Fisher Lassie I (fish Packer)
Built in 1929 by John Stebbland, New Westminster. Reg. No. 155233 Length 61 ft. beam 18 ft. Owner: Robert Swanson, Exporter, 1845 E. Pender St., Vancouver. First trip Oct. 18, 1930, Captain J. McCulloch. Seized by customs about Jan. 20, 1932. Released on board. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kingfisher (cannery Tender)
The Kingfisher, 40-ton cannery tender 60 feet in length, was built at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kingfisher (schooner)
The gasoline halibut schooner Kingfisher capsized in a storm off Lazaroff Island on June 3. Harold Heinz of Seattle, owner and master, was rescued by naval patrol craft, but three other members of the crew, Pat Hughes, John Herman and Dan Odair, all Alaskans, were drowned. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 512.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kingfisher (sloop)
The trading sloop Kingfisher of Victoria was seized by the Indians near Clayoquot Sound, and Captain Stephenson and three of the crew were murdered by the savages. When the news of the massacre reached Victoria H. B. M. ship Sutlej was dispatched to the scene of the outrage and on arrival shelled the village and captured the murderers. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.130.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kingfisher (steamer)
Halibut steamer Kingfisher underway. ALF, p. 94.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lone Fisherman (bng, P. 222)
A small stern -wheel freighter and towboat, the Loma, 45 tons, 68 feet, with 8 x 32-inch noncondensing engines was built by Forbes brothers at Everett and operated by them on the Snohomish and Snoqualmie Rivers, running in 1915 in ferry service between Utsalady and Whidbey Island, and abandoned shortly thereafter. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lone Fisherman (steamer)
A strongly - constructed little steamer, the Lone Fisherman, was launched by Crawford & Reid at Tacoma for operation as a passenger ferry at Y. P. Courbus of San Francisco between Juneau and the Treadwell mines on Douglas Island. With dimensions of 60 x 17 x 8, she was powered by a foreand-aft compound engine of 250 horsepower, and had a capacity of 150 passengers and considerable freight.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Merlin (fishery Patrol Vessel)
R. Geddes Large. Drums and Scalpel, p. 38.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ocean Pacific (sports Fisherman)
Jones-Goddell, Tacoma built vessel for serious California sports fisherman, Jim Jenks, The National Fisherman. March, 1985, p. 51. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ray Roberts (fisher Packer)
Length 53 feet. Beam 14 feet. Built 1925, W.R- Menchions Shipyard, in 1925 at Coal Harbor, Vancouver. derrick rigged Engine: One 65-HP gas engine. Owner: General Navigation Co., 1048 Hamilton St., Vancouver, 1929. There was also a Roy Roberts Reg. No. 155254, built 1929; not a rum runner. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Teal (fisheries Vessel)
The U. S. Bureau of Fisheries patrol vessel Teal, 78 feet in length and fitted with a 150-horsepower diesel, was designed by Coolidge & Hanson, Seattle naval architects, and built by Kruse & Banks at North Bend. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 384.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library