Admiral Goodr
(Schooner) - The steam schooner Admiral Goodrich was sold by the Admiral Line to the National Steamship Co. of California and was renamed Noyo.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Admiral Gove
- Four of the former Submarine Boat Co. vessels purchased from the Dollar Steamship Co. by the Portland-California subsidiary of the Admiral Line were disposed of in 1939, the Admiral Gove (ex -Surico) and Admiral Wood (ex - Sugillenco) passing to A. C. Stralla of San Francisco. The latter vessel was resold a few months later to the government of Thailand, being renamed Sisunthon Nawa. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Algoa
(Freighter) - The Pacific Mail freighter Algoa ran aground on the lower end of Henriel's Bar, 23 miles downriver from Portland in September, remaining ashore for four days while Port of Portland dredges and tugs worked to free her. The Hamburg-American Liner Brisgavia, attempting to pass the stranded Algoa on September 13, herself went aground on the upper end of the bar, the two large steamers lying opposite each other and practically blocking the river. Both vessels were freed the following day. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Algonquin
(Cutter) - The former Coast Guard cutter Algonquin was chartered by Siems-Drake-Puget Sound and towed to Kodiak by the Patricia Foss following installation of a 1,200 kilowatt generator by the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Company serving as a generating plant there in connection with Air base construction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Antigone
See NECKAR (2) .
Citation:
Arago
- Second brig built on the Pacific Coast. Cost $13,000. Used after 1880 for 24 years as a cod fisher. Retired in 1905. Peterson, Emil R. A Century of Coos and Curry, p. 406.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arago
(Barkentine) - Arago, a four-masted barkentine of 498 tons and 750 M capacity was built at North Bend in 1891 to perpetuate her name in the Simpson fleet. In 1914 she was old t o Chilean owners, and was listed in 1937 as owned in Peru under the name of Aurrera, although it is doubtful whether she had put to sea for many years. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arago
(Brig) - Arago, a brig of 185 tons, was built at North Bend, probably in 1859, though some accounts give 1856, and some 1860. Her master- builder was one McDonald, and she was owned by A. M. Simpson and cost $13,000. Some secondhand timber was used in her floors, which it is said came from a wreck at Coos Bay, but more likely was from vessels abandoned in the Gold Rush and broken up at San Francisco. At any rate, Simpson always had a reputation for acquiring odd pieces of gear and then building a vessel around them. The Arago was sold in 1880 to Lynde & Hough, San Francisco, for a codfisher, and was reduced to schooner rig. She continued in this business 24 years, while vessels far younger were worn out, and was finally withdrawn in 1905 and probably broken up. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arago
(Brig) - A good-sized vessel, the brig Arago, was launched at Coos Bay. She was built at North Bend for A. M. Simpson by a man named McDonald and entered the coasting trade, which she followed for several years. With the exception of the steamers previously mentioned this was the most important craft built in the Northwest in 1859. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.89.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arago
(Steamer) - October 20, 1896 Steamer, propeller, 947 tons, built by Union Iron Works of San Francisco in 1885 for the Coos Bay coal trade. 207'x 301 x 16' with a compound engine of 22 x 44 1 x 34 1. Originally the Emily, she wrecked at Coos Bay bar in 1891 with the loss of one life. This time, she hit again at the same spot; Joseph A. Younker of the U.S. Life Saving Service was on duty both times and participated in rescuing both crews. The ship struck a submerged portion of the jetty and sank; 13 of 37 died. Loran C, chain 9940; W:13539.52, X:27770.23, Y:43927.78. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Arago
(Tug) - The 109-ton tug Arago, 84 feet long, was buut at Portland for use by the United States Engineers on the Oregon coast, later passing to the Washington Tug & Barge Co. at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1901. W. H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Aramingo
(Ship) - Hunter p. 653.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo
- Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo
- 1926. 39 gross tons. 50.4 feet #225406. Pete Nelson, Tacoma, Washington. Merchant Vessels of the United States. 1945, p. 112.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo
(Steam schooner) - The Argo, 210 tons, 130 feet in length with 23-foot beam and loaded draft of nine feet was built at Ballard by Murphy & MWer, former Cleveland, Ohio shipbuilders, for the Cleveland-Alaska Gold Afining & MWing Co., in which they held a major share. She was placed in service under Capt. Joseph Murphy, with Thomas Murphy as mate, towing the river steamer Argo No. 2 north on her first voyage. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo
(Steamer) - November 26, 1909 Steamer, 110', 210 tons. Don Marshall, Ship disasters from Cascade Head to Nehalem River,Oregon Shipwrecks, 1985, p. 96-98.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo
(Steamer) - The steamer Argo, which was launched at San Francisco in 1869, was taken to Coos Bay in 1871 by Capt. William H. Clough. She was a small propeller and ran on the Bay and its tributaries for several years. Clough sold her in 1872, and Henry Wade took command. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo
(Tanker) - Argo, 160 -foot coastal tanker of 1,200 tons capacity built in 1944 at Stockton, California and employed in transporting herring oil from Alaska and gasoline between Puget Sound and British Columbia ports in recent years, purchased from the Pacific Navigation Co. of Seattle by Frank Waterhouse & Co. Ltd. of Canada and renamed Argus for transporting caustic soda from Tacoma to pulp mills in British Columbia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argo (2)
See ARGONAUT.
Citation:
Argo No 2
(Steamer) - On June 21 the steamer Argo No. 2 of the Cleveland-Alaska Gold Mining & Muling Co. broke away from the Argo No. I and foundered off Dixon Entrance. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argonaut
J.Carmichael & Co had an "Argonaut" built by Barclay Curle, Glasgow in 1876 which sailed between London and Sydney at this time. She was a three masted, full rigged ship and was used in the wool trade, 1488 tons, length 254.4ft x beam 38.6ft x depth 23.2ft and iron construction. Her best run from Sydney to London was in 77 days in 1895. I haven't much info on this ship, but she later became the Portuguese "Elvira" and was used on the Lisbon - Rio de Janeiro - New Orleans - Lisbon service. In 1913 she was renamed "Argo", but I have nothing on her after 1914. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 June 1998]
Argonaut
(Schooner) - The Argonaut, two-masted schooner of 194 tons, was built by White at San Francisco in 1880, also for A. M. Simpson. She is last listed in 1890. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argonaut
(Schooner) - The Argonaut, two-masted schooner of 194 tons, was built by White at San Francisco in 1880, also for A. M. Simpson. She is last listed in 1890. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Argonaut
(Steamer) - The propeller Argonaut, built at Portland in 1881 by J. W. & V. Cook, made her trial trip March 14th, with Fred Congdon, captain, and Herbert Holman, engineer. Capt. John W. Brown succeeded Holman in 1882 and had charge of the steamer for seven years. She was afterward in command of Willis C. Snow, and in 1890 was sold to the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company, after which Capt. Edward Sullivan handled her a short time. The Argonaut is seventy-six feet long, seventeen feet beam, and seven feet hold. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 286.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bangor (schooner)
The Bangor, a four-masted schooner of 511 tons, was built by Bendixsen at Eureka in 1891. Her first owner was C. A. Hooper, San Francisco, who sold her about 1910 to Capt. James Griffiths of Seattle. Capt Griffiths cut the schooner down to a tow-barge for his Coastwise Steamship & Barge Co. and renamed her C.S.S.No.l. In 1918 she was bought by the Alaska Codfish Co., San Francisco; they rerigged her as a bald-headed four-masted schooner and restored the name Bangor. Although they had her in the coasting trade for several voyages, the Bangor never made a trip codfishing, and in 1927 she was sold to the American Toll Bridge Company to serve as a fender for the central pier during construction of the Carquinez Bridge. Upon completion of the job the schooner was beached near Vallejo, where here remains could be seen not many years ago. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bangor (schooner)
The Bangor, a four-masted schooner of 511 tons, was built by Bendixsen at Eureka in 1891. Her first owner was C. A. Hooper, San Francisco, who sold her about 1910 to Capt. James Griffiths of Seattle. Capt Griffiths cut the schooner down to a tow-barge for his Coastwise Steamship & Barge Co. and renamed her C.S.S.No.l. In 1918 she was bought by the Alaska Codfish Co., San Francisco; they rerigged her as a bald-headed four-masted schooner and restored the name Bangor. Although they had her in the coasting trade for several voyages, the Bangor never made a trip codfishing, and in 1927 she was sold to the American Toll Bridge Company to serve as a fender for the central pier during construction of the Carquinez Bridge. Upon completion of the job the schooner was beached near Vallejo, where here remains could be seen not many years ago. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905,, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bangor (schooner)
The barge C. S. & B. No. 1, formerly the Bendixsen -built four- masted schooner Bangor of 1891, was purchased from Capt. Griffiths by the Alaska Codfish Co. of San Francisco and rerigged as a four-masted baldheaded schooner under her original name. She made several voyages in the coasting trade, but was not entered in the cod fishery.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 298.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bangor (schooner)
The old four-masted schooner Bangor, built at Eureka, California in 1901 and for 20 years in the offshore and coastwise lumber trade, temporarily lost the remainder of her identity in 1913. The Coastwise Steamship & Barge Co., having already converted her to a barge for the ore trade between the Britannia Mines of British Columbia and the Tacoma smelter, transferred her to British registry under the designation C. S. & B. No. 1, (although she later returned to sail under her old name). Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p226.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bangor (schooner)
Captain James Griffiths also renovated the four-masted, baldheaded schooner Bangor, a 511-ton vessel, 165 x 36.5 x 11.8, built in 1891 at Eureka, California, and purchased by Griffiths for $ 1,000 at U. S. Marshal's auction following her stranding in October, 1910. This craft, which cost about $ 30,000 to construct, was placed in barge service to the latest Alaska gold fields on the Kuskokwim River. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 185.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belle Of Oregon
Northwest Magazine. January 16, 1972.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Belmona (cargo Vessel)
In February, the 12,000-ton Norwegian cargo vessel Belmona, deeply laden with lumber from New Westminster for the East Coast, sent out a distress call after her engine room caught fire and she lost all power off the Washington coast. The Victoria tug Island Sovereign responded and towed the 521-foot vessel 100 miles through heavy seas to Esquimalt for repairs. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.70.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bengore Head
See BOHEMIA.
Citation:
Bengore Head Ii
See MORAVIA.
Citation:
Boksetegorsk (trawler. )
This 125 -foot Russian motor trawler was lost in a Bering Sea gale, January. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boskovic (yugoslav Vessel)
Tacoma pair find ship namesake, Tacoma News Tribune. December 7, 1961.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Canadian Constructor (cargo Liner)
The largest vessel to be built in a British Columbia yard to that time, the 7,500-ton cargo liner M. S. Canadian Constructor, was completed by Burrard Dry Dock Co., Ltd. for Canadian National Steamships. The steel motorship, with dimensions of 436 x 59 x 35.5 ' provided accommodations for 12 passengers and was designed for a service speed of 16 knots, operating between Halifax and the West Indies. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 544.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cape Alava (cargo Vessel)
Tacoma launching late this afternoon, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 1, 1940, p. 1. Cape Alava, the first C-1B Motorship, The Sea Chest. March, 1981, p. 81-83. The ship was christened on August 1, 1940 by Anna Boettiger, daughter of Franklin D. Roosevelt whose husband John Boettiger was editor of the Seattle Post Intelligencer.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chevron Oregon (tanker)
The newly constructed tanker Chevron Oregon lost power while headed upstream on the Columbia River in the course of her acceptance trials, anchored but snapped an anchor chain and swung out of the channel to collide with the Astoria-Megler bridge structure. Two Knappton Towboat tugs and one of Umpqua River Navigation Co. maneuvered the wayward tanker into a safe anchorage. Following minor repairs she again crossed the bar to resume sea trials, but this voyage was also aborted and the new vessel was forced to return to Swan Island for major repairs. Neither bridge or tanker suffered serious damage from the collision. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.196.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicago (1)
Built by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1866 for the Guion Line of Liverpool, this was a 2,869 gross ton ship, length 335ft x beam 42.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 72-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11th Oct.1866, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 18th Dec.1866. On 12th Jan.1868 she was wrecked near Roche's Point, Queenstown with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.708] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 October 1998]
Chicago (2)
Built for the British owned Furness Line in 1878 by W.Gray & Co, West Hartlepool (engines by T.Richardson & Sons, Hartlepool), she was a 1,384 gross ton ship, length 240ft x beam 33.3ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 21st Mar.1878, she sailed on her maiden voyage from West Hartlepool for Boston on 7th May 1878, but was wrecked at Happisburgh, Norfolk the following day. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1031] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 October 1998]
Chicago (3)
Built as the "Lincoln City" by E.Withy & Son, West Hartlepool (engines by T.Richardson & Co, Hartlepool) in 1884 for the Furness Direct Scandinavian and American SS Co Ltd, this was a 2,729 gross ton ship, length 301ft x beam 40ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 20-1st, 30-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29th Mar.1884, she was purchased by Wilson Line of Hull in 1885 and renamed "Chicago". She started her first Hull - Boston - New York voyage on 9th Mar.1885 and her last Hull - New York sailing commenced 13th Apr.1898. In 1898 she was renamed "Salerno" and sailed from Newcastle for Dundee and New York on 23rd Jul.1898. Her last Newcastle - New York voyage started 18th Nov.1900 and she was sold to Wilhelmsen of Norway in 1901. On 30th Jun.1905 she was wrecked on Lichfield Shoal, Halifax, NS.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1033] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 October 1998]
Chicago (4)
Built for the Wilson Line of Hull by Furness Withy & Co Ltd, West Hartlepool (engines by Central Marine Co, West Hartlepool)in 1898. 6,438 gross tons, length 475.5ft x beam 52.3ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 7th May 1898, she sailed from Newcastle on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (for repairs) and New York on 23rd Oct.1898. Later the same year she came under the control of Wilson's & Furness-Leyland Line and in 1904 was renamed "Etonian". In 1914 she went to Leyland Line and on 23rd Mar.1918 was torpedoed by the German submarine U.61 off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland and sank with the loss of seven of her crew. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.966] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 October 1998]
Chicago (5)
This was a 17,000 ton ship ordered by Hamburg America Line in 1906 from AG Vulcan, Stettin, but the order was cancelled and she was never built.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.414]] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 October 1998]
Chicago (steamer)
Halibut Steamer Chicago, ALF, p. 81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicago (steamer)
A halibut fishing steamer, the Chicago, 419 tons, 139 feet long and fitted with triple -expansion engine was built at Seattle, being operated in later years by Booth Fisheries. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicago (steamer)
The fishing steamer Chicago, after being damaged slightly by stranding at Fish Egg Island, Alaska on May 1, was wrecked June 21 at Warm Chuck, Prince of Wales Island, the cargo becoming a total loss but the hull later refloated and converted to a barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chicago (u.s.s)
Taking on supplies at Commencement Bay, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 170.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chikugo Maru (coal Carrier)
Nippon Yusen Kaisha's 111,000-deadweight ton coal carrier Chikugo Maru, with dimensions of 856 x 133 feet, loaded 110,000 tons of coal at Roberts Bank Westshore Terminals near Vancouver, becoming the largest cargo vessel to ply British Columbia waters. The giant motorship, with a loaded draft of 52 feet, was on her maiden voyage, having been especially built for the bulk coal trade at Hiroshima. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chitose Maru (cargo Vessel)
The 650-foot Japanese cargo vessel Chitose Maru, on her maiden voyage, and the 416-foot Danish cargo liner Marie Skou collided shortly after midnight near the international boundary north of Neah Bay. The Danish vessel was escorted to Victoria by the Coast Guard cutter Modoc, while the Chitose Maru, with a 30-foot gash in her hull above the waterline, proceeded to the same port under her own power. Both vessels were later judged at fault by the Exchequer Court in Victoria, on the basis of misuse of radar and failure to post lookouts forward. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LIV-LV.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Chicago
The "City of Chicago" was built by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow in 1883. She was a 5,202 gross ton ship, length 430.6ft x beam 45ft, straight stem, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 140-1st, 100-2nd and 850-3rd class. Laid down as the "Vancouver" for the Dominion Line, she was purchased on the stocks by Inman Line and launched as "City of Chicago". Her maiden voyage started on 18th Sep.1883 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She continued on this service until commencing her last voyage on this route on 8th Jun.1892. While homeward bound, she ran ashore in dense fog on 1st July, near the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland and was wrecked with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.244] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 October 1998]
City Of San Diego
City of San Diego in the Northwest sealing fleet, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
A Canadian schooner, 48 tons, built at San Francisco in 1871. Lost with all hands somewhere south of Cape Flattery in 1902. Some of her wreckage was found on the beach at Ozette, Washington. This vessel was one of the better Imown units of the Pacific sealing fleet during much of her career. She caught seals until 1895 and came under the British (Canadian) flag in 1893. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
(two-masted schooner) Reg. No. 100645 Engines: Two 3-cylinder 80 Owner: Northern Freighters Ltd., 627 Vancouver Block, Vancouver. Became the first Canadian rum running ship on April 15, 1922. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
The year 1883 marked the beginning of an important epoch in the sealing business, with the entrance of the first schooner into Bering Sea. The pioneer craft in this disputed territory was the American City of San Diego, in charge of Captain Cathcart and Daniel McLean. She left San Francisco, March 29th, with three hunters, entered Bering Sea and took 900 seals, landed at Hall Island and killed a few polar bears, and arrived at Victoria with her catch October 11th. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.427.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of San Diego (schooner)
The latter, in command of Capt. George Wester, went over to Copper Island, near which the McLean Brothers met with misfortune. Capt. Dan McLean made a raid on the island, and was surprised by a party of Russians, who opened fire, wounding McLean. The crew with him were unhurt and took to the boats, reaching the schooner in safety with the exception of one man, Talbot, who was so frightened that he fell overboard and drowned. Sail was made and the schooner got away from the dangerous locality as rapidly as possible. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.436-7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clauseus (cargo Ship)
The last steel cargo ship built in Portland during and immediately after World War One. Launched December 5, 1919, Northwest Steel Company, Dean Collins, Stars of Oregon. p. 105.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colorado (cargo Liner)
On September 19, States Steamship Co. of San Francisco took delivery of the first of five new super-Mariner type cargo liners, the Colorado, at the New Orleans yards of Avondale Shipyards. In command of veteran States Line Captain A. E. Sinnes, the Colorado picked up cargo at Gulf ports before loading at Portland, Vancouver and Seattle and departing San Francisco for Yokohama. Considered the most advanced cargo liners in the world at the time of their commissioning, the Colorado class vessels are 579 feet in length with a beam of 82 feet and are registered at 13,053 gross tons (14,149 dwt.). Powered by two General Electric steam turbines developing 24,000 shaft horsepower, they have a cruising speed of 23 knots and are fitted with first class accommodations for twelve passengers. In addition to automated boilers and pilot house controls, the States liners are fitted with hydraulic hatches, the first gyro-controlled flume stabilizers on any Pacific Ocean cargo ships, designed to reduce rolling by 50 to 75 pe
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia Gorge (tour Boat)
Paddle-wheeler tour boat launched at Hood River, Oregon, Marine Digest. October 29, 1983, p. 11-12.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbus California (cargo Vessel)
Columbus California calls at Tacoma; one ofthe two Columbus line vessels carrying freight between Tacoma and Australia\New Zealand, Marine Digest. August 2, 1986, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbus Canada (cargo Vessel)
Makes first call to Tacoma, Marine Digest. August 23, 1986, p. 7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cordova (cargo Vessel)
Cordova of 1912 and Lakina of 1913, cargo-passenger vessels of the Alaska Steamship Co., transferred at Vancouver, B. C. to Chinese owners for the China Coast trade, being renamed Lee King and Ping Hsing respectively. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 545.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
County Of Linlithgow
Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
County Of Linlithgow
Four master on way to load grain. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 173. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers.. Alternate name LINLITHGOWSHIRE.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dakota (cargo Vessel)
The first cargo of wheat to go foreign from Puget Sound was shipped from Tacoma, November 5, 1881, on the American ship Dakota, Capt. J. F. Gilkey. The Columbia River grain fleet was larger than in any previous year, and included 142 vessels, five of which loaded at Astoria. The smallest of the fleet was the British ship Odulia, 436 tons, the largest the British ship Trafalgar, 766 tons. Forty-three were over one thousand tons. The rapid growth of this branch of the marine business demanded additional pilot service on the bar, and accordingly branch licenses were issued to Captains J. E, Campbell and Charles S. Gunderson. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 288.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo
Two photographs, one taken in 1912 and the second in 1914. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 181.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo
The veteran Alaska Steamship Co. vessel Dirigo foundered off Cape Spencer November 16 as she was being towed from Seward for Puget Sound by the Cordova. Capt. John Johnson and the crew of 12 men were taken off by the Cordova. The vessel was scheduled for repairs and installation of oil burners at Seattle to fit her for service on the Unalaska feeder service, in which she had replaced the Dora for several voyages. She had already been fitted with accommodations for 48 first-class and 34 steerage passengers for this purpose. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.247.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo (bark)
First steel sailing vessel made in North America, built at Bath Maine in 1894. Torpedoed in 1917. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers. p. 180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo (steamer)
The Dirigo, built at Grays Harbor and engined at San Francisco was a passenger-carrying steam schooner, first placed in the Alaska trade by J. S. Kimball & Co. of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo (steamer)
Marine losses continued high in Alaskan waters. The Alaska Steamship Company's Dirigo, in charge of Capt. George Roberts, stranded off Midway lsland south of Juneau March 10, during a heavy snow storm. She was eventually salvaged and extensively rebuilt, her long passenger deckhouse being shortened to give her the lines of a typical steam schooner with limited passenger accommodations, continuing in the southeastern Alaska trade under the Alaska Steam house flag. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 52.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo (steamer)
The veteran steamer Dirigo of the Alaska Steamship Co. was also rebuilt in 1912, her cargo capacity being considerably enlarged. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dirigo (steel Bark)
An interesting event, in these vanishing days of sail, was the arrival on Puget Sound July 26 of the splendid American four-masted steel bark Dirigo, which had sailed from Baltimore on March 1, coming around Cape Horn via the Straits of LeMaire. Although famed as America's first steel square-rigger, the mighty Dirigo had, except for the thrifty lack of figurehead, billet head and ornamentation common to Sewall ships, the appearance of a typical British four -master of the 1890's having been designed, and her construction superintended by J. F. Waddington, a former Harland & Wolff apprence. She was built by Sewall and Company at Bath in 1894. On her 1912 voyage she had on board Jack London who based the highly imaginative sea story, Mutiny on the Elsinore on the background material acquired during the passage. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 203-04.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Drago
See H.H. MEIER.
Citation:
E.a. Bryan (cargo Steamer)
Quinault Victory and E.A. Bryan cargo steamers American flag, exploded at the Port Chicago Ammunition facility in California, July 17, 1944 taking the lives of 325 persons.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eagle I (cargo Vessel)
Eagle One, drug runner. renamed Rolande, purchased by Haitian firm to carry cargo between Haiti and Maimi. Marine Digest. September 20, 1986, p. 4. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Oregon
Built at Chester, Pa. in 1883. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Oregon (steamer)
The Oregon Pacific Railway were making great efforts to establish a seaport at Yaquina, and increased their fleet in 1887 with the Willamette Valley and Eastern Oregon. The latter was a light-draft iron steamship built at Chester, Penn., in 1883 for the Charleston & Florida Steamship Company, who intended her to enter the mouth of the St. John's River. She was christened the City of Palatka, but the yellow fever and the frost played such havoc with the tourist and orange trade that she was sold at a sacrifice to the Oregon Pacific. Capt. George Paton was her first master under this ownership, and in 1890 she was purchased by the Oregon Improvement Company. After making a few trips between San Francisco and the Sound, she alternated with the Premier on the Vancouver route until December, 1891, when she caught fire on the gridiron at Olympia, and everything except the bare hull was destroyed. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Oregon (steamer)
The steamship Eastern Oregon was taken to the Sound in July and placed on the Bellingham Bay route in charge of Captain Green and Chief Engineer Sutton. She remained there until the following year, when she was burned on the gridiron at Olympia. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.379.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
El Amigo
See JUNO.
Citation:
Emma Johanna (cargo Vessel)
Seven hundred foot ship, the largest ever to enter Gray's Harbor, Marine Digest. April 10, 1982, p. 3. German flag cargo vessel.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falgout (coast Guard Vessel)
The Coast Guard ocean station vessel Falgout, a converted Navy destroyer escort with a complement of 160 officers and men, was transferred from the East Coast and assigned to permanent station at Tacoma, with the patrol cutter CC, 83527. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Feugot
On way to West Coast port for gain, early 1900s. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (freighter)
The Fidalgo, a stern -wheel freighter 110 feet in length, was built by A. S. Nelsen at La Conner to replace the Northern Light, whose engines were installed in her. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (steamer)
The Sound freight steamer Fidalgo was lost on the night of February 11 when she broke her moorings and went to pieces in a storm at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 343.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (steamer)
Capt. Harry Barlow, who in association with William Marmont operated the Star Steamship Co. in independent Puget Sound freight service, in 1909 perfected the Barlow Marine elevator, the first one being installed on the company's freight steamer Fidalgo. This device made it possible to load and unload freight directly to or from the elevator platform at any stage of the tide, doing away with the costly and time consuming labor of man handling loaded handtrucks up and down gangways. Captain Barlow soon sold out his interest devoting full time to the development and promotion of the elevator which in its basic form, is still used on Puget Sound freight vessels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (sternwheeler)
Part of the La Conner grain trade, the 110 ft, stern-wheeler Fidalgo capsized in a winter storm on February 1 1, 1923 (U.S. National Archives Record Group 41:50, Newell 1966:106, 343).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flamingo
The steamship FLAMINGO was built as the LEOPARD, by Brownlow, Pearson & Co., Hull, in 1858, on their own account, for the Baltic trade. 550/849/690 tons (net/gross/under deck); 223.1 x 28.9 x 16.5 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); iron construction, screw propulsion, 5 bulkheads. Official number: 20634; international code signal letters: N.B.W.M. Acquired by Thomas Wilson Sons & Co, for their feeder service from Hamburg to Hull, in 1877. (Despite what the Hamburg indirect passenger list appears to say, the FLAMINGO did not sail from Hamburg to Liverpool but from Hamburg to Hull, where the passengers boarded a train for Liverpool, where they transferred to another vessel for the journey to North America.) Re-engined by Earle & Co., Hull, and renamed FLAMINGO in 1879 [Lloyd's Register for 1858-1881]. The latest edition of Lloyd's Register to which I have access is dated 1881, and I have no record of this vessel's history since that date.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
Flamingo (fishing Vessel)
In November, the 85-foot fishing vessel Flamingo caught fire on Puget Sound off Point No Point. A ruptured fuel line fed the fire. The tug Dorothy Foss, in charge of Capt. Sam Emmerson and towing two empty chip barges from Port Townsend, sighted the flames and removed the two-man crew after notifying the Coast Guard by radio. Three Coast Guard boats responded and used their entire supply of foam, but were unable to control the fire and the Flamingo became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.87.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flamingo (steamer)
Steamer Flamingo unloading from halibut trip. ALF, p. 90. Crew of the Flamingo, ALF, p. 91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frank Pargoud (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fred Gower (schooner)
February 22, 1901 Schooner missing. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gasgo (gasboat)
The eight ton gas boat Gasgo was built by Holland Bros. at Marshfield and was operated in passenger service on the Umpqua River and Coos Bay. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 61.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
General W. C. Gorgas (steamer)
General W. C. Gorgas, formerly Hamburg-American Prinz Sigismund, 4,636-ton steel steamship, 370 feet in length, built at Rostock, Germany, 1902, sold by the Panama Railroad Steamship Line to Libby, McNeill & Libby, Seattle, for service to the company's Bristol Bay canneries. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
George Mcgregor (steam Tug)
The 100-ton steam tug George McGregorof the Victoria Tug Co., running light from Bamberton for her home port, was overwhelmed by a roaring December gale in the dangerous channel between Victoria and Trial Island and sank.with the loss of all but one of her seven-man crew. Two of the crew were carried down with the tug as she sank stern first. The remaining five clung for a time to an overturned lifeboat, but dropped off one by one as they were numbed by the cold. A 17 - year - old deckhand, G. Anderson, was washed ashore still alive. Those drowned were Capt. John Mason; A. Jo- hanson, chief engineer; Leo Dobinson, second engineer; Wflliam Hunter, mate; Harvey Reader, seaman; and A. Mathews,cook. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 565.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Go
Getter (Tug) - American tugboat, 79 tons, out of Garibaldi, Oregon, in the service of Sause Bros., Ocean Towing Company, ran aground on the south jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River at high tide at 3 a. m., June 12, 1952, punching holes in her hull. The crew of six waded ashore. The tug was towing a steel barge with a $25,000 cargo of logs, which also grounded but was pulled free by the Coast Guard and the tug Chahunta. Three days later the salvage of the 1000 hp. Go-Getter got underway, with the services of the Sause tugs Klihyam and Chahunta aided by a Coast Guard cutter. The damaged tug was pulled free and escorted into safe haven, completing a splendid and speedy salvage undertaking, under supervision of Curtis Sause. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Go
GETTER (Tug) - The Go-Getter, a 75-foot shallow-draft, twin-screw tug with two F-M oil engines was built at Houghton for the Yaquina Bay log towing service of Pacific Spruce Corp. of Portland. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 340.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Go Getter (tugboat)
79 ton vessel from Garibaldi, Oregon, ran around on the south jett on June 12, 1952, She was salvaged, Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goddess Of Liberty (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 402.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goeben
See ROUSILLON.
Citation:
Goja (bng, P. 294)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 402.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golar Patricia (steamship)
While the vessels trading to Northwest ports did not approach the mammoth proportions of the super tankers engaged in the Near East bulk oil service, tonnage and cargo records continued to be broken regularly. A case in point was the Port of Olympia where, in January, the Panamanian-registered steamship Golar Patricia of 15,724 gross tons (26,000 dwt.), with dimensions of 631 by 83 feet, loaded 6.4 million board feet of logs for Japan, becoming the largest log carrier to call there. In April this record was broken by the 20,484 gross-ton Norwegian motorship Amica, 645 feet in length with a beam of 83 feet, which loaded a record cargo of eight million board feet of logs. In June the size and tonnage record for the port was again broken by the Norwegian motorship Rudolf Olsen of 22,500 gross tons and dimensions of 657 by 89 feet, which lifted 8,830,000 board feet of logs for Japan. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.38.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gold Dust (steamer)
The propeller Gold Dust was launched at Portland in 1880 by Capt. E. W. Spencer, who used her on the Vancouver route, making two round trips a day. She was withdrawn in August, and a year later was taken up over the Cascades to run in connection with the steamer Fleetwood. Spencer soon retired her on a subsidy, and in 1883 she was purchased by Bothwick & Frain, proprietors of the Cascade Lumbering Company. On May 25, 1884, she was taken over the Cascades by Captain Martineau and Engineer St. Martin. E. B. Fellows, George Adams and J. Jenkins were also on board at the time. She was employed in jobbing at Portland until 1886, when she was sold to O. A. and L. C. Smith of Olympia, who ran her between Seattle and the Capital City. Her career on the Sound was not a fortunate one, as she sank several times. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.274.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gold Dust (steamer)
The propeller Gold Dust was brought down from the middle river, May 25tb, by Captain Martineau and Engineer St. Martin. Capt. George Adatns also came over with the steamer. E.W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]., p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gold Gatherer (steam Scow)
The Gold Gatherer is a seventy-foot steam scow built in the interior of Idaho to run between Huntington and Salmon Falls on Snake River. She was used by her owners in prospecting and washing out gold from the sands along the stream, and formed the basis for an extensive suit against the Oregon Short Line Company, whose bridge across the Snake River would not permit the Gold Gatherer to pass down. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.367.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gold Hunter
The GOLD HUNTER was a wooden side-wheel steamer, built by A. J. Westervelt, New York, for William Skiddy, for service on the Sacramento River, and launched on 5 September 1849. 1 deck, 3 masts, round stern, no head; 436 2/95 tons; 172' 6" x 25' 6" x 10' 4" (length x beam x depth of hold); double engined. She cleared New York for San Francisco 17 December 1849, but returned to port two days later. Arrived at San Francisco from Panama 29 April 1850. Made one voyage to Acapulco in 1850, and two voyages to Tehuantepec, Nicaragua, and Panama in 1851, the last-named for Cornelius Vanderbilt. Purchased by the United States government in 1852, and became the ACTIVE, of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. Purchased for Holaday and Brenham's California, Oregon and Mexico Steamship Company in 1860 or 1861, and was engaged in coastal service north of San Francisco. On 5 June 1870, en route from San Francisco to Victoria, struck a rock about 22 miles north of Cape Mendocino in a dense fog, and was lost. Her passengers and about half her cargo were taken off [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943), p. 225].
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 November 1997]
Gold Mizushima
Presentation ceremony on maiden voyage, The Marine Digest. November 3, 1984. p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers.. Case, p. 223-225. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 120.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Ace
Another ship bashes the Blair waterway bridge. Tacoma News Tribune. March 16, 1982.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Age (ferryboat)
Purchased in 1937 by the Black Ball Line from San Francisco the Golden Age was one of the wooden electrics which were built in 1926-1927. 226.8 x 40 x 15.9 feet they had three diesel engines supplying power to two electric drive motors. Upon reaching Puget Sound the Golden Age was renamed the Klahanie. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Age (steamer)
Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, I, p. 436. Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, II, p. 269. Hazard, p. 100.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Alaska (fish Processor)
West Coast focus,302 foot processor ready for work,The National Fisherman, January, 1983, p. 6. (il). The 302 Golden Alaska to begin another new life; Tacoma ship finished refurbishing in May, The National Fisherman. August, 1985, p. 57. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear
Maritime folk told out of staters get most jobs in field, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 23, 1982.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (ferry Boat)
Purchased in 1937 as one of the wooden electric Ferryboats for use on Puget Sound by the Black Ball line. Built in 1926-1927 the Golden Bear was under tow of the Seattle tug Active when she encountered heavy weather after reaching Cape Blanco on the Oregon Coast. The ferry's pitching caused the towline to part and the vessel's entire superstructure subsequently collapsed. The crew was removed and the vessel taken into the lumber town of Empire wher she was stipped of machinery and disposed of. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line, p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (freighter)
1937 Diesel electric freighter under Captain Louis Van Bogaert. While struggling against high seas, her superstructure, along with several pipes, worked loose. Leaking fumes from the exhaust pipe sickened the crew and they soon became incapacitated. The Active towed the disabled vessel to Coos Bay; she was declared a loss and turned into a barge. She now forms part of a breakwater in British Columbia. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Bear (training Ship)
Letter to the editor includes information about the ship. Marine Digest. July, 1991, p. 708.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Cloud (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Dragon (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Eagle (fishing Boat)
Satiacum's boat auctioned for $82,000, Seattle Times. May 1, 1983. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Eagle (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Fleece
See LAKE NEPIGON.
Citation:
Golden Fleece (schooner)
The Golden Fleece, a two - masted schooner of 127 tons, was built on Humboldt Bay in 1875. She was owned first by J. H. Jacobsen, her master; and after 1885 by Wright, Bowne & Co., disappearing from registry in 1895.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Fleece (schooner. )
The Golden Fleece, a two - masted schooner of 127 tons, was built on Humboldt Bay in 1875. She was owned first by J. H. Jacobsen, her master; and after 1885 by Wright, Bowne & Co., disappearing from registry in 1895.John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Forest (steamer)
The steamship Golden Forest, an Oceanic & Oriental Line freighter, was wrecked September 15 in Shellikof Strait. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 404.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Gate
The GOLDEN GATE was a wooden side-wheel steamship, built by William H. Webb, of New York, for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co; keel laid 1 July 1850, launched 21 January 1851. 2067 tons; 269ft 6in x 40 ft x 22 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 funnels, 3 masts, 3 decks, round stern, round tuck, spread-eagle head; mean draft 10 ft 2 in; two oscillating engines by Novelty Iron Works: bore 85 in, stroke 9 ft, steam pressure 18 psi, approximate ihp 1150, 14 revolutions per minute; wheel diameter 33 ft 6 in, float width 10 ft 6 in. The GOLDEN GATE entered the Panama-San Francisco service in November 1851; her passage from Panama to San Francisco of 11 days, 4 hours, stood as a record until 1855. She remained in the service until she burned at sea and was beached on the coast a short distance north of Manzanillo, Mexico, on 27 July 1862, with the loss of 223 lives and $1.4 million in specie [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943), p. 228; Cedric Ridgely-Nevitt, American Steamships on the Atlantic (Newark: University of Delaware Press, c1981), pp. 178-180, 272, 355-356]. A picture of the GOLDEN GATE serves as the frontispiece to Kemble's book. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michale Palmer - 29 January 1998]
Golden Gate (bark)
Among the more prominent vessels which met their fate [in 1867] was the bark Golden Gate, belonging to the Russian-American Telegraph Company, caught in the ice and crushed near the mouth of the Anadyr River, the vessel becoming a total wreck, though the crew were saved. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Gate (steamer)
Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, II, p. 269. W.H.H.Hall. The private letters...of Captain Hall., p. 100, 102-03, 108, 118, 120. Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 307. Richard A. Seiber. Memoirs of Puget Sound and Early Seattle., p. 55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Gatherer (steam Scow)
The Gold Gatherer is a seventy-foot steam scow built in the interior of Idaho to run between Huntington and Salmon Falls on Snake River. She was used by her owners in prospecting and washing out gold from the sands along the stream, and formed the basis for an extensive suit against the Oregon Short Line Company, whose bridge across the Snake River would not permit the Gold Gatherer to pass down.E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]., p. 367.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Hind
Drake's ship. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 27, 29. Reached Pacific Ocean, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 36-37. Former Pelican. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., I, p. 48-49. Sails north, LLOG, p. 1-2, 7. Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 15. Sir Francis Drake rumored to have brought acorns from English oak Agnes Rothery. Ports of British Columbia, p. 223-24. Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Hind (replica)
Golden Hinde arrives, two months late for Expo 86, Marine Digest. July 12, 1986, p. 22-24. Chris Norgaard of San Francisco praised for his efforts in making project authentic, Marine Digest. August 16, 1986, p. 25. Fire erupts on Golden Hind replica in British Columbia, Marine Digest. November 8, 1986, p. 3. Golden Hind reparis $25,000, The Marine Digest. November 15, 1986. p. 16+ Mostly smoke and water damange, little structural work will need to be done. Fire caused by spark from welder's torch. Time Traveler, Pacific Northwest. June 1987, p. 48-50. A visitor from the past moors in Seattle until the end of January, Marine Digest. January 17, 1987, p. 24-25. Golden Hind moves to Tacoma; docks at The Dock for two weeks, Tacoma News Tribune. January 31, and February 1, 1987. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Horn (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Kauri (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century,p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Mariner
Golden Mariner, built by Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Co. at San Francisco as the first of the new Mariner vessels to be completed on the Pacific Coast assigned to Pacific Atlantic Steamship Co. (States Steamship Co.), Portland, by the U. S. Maritime Commission. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Mountain (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Odyssey (cruise Sip)
Second cruise line shifts to Northwest, Royal Cruise Lines' Golden Odyssey will be based in Vancouver, during summer 1986 to avoid Mediterranian terrorism, The Marine Digest. February 8, 1986, p. 3+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Phoenix (bulk Carrier)
Phoenix ships caught in huge loan default; too large to be practical, cannot load at most ports, The Marine Digest. May 18, 1985, p. 28. The Jade Phoenix and Golden Phoenix are the largest U.S. Flag bulk carriers. 128,000 dwt.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Poppy (ferry Boat)
One of six wooden electric ferry boats purchased by the Black Ball Line for use on Puget Sound. Built in 1926-27 226.8 x 40 x 15.9 feet with three diesel engines supplying power to two electric drive motors. Upon reaching the Pacific Northwest the name of the vessel was changed to Chetzemoka. As the Chetzemoka she sank off the Washington Coast in the Spring of 1977 while be towed to San Francisco. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden River (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Rod (fishboat)
The Golden Rod was a motor vessel (fishboat), 15 tons, foundered one mile south of Tatoosh Island, September 28, 1955. Was built in 1907 and owned by Harold Rogers, Port Angeles, Washington. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Rule
Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 53.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (ferry Boat)
One of four ferry boats arriving on Puget Sound after purchase by the Black Ball Line from San Francisco in 1937. As the Elwha she was sold in 1944 to a San Diego Company and in 1970 she was torn from her moorings by high winds and driven onto a breakwater, a total loss. Grahame F. Shrader. The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (ferry)
Another of the San Diego boats, the former San Francisco ferry Golden Shore and Puget Sound Navigation Co. Elwha, last operated as the Silver Strand, was purchased for $10 by an El Monte group for conversion to a diving barge for underwater research in Long Beach harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (schooner)
The Golden Shore, a four-masted schooner of 699 tons and 950 M capacity, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1889. Winslow Hall was registered as managing owner of her first two years, then J. J. Smith of San Francisco, then the Slade Lumber Company. In 1915 the vessel was bought by the Rolph Navigation & Coal CO., who were owners for the remainder of her career. She arrived at San Francisco from Levuka, Fiji, in December, 1920, with 780 tons of copra, and was then laid up. While lying off Butchertown in October, 1922, the Golden Shore took fire, but this was speedily extinguished by the fireboat David Scannell, which filled her with water and beached her. The schooner was later put on the mud at Government Island, Oakland Estuary, where the ark-dwellers chopped her up for fire-wood in 1032. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (schooner)
The Golden Shore, a four-masted schooner of 699 tons and 950 M capacity, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1889. Winslow Hall was registered as managing owner of her first two years, then J. J. Smith of San Francisco, then the Slade Lumber Company. In 1915 the vessel was bought by the Rolph Navigation & Coal CO., who were owners for the remainder of her career. She arrived at San Francisco from Levuka, Fiji, in December, 1920, with 780 tons of copra, and was then laid up. While lying off Butchertown in October, 1922, the Golden Shore took fire, but this was speedily extinguished by the fireboat David Scannell, which filled her with water and beached her. The schooner was later put on the mud at Government Island, Oakland Estuary, where the ark-dwellers chopped her up for fire-wood in 1032. John Lyman, Pacific Coast- Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Golden Shore of 699 tons, built by Hall Bros. in 1889, was damaged by fire in October while in layup at San Francisco. After being filled with water by a fireboat she was beached and later taken to the Oakland mudflats, where she was eventually cut up for firewood. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 330.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Shore (schooner)
The Golden Shore is one hundred and eighty-five feet one inch long, thirty-eight feet five inches beam, fourteen feet two inches hold, tonnage 664. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.369.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden State
Golden State loading salted codfish at Unga, Alaska. ALF, p. 141.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden State (ferry Boat)
One of six ferry boats purchased in 1937 by the Black Ball Line for use on Puget Sound. Only four made it, one being sold and another lost. The Gold State was a wooden hulled 226.8 x 40 x 15.9 foot vessel. She became the Kehloken when she arrived on Puget Sound. As the Kehloken she was sold in 1973 and six years later while moored at Kirtland was destroyed by fire. Grahame F. Shrader, The Black Ball Line. p. 10.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden State (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden Sun (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden West (freighter)
March 29, 1936 Motor freighter, 61.2'long and 72 tons, built at St. Helens in 1923. Owned and captained by William Crone of California Cargo Co. She was transporting general merchandise when thrown upon the rocks at the Coquille's north jetty. The crew was saved, the ship was not. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden West (motor Vessel)
The motor vessel Golden West, bound from San Francisco for Bandon, went ashore March 29, 1936 on top of the north jetty at the Coquille River entrance, the crew being removed safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Golden West (motor Vessel)
The motor vessel Golden West, bound from San Francisco for Bandon, went ashore March 29, 1936 on top of the north jetty at the Coquille River entrance, the crew being removed safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 449.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldfinch (tug)
The increasing success of the internal combustion engine led to the conversion of a number of older steam-powered craft to motor power, among them the 49-foot Everett tug Goldfinch of Capt. Pear Pearson, which received a 45-horsepower Atlas. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 191.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldlouis C. Hunter. Steamboats On The Western Riv
Later named Active; second ocean vessel to land at Portland, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 742. Purchased by Portland interests. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 652.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldsborough (torpedo Boat)
Another U. S. Navy torpedo boat, the Goldsborough, was built by Wolff & Zwicker Co. at Portland, eventually earning for herself the title of the Pacific Coast's most hoodooed vessel. During a score of trial trips she invariably suffered mechanical breakdown or some other accident which prevented her meeting naval standards. Several times she narrowly escaped going down with all hands. Transferred to the Puget Sound Navy Yard at Bremerton, she went out of control and rammed a concrete dock, badly wrecking herself. The builders were forced into bankruptcy by her perversity and there were times when it appeared the government might suffer the same fate. Eventually she was purchased by the Navy, although she had still failed to meet her specifications, and in 1903 was almost completely rebuilt, but the Goldsborough remained a hoodoo to the end, never proving of much use to the service for which she had been designed. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1901. W. H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwe
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldsborough (torpedo Boat)
The notorious hoodoo of the Navy, the torpedo boat Goldsborough, added another chapter to her long tale of woes when she cracked her port crankshaft while- preparing to depart for a cruise with the other units of the Pacific torpedo fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldsborough (torpedo Boat)
The resulting dismay among many naval personnel was only partially offset by the removal of the notorious torpedo boat Goldsborough from the active fleet that month, the vessel being turned over to the Tacoma naval militia for training purposes. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.238.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah
An enduring name on the west coast, The Marine Digest. LVI (October 22, 1977). Illustration of the Goliah accompanying an article on William Crockett, The Marine Digest LIX (February 7, 1981), p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah
The pioneers Goliah and Beaver were both extensively repaired in 1877, the former costing the owners over $15,000. She was equipped with a new boiler, seventeen feet long, fourteen and one-half feet wide, and twelve feet in diameter, and started out in August in charge of Capt. S. D. Libby, with J. F. Drisko, mate. The Beaver made her trial trip after overhauling in October, with J. D. Warren, master, and Benjamin Madigan, engineer. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.253- 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steam Tug)
Towing the barge, Dashing Wave, in Elliot Bay. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 38.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steam Tug)
The powerful steel steam tug Goliah (the second of that name) was purchased by the Puget Sound Tug Boat Co. from the Shipowners'& Merchants' Tugboat Co. of San Francisco, the vessel having been previously inspected and pronounced to be A- 1 in every respect by Capt. Buck Bailey and Port Engineer J. F. Primrose, who, with Capt. T. H. Cann as pilot, brought the Goliah up the coast. Upon her arrival she was placed in charge of Capt. Charles C. Manter, formerly of the Sea Lion, with Capt. Cann as pilot, and after minor renovation, was immediately assigned to towing the Grffiths' barges from Waldron Island to Grays Harbor with rock for the jetty under construction there. The Goliah with her sister tug Hercules, was built by John A. Dialogue at Camden, New Jersey in 1907. Of 414 gross tons, with dimensions of 151 x 27.1 x 15.2, her 1,000-horse power triple-expansion engine gave her speed in excess of 13 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 163.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steamer)
The Steamer Goliah. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 36.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steamer)
If the H.B.C. steamers Beaver and Otter enjoyed a remarkable longevity, so did the American-owned Goliah. Although she was never engaged in the Columbia River trade, she ran on Puget Sound for years, where she won the sobriquet of The Indestructible Goliah. With the lumber business booming, she is said to have towed half of the dozens of coastwise vessels that entered the straits bound for Nanaimo, on the British side, and nearly all that went to the American sawmills. The Goliah was built in New York in 1852 as an oceangoing tugboat. After her arrival on the Sacramento River in 1853, she underwent many changes. She was alternately lengthened, shortened, then lengthened again, and again shortened. At one time staterooms were added. They had been removed when Captain Flavel brought her north. On the Sound, she was stripped down for the purpose for which she was originally intended. When she was forty-one years old, she was still the workhorse of the Sound. Harry Sinclair Drago. The Steamboaters, New York: Br
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steamer)
The steamer Goliah, which had made occasional trips to Northwestern ports twenty years before, became a permanent fixture on Puget Sound in 1871, coming up from San Francisco in March in command of Captain Hayden, and entering the service of the Port Gamble Mills, Capt. Thomas Butler having charge for a few months, and Benjamin V. Rose, Jeremiah McGill and Williamson being among her first engineers. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.191.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steamer)
The steamer Goliah, Capt. S. D. Libby, Mate J. A. McCoy, served for a short time on the Victoria route in 1872 as a mail boat. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (steamer)
The steamer Goliah, Capt. S. D. Libby, Mate J. A. McCoy, served for a short time on the Victoria route in 1872 as a mail boat. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tug)
Built in New York in 1849. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tug)
Built at Camden, New Jersey in 1907. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tug)
The Goliah was requisitioned by the government shortly after the entry of the United States into World War 1, and the Lorne was disposed of the same year. The following year the Tyee, Richard Holyoke and Prosper were sold to the Port Blakeley Mill Co. for use in connection with the shipbuilding activities of the Skinner & Eddy Corporation at Port Blakeley. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tug)
The Goliah was built at New York in 1849 by William Webb, who had built the Aiax the year before. The two side-wheelers were designed to compete with Cornelius Vanderbilt who had been employ- ing under-powered and worn-out steamboats for towing in New York harbor. 'ne Ajax is said to be the first and Goliah the second, vessels built in the United States exclusively as tugboats. The Goliah was sold on completion to parties who planned to operate her in passenger and freight service on the Sacramento out of gold rush San Francisco. According to E. W. Wright in Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, the new owners became involved financially, and the Goliah was put in charge of the marshal, who awoke one morning to find himself on the way to California. The steamer had slipped away without any coal, and by a scratch managed to reach St. Thomas, where she secured fuel and provisions. Upon her arrival on January 1, 1851 in San Francisco she was lengthened 44 feet, operating on the river as the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tug)
Just as many of the sailing vessels seemed to outdo themselves in their waning years, the powerful steam tug Goliah of the Puget Sound Tug Boat Co. established some remarkable towing records in addition to a notable rescue operation. In January the Goliah towed the 2,017-ton full-rigged ship Aryan from San Francisco to Victoria in 88 hours, 30 minutes. In June she beat her own Alaska towing record, taking the barge James Drummond north and the St. James on the return voyage from Gypsum, Alaska, and making the round trip of nearly 2,000 miles in 10 days, 12 hours, both barges being loaded to capacity. The skysail-yarder Aryan was built by C. V. Minott at Phippsburg, Me. in 1893. The only other Downeaster built that year was the Holliswood. These were the last wooden square-riggers to be built in American yards, being followed between that date and 1902 only by the nine steel sailing vessels built by Sewall at Bath, Me. She was lost by fire at sea in 1918 while on a voyage from Wellington for the Pacific Coast.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tugboat)
Built in Philadelphia in 1883. Formerly the George W. Pride and also the Vigilante. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 208. Maritime memories, the tug Goliah, Marine Digest. September 28, 1985, p. 6. (il). The Tugboat Goliah. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 71-72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gomelza
The British ship Gomelza, Captain Naunton, while loading spars in Hood's Canal, listed over during a gale and sank. She was raised without much difficulty by Captain Blinn, but before getting away with her freight was purchased by Captain Stamp of the Barclay Sound Mills. Her cargo cost originally about $3,600, and it brought fifteen thousand pounds in Spain. It included a flagpole one hundred and fifty feet long, which Stamp sent as a sample of the timber grown in Northwestern forests. The vessel was afterward renamed and ended her days as the Somass. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.89.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gondar
The square-rigged ship GONDAR, 645 tons, was built in 1847 in Wiscasset, Maine, by John Johnston & Son, and named after the capital of Abyssinia. Registered in Wiscasset. 1848, Georg Barstow, master, ran in the Nesmith & Walsh Line of New York-Liverpool Packets (passenger manifest, dated 12 June 1848, in National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 73, list #544 for 1848); 1850, J. G. Barstow, master, in the Philadelphia-Liverpool line of packets. 13 May 1852, Barstow, master, arrived at New York from Liverpool, 12 April 1852 (passenger manifest, dated 14 May 1852, in National Archives, Microfilm Publication M237, roll 113, #531 for 1852); 21 May 1853, Barstow, master, arrived at New York, 38 days from Havre (passenger manifest in National Archives Microfilm Publication M237). The GONDAR was destroyed by fire at Charleston, South Carolina, in mid-June 1853, when loaded with cotton and naval stores and about to sail for Liverpool. The figurehead, an image of the Queen of Sheba, famed for its beauty, was saved, and stood in Alexander Johnston's garden at Wiscasset for 30 years, following which it was owned by Dr. A. J. Stedman, of Georgetown, Maine, for some 20 years. It was then sold and sent around Cape Horn in a Bath Ship to Honolulu [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945]55], vol. 5, pp. 3344-3346; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 386 and 405]. This vessel is to be distinguished from the vessel of the same name, 710 tons, that in 1860, Gooding, master, sailed in the Southern Line of Charleston-Liverpool packets [Cutler, op. cit, p. 410.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 2 August 1997]
Good Hope (schooner)
The schooner Good Hope was wrecked at Nome September 11, 1902 and her two -man crew lost. The little steamer Elk went ashore at Nome during an October storm, but was subsequently salvaged. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 84.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Good Templar (schooner)
The Good Templar, a two-masted schooner of 126 tons, was built at Steilacoom, Wash., in 1866 by one Williams or Williamson, and cost $11,800. She was wrecked at Manzanillo. Mexico, on October 28, 1881, her owner then being C. F. Kroger, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Good Templar (schooner)
126 ton two masted vessel wrecked October 28, 1881 at Manzanillo, Mexico. The vessel was built in 1866. LPC, April 26, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Good Templar (schooner)
The Good Templar, a two-masted schooner of 126 tons, was built at Steilacoom, Wash., in 1866 by one Williams or Williamson, and cost $11,800. She was wrecked at Manzanillo. Mexico, on October 28, 1881, her owner then being C. F. Kroger, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goodtime (passenger Vessel)
Goodtime, 85 x 27-foot, 462-passenger excursion vessel with twin 350-horsepower engines, purchased by Capt. Lynn Campbell and brought to Puget Sound from Honolulu under her own power as the new flagship of his Seattle Harbor Tours fleet;* *Deep water cruising was not a new experience for this inland passenger vessel. Built at Warren, Rhode Island in 1967 as the Adventure IV, she sailed down the East Coast and through the Panama Canal to San Diego and then on to the Hawaiian Islands, where she operated out of Honolulu, and later on the Kona Coast of the Big Island as Captain Cook. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.102
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goodtime One
Harbor Tour business, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1986, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goodtime Two
Goodtime II carrying Port of Tacoma tour group, The Marine Digest. November 29, 1986, p. 7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gordon (steamer)
The U. S. Army steamer Gordon, 98 x 22, was purchased at Wilmington, Calif. by Foss Launch & Tug Co. and extensively rebuilt and re-engined with a 500-horsepower Western diesel as the tug Mathilda Foss. She was placed in charge of Capt. W. G. Sampson and engineer Leonard Sund. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gordon (steamer)
The U. S. Army steamer Gordon, 98 x 22, was purchased at Wilmington, Calif. by Foss Launch & Tug Co. and extensively rebuilt and re-engined with a 500-horsepower Western diesel as the tug Mathilda Foss. She was placed in charge of Capt. W. G. Sampson and engineer Leonard Sund. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gorgon
Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. 70-71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goschen
The GOSCHEN was built by Johann Lange, Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 31 March 1859, for D. H. Watjen & Co, Bremen. 620 Commerzlasten/1137 tons register; 50,1 x 12 x 7,1 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). She was built originally as a ship, but later retackled as a bark. Her maiden voyage, under Eldert Deetjen, began in Bremerhaven on 19 May 1859. She served mainly in the North Atlantic trade, carrying immigrants westward and returning home with cotton and tobacco. Other masters, after Deetjen, were Johann Daniel Probst, H. Batjer, Diedrich Hein, and H. Henke. In 1867/68, the GOSCHEN sailed from Holmsund, Sweden, to Adelaide, Australia, reaching Hamburg in 1869, via Callao, with a load of guano. Since 1882, the bark GOSCHEN, under captain Susewind, served in the petroleum transport trade. On her 27th voyage in the petroleum trade, with a cargo of 7,000 barrels, en route from New York to Stettin, she sprang a leak, but reached Stettin intact in August 1893. Soon afterwards, she was sold by Watjen, probably to the shipowner Gustav Ludwig, from Swinemunde. She was wrecked in 1894. 410.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 26 October 1997]
Goshu Maru
See SANGOLA .
Citation:
Gospak (cannery Tender)
The 43-ton steam cannery tender Gospak, 54.6 x 15.4, was built at Vancouver for the Gosse Packing Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 384.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gothia
The "Gothia" was built by Raylton, Dixon & Co, Middlesborough in 1884 as the "Jacatra" for the Insulinde SS Co, Amsterdam. She was a 2,381 gross ton ship, length 314.5ft x beam38.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 20-1st and 550-3rd class passengers. Launched on 13/3/1884, she was purchased by Hamburg America Line on 30/6/1886 and renamed "Gothia". She commenced sailing from Stettin to Gothenburg and New York on 2/8/1886 and made 15 round voyages on this service, the last one commencing 1/1/1889. On 26/2/1891 she transferred to the Hamburg - New York service and commenced her last voyage on this route on 7/4/1892. She transferred to the Stettin - Helsingborg - Gothenburg - Christiansand - New York route on 23/7/1892 until her last voyage with this company started in July 1894.(7 round voyages). In 1898 she was sold to the Deutsche Levant Line and renamed "Lipsos". In 1913 she went to Wm Eisenach of Stettin who renamed her "Anna Strowig" and in 1914, went to other German owners and was named "Rudolf". Ceded to France in 1919 as war reparations, she went to Lalande Lofebrie & Cie in 1922 and was renamed "Maguyla". She was scrapped in 1923. ]Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 November 1997]
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Gothic
See GOTHLAND.
Citation:
Gothicstar (steamer)
View of the Gothicstar AW, 1928, p. 28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gothland
The "Gothland" was a 7,755 gross ton ship, built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as the "Gothic" for the White Star Line's New Zealand service. Her details were - length 490.7ft x beam 53.2ft (149,55m x 16,21m), one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. Launched on 28th Jun.1893 with accommodation for 104-1st and 114-3rd class passengers and with refrigerated cargo space, she sailed on her maiden voyage from London to Capetown and Wellington on 28th Dec.1893. In June 1906, she was damaged when her wool cargo caught fire and was beached and flooded at Plymouth. Converted to an emigrant carrier with third class accommodation for 1,800 passengers, all in four berth cabins, she was purchased by the Red Star Line, registered under the Belgian flag and renamed "Gothland" in 1908. She commenced her first Antwerp - New York voyage on 11th Jul.1908, made a single round voyage between Hamburg, Antwerp, Quebec and Montreal on 6th May 1911 and started her last Antwerp - New York sailing on 24th Jun.1911. Between 1911-1913 she resumed the name of "Gothic" and sailed on the UK - Australia/New Zealand service for the White Star Line. She went back to the name "Gothland" and returned to the Antwerp - New York route for Red Star Line on 23rd Apr.1913. On 23rd Jun.1914 she stranded on the Gunnar Rocks, Scilly Isles, was towed off after three days and was repaired at Southampton. On the 20th Apr.1916 she commenced the first of three or more voyages between New York, Falmouth and Rotterdam for the Belgian Relief Commission and returned to Antwerp - New York voyages with cargo only on 6th May 1919. She resumed passenger voyages on 7th Aug.1920 and commenced her last voyage between Antwerp and Philadelphia in March 1925. Sold in Nov.1925 and scrapped at Bo'ness the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.858] - [Posrted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 September 1998]
Citation:
Gotoma (schooner)
Gotoma, two-masted schooner of 198 tons, was built at North Bend. Ore.. in the Simpson yard in 1872 at a cost of $16,000. She was owned in turn by the Simpsons, James Madison, and Samuel Perkins, all of San Francisco, and was finally lost at Willapa Harbor. Wash., on December 25, 1908. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gotoma (schooner)
Gotoma, two-masted schooner of 198 tons, was built at North Bend. Ore.. in the Simpson yard in 1872 at a cost of $16,000. She was owned in turn by the Simpsons, James Madison, and Samuel Perkins, all of San Francisco, and was finally lost at Willapa Harbor. Wash., on December 25, 1908. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. April 26, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gottardo
The "Gottardo" was a 2,837 gross ton ship, built in 1883 by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow for the Italian company, Navigazione Generale Italiana. Her details were - length 350ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 18/9/1883, she sailed from Palermo on her maiden voyage to New York on 7/1/1884. On 30/7/1887 she started her last Palermo - Naples - New York crossing (14 round voyages) and in the same year was transferred to the South America service. In 1903 she was renamed "Memfi", her masts reduced to two and she was transferred to the Italy - Alexandria service. Between 1910 and 1925 she was owned by several Italian companies and on 2/2/1927 stranded on the coast of Sardinia, was refloated and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1112] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 February 1998]
Gov. Elisha P. Ferry (patrol Vessel)
The first patrol vessel built for the service of the Washington State Department of Fisheries, the Gov. Elisha P Ferry, was built at the Barbara Bros. Shipyard in Tacoma. A 38-ton craft, 56.2 x 14.3 x 6.5, she was equipped with 75-horsepower gasoline engines which gave her a speed of 12 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor (bng, P. 11
13) -
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor (liner)
The Admiral Line, facing serious competition from its former vessels Yale and Harvard on the California coast, received a further blow on April 1, 1921, with the loss of its coastwise liner Governor in collision with the freighter West Hartland off Port Townsend, the Governor having operated with the President in the line's through service to Los Angeles and San Diego. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922. H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 319.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor (steamer)
Steel steamer; 4 decks, 2 Masts; 5,474 tons; 391.9 x 48.2 x 19.7 feet; 120 crew; 540 passengers; 15.4 knots. Built in 1907 at Camden, New Jersey. Prior to 1916, operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Operated by Admiral Line on Seattle to California route from 1916 until April 1, 1921 when she collided with the West Hartland off Point Wilson, Puget Sound, and sank. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor (steamer)
Steel built vessel with four decks and two masts, 5474 tons 391.9 x 48.2 x 19.7 feet. 120 crew, 540 passengers. 15.4 knots. Built in 1907 at Camden, New Jersey. Prior to 1916 she was operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Operated by the Admiral Line on the Seattle to California route until April 1, 1921 when she collided with the West Hartland off Point Wilson, Puget Sound and sank. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more. Whose ship? Who cares? Marine Digest. April 27, 1985, p. 2. Divers seek two million dollar treasure from Governor, The Marine Digest. April 27, 1985, p. 3. Dive delayed, lack of diving bell, The Marine Digest. May 11, 1985, p. 9. Divers expected to reach Governor, The Marine Digest. June 22, 1985, p. 6. Dive still on despite collision with barges, The Marine Digest. June 6, 1985, p. 3. Governor dive fails, members vow to return, strong currents defeat divers, The Marine Digest. July 13, 1985, p.3. Divers return to the wreck, The Marine Digest. April 25, 1987, p. 3. G
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor (steamer)
Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, II, p. 345. Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 151.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor (tug)
The gasoline tug Governor of 14 tons, 41.4 x 11. 9 x 4.9, with 50 - horsepower engine, was built at Tacoma for service at Anacortes, later becoming the pioneer boat of the Gilkey Brothers fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Ames (schooner)
The Governor Ames, the first five-masted schooner in the United States, arrived at Nanaimo, April 19, 1891. She was built at Waldboro, Me., in 1888, was two hundred and forty-five feet six inches long, fifty feet beam, twenty-one feet hold, and registered 1,689 tons. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.392.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Douglas (steamer)
Frederic W. Howay. Voyages of the Columbia 1787-1793, p. 43, 120.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Douglas (steamer)
In British Columbia the first steamer built in the province for inland navigation commenced regular trips between Victoria and Fraser River points. This vessel, the Governor Douglas, was launched the previous year, but did not make her trial trip until January, 1859. She was followed in May by the steamer Colonel Moody, and later by the Henrietta, the latter boat having been set afloat in October and run under sail until the arrival of her machinery. The Governor Douglas was the first steamboat venture in British Columbia of that pioneer of the Columbia and Willamette, Alexander Sinclair Murray, and was also the craft which tempted another hero of early navigation in Oregon, Capt. William Irving, to sail under the British flag, where he and his son, Commodore John Irving, afterward made fame and fortune. The Douglas was launched in the fall of 1858, the machinery coming from San Francisco on the brig Willimantic in December. She was a good-sized sternwheeler, with sixteen-inch cylinders and six-foot stroke, a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Elisha P. Ferry (patrol Boat)
The Washington fisheries patrol boat Gov. Elisha P. Ferry was sold to Whiz Fish Company of Seattle in 1933 becoming the trap tender Marquerite, and later cannery tender Rosalie. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 423.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Elisha P. Ferry (patrol Vessel)
Governor Elisha P. Ferry, 72-foot former Washington State fisheries patrol vessel, which had served during the war as the Army Q-48 and as a shipyard workers' ferry on Lake Washington, purchased by Freeman & Gibson, Seattle shipbrokers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 545.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Grover
Operations were commenced with the Governor Grover, which was launched at Portland, January 28, 1873, and made her trial trip March 16th with the following crew: Charles Holman, captain; George Marshall, chief engineer; and A. Vickers and Charles Kellogg, pilots. Two days later she went up the Willamette to Harrisburg, having been the first large steamer to reach a point so far inland. Captain Holman was succeeded in command in 1874 by Capt. James Wilson, who remained with her for several years. Charles H. Jennings and W. H. Marshall were among the best known of her early engineers. From the Willamette River Transportation Company the Governor Grover passed into the hands of the Willamette Transportation & Locks Company, and subsequently to the Oregon Steam Navigation Company, in whose service she ended her days, having performed good service on every route out of Portland. The Governor Grover was one hundred and forty feet long, twenty- eight feet six inches beam, five feet six inches hold. E. W. Wright, Wi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Harry W. Nice (ferry)
Late in December the Puget Sound Tug & Barge Co. tugs Monarch and Wando arrived at Seattle, completing a tow of approximately 6,000 miles from Baltimore with the former Virginia State ferries Gov. Harry W. Nice and Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, purchased by the Washington State Toll Bridge Authority and placed in Puget Sound service as the Olympic and Rhododendron respectively. Both were steel double - enders built in 1946. The Olympic, 207 x 62, had a 1,400horsepower Fairbanks-Morse diesel, with an automobile capacity of 65 and accommodations for 600 passengers. The Rhododendron, 227 x 63, with two 805-horsepower Fair- banks -Morse diesels, handled 75 automobiles and 600 passengers. The Wando made the long tow in charge of Capt. Kelly Sprague, Fe@ Plank and Torsten Gastigivar, mates, and Wesley Oaks, chief engineer. Capt. Don Barbeau had charge of the Monarch with M. F. Christy and Soren Michelson, mates; Don McColloch, chief engineer. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Isaac I. Stevens (patrol Boat)
The Governor Isaac L Stevens, a 34-foot motor patrol boat, was built at Seattle for the Washington State Department of Fisheries. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 417
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Moody (pilot Schooner)
The pilot schooner Governor Moody, in charge of Capt. Peter C. Cordiner, with a crew of four men, was wrecked at North Head, near the mouth of the Columbia, September 20th. She drifted in during thick weather at 5 A.M. and was nearly in the breakers before the danger was discovered. There was not wind enough to get off shore, and a heavy sea soon battered her to pieces against the rocks, which the captain and crew reached from the mast. The life-saving crew at Fort Canby afterward succeeded in saving portions of her rigging. The Governor Moody's place on the Columbia bar was taken by the schooner San Jose, which P. W. Weeks, the pilot commissioner, purchased in San Francisco. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.382.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Moody (schooner)
September 20, 1890 Pilot Schooner built at Astoria in 1885, 61 tons, 83'x 21'x 10', two masts, owned by A. M. Montgomery. At 4:15 a.m. she hit thick weather and went ashore on the north head of the Columbia. Some of her rigging was saved. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Moody (schooner)
American pilot schooner, 65 tons, was wrecked at North Head, September 20, 1890. The crew were saved but the vessel was a total loss. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Newell
The Governor. Newell, 112 feet in length, was also built at Portland for the Shoalwater Bay Transportation Co. In 1885 she also returned to the Columbia and during much of her career after 1889 was owned by Capt. Charles 0. Hill and commanded by his wife, the famous Columbia River female steamboat master, Capt. Minnie Hill. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 64.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Newell (steamer)
The steamer Governor Newell was built at Portland for the Shoalwater Bay Transportation Companv, and, in charge of James P. Whitcomb, made her trial trip August 26th. She was one hundred and eleven feet long, twenty feet beam, and five feet hold, with engines twelve by forty-eight inches. She ran but little on the route for which she was intended and in 1885 returned to the Columbia, Capt. Charles Haskell running her for a short time. She was purchased by J. C. Trullinger in 1887, and Capt- P. A. Trullinger operated her for a short time on the Westport route from Astoria. She was sold to Capt. Charles 0. Hill in 1889 and has since been handled by Capt. Minnie Hill. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]. , p. 307.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Governor Robie
The Governor Robie carried her last cargo of lumber under sail from Puget Sound to New York, where she was reduced to a coastwise barge. The Governor Robie, 1,713 tons, built in 1883, was one of four smart ships formerly owned by the Searsport captains, Pendleton, Carver & Nichols, one of the others being the Abner Coburn of 1882, also well known in the Pacific Northwest in later years. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gower (tug)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 45.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gregor
See BONN.
Citation:
Gregory Morch
See MUNCHEN .
Citation:
Guy C. Goss (bark)
Built in 1879, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Guy C. Goss (bark)
With the arrival of the steamship Eastern Gale purchased by the Northwestern Fisheries Company of Seattle the ships St. Paul and Benjamin F. Packard and the bark Guy C. Goss were retired from the service of the packing company. The Guy C. Goss was sold to M. W. Vandercook, A. G. Carey and Adam Beeler of Seattle and later in the year was towed to Vancouver, B. C. where she loaded lumber for New Zealand. The Packard was sold to the Hansen & Nieder Lumber Co. of Seattle and dispatched to the East Coast, where it was planned to use her as a coal barge. She was, however, taken over by Theodore Roosevelt Pell of New York, who hoped to keep her afloat as a museum, and for a time was moored at the foot of 129th Street, New York. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Guy C. Goss (bark)
The old wooden bark Guy C. Goss of the Northwestern Fisheries Co., commanded by 24-year-old Capt. Harry De Gueldre left Seattle, lumber laden, the day before Christmas arriving at San Francisco on New Year's Day. The Goss was a Bath built ship having been launched in 1879. She registered 1,572 tons, with deminsions of 213.9 x 39.8 x 24. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen Mcgregor (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 284, 295, 435, 532.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
In November The Oregon & Alaska Transportation Co.
such business and shipping leaders of the community as John McCracken, J. C. Ainsworth and Charles E. Ladd, announcing plans to EUGENE Steamer. An episode rivaling that of the Eliza Anderson expedition in drama and comedy was that of the Columbia River stern wheel steamboat Eugene, a light-draft lightly constructed vessel 140 feet long with engines 12 x 60 inches, built at Portland in 1894 by Capt. F. B. Jones for the route between Portland and the headwaters of the Willamette River. Arrangements were made by the newly-formed Portland & Alaska Trading & Transportation Co. in the late summer for the steamer Bristol, Capt. Mc Int-yre, to tow her from British Columbia to St. Michael for Yukon River service. Setting out in charge of Capt. C. H. Lewis and chief engineer Stearns, the river boat reached Union Bay under her own power, but the Bristol did not arrive as planned and the Canadian customs officials impounded the vessel on various charges. When the ocean steamer finally put in an appearance Capt. Mc Intyre
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Island Trader (cargo Vessel)
A 90-foot Ed Monk-designed cargo vessel, Island Trader, was completed by Nelson Log Bronc of Coos Bay and delivered to Ketchikan Transportation Co. for service to southeastern Alaska logging camps. She was fitted with twin screws, with provision for installation of a third diesel engine and propeller. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.77.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Goode (tanker)
The Liberty-type tanker John Goode was acquired by World Wide Tankers, Inc., a subsidiary of Time Oil Co., which had entered the petroleum distribution field at Seattle in the post-war period. The John Goode was built in 1943 at Terminal Island, California to Liberty ship specifications, having dimensions of 441.6 x 56.11 and a Joshua Hendy steam plant (with the unusual feature of a flywheel on the shaft to reduce hull vibration) developing 2,500 horsepower. The Seattle-based tanker was placed in charge of Capt. Carl Olson. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966..p. 555.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kagome
Length 68 ft. (shore boat) beam 13 ft. Reg. No. 155120 Engines: Three 450-HP Liberty gas engines. Owner: Charles Henry Hudson and later General Navigation Co- of British Columbia, 1048 Hamilton St. Seized December 1932, released early 1933. Later known as Salt Mist in Greene's Personalty Ships. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kozara (cargo Vessel)
No serious mishaps befell offshore vessels trading to the Pacific Northwest in 1971, although a rather spectacular collision occurred off Race Rocks in the Strait of Juan de Fuca in mid-July when the 23,000-ton Yugoslavian cargo vessel Kozara, the 16,000-ton Hoegh Miranda, a Norwegian flag freighter, and the 5,000-ton Danish motorship Nordglimt came together in a heavy fog. All three suffered hull damage, but were able to reach British Columbia shipyards for repairs. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.108.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lambert Point (tubgoat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Largo Law (schooner)
Will sail next week with grain for Africa. Tacoma Daily Ledger. November 30, 1902, p. 3. (il). Shanghaied crew refused to sign,The Tacoma Daily Ledger. December 6, 1902.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lieutenant Goerge M. Harris (mine Planter)
The Andrew Foss, built at the Navy mine planter Lieutenant George M. Harris, The Marine Digest. December 20, 1986, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lord Gough
The "Lord Gough" was built in 1878 by Laird Brothers, Birkenhead for G.M.Papayanni. Her details were 3,655 gross tons, length 382.8ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. I have no information on her passenger accommodation. Launched in November 1878, she was chartered to the American Line and made her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia in April 1879. In 1888 she was bought by the Lord Gough Steamship Co (American Line) but continued to sail under the British flag. She commenced her last Liverpool - Philadelphia voyage on 9/2/1895 and was sold in 1896 to the Aberdeen Atlantic Line. In 1898 she was resold and scrapped the following year at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.940]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 October 1997]
Machigone (schooner)
American schooner, disappeared with her crew of nine off the mouth of the Columbia, After departing Astoria for San Francisco, November 20, 1852. The windjammer, commanded by Captain 1. H. Simpson put out from Astoria with a heavy load of lumber and shortly after her departure a terrible gale roared across the latitudes of the Columbia's mouth. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Machigone (schooner)
Lost at sea November 20, 1852 will a load of lumber. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 172.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maid Of Oregon
September 1896 Wood, propeller, two masts, 92'x 55'x 6', built at Astoria in 1888. Brazil Grounds was her owner and captain. She was lost someplace off southern Oregon. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maid Of Oregon (steamer)
The wooden propeller Maid of Oregon, 91 feet in length, built in 1888 for Capt. Brazil Grounds, who operated her in Oregon coast service, stranded and became a total loss on the southern Oregon coast in September. On October 20, during thick weather and heavy seas, the steamer Arago was wrecked near the outer end of the north jefty at the Coos Bay bar. A handsome propeller steamer, she had been built at San Francisco by Union Iron Works in 1885 for the Coos Bay coal trade, having dimensions of 207 x 30 x 16 and compound (22, 44 x 34) engine. Thirteen of the 32 persons aboard were drowned when the vessel struck, but the remainder were all saved through the gallant efforts of the local lifesaving crew. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maid Of Oregon (steamer)
Capt. Brazil Grounds, who lost his steam schooner Queen of the Bay in 1887, replaced her with the Maid of Oregon, length ninety-one feet three inches, beam twenty-five feet, and depth of hold five feet nine inches. He ran her on the Columbia River until 1892 and then took her to the Sound, where she has since been engaged. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.355.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Major Samuel Ringgold (mine Planter)
The twin-screw steam mine planter Major Samuel Ringgold of 1904, assigned for many years to the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound, was sold to the Shipowners & Merchants Tugboat Co. and converted at the Crowley Oakland yard from a coal-burner to the oil burning Red Stack tug Sea Salvor. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 354.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Major Samuel Ringgold (mine Planter)
The steel twin-screw steam mine planter Major Samuel Ringgold was built at Jersey City, New Jersey and made the voyage from Fort Monroe, Va. to San Francisco in 135 days, commanded by Capt. F. K. Ferguson. She then proceeded to Port Townsend for assignment to the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound, U. S. Army Coast Artillery Corps. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margo (freighter)
Tug reaches propellerless ship a thousand miles out. The Tacoma News Tribune. November 20, 1953.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maria Rubicon (cargo Vessel)
About two weeks later the 590-foot Singapore-registered cargo vessel Maria Rubicon of Sanko Line, maneuvering in Elliott Bay without the assistance of a tug during an early morning fog which had limited visibility to 50 feet, smashed into the Port of Seattle Pier 39, tearing off about 50 feet of the pier and a section of the warehouse. Harbor waters were littered with floating debris until it was removed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The former steam ferry San Mateo, still without a permanent berth as a maritime museum after five years of negotiations between the state parks department and the city of Seattle, was moored at Pier 39 in a semi-abandoned condition at the time of the accident, but was fortunately some distance from the point of impact, thus escaping immediate destruction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maria Rubicon (cargo Vessel)
About two weeks later the 590-foot Singapore-registered cargo vessel Maria Rubicon of Sanko Line, maneuvering in Elliott Bay without the assistance of a tug during an early morning fog which had limited visibility to 50 feet, smashed into the Port of Seattle Pier 39, tearing off about 50 feet of the pier and a section of the warehouse. Harbor waters were littered with floating debris until it was removed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The former steam ferry San Mateo, still without a permanent berth as a maritime museum after five years of negotiations between the state parks department and the city of Seattle, was moored at Pier 39 in a semi-abandoned condition at the time of the accident, but was fortunately some distance from the point of impact, thus escaping immediate destruction. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (tubgoat)
Scrapped in 1932 on the Everett jetty, the 92 ton tug Mary C. had already sunk before in 191 7, but was raised on that occasion and refitted (Newell 1966:90-91, Barnard 1984, Straub 1979, Gibbs 1955, Firemen's Insurance Company 1917).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigone (schooner)
November 20, 1852 Schooner en route AstoriaSan Francisco under Captain 1. H. Simpson. The ship is believed to have foundered just west of Clatsop Spit. Captain Simpson was the half-brother of Asa Simpson, the famous lumberman of Coos Bay. Simpson's ships were never insured and by 1892 he had lost over $500,000 in 34 separate shipping mishaps. The cargo of the Michigone was, of course, lumber. Mate Lem Small, nine other crewmen and the ship disappeared without a trace. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Minnesota (cargo Vessel)
1905-1923. The Minnesota and the Dakota were the two pas- senger-cargo sister ships that provided service between Seattle and Far Eastern ports. The ships belonged to the Great Northern Steamship Company (GNSS), whose owner was the railroad magnate James J. Hill. The Minnesota, with 22,250 deadweight tons, length of 622 feet, beam of 73 feet, and accommodations for 200 first-class passengers and at least 1,800 persons in steerage class, was among the biggest ships of its time, but her maximum speed of thirteen knots was very slow for a passenger liner. Hill insisted on such huge ships in order to achieve economies of scale or lower operating costs; he believed low rates would attract large volumes of cargo and make the shipping venture profitable. Until the construction of the Virginia in 1928, the Minnesota remained the largest ship ever built in an American shipyard, and its cargo capacity was not equaled until 1928, when the Standard Oil Company built the tanker C.O. Stillman. Hill ordered the two ships
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mohongo (steamer)
The Pacific Mail Company operated the steamer Mohongo, Charles Thorn, captain, J. G. B. King, chief engineer. She was an iron sidewheeler of 1,300 tons built for the Government in 1864 and sold to Holladay after the close of the war. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.235.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mohongo (uss)
Joins the Pacific Squadron. Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 320-21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mongolia
See RIMUTAKA (3) .
Citation:
Mongolia (liner)
The famous old Pacific Mail liner Mongolia, following American President Lines service as the President Fillmore, had been sold in 1939 to Arnold Bernstein, who placed her in Atlantic service as the Panamanian. She was scrapped at Shanghai in 1946. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1946, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 536.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mongolian
Steamship MONGOLIAN, built for the Allan Line by D & W Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, and launched on 13 November 1890. 4,838 tons; 121,91 x 13,77 meters (400 x 45.2 feet, length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 100 1st-, 80 2nd-, and 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 12 February 1891, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Halifax-Portland. 23 April 1891, first voyage, Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal. 14 May 1897, first voyage, Glasgow-New York. 1900, Boer War transport. 13 April 1905, last voyage, Glasgow-Liverpool-Halifax-New York. 20 May 1905, first voyage, Glasgow-Quebec-Montreal. December 1907, first voyage, Glasgow-St. John's, Newfoundland- Philadelphia. 30 December 1914, last voyage, Glasgow-St.John, New Brunswick-Halifax-Glasgow. 1915, sold to the British Admiralty. 21 July 1918, torpedoed and sunk near Filey Brig, Yorkshire (36 lives lost) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975),p. 317]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983),p. 206, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum. Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 September 1997]
Citation:
Nedlloyd Baltimore (cargo Vessel)
Nedlloyd Baltimore made first visit to the Port of Tacoma in August, will began regular visits, The Marine Digest. August 27, 1988, p. 27.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nijni Novgorod
See SAXONIA (1).
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Norango (motor Yacht)
Norango, 153-foot motor yacht owned by Tricontinental Investments of Nassau, struck rocks and sank in 40 feet of water while approaching the dock at Alliford Bay in the Queen Charlotte Islands. Capt. Ed Phillips and the three crew members were able to reach shore in a lifeboat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
North Star Iii (cargo Vessel)
Provides unique service, the Alaska resupply operation, The Marine Digest. May 1, 1982, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Obligago
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 113, 117, 120, 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ogontz (steamer)
The Hog Island type steamship Ogontz was purchased from the Lykes Bros. Steamship Co. of New Orleans and rebuilt as a floating cannery for Alaska service by the Alaska Southern Packing Co. of Seattle. Capt. E. B. Hoffman and Chief Engineer Eli Christensen of the company's floating cannery La Merced brought the vessel to the Pacific Coast. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 473.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Onondago (ice Breaker)
Along Tacoma's waterfront, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 31, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon
The "Oregon" of 1891 was built by C.Connell & Co, Glasgow in 1882 for the Dominion Line of Liverpool. She was a 3,672 gross ton ship, length 360.7ft x beam 40.3ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 80-cabin, 60-intermediate and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/12/1882, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Halifax and Portland on 15/3/1883. On 3/5/1883 she commenced her first voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal. Later, her masts were reduced to two and on 19/6/1895 commenced her last Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage. In 1896 she was sold to Furness Line and immediately chartered to Hamburg America Line. She commenced a single round voyage on 18/7/1896 from Hamburg to Montreal and on 15/9/1896 tramsferred to the Hamburg - New York service. On 10/10/1896 she commenced sailing for Furness Line between New York, Naples, Genoa and Leghorn, for 4 round voyages, the last starting 8/7/1897. In Sept.1897 she was scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.806]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 November 1997]
Oregon (barge)
The Bath-built ship Oregon of 1875 was also purchased and converted in British Columbia to a barge by Robert Dunsmuir and Sons. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 89.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (battleship)
Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. 299. Going into commission at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. RP, p. 141. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 216. Used in the Spanish American War. President Woodrow Wilson reviewed the Pacific Fleet in Elliot Bay aboard the Oregon in 1919. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier.. II, p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (battleship)
The famous old battleship Oregon, which thrilled the nation in 1898 by her dash around Cape Horn to join Dewey's fleet in Cuba, was decommissioned at Bremerton and moved to Portland, where she was moored and maintained with funds provided by the Oregon legislature. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 337.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (battleship)
The famous battleship Oregon was recommissioned at the Bremerton Navy Yard late in August 1911 after five years' idleness, during which time approximately $ 1,000,000 was spent in modernizing the noted Spanish American War fighting ship. Capt. C. A. Pond, formerly of the cruiser Pennsylvnia and the fleet tug Iroquois (ex-Fearless), was given command of the Oregon. In a commendable effort at economy, the Oregon and Pennsylvania were berthed to- gether at Bremerton, the same crew manning both vessels. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 193.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (brig)
Purchased by Wilkes. The name was changed from the Thomas H. Perkins. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 381. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 228.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (brig)
250 tons. Purchased at Ft. Vancouver, 1841; sold 1845. Vincent Ponko, Jr. Ships, Seas, and Scientists, U.S. Naval Exploration and Discovery in the 19th Century. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1974., p. 27-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (launch)
This launch was lost on the Columbia bar, in the fall of 1914. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (launch)
Lost on the Columbia Bar in the fall of 1914. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 176.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (motorship)
The motorship Oregon built by the Alaska Pacific Co. at Seattle in 1917, was bought by McGinitie & McDonald from the Lake Washington Shipyards, Houghton, at whose plant she had lain idle since the suspension of the former Independent Navigation Company's Puget Sound - Alaska service about eight years earlier. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (motorship)
The twin-screw wooden motorship Oregon of 1917, in layup at Seattle since 1939, was acquired by Mc Giwtie & Mc Donald of Seattle and resold to the Armour Salvage & Towing Co. of Vancouver, B. C., who converted her to a barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (motorship)
The Seattle-built wooden motorship Oregon of 1917, idle for many years and last under the ownership of McGinitie & McDonald, was stripped of engines and auxiliary machinery at Seattle and converted to an ocean-going barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 510.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (motorship)
The wooden motorship Oregon of 1917 was repowered by the Independent Navigation Co. with 2,500-horsepower McIntosh & Seymour diesels. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 355.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (schooner)
This Oregon, a shoal-draft three masted schooner of 343 tons and 400 M capacity was built at Propser, Oregon in 1905 by H. Heuckendorff for J.L. Kronenberg of that port. In 1917 she was sold to Crawley Launch Company of San Francisco and given a gas engine and later was owned in Seattle as the Apollo and in 1933 she was the Apollo Maru of Kobe. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. July 19, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (schooner)
This Oregon, a shoal-draft three masted schooner of 343 tons and 400 M capacity was built at Propser, Oregon in 1905 by H. Heuckendorff for J.L. Kronenberg of that port. In 1917 she was sold to Crawley Launch Company of San Francisco and given a gas engine and later was owned in Seattle as the Apollo and in 1933 she was the Apollo Maru of Kobe. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. July 19, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (sidewheeler)
1854 Sidewheeler, 100', built at Fairfield, Oregon in 1852. Snagged and sank below Salem in eight feet of water. The Gazelle quickly moved alongside to salvage her freight; while doing so, she bumped the Oregon hard enough to dislodge her from her perch. She drifted downstream, hit another rock and broke in two. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (sidewheeler)
Started mail service on the Columbia River in 1850. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 143. Edward Hungerford. Wells Fargo, p. 7, 26. August Kautz. Northwest Journals of August V. Kautz, 1857-61, p. 120, 245, 356.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (steamer)
Steamer Oregon, second American steamer to round the Horn, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 59. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 288, 367. Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 40, 145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (steamer)
On a return voyage from Nome in September the steamship Oregon of the White Star Steamship Co., with 474 passengers in addition to officers, crew and workaways, making a total of 585 persons on board, and only a scant supply of provisions for a voyage of normal duration, was disabled by the loss of her rudder. A jury rudder was improvised and, the weather being mild, the vessel was gotten safely to Port Townsend, but the time of the voyage was prolonged ten days. Since storms and heavy seas were to be expected at that season it was assumed that the delay might be even longer and all hands were put on a minimum allowance of food and water. In a suit in admiralty the passengers were eventually partially compensated for their suffering by an award of damages. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1901, H.W. McCurdy, Marine HIstory of the Pacific Northwest, p. 72-73.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (steamer)
The passenger steamer Oregon, taken over in 1905 from the White Star Steamship Co. by John Rosene's Northwestem Steamship Co., struck the rocks on the beach at Cape Hinchinbrook near the entrance to Prince William Sound at midnight September 13, 1906 The vessel was in charge of Capt. Horace E. Soule, who had just taken over from Captian John O'Brien who was transferred to the Edith. Second Office Kinney was on the bridge at the time of the stranding. There was some panic after the vessel strudck, but the ship' s officers restored discipline quickly and all the passengers and crew abandoned the ship safetly, being picked up by the light house tender Columbina which was then surveying this dangerous area preparatory to the construction of a light house and fog signal station. Second Officer Kinney and four seamen carried the news of the wreck to Ellamar, 35 miles distant, where they secured a launched and proceeded to Valdez, the port for which the Oregon had been bound. The cutters Rush and McCulloch moored th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (steamer)
The loss of the Great Republic deprived Portland of the largest steamship that has ever entered the Columbia, but less than a month after the big sidewheeler went to pieces two elegant modern-built propellers were in operation between San Francisco and Portland. The first of these, the Oregon, sailed from New York, calling at Rio Janeiro and Valparaiso, and arrived at Portland, April 22 [1879] making the voyage in sixty-five days and four hours. She came out in charge of Capt. Francis Conner and Chief Engineer J. C. Henderson, Capt. H. S. Ackley and Patrick Friel also being members of the crew, and brought thirty-four through passengers and twenty from Valparaiso. On her second trip from San Francisco to Portland she carried three hundred passengers and on her third three hundred and fifty. Conner was succeeded in command by Edward Polemann, who has remained in charge of the steamship since 1880, making regular trips on the Portland route until 1894, when the Oregon was laid off and has since been used only a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (steamer)
A disastrous collision occurred on the Columbia River near Kalama at 1:00 A.M., December 28th. The steamship Oregon, in charge of Capt. George Pease, the river pilot, struck the British ship Clan Mackenzie, lying at anchor in the channel. The ship was on her way up the river in tow of the Ocklahama, which had dropped her a short time before for the purpose of wooding up. The Oregon was moving at pretty good speed and was heavily laden. She struck the Clan Mackenzie between the stem and the cathead on the port bow, cutting her down to the keel and sending her prow into the ship nearly thirty feet. It was reported that two of the ship's crew were killed by the collision, but no trace of their bodies was found, and their shipmates were of the opinion that they took advantage of the opportunity and deserted. The Clan Mackenzie was raised January 27, 1890, by T. P. H. Whitelaw of San Francisco and towed to Portland, where she was repaired, loaded grain and sailed for Liverpool, June 2d. E. W. Wright, Finest Steam
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (steamer)
The steamship Oregon* made several trips to the Columbia and Puget Sound this year. *The steamship Oregon, which played a very important part in early navigation on the Coast, was built in New York in 1848, and came to the Pacific the following spring, arriving in San Francisco, March 31, 1849. She was 208 feet long, 33 feet 10 inches beam, and 20 feet hold. She had three masts, and, according to her custom-house register, was of 1,503 tons burden. Her first work on the Pacific was on the Panama route, where she remained several years, having been one of the pioneer vessels of the Pacific Mail Company. On the first trip to Vancouver and Portland in 1856 she was in command of Captain Lapidge. In 1858 Captain Patterson was in charge, and he was succeeded by W. H. Hudson, Francis Conner, H. J. Johnston, Chris and William Dall, Scholl, and others. During the Fraser River mining excitement the old steamer made a fortune for the owners nearly every trip, carrying frequently from 500 to 700 passengers. In 1866 the O
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (tug)
On September 15, the 74-foot Shaver Transportation Co. tug Oregon struck an underwater object and exploded at 3:00 a.m. while towing a barge loaded with creosote. The accident occurred off the Washington coast near the mouth of the Quillayute River. Capt. R. L. Gannon and five members of the crew escaped to the barge and were rescued by the Coast Guard. The Oregon sank in 140 feet of water near LaPush. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.54.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (tug)
Other construction on Puget Sound in 1913 included the following: steam tugs Oregon, 85 feet, at Seattle, and Arctic, 111.5 feet, with 500-horsepower compound engine, Winslow. Port Hueneme, 80- foot gasoline patrol boat for the Oxnard, California Harbor District, Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (tugboat)
ALF, p. 104. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon Argus
Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 142.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon Chevron (tanker)
The largest ship ever built in Portland and the first large cargo vessel built there since World War II, the 650-foot tanker Oregon Chevron of 35,000 deadweight tons, was launched at the FMC Marine and Rail Equipment plant (formerly Gunderson Bros.), the first of six of the same class to be operated for Chevron Shipping Co., a subsidiary of Standard Oil Co. of California. The Nickum & Spaulding-designed vessels were fabricated from 200-ton steel modules, with modular living quarters, complete to carpeting and drapes, installed after launching. The coastal tankers, with a carrying capacity of 267,000 barrels of petroleum products, are powered by gas turbines providing service speeds of 15 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.160.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon Fir (schooner)
Among the well-known Northwest vessels to change ownership in 1927 were the following: six -masted schooner Oregon Fir, purchased by Capt. E. R. Sterling from Grant Smith & Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 387.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon Flyer
The Oregon Flyer left the Bay City at noon November 27 [1875] and reached the Columbia River, December 1st, making the run in seventy-six hours. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon Patrol (patrol Vessel)
The 45-foot fisheries patrol launch Oregon Patrol was built at Portland for the state of Oregon. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon Pine (schooner)
The sixmasted schooners Oregon Pine and Oregon Fir continued to operate quite steadily from the Columbia River for the Shanghai Building Co., while the five -masted Elinor H. and four-masted Ella A, operated by the Poulsen interests of Grays Harbor, kept reasonably busy in the Pacific lumber trade, with occasional coal cargoes to South America. Gordon Newell, Marine Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 372.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregona (steamer)
December 10, 1909 Steamer, owned by Oregon Transportation Co. Struck a snag on the Willamette and beached 3 miles above the Weston landing. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregona (steamer)
December 26, 1913 Steamer en route from Corvallis on her last run of the season. Under the command of Captain Bluhm, she rammed the government dredge Champoeg, which lay at anchor. The Oregona received a three-foot gash below her waterline and headed for shore. She struck the Meldrums bar and settled a short distance below Clackamas Rapids.Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregona (steamer)
The Oregona, a 370-ton stern-wheel steamer 131 feet in length, was built by the Portland Shipbuilding Co. for the upper Willamette route of Graham's Yellow Stack Line. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregona (steamer)
The stern-wheel steamer Oregona of the Oregon City Transportation Company's Yellow Stack fleet collided with the river barge Champoeg 12 miles above Portland on the Willamette River on the night of December 26. A hole was stove in the steamer's hull and she sank, her upper deck being a foot below the surface of the river. The passengers and crew were taken off without loss of life and, with the aid of the crew of the Grahamona of the same company, most of the freight was salvaged. The Oregona was later refloated and repaired. The barge was at anchor when the collision occurred. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.232.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregonian (schooner)
The Oregonian, three-masted schooner of 247 tons, was built at North Bend, Ore., by John Kruse, costing $20,000, in 1872. She was wrecked at Coquille, Ore., January 16, 1877. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. July 19, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregonian (schooner)
January 16, 1877 Two mast, 246 ton schooner built by John Kruse at North Bend in 1872. An error in reckoning caused the $20,000 ship to go ashore for a total loss five miles south of the Coquille River. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregonian (schooner)
The Oregonian, three-masted schooner of 247 tons, was built at North Bend, Ore., by John Kruse, costing $20,000, in 1872. She was wrecked at Coquille, Ore., January 16, 1877. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. July 19, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregonian (steamer)
The Oregonian of the same company was torpedoed and sunk September 3 off northern Russia with the loss of 25 lives.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 519.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ostrogozhk (motor Vessel)
The rapid expansion of the state-owned Russian merchant marine and its aggressive competition with established berth line steamship companies was felt in the Pacific Northwest in 1969 when the first regular Soviet-flag trans-Pacific liner service began with the arrival at Vancouver, B.C. of the 14,000-deadweight ton motor vessel Ostrogozhk. The service, known as the Fesco-Pacific Line, a subsidiary of the government-owned Far Eastern Steamship Co. of Valdivostok, subsequently placed the Ola and Orsha on the route between Japan and British Columbia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oswego (steamer)
Captain George W. Taylor, who had been interested in steamboating for a quarter of a century, replaced the ancient Commodore Perry with the propeller Oswego, which was handled by his son W. W. Taylor, also by Ernest Loll, Fred G. Lewis and other masters and is still in service. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 308- 09.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oswego (steamer)
February 11, 1902 Screw steamer, built in 1883. Sank at Oak Point on the Columbia. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oswego (towboat)
The towboat Oswego, a screw steamer built in 1883, sank off Oak Point in the Columbia River February 11, 1902. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 83.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Otago (bark)
The American bark Otago, 870 tons, from Seattle for San Francisco in command of Capt. W. M. Collins, with a crew of fourteen, went ashore during a thick fog four miles north of Point Reyes at 4:00 A.M., July 28th. The crew abandoned her two hours later and landed in Drake's Bay, going from there to San Francisco. The vessel proved a total loss. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.360.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Otsego
See PRINZ EITEL FREIDRICH (1)
Citation:
Otsego (cannery Steamer)
Originally launched December 12, 1901 in Hamburg, Germany as the Priz Eitel Friedrich for the Hamburg American Line. (HAPAG. It was not the Prinze Eitel Friedrch launched in 1904 for the North German Lloyd line which later became a World War One German raider. Otsego, the other Prinz Eitel Friedrich, The Sea Chest. June 1983, p. 121-125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ouingondy (scallop Vessel)
An interesting conversion at Seattle involved the rebuilding of two East Coast type scallop vessels to king crabbers at the Marco yard. In addition to new masts and booms, the Ouingondy and Smaragd were fitted with complete hydraulically-powered Marco fishing system and deck machinery. The two boats, owned by Alaskan Scallop Fleet, Inc. of Seward, had fished for scallops in the North Pacific for 18 months before being refitted for the more lucrative crab fishery. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pacrover (cargo Vessel)
The storms of December provided a costly finale to a year which had begun with a fruitless search for the 33 Korean officers and crew members of the cargo vessel Pacrover, which vanished 800 miles south of Kodiak Island while outward bound with a 20,000-ton cargo of coal. The search was given up early in January, having located only four capsized lifeboats and an oil slick. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.149.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Paragon (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 23, 69, 70, 644.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Goddefroy
The PETER GODDEFROY was built by Joh. Weilbach, Stockholm, for the Hamburg firm of Joh. Ces. Goddefroy & Sohn, and launched on 7 August 1851 [Bielbrief]. 352 Commerzlasten; 137,1 x 35,8 x 19.8 Hamburg feet (length x breadth x depth of hold; 1 Hamburg foot = .286 meters) "im Kiel"; rigged originally as a ship, later as a bark. Master: 1851-1855 - H. E. Decker; 1855-1857 - S. Johannsen. Voyages: 1851/52 - Bremen/New Orleans; 1852/55 - Sunderland/intermediate ports/Antwerp; 1855/56 - Melbourne/Adelaide/Chincha Islands, Peru/Callao. 4 April 1857, sold to HAPAG (Hamburg America Line) and renamed WESER. Re-rigged as a ship and readmeasured at 742 tons register; 155,1 x 36,9 x 22,1 Hamburg feet (length x breadth x depth of hold) "zwischen den Steven" (44,3 x 10,5 meters, length x breadth); accommodation for approximately 40 in 1st and 2nd cabin, and 250 in steerage; crew of 20. Master: C. F. C. Fischer. 16 April 1857, first voyage for HAPAG, Hamburg-New York. 1858, stranded and lost on the west coast of Ireland [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, pp. 166 and 189; Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), pp. 22 and 23 (picture)]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]
Pioneer Star (ocean Going Tug)
Left Tacoma for sixty-four day trip to Taiwan, two vessels to be scrapped; the LSD-19 landing ship COMSTOCK and the retired tanker MEDINA, The Marine Digest. May 4, 1985, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Port Gordon
The British ship Port Gordon, from Androssan for Tacoma, was wrecked near Destruction Island during a heavy fog at 3:00 A.M., February 27th. The vessel stranded at high water, and, as she was a fine new ship, did not go to pieces for some time. Two of the crew were drowned and two died from exposure. Those lost were Matthew Campbell, Valentine, Lackey and Gassey. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
President Mckinley (cargo Liner)
The continued enthusiasm for full container ships in the Pacific led to the construction at the Todd Seattle yard of two 900-ton, 90-foot mid-bodies which were joined to the two American President Line break-bulk cargo liners President McKinley and President Van Buren. The conventional cargo vessels, formerly 574 feet in length, were thus stretched to 664 feet in the course of their conversion to container ships. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
President Van Buren (cargo Liner)
The increasing speed of merchant vessels in the Pacific was dramatized by the arrival on the Coast from the builder's yard at Pascagoula, Mississippi of the new American President Lines' Seamaster cargo liner President Van Buren. Although designed to cruise at 23 knots fully loaded, she steamed at 27 knots between San Diego and Los Angeles; then made the 350-mile run from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 14 hours, for an average speed of 25 knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.L.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prygona
See LAKE ERIE.
Citation:
Quinault Victory (cargo Steamer)
Quinault Victory and E.A. Bryan cargo steamers American flag, exploded at the Port Chicago Ammunition facility in California, July 17, 1944 taking the lives of 325 persons.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
R. B. Angus (cargo Vessel)
The 13,000-ton Canadian cargo vessel R.B. Angus, out of British Columbia for Japan with zinc concentrates from New Westminster and lumber from Chemainus, sank in rough seas off the Japanese coast in mid-December. The British officers and crew of Hong Kong Chinese were picked up from three liferafts by a Japanese fishing vessel 500 miles northeast of Tokyo. The 502-foot motor vessel was built in Italy in 1959 as the Sunrise and was currently owned by Canadian Pacific (Bermuda) Ltd. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.LII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Regal Scout (cargo Vessel)
On October 22, a Greek national holiday, the merriment aboard the Greek cargo vessel Regal Scout, at the same port to load grain for Japan, was interrupted by a violent explosion in the hull forward. The vessel's third engineer was fatally burned and several other crew members received minor injuries. It was reported that the engineering officer was working in a space forward of the boiler room where it was believed acetylene tanks exploded. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.197-8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Regna Governadora
See ROYAL TAR.
Citation:
Robin Goodfellow
The Robin Goodfellow, a sister of Robin Gray, was torpedoed and sunk in the south Atlantic on July 28. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rolande (cargo Vessel)
Ex drugship sails for Haitian firm; former Eagle I, drug runner refitting to carry cargo between Haiti and Miami,The Marine Digest. September 20, 1986, p. 4. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth E Godfrey (schooner)
The Hall-built four-masted schooner Ruth E. Godfrey, which had sailed from Tocopilla for Port Townsend August 28, 1911 in charge of Capt. Jens (Sleepy) Johnson with a crew of eight, was posted in January as missing with all hands, as was the British bark Gulf Stream, Glasgow for Vancouver. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth E. Godfrey (schooner)
The Ruth E. Godfrey four - masted schooner of 597 tons and 750 M capacity, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1900 for their own account, and was abandoned at sea on January 10, 1912. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth E. Godfrey (schooner)
The Ruth E. Godfrey four - masted schooner of 597 tons and 750 M capacity, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1900 for their own account, and was abandoned at sea on January 10, 1912. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. August 16, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Diego
The Hart-Wood Lumber Company's San Diego, built by Matthews at Portland in 1918 was, at 241 feet, a longer vessel, but her tonnage, 1,487, was considerably less than that of the Everett. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 305.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Diego (ferry)
Another of the former San Diego-Coronado ferries, the San Diego, built at Oakland in 1931, was purchased by Olympic Ferries and placed on the Port Townsend-Keystone route, replacing the veteran ferry Defiance, which was placed in standby status. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.80.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Diego (ferry)
The 205-foot ferry San Diego, which had operated briefly on the Olympic Ferries' Port Townsend-Keystone route was sold to Doug Emery of Embyr Enterprises, recent purchasers of the steamer Beaver replica, and transferred to Vancouver. Emery was formerly a principal in Harbour Navigation Co., which had long operated excursion vessels on Howe Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.146.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Diego (schooner)
Albert Salisbury. Here rolled the covered wagons, P. 124. Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 25. Gordon Speck. Northwest explorations, p. 47-49. Aurel Krause. Tlingit Indians. American Ethnological Society., p. 47
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Diego (schooner)
The American schooner San Diego, Captain Cathcart, arrived at Victoria, September 25th, after cruising as far north as sixty degrees. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.427.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Diego (steam Schooner)
The limited construction of vessels other than for primary war service included the steam schooners San Diego, 1,487 tons, 237 feet, by the Matthews Shipbuilding Co. at Hoquiam for the Hart-Wood Lumber Co., and H. B. Lovejoy, 1,067 tons, 202 feet, by the Ballard Shipbuilding Co. at Seattle for the Northwestern Shipping Corporation, a company formed Joshua Green, Capt. Harry Crosby and others. Captain Harry Crosby was the first master of the steamer, which was designed by Capt. H. B. Lovejoy, for whom she was named. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966., p. 296.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
San Gottardo
The "San Gottardo" was built by G.Ansaldo & Co, Sampierdarena in 1884 for Dufour & Bruzzo, Genoa. She was a 2,532 gross ton ship, length 344.5ft x beam 38.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 30-1st and 1,290-3rd class. Launched in May 1884, she started her maiden voyage on 20/5/1884 when she left Genoa for Brazil and Argentina. In 1886 she was chartered by the Italian government for the Abyssinian campaign. In 1889 she was chartered by La Veloce of Genoa and in 1897 chartered by Ligure Brasiliana. She then passed back to her original owners and on 18/4/1903 started her first voyage from Genoa to Naples, Azores and New York. On 5/10/1903 she started her second crossing when she sailed from Genoa for Naples, Palermo and New York, and on 18/4/1904 commenced her third and final voyage on this service. On her last two crossings, only a comparatively small proportion of her available accommodation was taken up and the service was abandoned. Later the same year, the ship was sold to Japanese owners and renamed "Kabafuto Maru" and was eventually scrapped in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1322]] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 Feb 1998]
Sangola
The "Sangola" was one of a class of seven mainly cargo ships built for British India Steam Navigation Co. Built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton in 1901, she was a 5,149 gross ton ship, length 410.8ft x beam 50.7ft x depth 32ft (125,21m x 15,45m x 9,75m). She had one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10.5 knots. There was accommodation for 6-1st class passengers and she carried a crew of 94. Launched on 18th June 1901, she was delivered to BISNCo on August 16th. In September 1914 she trooped between India and Marseilles and was sold to Japanese owners in June 1923. Renamed "Goshu Maru" by Fukuhara Kisen, Dairen she served this company until 1933 when she was scrapped in Japan. [Merchant Fleets, vol.11, British India S.N.Co, by Duncan Haws] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 July 1998]
Santiago
See WEIMAR.
Citation:
Santiago (corvette)
Philip H. Parrish. Before the Covered Wagon, p. 50. Thomas Vaughan. The Western Shore. Oregon Country Essays., p. 39-40, 55. Francis N. Blanchet. Notices and Voyages, 1838-1847., p. 214. Derek Pethick. First approaches to the Northest Coast., p. 40-50, 149, 191. Nicknamed Nueva Galicia. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier. I, p. 68-75. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 29. Aurel Krause. Tlingit Indians. American Ethnological Society., p. 16. Robert B.Whitebrook. Coastal Exploration of Washington. p. 123. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 31-32.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Santiago (steel Bark)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 9-11, 22-24, 28-29, 161. Santiago made sea history; once queen of the ocean, now only an oil barge, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. September 4, 1927, p. A-5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Santiago (transport)
In August, 1774, Juan Perez in command, the Spanish transport Santiago discovered the west coast of Queen Charlotte's Island, and entered what Captain Cook afterward called Nootka Sound. From there Perez sailed south and found nothing. In 1775 Perez was followed by two other vessels, the Santiago and the Sonora, the former in command of Bruno Heceta, with Perez as pilot, the other by Lieut. Bodega Quadra. The Santiago made the land in 48 27' and crept cautiously down the coast, keeping close in-shore, but failing to find the much-sought straits. Heceta, however, came very near blundering on a most important discovery. He sailed up to the mouth of a seeming large river, but, being unable to enter, be concluded it was of no great importance, and sailed away after naming the high promontory at its entrance Cape St. Roc, a name which the Spaniards afterward transferred to the river, although it was left for an American to rediscover and make known its grand commercial advantages. Quadra, who was accompanied by A
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Santigo
See BYRON.
Citation:
Schiedyk (cargo Vessel)
Another total loss in 1968 was the Dutch motorship Schiedyk of the Holland-American Line, a 10,000-ton general cargo vessel built in 1949. The Schiedyk had loaded 1,800 tons of pulp at Gold River, B.C. and was traversing Nootka Sound outward bound on the evening of January 3 when she struck a reef off Bligh Island, the site of the first landing of white men on the British Columbia coast in 1778. The engine room was flooded and two holds opened to the sea. Capt. Arie Van Dijk ordered the crew into the lifeboats, but he later returned to the ship with five volunteers in an effort to save some of the gear and equipment. The other members of the 39-man crew were picked up by the lighthouse tender Camsell and later taken to Gold River by the Canadian Coast Guard cutter Ready. Several tugboats in the area, including the powerful Gibralter Straits, stood by the stricken cargo vessel, but on the rising tide she slid under water bow first. There were no serious injuries or fatalities as the result of the sinking. Gord
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Silverado (cargo Vessel)
Maritime Memories, the Silverado sold to the McCormack Steamship Company in 1923, The Marine Digest. December 28, 1985, p. 7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Snapdragon
The SNAPDRAGON was a "medium clipper" bark, built in New York in 1853 by William H. Webb for Wakeman & Dimon, of New York. She was 619 tons, 140 feet long x 29 feet 4 inches in beam, with a hold depth of 18 feet. She appears to have been a transient trader: No record of any voyages in 1853, but on 16 April 1854, Sherwood, master, she arrived at New York, from Antwerp 12 March, with 212 steerage passengers [passenger list, dated 19 April 1854, published in Germans to America, vol. 6, pp. 395-396, where the vessel is incorrectly given as the DRAGON]. On 4 June 1855, she cleared Philadelphia for San Francisco, where she arrived on 8 October 1855, after a passage of 126 days. She sailed from the Gulf of California for Hamburg early in 1856, and was in the South Atlantic, at lat 31 40 S, lon 27 35 W, when on 21 February 1856, she spoke with the whaler SPLENDID. In 1858, she sailed from China to Britain in 104 days with a cargo of tea [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), II.1517, 1536 III.1881; IV.2229, V.2803, 2808, 2815; VI.3891, 3933, 3938; New York Times, 5 April 1856, 8e]. I have no information on the later history of the SNAPDRAGON. However, you should be able to obtain some information on her ultimate fate from her registration certificates. (A registration certificate--which indicates the name of a vessel, her tonnage, when and where she was built, and her current owner and master--was issued when a vessel first registered at a port, and upon every change of ownership or repair extensive enough to be considered a rebuild. When a vessel was registered at another port, or was lost, wrecked, or broken up, the last registration certificate was returned to the port authorities, with a note indicating the reason why.) The SNAPDRAGON was registered at New York, and you can obtain abstracts or (preferably) photocopies of her registration certificates from the National Archives. (When writing to the National Archives, be certain to include the type and name of the vessel, her tonnage, and where, when, and by and for whom she was built: "bark SNAPDRAGON, 619 tons, built in New York in 1853 by William H. Webb for Wakeman & Dimon").
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 August 1997]
Southern Accord (cargo Ship)
527 foot Panamian register cargo vessel. Logship has close call at Aberdeen dock; able to right vessel after list of thirty degrees, The Marine Digest. February 2, 1985, p. 22. Marshal arrests ships; action to protect Port's right to claim damanges, sailing not delayed, The Marine Digest. FEbruary 9, 1985, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Spirit (cargo Vessel)
Relief Ship rebuilt by volunteers. Originally the Palisana, later renamed the Sea Harvester. Donated by William Walker, Coast Engineer Equipment of Tacoma to Park West Children's Fund for transporting donated goods to developing countries, The Marine Digest. November 15, 1986, p. 11+ Gratitude joins Spirit in helping world's needy, The Marine Digest. December 27, 1986, p. 4. Letter to the editor from professinal marine services about the Spirit, The Marine Digest January 31, 1987, p. 9+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Oregon
Hull #170 at Oregon Shipbuilding yards. Launched September 27, 1941. Dean Collins, Stars of Oregon., p. 114.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Oregon
Ewing Young, who had driven a band from California in 1837, they determined to build this vessel, sail her to California and exchange her for stock. Joseph Gale was an old mountaineer of the class to which Meek, Newell and Tibbetts belonged, but he was also a seaman and possessed knowledge of ship-building and navigation and was given charge of the enterprise. A site on Swan Island was selected and work begun in the fall of 1840, and May 19, 1841, the Star of Oregon was launched. This was before a single tree had been cut to clear the site of the present city of Portland. Through the influence of Capt. Charles Wilkes, then in the Columbia on his exploring voyage round the world, absolutely necessary things, which the Hudson's Bay Company had refused to let them have, were secured from that company. Captain Wilkes also gave Gale papers necessary for the commander of a vessel to have. After launching, the Star was worked up to the Willamette Falls, where the work of fitting her for sea was completed. August 27
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Oregon (liberty Ship)
The Star of Oregon first Liberty ship built by Kaiser at Portland and operated for the government with Capt. E. P. Thomas in command, was torpedoed by a German submarine off Trinidad on August 30, one life being lost and the survivors picked up by a Coast Guard patrol boat the same evening. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 511.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Of Oregon (schooner)
First ship built by Americans south of the Columbia River, 1841-42. Lancaster and Pollard, Oregon and the Pacific Northwest., p. 142. Robert O. Case. The Empire Builders, 1949., p. 87, 92-95. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 20. Horace Lyman. History of Oregon., III, p. 212, 255. (This reports a year of 1834 built by Joseph Gale). Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p. 194. Dean Collins, Stars of Oregon., p. 39. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front,p. 57. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 166, 167. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 366. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., I, p. 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Pinewood (cargo Vessel)
Late in February, the 29,000-deadweight ton British cargo vessel Star Pinewood struck a rock off Vancouver Island shortly after departing Crofton, B.C., sustaining considerable underwater damage along her starboard side. The 564-foot vessel was carrying 11,000 tons of pulp, about half of which had to be removed before the damaged ship was able to proceed to Seattle for drydocking, escorted by the Foss tug Sea King. None of the 39 crew members aboard the Star Pinewood were injured. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.166-7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Star Pinewood (cargo Vessel)
Late in February, the 29,000-deadweight ton British cargo vessel Star Pinewood struck a rock off Vancouver Island shortly after departing Crofton, B.C., sustaining considerable underwater damage along her starboard side. The 564-foot vessel was carrying 11,000 tons of pulp, about half of which had to be removed before the damaged ship was able to proceed to Seattle for drydocking, escorted by the Foss tug Sea King. None of the 39 crew members aboard the Star Pinewood were injured. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.166-7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Takasago Maru (steamer)
James Griffiths & Co. procured the old but sturdy and handsome Japanese iron steamship Takasago Maru and, renaming her Centennial, under the Danish flag, formed the Centennial Alaska Transportation Co. Unable to immediately secure American registry for the steamer, the company operated her from Victoria to Skagway and Dyea during March, April and May. In June she was diverted to the Vancouver-Victoria-St. Michael route. Of 2,075 tons, 325 feet long and 35 feet beam, she was one of the largest vessels then in the Alaska trade, providing accommodations for 100 first class and 500 steerage passengers. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 35. The early history of the Centennial is interesting. She was launched in Great Britain as a paddle steamer by the Thames Iron Shipbuilding Co. in July, 1859.lShe was then known as the Delta and was designed to operate in fast P & 0 mail steamship service. At the time she was constructed the P & 0 had already found
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tango (schooner)
The Tango (ex -Mary Dollar), also formerly in use as a gambling casino in California waters, was also remasted at San Pedro, as a six-masted schooner, her sails being delivered to St. Helens, where she loaded a full cargo of lumber for South Africa. She departed early in 1942 under Capt. Carl Gunderson. She arrived at Cape Town in 105 days and eventually finished discharging her cargo at Durban. She was subsequently sold to Portuguese owners, finally ending her days at Lisbon after the war as the Cidade Do Porto. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966., p. 490.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tello (cargo Vessel)
This Peruvian cargo vessel makes first Tacoma call, operated by the Compania Peruana de Vapores (CPV) line, The Marine Digest. September 13, 1986, p. 23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Trigonia
See MARINULA.
Citation:
Usns Marquette (cargo Vessel)
USNS Marquette, former C-2 naval cargo vessel, formerly in the Olympia Reserve Fleet, converted at Tacoma to a fully self-contained floating plywood manufacturing plant and towed to Panama to increase plywood production of a land-based mill already in operation there by her new owners, a Montana corporation. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.117.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Uss Seminole (cargo Ship)
The USS Seminole, a 10,665-ton Navy attack cargo ship which had participated in the annual Olympia Lake Fair celebration, attempted to pass on the wrong side of the buoys when making her departure and ran hard aground on Olympia shoal in July, but was subsequently freed without damage. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.70.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Uzuki Pioneer (cargo Vessel)
26,000 ton cargo vessel powered by an engine supplemented by steel framed sails, built in 1984. Sail assist vessel visits the Port of Seattle, The Marine Digest. December 15, 1984, p. 3. Uzuki Pioneer sail assited Japanese freighter to vicit Vancouver Expo, The Marine Digest. March 15, 1986, p. 20. Sail Drive Uzuki Pioneer visits Portland, The Marine Digest. October 11, 1986, p. 16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Vanlene (cargo Vessel)
On March 14 the 10,206-deadweight ton Panamanian cargo vessel Vanlene sent out distress signals after running hard aground on Austin Island in Barkley Sound on the West Coast of Vancouver Island. After an intensive search by six vessels, the Vanlene was located 58 miles from her reported position, down by the stern and leaking 40,000 gallons of fuel oil from ruptured tanks. The 473-foot motor vessel, built in Japan in 1951 as the Africa Maru, was owned by the Marlene Shipping Co. of Panama and was manned by Taiwanese officers and crew. She was carrying 300 Japanese-built Dodge Colt automobiles for delivery at Vancouver. It was found that the ship had only one working compass, without gyro, radar or other navigational equipment considered standard for seagoing vessels, and was headed north when she struck, far off the southeasterly course into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. As the crew left the vessel over one side, West Coast fishermen and beachcombers boarded her from the other, and relics of the wrecked Vanlen
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Venus Argosy
A problem suddenly faced the industry on a worldwide basis...[in 1973 was] the highly controversial fuel shortage which occurred virtually without warning, leaving motorists stranded on the highways and merchant ships moored idly at piers. The first vessel on Puget Sound to be tied up for lack of bunker fuel was the Liberian registered Venus Argosy, which was unable to leave port after loading wheat at Seattle for Indonesia in early December. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Virago
Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 103, 112-113, 133, 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Washington Mail (cargo Liner)
Three American Mail Line Mariner-type (C-4) cargo liners were similarly jumboized during the year. The Washington Mail, Japan Mail and Philippine Mail received new 105-foot midbodies at Bethlehem Steel's San Francisco yard, increasing their length from 564 feet to 669 feet. As full container ships of the C-6 class, they were able to handle 892 20-foot containers compared to 200 under their original design. The vessels also received new bow thrusters for better steering control in close quarters, and a new stabilization system. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wild Goose (john Wayne's Boat)
Comments on some of the World War II YMS minesweepers built in Northwest, including the vessel which later became Wayne's Wild Goose, Marine Digest, May 7, 1983, p. 18+. (letter)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library