the weather at Cape Flattery? Such was the first voice radio conversation ever held between ships at sea on the North Pacific. The H. F. was then 300 miles south of Seattle; the Dorothy 280 miles north of San Francisco. This event took place shortly before the placing in operation of similar equipment aboard the U. S. liner Leviathan on the Atlantic. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 338.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. F. Alexander (steamer)
Steel steamer, three decks, two masts, 8357 tons 500.1 x 63.1 x 20.6 feet. 225 crew, 585 passengers 23 knots. Built in 1914 in Philadelphia as the Great Northern. Operated between Portland and San Franciso by the Great Norther Pacific Steamship Company from 1915 until 1917. U.S. Government purchased the vessel for War service during which she made ten round trips between New York and Brest establishing a world record of fourteen days, four and a half hours for a round trip. After War service she became the Columbia and was commissioned as the flagship of the Atlantic Fleet of the United States Navy. She was purchased by the Admiral Line Mar 4, 1922 and brough to the Pacific Coast. She served as a troop transport during World War II under the name General George S. Simonds and was sold for scrap in 1948. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., II, p. 283. Inducted into the national maritime hall of famy May 18, under name Great Northern, Marine Digest. May 4,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H. W. Bancroft (steamer)
The Hall Bros. shipyard at Eagle Harbor (Winslow), long famed for the construction of graceful schooners, in March launched what was for it an unusual craft, the sternwheel steamer W H. Bancroft, built for freight and towing service at the Orca, Alaska canneries of the Northwestern Fisheries Co., being designed by Lee & Brinton, Seattle naval architects, to negotiate the shallow flats of the Copper River. The 111 - foot steamer was equipped with five rudders, two aft of the wheel and three forward, giving her excellent maneuverability. Construction was supervised by Frank Walker, and the Bancroft was christened by Miss Ruth Buschmann, daughter of the company's general superintendent, C. H. Buschmann. The event was witnessed by a large party of officials of the Northwestern Fisheries and Alaska Steamship Co. Following completion the Bancroft in charge of Capt. T. Collins, was towed north by the tug Richard Holyoke. She remained permanently stationed at Orca, later passing to Booth Fisheries when that company t
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.f. Alexander (liner)
The H. F. Alexander was removed from ]ayup at San Francisco in March, having passed to the Canadian Pacific for British Admiralty war service. After Pearl Harbor she was returned to the United States government, serving throughout the remainder of the war as the transport George S. Simonds. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 491.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
H.m. Delanty, Along The Waterfrontn
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ha Fu 6 (japanese Submarine)
The reality of war was emphasized in December when a Japanese submarine using the radio call signal Ha Fu 6, after firing on the Canadian government lighthouse at Estevan Point, Vancouver Island, surfaced off Seaside, Oregon, and fired a number of shells from her 4.7 naval guns in the direction of Fort Stephens, headquarters for the Harbor Defenses of the Columbia. Although no damage was done, the Japanese submariners had the short-lived satisfaction of having subjected the United States continental territory to the first bombarding it had undergone since the War of 1812. The shelling also emphasized the fact that the fixed seacoast rifles and mortars of Spanish War vintage, which had been depended upon to guard the harbor entrances of the United States for so many years, were useless in modern warfare. Although the garrison at Fort Stevens was on 24-hour alert, as it had been for some weeks before Pearl Harbor, and the muzzles of the huge cannon swung grimly to track the submarine, the order to return the fi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hai Da (freighter)
On October 24, the 3,800 ton single screw freighter Hai Da (built at Sunderland in 1909 as the Vogesen and later the Quincy) cleared Seattle for China with 5,000 tons of sulphur for the manufacture of gunpowder for the armies of Chiang Kai - Shek, then fighting the Japanese. Operated under British registry by Chinese owners, she was commanded by Capt F. C. Norvik, a Norwegian, and carried a crew of 27 Chinese under First Officer K. F. Yank, a Cantonese. After clearing Cape Flattery she disappeared without a trace, only a life ring and oar blade marked with the name Hai Da drifting ashore in January of 1938 at Carmanah Point, Vancouver Island. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 457.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hai Da (freighter)
On October 24, the 3,800 ton single screw freighter Hai Da (built at Sunderland in 1909 as the Vogesen and later the Quincy) cleared Seattle for China with 5,000 tons of sulphur for the manufacture of gunpowder for the armies of Chiang Kai - Shek, then fighting the Japanese. Operated under British registry by Chinese owners, she was commanded by Capt F. C. Norvik, a Norwegian, and carried a crew of 27 Chinese under First Officer K. F. Yank, a Cantonese. After clearing Cape Flattery she disappeared without a trace, only a life ring and oar blade marked with the name Hai Da drifting ashore in January of 1938 at Carmanah Point, Vancouver Island. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 457.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Haida Chieftain (tug)
Canadian tug, 143 feet long, caught fire off Cape Beale, B. C., January 3, 1965, and was abandoned by her crew of ten who were picked up by the tug LaPointe of Vancouver Tug Boat Co., Vancouver, B. C. The brand-new tug La Beine on her maiden trip intercepted the Hada Chieftain, put out the fire, and towed the vessel to port. The Haida Chief one of the largest Canadian tugs, was rebuilt and returned to service. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Haida Prince (freighter)
The 539-gross ton motor freighter Haida Prince was sold by Northland Navigation Co. of British Columbia through Oaksmith Boat Sales of Seattle to Cayman Islands owners (Island Shipping Co.), for operation between Grand Cayman, Miami and Jamaica, under the new name Island Prince III. The 151-foot vessel was built at Port Arthur, Texas in 1946 as the Ottawa Mayferry, one of a standard class of small coastal freighter, and was purchased in 1952 by Union Steamships Ltd., who operated her for seven years as the Capilano before selling her to Northland. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLV.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hai-fu
See CHANUTE VICTORY.
Citation:
Halaur (fishboat)
The 42-foot commercial fishing vessel Halaur was built at Tenino, Washington, a community located 15 miles from the nearest navigable water, and hauled to Puget Sound for launching, after which she voyaged to Ketchikan for opera tion by H. D. Royer of that port. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: :Superior, 1966,, p. 429.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hamakua (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hanover (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harbor Princess (ferry)
The 110-foot passenger ferry Harbour Princess was designed by T. Halliday and built at Vancouver for local service by the Harbour Navigation Co. She was powered with a 220-horsepower Polar diesel giving her a service speed of 12 knots and had accommodation for 325 day passengers. Gordon Newell,Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 352.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harold J (fishing Vessel)
Drifting during the night while the crew sleeps is a common practice for small fishboats. The 48-foot Harold J. was drifting with no one on watch when she went aground in heavy surf north of the Siuslaw River early on the morning of December 27. Boatswains Mate Wayne Gage of the Siuslaw River Coast Guard Station swam through the surf with a line and rescued the three men aboard the Harold J. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.88.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harriet G (fishing Boat)
The former codfisher Harriet G. was used by Gorman & Co. at Port Heiden as a salmon saltery. The Alaska salmon packing industry, with 79 canneries in operation, produced a pack of 3,737,185 cases, with 1,353,901 cases processed in 89 British Columbia canneries and 2,583,463 cases by 32 Puget Sound canneries. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p227.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harry Frank (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harry Of The West (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 652.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hartfield (iron Ship)
British (iron) Ship, 1,867 tons. Unconfirmed report said vewd disappeared off Cape Flattery, January 1908. Owned at LiverpooL Fmgk4 by J. B. Walmsley, and built in 1884, by Whitehaven shipbuilding co. in England. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harvester King (ferry)
The Victoria-Anacortes Ferry Co. was organized in 1921 by Capt. Harry W. Crosby, J. W. McDaniel and associates, placing the converted kelp-harvester Harvester King on the Anacortes-Victoria route during the summer months, the service evolving into the Crosby -Direct Ferries, later amalgamated with the Puget Sound Navigation Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1921-22, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 324.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Haverford
The "Haverford" was an 11,635 gross ton ship, built in 1901 by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow for the American Line. Her details were length 531ft x beam 59.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 150-2nd and 1,700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4/5/1901, she sailed on her maiden voyage under the British flag, from Southampton for Cherbourg and New York on 4/9/1901. After one voyage, she was chartered to Red Star Line of Antwerp and sailed on 9/11/1901 under the Belgian flag from Antwerp for New York. She made four round voyages on this service, the last commencing 8/3/1902 and was then returned to the American Line. In April 1902 she commenced sailings between Liverpool and Philadelphia and on 17/12/1908 was chartered to Dominion Line and started sailing between Liverpool, Halifax and Portland. On 21/1/1909 she started her second and last voyage on this route and in Jan.1915 commenced her last Liverpool - Philadelphia run. Between 1915-16 she was used as a British transport ship and on 26/6/1917 was torpedoed by a German submarine off the West coast of Scotland with the loss of 8 lives but was beached. On 17/4/1918 she survived an unsuccessful submarine attack in the North Atlantic and in Jan 1919 resumed the Liverpool - Philadelphia service. She made her last voyage on this route for American Line in Feb.1921 and on 1/4/1921 commenced sailing for White Star Line on the same route. The seventh and last voyage on this service commenced on 6/11/1921, and on 18/1/1922 she started sailing between Hamburg and New York for American Line. After three round voyages she went back to White Star's Liverpool - Boston - Philadelphia service on 16/5/1922. Her final voyage began on 27/8/1924 when she left Liverpool for Belfast, Glasgow and Philadelphia and the following year she was scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.945]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 December 1997]
Havilah (freighter)
A forerunner of many remarkable deep-sea towing accomplishments to be made by B. C. tugs was the towing in 1929 of the damaged 10,000-ton American freighter Havilah from Dutch Harbor to Yokohama by the Pacific Salvage Company's 186 -foot Salvage King, built at Paisley, Scotland in 1925. In charge of Capt. J. M. Hewison, First Officer J. Rawlinson and Chief Engineer W. G. Jordan, the Salvage King battled through a series of 16 violent gales which threatened the lumber deckload of the Havilah and during one 24-hour period reduced the distance covered to seven miles, delivering her tow safely to its destination, where the cargo was discharged and the steamship scrapped. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 404.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Haysport Ii64.5 Ft.built 1906,
(schooner?)beam 17.6 ft.Seattle, Washington Reg. No. 13412740 tons gross Owner: Henry L.Higgins. Made only one three-month rum running trip, during 1923. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hayward (steam Ferry)
Two large steam ferries, the Hayward and San Leandro, were taken over from the Key Route of San Francisco for wartime operation at Portland, augmenting the fleet of smaller craft used to transport shipyard workers to the Kaiser yards at St. Johns, Swan Island and Vancouver, Washington. The 240-foot vessels, built at Los Angeles in 1923, were of screw propulsion, driven by steam turbo-electric machinery, and each had a capacity of 3,500 passengers. Renamed Liberty Clipper and Victory V for the duration, they were operated by the Russell Towboat & Moorage Co., with W. H. Holmes as operating manager. Capt. E. E. McCoy was port captain for the operation, while Capt. C. G. Bergstein commanded the Hayward (Liberty Clipper), and Capt. Arthur N. Smith the San Leandro (Victory V). Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 509.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hazel B. No. 4 (freight Boat)
Another gasoline -powered freight and passenger boat, the 65-foot Hazel B. No. 4, of 90 horsepower, was built at Wrangell for Stikine River operation by Capt. S. C. Barrington. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 305.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hazel Foss (tug)
The Hazel Foss began her career as the Winona built for Captian Walter Griffin of Tacoma by the Bolcom Boat Company of Seatt. She was sixty feet in length with a twelve foot beam. She worked on Puget Sound and has also been known as the Gypsy Two. Michael Skalley. Foss 90 years of towboating. Seattle 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen E (fishboat)
The former Navy patrol boat Helen E., converted to a commercial fishing vessel by I. D. Flannery, grounded early in April four miles north of the Coos Bay bar. After efforts to salvage the vessel failed the wreckage was burned. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 577.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henrietta Foss (tugboat)
Marine Dig. 4/28/1984, p. 25. Henrietta is last of the wooden Foss tugs. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henrietta Foss (tugboat)
The Herietta Foss was built in Tacoma in 1931 and given a General Motors 165 horsepower engine. She was 49 feet in lenth and had a beam of 15 feet. When Michael Skalley wrote his book about Foss in 1981 the Henrietta Foss was tghe senior member of the Foss fleet and with the Christine was the only wood hull tug still operating under Foss ownership. (Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 89).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Christofferson (tug)
The newly formed Arctic towing consortium, Arctic Transportation Ltd., received an interesting assignment when it was picked to convoy a fleet of British Columbia-built tugs and barges to Tuktoyuktuk at the mouth of the Mackenzie River for operation on that stream by Northern Transportation Co. Ltd. Two shallowdraft river tugs were built by Vito Steel Boat & Barge Construction Ltd. at Delta, and the third and fourth by Burrard and Yarrows respectively, which also built seven barges. Seven more barges were built by Vancouver Shipyards and six by Dominion Bridge Co. The flotilla left Vancouver in July, with seven tugs towing 25 barges. In addition to the four new river towboats, each with a single barge, the Seaspan International tugs Seaspan Navigator, Seaspan Commander and Seaspan Mariner participated. Two of the Seaspan tugs towed two barges each with two smaller barges lashed down on top of them. The third towed a barge with two other barges on top, in tandem with a third barge carrying a small river tug an
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Failing
At Dockside. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers. p. 72
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Failing
Square-rigged downeaster. Thru-masted. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers. p. 71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Foss
TNT 10/24/82: Foss' agile new 'eggbeater' tug creates a stir (T. Industries-Shipping-Foss) (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Henry Foss (2) was built as an Army Transport tug the LT-815 at Marietta Shipyard in Point Pleasant, West Virginia in 1943. This tug was purchased by Foss at a government sale in November, 1962 and for the next two and one half years was reconditioned at the Foss- Seattle yard. The vessel was 149 feet long with a 33 foot beam. It was used in Ocean and Coastwise work with severa long hauls. When Michael Skalley wrote his book on Foss in 1981 the Henry (2) was in layup. Michael Skalley, The Henry Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Foss (tractor Tug)
Marine Dig., 9/25/1982, p. 11+ (cover story): Tacoma Boat builds Foss tracotr tug, christened Sept. 20, 1982 (il) Marine Dig., 4/26/1983, p. 21 (photo): assisting Queen's yacht Britannica during royal visit to Seattle. Marine Dig., 9/29/1984, p. 13: Participated in exhibition race, Olympia's Tug Boat Race; completed race in reverse to demonstrate vessel's agility. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Foss (tug)
The Henry Foss was built in Seattle in 1900 as the John Cudahy. She had a 1,000 horse power engine and was 90 feet in length with a 21 foot beam. After several kinds of service along the coast and in Puget Sound the Foss company purchased the vessel in 1941. The many years of service of the Henry Foss ended on February 13, 1959 when the Henry sank near Beaver Point on Saltspring Island, British Columbia. She was not salvaged although she sank in only 150 feet of water. (Michael Skalley, The Henry Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hereford
In the 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping I found the following information: HEREFORD. Call sign: JFVS Official #: 60978. Master: F. Gordon, appointed to the shipping line in 1881 and to the ship in 1882. Rigging: Iron ship with 2 decks and 1 cemented bulkhead. Major repairs in 1881. Tonnage: 1,524 tons gross, 1,351 under deck and 1,469 net. Dimensions: 241.1 feet long, 37.2 foot beam and holds 23.2 feet deep. Poop deck 95 tons and Forecastle 47 tons. Built: in 1869 by J. Elder & Co. Owners: J. Nourse Port of registry: London. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 29 September 1998]
Hero Of Sidon
The bark HERO OF SIDON, 510/615 tons (old/new measurement) was built at River John, Nova Scotia, by George Smith in 1841. She was originally registered at Pictou, but in 1843 she was transferred to Liverpool registry. The following information is taken from the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1842/43 through 1851/52: Master: 1842-1848 - "M'Caragr"; 1849 - no entry; 1850 - J. Spence; 1851 - J. Govea. Owner: 1842-1848 - "M'Calmnt"; 1849 - no entry; 1850-1851 - Nichols. Port of Registry: Liverpool. Port of Survey: Liverpool. Destined Voyage: 1842-1845 - New Orleans; 1845-1848 - Trieste; 1849 - no entry; 1850 - New Orleans; 1851 - "Apalchie" [possibly Apalachee Bay, Florida]. Rating: 1842-1844 - A1; 1845-1848 - suspended for failing to comply with "Sec. 63"; 1849 - no entry; 1850-1851 - AE1. The entry in Lloyd's Register for 1851/52 is marked "condemned".
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 December 1997]
Hickey Length Ii 0 Ft
(sub-chaser) beam 15 ft. Reg. No. 157448 Engines: Two Garwood 12-cylinder gas engines, 400-HP, One Cooper Bessimer 6-cylinder 150-HP diesel. Owner: General Navigation Co. of Canada, 1048 Hamilton St., Vancouver. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
High Point (uss Hydrofoil)
Navy Hydrofoil to be formally accepted, The Marine Digest. XLI (July 27, 1963), p. 35. The 115-foot Navy hydrofoil High Point, built by the J.M. Martinac Shipbuilding Corp. here for the Boeing Co., is expected to be formally accepted by the Navy July 31 after successful acceptance trials in mid-July. The Navy's first operational hydrofoil is 115 feet long with a beam of 31 feet. Her full load displacement is 110 tons and she is desigiled to operate at speeds exceeding 50 miles per hour.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hildur Foss (tugboat)
The Hildur Foss was originally a Puget Sound cannery tender named the Venture. She was built at Friday Harbor, Washington at the Jensen Brothers Yard in 1907. The Venture became a Foss tug when the Wagner Towboat Company of Seattle was acquired by Foss in 1937. The Foss name was added in 1940. She was ordered sunk in Commencement Bay April 1, 1949 Michael Skalley, The Hildur Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 116
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Himalaya (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hittfeld
See IOANNINA.
Citation:
Hiyu (ferry)
The West Coast shipyard strike also slowed construction of the much smaller ferry Hiyu, which was launched from the yard of Gunderson Bros. Engineering Corp. at Portland on February 24. The 162-foot vessel with a capacity of 40 automobiles, was designed to replace the wooden ferry Skansonia of 1929 vintage on the Tacoma-Vashon Island route. This was the second important ferry built at Portland in the past 20 years, the other being the 172-foot M. R. Chessman, built in 1948 by Albina Engine & Machine Works for the Astoria-Megler service, from which she was retired in 1966 when the new lower Columbia River bridge was completed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXVII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hiyu (motor Ferry)
The small motor ferry Hiyu was launched in March as the first vessel built by the Houghton plant of the Lake Washington Shipyards Corp. headed by Charles A. Burckhardt. Miss Alice Moran, daughter of Sherman Moran who was associated with his brother Robert in founding the Northwest steel shipbuilding industry, christened the 61 x 28-foot wooden craft, which was built for the Kitsap County Transportation Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 351.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hmcs Beacon Hill (frigate)
The last surviving frigate in the Royal Canadian Navy, HMCS Beacon Hill, was decommissioned and laid up at Esquimalt awaiting eventual scrapping. The warship was built at the Yarrows Ltd. yard and commissioned in 1944, serving on Atlantic convoy and patrol duties during the second World War. She underwent a major conversion in 1954 and had been stationed at Esquimalt as an antisubmarine and training ship. Her last commanding officer was Lcdr. S. C. Gould of Victoria. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLVIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoboken (freighter)
25th Todd freighter launched. 7,500 ton. DTW August 10, 1920, p.3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoboken (freighter)
Twenty-fifty Todd freighter launched in Tacoma, Down the Ways. (August 10, 1920), p. 3. (7,500 ton vessel).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoegh Miranda (freighter)
TNT, 4/27/1980: New freighter has luxury-liner look. (T. Industries-Shipping-Weyerhaeuser). (il). Marine Dig., 9/16/1989, p 15: (Brief) Port of Tacoma welcomed vessel on its first visit to Tacoma.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hohenstaufen
The "Hohenstaufen" was a 3098 ton vessel built by Earle's Shipbuilding Co. at Hull, UK in 1874 for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). Her dimensions were 353ft x 39.1ft and she had a straight stem, one funnel, two masts and a service speed of 12 knots. Accommodation was provided for 142 1st class and 800 3rd class passengers. She was employed on the Bremen - New York with calls at Havre, Southampton or Christiania (Oslo) at various times during her career. In 1886 she was transferred to the Bremen - Baltimore service for one voyage and then put on the Bremen - Australia run. In 1895 transferred to Bremen - South America service and scrapped in London in 1897.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 4 July 1997]
Hollyburn (ferry)
The 109 x 21 -foot, 325 -passenger motor ferry Hollyburn with 230 -horsepower Union. diesel, was built by North Vancouver Ship Repairs Ltd. for the West Vancouver service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hollyburn (ferry)
The 109 x 21 -foot, 325 -passenger motor ferry Hollyburn with 230 -horsepower Union. diesel, was built by North Vancouver Ship Repairs Ltd. for the West Vancouver service. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hollyburn (ferry, 1936
1945) - Marine Dig., 6/14/1986, p.23-25: Several ferries shuttle fairgoers between Expo sites (Vancouver, B.C.). The restored HOLLYBURN, the flagship of the fleet, transports passengers from downtown site to main fairgrounds on False Creek. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Honomu (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 95, 96, 165, 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hornet (aircraft Carrier. Cv
12) - Majestic USS Hornet will arrive Friday, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 11, 1961. Don Hannula, Sunshine and dancers welcome Hornet crew, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 16, 1961. Memorial to the past. Hornet hosts reunion of Doolittle's raiders, Marine Digest. May 20, 1989. Vessel joins inactive fleet at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. The first Hornet (CV-8) was sunk in October of 1942 after the Doolittle Raid over Tokyo on April 18, 1942.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Howard D (freight Boat)
The 62 -foot gas passenger and freight boat Howard D., with a 50 -horsepower Frisco Standard engine, was built at Everett for the Everett-Whidbey Island service of Capt. Edward Reid. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Howe Sound Queen (ferry)
Howe Sound Queen, 221-foot motor ferry with a capacity of 335 passengers and 70 vehicles, formerly in service at Sorel, Quebec as Napoleon L., purchased for $350,000 by the B.C. Ferry Authority for the Horseshoe Bay-Bowen Island run, and brought to Vancouver for renovation costing about $250,000. It was estimated that a similar vessel would cost about one and a half million dollars to build. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.102.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hugh Hogan (freighter)
The 765-ton gasoline auxiliary powered freighter Ozmo (formerly the Hugh Hogan. built at Marshfield in 1904) ran on the rocks at Orford Reef on May 18. Although later refloated and taken in tow by the steamer Daisy, she broke away while entering Coos Bay and again struck on the south spit, this time becoming a total loss. The Daisy was also beached inside the bar, but was later refloated.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hurry On Length 174 Ft (mother Ship)
Reg. No. 148914 Captain G.B. Murray, Mate J.A. Wright. Made two trips only 1927, total time at sea nine months. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hyades (freighter)
The freighter Hyades, prominent in Puget Sound maritime affairs in past years, was sold by the Matson Navigation Co. to the Red Salmon Packing Co. of San Francisco to replace sailing vessels formerly operated in the Alaska cannery trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hyak (ferry)
The program of modernization of the Washington State Ferries fleet, which was still made up predominantly of old San Francisco Bay ferries, continued with the launching on December 17 of the first of four superferries, the Hyak, at the San Diego yard of National Steel & Shipbuilding Company. The vessel was christened by Mrs. Daniel J. Evans, the wife of Washington's governor. The second of the new class, Kaleetan, was under construction, with the Elwha and Yakima scheduled for keel-laying when the first two were completed and transferred to Puget Sound. Designed by W. C. Nickum & Sons and financed by $23 million in state bonds and federal funds, the new vessels were basically enlarged versions of the Evergreen State class ferries built by Puget Sound Bridge & Drydock Company in the mid-1950's. The following is a comparison of the two classes: Evergreen State class Hyak class length 310 feet 382 feet beam 73.2 feet 73 feet automobiles 100 160 passengers 1,200 2,600 horsepower 2,500 8,000 service speed 14 kno
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hyak (ferryboat)
Ferry Hyak grounds near Anacortes dock, Marine Digest. April 19, 1986, p. 3+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hyak (superferry)
Vessels of the Northwest ferry fleets suffered the usual mishaps although, as usual, damages and injuries were of a minor nature. In January the new Washington State superferry Hyak collided in Elliott Bay with a loaded railway car barge towed by the Island Navigator. The accident occurred at 9:30 a.m. in a heavy fog shortly after the Hyak had left the Seattle Ferry Terminal on her regular run to Bremerton. The Island Tug & Barge tow was en route to Pier 16 from North Vancouver. Capt. Ed Ryerson, veteran master of the ferry, said he saw the tug and barge on radar from the time he left the terminal, while Capt. John Webb of the Island Navigator said he had followed the Hyak on radar for the same length of time. He said he had shortened his towing cable to 225 feet and cut the tug's engines to quarter speed prior to the collision, but when the tug was sighted the ferry veered sharply, scraping the tug and striking the barge. The barge sustained minor damage, as did the ferry, which continued her run until a rel
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ida Mae (fish Packer)
American fish packer, 26 tons, struck bottom and went down off Cape Disappointment in the fall of 1953. The Astoria crew of three swam to safety. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ida Mae (fish Packer)
Twenty-six Americna ship sank off Cape Disappointment in 1953. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 169.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ida N (fish Boat)
The 31 -ton gas fishing vessel Ida N., with a crew of five, stranded and was lost at Neah Bay September 10 without loss of life. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301. ILWACO Steamer. The 74-ton steamer Ilwaco of 1891, converted to a gasoline fishing vessel carrying a 30 -man crew, stranded in Chatham Sound, Alaska November 5 without loss of life. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 301.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ile De France
The "Ile de France" was a 43,153 gross ton liner built in 1926 by Chantiers & Ateliers de St. Nazaire for the French Line (Compagnie Generale Transatlantique). She had an overall length of 792.9ft x beam 91.8ft, three funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 23 knots. There was accommodation for 537-1st, 603-2nd and 646-3rd class passengers. Launched on 14/3/1926, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Havre to Plymouth and New York on 22/6/1927. In July 1928 she was fitted with a catapult in her stern and on 13/8/1928, catapulted a seaplane from the ship when 400 miles from New York. The last seaplane landing was made in Havre harbour in October 1930 and the catapult was removed in 1930-31. On 15/3/1932 her accommodation was regraded to 670-1st, 408-tourist and 508-3rd class passengers and on 9/1/1935 she commenced a Havre - Southampton - New York service. In March 1936 her accommodation was again regraded to cabin, tourist and third class and on 1/9/1939 she started her last voyage from Havre to New York, where she was laid up. On 1/5/1940 she sailed to Marseilles and then to Capetown, and Saigon but was diverted to Singapore, where she was seized by the Royal Navy. On 8/11/1940 she was requisitioned as a troopship and on 10/3/1941 sailed from Singapore for Sydney. On 22/9/1945 she reverted to the French flag but stayed under Cunard management and on 3/2/1946 returned to the French Line. She commenced her first post war commercial voyage on 22/10/1946 when she sailed from Cherbourg for New York, but from April 1947 to July 1949 was completely reconditioned and rebuilt to 44,356 tons, two funnels, 541-1st class, 577-cabin class and 227-tourist class passengers. On 21/7/1949 she resumed the Havre - Southampton - New York service and on 26/7/1956 rescued 750 survivors from the sinking liner "Andrea Doria". On 10/11/1958 she commenced her last voyage from New York to Plymouth and Havre and on 26/2/1959 sailed from Havre for Osaka as the "Faransu Maru" preparatory to scrapping. In 1959 she was renamed "Claridon" and scuttled during the making of the film "The Last Voyage"; later refloated and scrapped at Osaka. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.663]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 October 1997]
Illitch (freighter)
June 24, 1944. Russian freighter, 2407 tons, 390'x 45', built in 1895 at Dumbarton as the Emperor Nicholas II, a gift from Germany to Russia and used as a yacht by Czar Nicholas. The communists converted the ship to a freighter and named her Illitch. The beautiful steel ship with a clipper bow and long bowsprit could not keep up with the ravages of hard use and time. While docked at Portland, she simply gave up; crewmen claimed they heard a pop and she began swallowing water. Down in 30 minutes with the loss of one female crew member, she was declared not worth the expense of raising. She was torched and blasted into the mud. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imperial Tofino (tanker)
Imperial Tofino, a 146-foot coastal tanker of 750-deadweight tons and a capacity of 200,000 gallons, was built by McKenzie Barge & Marine Ways Ltd. (formerly McKenzie Barge & Derrick Co.), for Imperial Oil, replacing the Imperial Nanaimo, a 120-foot vessel built in Quebec in 1937 as the Beeceelite. The new tanker, fitted with a 1,000-horsepower Atlas diesel, has a cruising speed of 11.2 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Implacable (aircraft Carrier)
An interesting event in British Columbia marine history was the arrival at Vancouver in the fall of the British aircraft carrier HMS Implacable loaded with British troops who had been imprisoned by the Japanese since the early years of the war. This was the largest naval vessel to dock there until the arrival, some years later, of the American carrier USS Coral Sea. HMCS Prince Robert, the former Canadian National Alaska cruise liner, in 1945 carried food, medicine and other relief supplies to Hong Kong and returned with Canadians who had been interned by the Japanese. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 627
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Indefatigable
Cecil P. Dryden. Give all to Oregon., p. 182-86, 212, 220.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Independent (fishing Steamer)
The new fishing steamer Independent, owned by Welding Bros- & Independent Fish Co., capsized atthe Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers in Seattle at 4 o'clock on the morning of February 22, 1912 plunging half of her 42 -man crew into the cold waters of the Sound. The 14-dory, 145-foot steamer, built at Tacoma the previous year and commanded by Capt. T. Salness, had taken on a heavy load of coal, which had not yet been trimmed, and its weight was believed to have caused the mishap. he Independent was refloated within a few days. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
India (freighter)
The Puget Sound Freight Lines' diesel carrier India originally the Columbia River freighter L. P Hosford, underwent a second conversion at Seattle. Her hull was lengthened from 160 feet to slightly over 169 feet and her beam was increased from 30.6 to 40 feet, thus increasing her cargo capacity 417,, over her original Puget Sound period, and 61% over her original capacity while in Columbia River service. The hull was also strengthened to better fit her for ser- vice on the British Columbia route with the newer F. E. Lovejoy. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Infallible (cannery Tender)
Among the other smaller craft completed at Northwest yards in 1936 were the following: Infallible, 86-foot diesel cannery tender of 240 -horsepower, at Tacoma for the Brindle Brothers of the Wards Cove Packing Co., Ketchikan, the vessel being rifted with purse seining equipment as well as being adapted to regular cannery tender work. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Infallible (cannery Tender)
Among the other smaller craft completed at Northwest yards in 1936 were the following: Infallible, 86-foot diesel cannery tender of 240 -horsepower, at Tacoma for the Brindle Brothers of the Wards Cove Packing Co., Ketchikan, the vessel being rifted with purse seining equipment as well as being adapted to regular cannery tender work. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 446.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Infanta (yacht)
Infanta, 120 -foot diesel ocean yacht formerly owned by John Barrymore, and in wartime patrol service from Puget Sound, purchased by Henry Foss of Tacoma and renamed Thea Foss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Infatigable
E. Laveille. The life of Father Des Smet, 1801-1873., p. 158.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Inland Chief
Although construction of new vessels remained light, some significant developments occurred in the shipbuilding field during 1937. The reopening of the upper Columbia River to boat freight service, inaugurated in 1932 by the Shaver Forwarding Co. of Portland, was, with completion of channel dredging of the upper river in 1937, beginning the evolution to powerful diesel towboats and dual-purpose barges. The first vessel built for the purpose of carrying petroleum products upstream and grain cargoes down to Portland, the classic traffic pattern on the river at the present time, was of a transitional type. Designed by Carl J. Nordstrom, the inland Chief was a steel, electrically welded motor vessel with dimensions (overall) of 190 x 38, with a draft of slightly over six feet when fully loaded. Of the semi-barge type, she was fitted with oil or gasoline tanks of 600-ton capacity below the main deck and freight compartments of equal capacity above for bulk grain, and was powered by a 600 -horsepower diesel engines
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Inland Chief
Although construction of new vessels remained light, some significant developments occurred in the shipbuilding field during 1937. The reopening of the upper Columbia River to boat freight service, inaugurated in 1932 by the Shaver Forwarding Co. of Portland, was, with completion of channel dredging of the upper river in 1937, beginning the evolution to powerful diesel towboats and dual-purpose barges. The first vessel built for the purpose of carrying petroleum products upstream and grain cargoes down to Portland, the classic traffic pattern on the river at the present time, was of a transitional type. Designed by Carl J. Nordstrom, the inland Chief was a steel, electrically welded motor vessel with dimensions (overall) of 190 x 38, with a draft of slightly over six feet when fully loaded. Of the semi-barge type, she was fitted with oil or gasoline tanks of 600-ton capacity below the main deck and freight compartments of equal capacity above for bulk grain, and was powered by a 600 -horsepower diesel engines
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Inland Chief (motor Vessel)
During this year the pioneer upper Columbia motor vessel Inland Chief of the Inland Navigation Co. was hauled out at Portland and separated, the stern and a short section of the bow being joined to form a towboat. The mid -section, containing the cargo tanks and hold, was reassembled as a barge. These two vessels, evolved from one, continued to engage actively in the upper river petroleum and grain trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 554.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Inland Flyer
Built at Portland in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Inland Flyer (passenger Boat)
The 106-foot wooden passenger and freight steamer Inland Flyer, having been sold in 1910 by the Navy Yard Route subsidiary of Puget Sound Navigation Co. to F. G. Reeve's Port Washington Route as the Mohawk, was dismantled in 1916, her machinery going into the new steamer F. G. Reeve and the hull being used for some years as a fish barge at Neah Bay. The Inland Flyer had been constructed at Portland in 1898. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H. S. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, 270.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Inland Flyer (steamer)
The Navy Yard Route steamer Inland Flyer was sold to Capt. F. G. Reeve for his Port Washington Route, being renamed Mohawk. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 175.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Investor (fishing Boat)
Murder, arson aboard Alaska Boat remains a puzzle, The National Fisherman. (December, 1982). p. 2 + Owners Mark and Irene Coulthurst of Blaine killed and the boat burned. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iowa (freighter)
January 12, 1936 Steel freighter, 8800 tons, Captain Edgar L. Yates. Owned by the States Line. En route Astoria-New York with general cargo. Ship left the river in the face of a fierce, 76 mph gale. One faint SOS was heard and the CG Cutter Onandaga put out immediately in search of the distressed vessel. She was located within a few hours, broken in half with only her masts above water. The storm's terrific power broke off her metal stanchions and cast them ashore nearly three miles away. Six bodies were recovered; a total of 34 died. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iowa (freighter)
Thirty-two lives lost in shpwreck at the mouth of the Columbia River, three Tacomans among the dead, The Tacoma Ledger. January 13, 1936. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 170.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ironbarklength 50 Ft
(motor boat)beam 10.6 ft. Reg. No. 150978 Engine: One 200-HP3-cylinder gas. Owner: Archibald McGillis, 1701 Georgia St. West, Vancouver. There were two Ironbarks. One was never cleared for deep sea trips. If indeed used in rum running, it was in the Vancouver to Victoria to Seattle runs. Clarence Greenan says he ran a 35 foot Ironbark while rum running between Vancouver and the Gulf Islands. This smaller Ironbark had a 220-HP 6-cylinder Standard Motors gas engine removed from Trucilla when she was converted for use as a tugboat with two diesels replacing the Standard gas engines. Greenan's Ironbark went 35-40 knots with a 26 x 2611 propeller on the 220-HP Standard gas engine. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iroquois (freighter)
In July the Black Ball Transport freighter Iroquois of 1901 vintage apparently settled onto a submerged object during a low tide at Port Angeles and began taking on water in such volume that her pumps were unable to keep her afloat. Coast Guard vessels, a Foss tug and the local fire department responded and succeeded in keeping her afloat until temporary repairs could be made, after which she was towed to a Seattle shipyard for drydocking. The Washington State ferries Enetai and Willapa were chartered to handle the Seattle-Port Angeles paper freighting duties of the Iroquois on an interim basis, this being the first time that state ferries had been chartered for commercial service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXX.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iroquois (freighter)
The old Black Ball freighter Iroquois ended her 67-year career on Puget Sound as a steam passenger vessel and ferry and motor freighter, being sold to Alaska Shell, Inc. of Seattle for use as a king crab processing barge in Alaska. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.146.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Island Forester (2) (barge)
In British Columbia, the Island Forester (2),* the largest self-loading and unloading log barge in the world, was built as a joint venture by Burrard and Yarrows for Island Tug & Barge. The 450 x 96-foot vessel has a capacity of 17,250 tons of logs compared to the 11,000-ton capacity of Island Yarder, formerly the largest barge of that type. *The first Island Forester was the former steel four-masted bark James Dollar. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Island King (freighter)
The B. C. Cement Co. acquired the 165-foot freighter Island King, built in Norway in 1920 as Breuik. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Islander (freight Boat)
The 89-foot motor passenger and freight boat Islander was built at Friday Harbor for operation on the Seattle-San Juan Island route of the Island Transportation Co. The older steam --powered Islander, the 72 -foot vessel of 1904 which had been operated by Capt. Newhall on the San Juan Island route from Bellingham had been sold to Fred A. Hooper for use on San Francisco Bay about a year earlier. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1921-22, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 325.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Islander (freighter)
Marijuana freighter eludes search, The Tacoma News Tribune. July 29, 1981. Coast Guard seizes freighter, believed pot running mother ship,The Tacoma News Tribune, July 31, 1981. Suspect vessel leaking, San Francisco bound, Alleged pot mother ship can't make it to Tacoma, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 3, 1981. Jury indicts thirteen in drug bust, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 13, 1981. Drug ship sunk, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 14, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Issaquah (ferry)
The Anderson Steamboat Co. followed the same year with the construction of the steam propeller ferry Issaquah at its yard on the lake. The 288-ton double-ended vessel, with dimensions of 114.4 x 38.2 x 8.9, was designed by Capt. Anderson and incorporated several new features, including double runways for automobiles and teams on the lower deck, and an adjustable loading apron. The ferry was placed in service between Leschi Park and Newport, making a stop en route at Roanoke, Mercer Island. At Newport the ferry connected with the new state highway to Lake Sammamish, Fall City, Issaquah, North Bend and Snoqualmie. Following her successful trials, during which she was in charge of Capt. Anderson, she was commanded by Capt. Fred Wyman. The ferry steamer was equipped with a hardwood dance floor, and made moonlight excursions on the lake after her regular scheduled crossings during the summer months. The Issaquah and the little steamer Dawn were the last vessels built by Capt. Anderson for his own use, and the Issa
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Issaquah (ferry)
The Anderson Steamboat Co. followed the same year with the construction of the steam propeller ferry Issaquah at its yard on the lake. The 288-ton double-ended vessel, with dimensions of 114.4 x 38.2 x 8.9, was designed by Capt. Anderson and incorporated several new features, including double runways for automobiles and teams on the lower deck, and an adjustable loading apron. The ferry was placed in service between Leschi Park and Newport, making a stop en route at Roanoke, Mercer Island. At Newport the ferry connected with the new state highway to Lake Sammamish, Fall City, Issaquah, North Bend and Snoqualmie. Following her successful trials, during which she was in charge of Capt. Anderson, she was commanded by Capt. Fred Wyman. The ferry steamer was equipped with a hardwood dance floor, and made moonlight excursions on the lake after her regular scheduled crossings during the summer months. The Issaquah and the little steamer Dawn were the last vessels built by Capt. Anderson for his own use, and the Issa
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Issaquah (washington State Ferry)
Launched December 29, 1979. Report says official pushed for ferry's acceptance, The Tacoma News Tribune. October 12, 1981. Harriet U. Fish, The Issaquah, Marine Digest. July 13, 1985.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Issaquah (wooden Ferry)
This was the first double ended ferry. It was launched March 7, 1914. Issaquah, the area's first double ended ferry, served on Lake Washington, Puget Sound and San Francisco Bay until 1948, The Marine Digest. July 13, 1985, p. 22-24+ (il). Letter to the editor regarding the Issaquah, Marine Digest. July 27, 1985, p. 22. Model of first Issaquah built by Gordon Ross and donated to the city of Issaquah, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1986, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iultuishlength 87.6 Ft
(fish packer)beam 20.4 ft. Reg. No. 141722(or 141732?) Engine: One 150-HP 3-cylinder Fairbanks Morse semi-diesel. Owner: Consolidated Exporters, 1050 Hamilton St., Vancouver, 1924. Wrecked 1927 but believed salvaged and returned to fishpacking. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (1) (tug)
The Iver Foss was built in 1925 as the Angeles being built by the Angeles Gravel and Supply Company for towing scows. On May 22, 1926 Foss pruchased the assets of the Angeles Gravel and Supply Company which included the tug which then was renamed the Iver Foss. The Iver Foss operated until August 21, 1972 when she was laid up and sold in March 1974. She first became the Bonney-Gal and later the Marilyn. Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety years of Towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Iver Foss was built for the United States Navy as the U.S.S. Canocan at the Everett Marine Ways, Inc. of Everett, Washington in 1943. She worked along the west coast and in Hawaii until 1958 when she was declared surplus. Purchased by Foss she became the Sea King on April 28, 1959 and operated in northern Puget Sound. In February of 1975 she became Iver Foss and worked for another year and was sold in February of 1978 to Alaska interests. There she was named Tagish and left for Alaska on May 6, 1978 under her new owners. Michael Skalley, The Iver Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (3) (tugboat)
The Iver Foss was built and outfitted by Main Iron Works of Houma, Louisiana in 1977. Her length was 98 feet with a 32 foot beam. She was the fourth in the series of five MAMO II class tugs ordered by Dillinham tug and Barke of Honolulu. The Foss Ocean Division had entered the East and Gulf Coast towing market when the Iver Foss was ready for service and she worked in the Gulf port area until late in 1978 when she came home to the Pacific Northwest to work on Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Iver Foss (3), Foss, ninety years of twoboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 297.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (tugboat)
Built in 1925 as the Angeles and later the Marilyn. Sixty-five feet long. Gary Duff purchases classic tugboat Marilyn, Marine Digest. December 4, 1982, p. 8. (Operated as the Iver Foss from 1926 to 1974.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. C. Brittain (freight Steamer)
The freight steamer J. C. Brittain, owned by the Everett Transportation Company, in charge of Captain McDonald and A. F. Hennessey, was wrecked on Bell Rock, in Rosario Straits, May 10th, while en route from Roche Harbor to Everett. The steamer struck amidship and began filling rapidly, the incoming water firing her lime cargo and soon damaging her beyond repair. She was valued at $8,000 and insured for $5,000. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. C. Ford (schooner)
The J. C. Ford, a three-masted schooner of 242 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1882 by M. Turner. On February 17, 1893, while bound inward with a cargo of lime and machinery, she touched on South Spit, Grays Harbor. She floated leaking and worked off sh ore again: the crew spent two days pumpin, and were taken off the third morning by the sealing schooner Brenda, the cargo having taken fire. J. C. Ford was reported owned at that time by S. E. Slade and her master, Capt. Charles Brown, and was valued at $15,000. John Lyman, Pacific coast built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. C. Ford (schooner)
The J. C. Ford, a three-masted schooner of 242 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1882 by M. Turner. On February 17, 1893, while bound inward with a cargo of lime and machinery, she touched on South Spit, Grays Harbor. She floated leaking and worked off sh ore again: the crew spent two days pumpin, and were taken off the third morning by the sealing schooner Brenda, the cargo having taken fire. J. C. Ford was reported owned at that time by S. E. Slade and her master, Capt. Charles Brown, and was valued at $15,000. John Lyman, Pacific coast built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. C. Ford (schooner)
The three-masted schooner J. C. Ford, Capt. Charles Brown, from San Francisco for Aberdeen, foundered off Gray's Harbor, February 17th. She left the Bay City, February 9th, with a cargo of lime and machinery, arrived off the mid-channel buoy February 17th, and, in attempting to run into the harbor, a squall drove her on the South Spit, where she lost her rudder and a long strip of the keel extending to the mainmast. She immediately began to fill, and while one portion of the crew worked the pumps the other was employed in keeping her off shore by working the sails. After two days the pumps became plugged and the vessel almost uncontrollable. The next morning the lime caught fire. The schooner was then about thirty miles off shore, with a tremendous sea running, and the chances of safety for her crew were small; but, on the third morning after the disaster, the Victoria sealing schooner Brenda bore down upon them and succeeded not only in saving those aboard, but also in securing about $2,000 worth of property
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. D. Farrell (steamer)
Steamboating on the upper Kootenay River again became competitive in 1897, when Capt. M. L. Mc Cormack, a former steamboat man on the Mississippi, St. Croix and Red Rivers, formed the Kootenay River Transportation Co. and built the 359 - ton stern - wheeler J. D. Farrell (named for the Spokane mining magnate who backed him in his venture) at Jennings, Montana. This handsome steamer, 130 x 26 x 4.5, brought such niceties as electric lights and bathrooms to river travelers of the region and provided brisk competition for a short time to the established Upper Columbia Navigation & Tramway Company of Capt. Armstrong. The older company responded by commissioning Louis Pacquet to build the North Star, 265 tons, 130 x 26 x 4, also at Jennings, and placed her in the service of the subsidiary American flag Upper Kootenay Transportation Co. These boats were a vast improvement over the primitive craft of a decade earlier, the Farrell being built by skilled shipbuilders brought out from Stillwater, Minnesota, and Louis P
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. H. Carlisle (fireboat)
Vancouver's second fireboat, the 47-ton J. H. Carlisle (2), 54.8 x 15.1 x 5.5, was completed the following year by the Wallace Shipyard's North Vancouver yards and stationed on False Creek in charge of Capt. G. J. McInnis. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 384.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. H. Carlisle (fireboat)
The J. H. Carlisle, 60 feet in length with 150 horse power propelling engine and two 12-inch centrifugal pumps, was built by Burrard Drydock Co. for the Vancouver Fire Department. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. J. Fransen (schooner)
The J. J. Fransen, two-mast-schooner of 120 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1867 by the man for whom she was named and cost $16,000. The dimensions of this schooner have been preserved and are worth giving at length as an example of an early West Coast lumber schooner. She was 90 feet on the keel, with registered dimensions 105 x 28 x 8 1/2 feet, and a 24 x 9 foot centerboard. The masts were 33 feet apart, the foremast 821/2 feet long, and the mainmast 84 feet. There was a 36-foot topmast on the main only. The bowsprit was 23 feet outboard, and the jibboom 20 feet outside that. Her lumber capacity was 155 M feet. The schooner drops from registry about l880. John Lyman, Pacific coast built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. J. Fransen (schooner)
The J. J. Fransen, two-mast-schooner of 120 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1867 by the man for whom she was named and cost $16,000. The dimensions of this schooner have been preserved and are worth giving at length as an example of an early West Coast lumber schooner. She was 90 feet on the keel, with registered dimensions 105 x 28 x 8 1/2 feet, and a 24 x 9 foot centerboard. The masts were 33 feet apart, the foremast 821/2 feet long, and the mainmast 84 feet. There was a 36-foot topmast on the main only. The bowsprit was 23 feet outboard, and the jibboom 20 feet outside that. Her lumber capacity was 155 M feet. The schooner drops from registry about l880. John Lyman, Pacific coast built sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. M. Griffith (barkentine)
The J.M. Griffith, barkentine of 606 tons and 750 M capacity, was built at Seabeck, Wash., in 1882, and was first managed by Richard Holyoke, Port Townsend. In the years before the first World War she was owned by the Griffith-Retriever Co., San Francisco, in a sort of two-ship parlay with the barkentine Retriever, both vessels being managed by W. G. Tibbits. In 1916 she was sold for $15,000 to A. F. Thane, who resold her just 15 months later for just twice that sum to L. A. Scott, Mobile. She was under Portuguese registry in 1920, and disappears from the registers soon thereafter. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. M. Griffith (barkentine)
Built in Seabeck in 1882. 529 net tons 162 feet long, 29 foot beam, Tacoma Daily Ledger. December 9, 1910, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. M. Griffith (barkentine)
The J. M. Griffith, barkentine of 606 tons and 750 M capacity, was built at Seabeck, Wash., in 1882, and was first managed by Richard Holyoke, Port Townsend. In the years before the first World War she was owned by the Griffith-Retriever Co., San Francisco, in a sort of two-ship parlay with the barkentine Retriever, both vessels being managed by W. G. Tibbits. In 1916 she was sold for $15,000 to A. F. Thane, who resold her just 15 months later for just twice that sum to L. A. Scott, Mobile. She was under Portuguese registry in 1920, and disappears from the registers soon thereafter. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. M. Griffith (barkentine)
The three-masted barkentine J. M. Griffith, built at Seabeck in 1882 for the Seabeck Mill Co., having been purchased 15 months earlier by A. F. Thane of San Francisco for $ 15,000, was resold in 1918 to L. A. Scott of Mobile for $30,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 298.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. M. Hannaford (steamer)
Apparently influenced by the success of the Alaska Commercial Co. Louisville packets on the Yukon, the Union Pacific Boatbuilders at Potlatch, Idaho launched the big steamer J. M. Hannaford, 746 tons, 169 feet, with features reminiscent of the Mississippi. She had two tall stacks forward of her pilot house and attracted much attention on her passages up and down the Snake River. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. M. Wjoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris Of Nisquallyer
Launching of the WJoseph Thomas Heath. Memoris of Nisquallyerwax, Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 82.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. Marhoffer (schooner)
May 19, 1910 Steam schooner, 608 tons, built by Lindstrom at Aberdeen in 1907. One soul was lost when she burned off Yaquina Bay and drifted into what is now called Boiler Bay, due to the obvious reason. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. Marhoffer (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner J. Marhoffer, burned off Yaquina Bay, May 19, 1910 with loss of one life. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1910., p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. R. Mcdonald (steam Freighter)
The J. R. McDonald, a large steam freighter, was set afloat at Lake's yard on Salmon Bay, March 13th, for the Pennington Navigation Company. Capt. George W. McGregor was first in command, and the steamer proved a profitable vessel of her class. She burned at Prevost Island in 1893, and was afterward rebuilt and put under the British flag at Victoria. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J.b.ford (schooner)
A two masted schooner of 196 tons new measurement was built at San Francisco in 1860. Her owners in 1860 were Andrew Crawford and J. J. Marks. She is listed as a brig in 1877, indicating her rig was probably a topsail schooner on the borderline between the two definitions and falls out of registry shortly after. John Lyman, Pacific coast built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J.b.ford (schooner)
A two masted schooner of 196 tons new measurement was built at San Francisco in 1860. Her owners in 1860 were Andrew Crawford and J. J. Marks. She is listed as a brig in 1877, indicating her rig was probably a topsail schooner on the borderline between the two definitions and falls out of registry shortly after. John Lyman, Pacific coast built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 10, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J.d. Farrell (sternwheeler)
Sternwheel vessel of 359 tons, 130'x 26'x 4.5', built at Jennings, Montana in 1897. The very plush river steamer sported electricity and bathrooms. Captain McCormack lost his ship to a hurricane in Jennings Canyon in June of 1898. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jabez Howes (full Rigged Ship)
The wooden full -rigged ship Jabez Howes, owned by the Columbia River Packers' Association and used as a cannery tender, sprang a leak in a violent gale off Chignik on the night of April 17, 1911 and was beached to save her cargo. The cannery ships Star of Alaska and Benj. F. Packard, at anchor with the Howes, were also blown ashore, but were later refloated. The Howes was a total loss. The old Downeast ship Reuce 14 of 1881 vintage was purchased from the California Shipping Co. to replace the Jabez Howes, the purchase price being about $ 15,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 196-97.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jabez Howes (full Rigged Ship)
The wooden fullrigged ship Jabez Howes, 1,648 tons, built by J. Currier, Jr. at Newburyport, Me. in 1877, was purchased for the salmon trade by the Columbia River Packers Association, from W. A. Mighell of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 142.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jacob Henkel (ferry)
Yarrows Ltd. at Esquimalt built the 181 -ton motor ferry Jacob Henkel, the 16-car, 120passenger vessel being transferred to Francois Lake and reassembled for ferry service there, later as Francois Lake Ferry. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jacona (freighter)
Scene at launching of 7,500 ton vessel, November 20, 1918, Down the Ways (December 15, 1918, p. 10-111.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James A Garfield (schooner)
The schooner James A. Garfield, a 360-ton three-master built at Coos Bay in 1881, was caught by a breaking sea while entering Grays Harbor early in April. The sea engulfed the vessel, starting the seams and causing other damage. Capt. Palmgren, who was at the wheel, was thrown over the deckhouse and seriously injured. A short time later the unfortunate schooner drifted into the British bark Inveramsay in San Francisco Bay and lost her jib boom and forerigging. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James A Garfield (schooner)
The 300-ton schooner James A. Garfield built at North Bend in 1881, was sold by Olson & Mahony to Peruvian owners for $ 7,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James A. Garfield (schooner)
This three masted schooner of 316 tons was built at North Bend, Oregon in 1881 by John Kruse in the shipyard of A. M. Simpson of San Francisco. She was sold by the Simpsons aobut 1910 to Peruvian owners who renamed her the G. Garibaldi, and dropped from registry about 1916. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James A. Garfield (schooner)
A three masted schooner of 316 tons was built at North Bend, Ore, in 1881 by John Kruse in the shipyard of A. M. Simpson, San Francisco. She was sold by the Simpsons about 1910 to Peruvian owners who renamed her the G. Garibaldi and drooped from the registery about 1916.John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James A. Garfield (schooner)
This three masted schooner of 316 tons was built at North Bend, Oregon in 1881 by John Kruse in the shipyard of A. M. Simpson of San Francisco. She was sold by the Simpsons aobut 1910 to Peruvian owners who renamed her the G. Garibaldi, and dropped from registry about 1916. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James A. Garfield (schooner)
A three masted schooner of 316 tons was built at North Bend, Ore, in 1881 by John Kruse in the shipyard of A. M. Simpson, San Francisco. She was sold by the Simpsons about 1910 to Peruvian owners who renamed her the G. Garibaldi and drooped from the registery about 1916.John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James F. Polhemus (dredge Tender)
Although the shipbuilding industry of the Pacific Northwest was on the threshold of an even greater expansion than during the first World War period, construction in 1939 remained light, consisting largely of government vessels. The 84-foot motor dredge tender James F. Polhemus was completed at a cost of $ 125,000 by the Seattle Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. for the United States Army Engineers at Portland. The new vessel, powered by a 350-horsepower Enterprise diesel engine, was christened by Mrs. Polhemus, wife of James F. Polhemus, principal civilian assistant to the Army Engineers at Portland and originator of the system of jetty installations used along the Pacific Coast, for whom the tender was named. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 472.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Griffiths (bark)
Towing the Mae Dollar. Largest British Bark afloat when built in 1892. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 143.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James P. Flint (steamer)
First steamer above the mouth of the Willamette, North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, II, p. 138. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 162, 165. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 153. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 480.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Tuft (barkentine)
James Tuft, four - masted skysail-yard barkentine of 1274 tons and 1400 M feet capacity, was built by the Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1901 for their own management, costing $74,000. She was a smart sailer, making two passages from the Fiji Islands to San Francisco in 49 and 51 days in 1920-1, and one from Callao to San Francisco in 37 days in 1923. Early in 1923 she left Kildonan, B. C., for Callao with lumber, and on January 5 was reported waterlogged, anchored in a dangerous position near Destruction Island, Washington. The cutter Haida went out and after parting a tow line took off ten of the crew, the master and two men remaining aboard. The Tuft was finally towd to Seattle on January 7. After repairs at Winslow she proceeded to Callao making the a fast return passage. In 1928 she was sold for $4500 by the G.E. Billings Company to become a fishing barge at Venice Clifornia. She became a gambling barge under the name Casino and was burned off Long Beach on August 22, 1935.John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Tuft (barkentine)
Being towed up San Francisco Bay, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 138.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Tuft (barkentine)
James Tuft, four - masted skysail-yard barkentine of 1274 tons and 1400 M feet capacity, was built by the Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1901 for their own management, costing $74,000. She was a smart sailer, making two passages from the Fiji Islands to San Francisco in 49 and 51 days in 1920-1, and one from Callao to San Francisco in 37 days in 1923. Early in 1923 she left Kildonan, B. C., for Callao with lumber, and on January 5 was reported waterlogged, anchored in a dangerous position near Destruction Island, Washington. The cutter Haida went out and after parting a tow line took off ten of the crew, the master and two men remaining aboard. The Tuft was finally towd to Seattle on January 7. After repairs at Winslow she proceeded to Callao making the a fast return passage. In 1928 she was sold for $4500 by the G.E. Billings Company to become a fishing barge at Venice Clifornia. She became a gambling barge under the name Casino and was burned off Long Beach on August 22, 1935.John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane (skiff)
Walter O'Meara. The Savage Country, p. 290, 296.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A. Falkenberg
The Jane A. Falkenberg sailing from Honolulu to Astoria in twelve days, making a record which is still unbroken. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jane A. Falkenberg (barkentine)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 67. Ar