City Of Rio De Janeiro
Passenger steamship, American flag, struck foul ground at the entrance to the Golden Gate February 22, 1901, and went to the bottom claiming an estimated 129 lives of passengers and crew. Valencia, passenger steamer, American, stranded in thick weather near Pachena Point, Vancouver Island, January 22, 1906. Somewhere between I 1 7 and 126 lives were lost in the harrowing hours that followed.
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City Of Rio De Janeiro (steamer)
Passenger steamship, American flag, struck foul ground at the entrance to the Golden Gate February 22, 1901, and went to the bottom claiming an estimated 129 lives of passengers and crew. Valencia, passenger steamer, American, stranded in thick weather near Pachena Point, Vancouver Island, January 22, 1906. Somewhere between I 1 7 and 126 lives were lost in the harrowing hours that followed.
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City Of Rio De Janeiro, 1878
1901. (Liner) - The City of Rio de Janeiro, completed in 1878, was one of five ships the shipbuilder John Roach constructed in his vain attempt to make the United States and Brazil Mail Steamship Company successful venture. The City of Rio de Janeiro was an iron screw steamer with compound engine and capable of twelve knots, and although she was not big for the time, just like her sister vessels, she was too large for the barely incipient trade between the United States and Brazil. Roach and his partners took heavy losses in the United States and Brazil Mail Steamship Company, and when the service was suspended in 1881, Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) bought the City of Rio de Janeiro at a giveaway price. The City of Rio de Janeiro performed well in the transpacific service for nearly twenty years. in the morning of 22 February 1901, the captain of the City of Rio de Janeiro was anchored outside San Francisco Bay, waiting for the fog to clear in order to enter the bay; the visibility improved, but fifte
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Fanny Jane (schooner)
Fanny Jane, schooner, probably two-masted, of 120 tons, was built on Coos Bay, Ore., in 1869 by Jacob Sutherland for San Francisco owners. She disappears from registry about 1878. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
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Fanny Jane (schooner)
Fanny Jane, schooner, probably two-masted, of 120 tons, was built on Coos Bay, Ore., in 1869 by Jacob Sutherland for San Francisco owners. She disappears from registry about 1878. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. April 12,1941,p.2
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Jane
According to the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1839/40 (supplement)-1867/68, the JANE was a schooner, built at Plymouth, and launched in November 1839. Originally 76/72 tons, lengthened in 1853 and readmeasured at 111 tons. Master: 1839/40-1844/45 - J. Davies; 1844/45-1847/48 - E. Blake; 1848/49-1851/52 - Power; 1851/52-1853/54 - J. Maine; 1854/55-1867/68 - C. Benson. Owner: Hill & Son. Registry: Plymouth. Port of Survey: 1839/40-1845/46 - Plymouth; 1845/46-1847/48 - Newport, Wales; 1848/49-1859/60 - Plymouth (last surveyed, 1859). Destined Voyage: 1839/40-1841/42 - Liverpool; 1842/43-1844/45 - Spain; 1844/45-1847/48 - Mediterranean; 1848/49-1850/51 - Liverpool; 1851/52-1852/53 - Lisbon; 1853/54 - [not given]; 1854/55-1856/57 - Mediterranean; 1857/58-1867/68 - [not given]. Although Lloyd's Register lists the JANE through 1867/68, the entries indicate she was last surveyed in 1859, and it is therefore possible that she was sold, wrecked, or dismantled in the early 1860's. For further information on the JANE, contact the West Devon Area Record Office.
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Jane
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 153.
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Jane (motor Vessel)
The Jane was a motor vessel 33 tons, foundered on September 27, 1959, three miles off Tatoosh Island. Owned by P. H. Taft of Seattle, the vessel-built in 1930 was a commercial fishing craft. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
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Jane (skiff)
Walter O'Meara. The Savage Country, p. 290, 296.
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Jane A. Falkenberg
The Jane A. Falkenberg sailing from Honolulu to Astoria in twelve days, making a record which is still unbroken. E. W. Wright, Organization of Pacific Coast S. S. Co., Fierce Competition on Ocean Routes, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.255.
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Jane A. Falkenberg (barkentine)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 67. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 214, 301. Stranded on Clatsop Spit in 1872, Refloated. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 170.
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Jane A. Falkenberg (barkentine)
An important addition to the fleet in the Northwest this year was the barkentine Jane A. Falkenberg, which was bought by Capt. George Flavel. The Falkenberg had been running to the Columbia in the lumber trade, and, while Flavel was sailing his old schooner Halcyon up and down the coast, he often looked with envious eyes on the clipper that was never known to make a slow passage. Flavel had made considerable money with the Halcyon, carrying ice from Vancouver to San Francisco and bringing back Government freight. Along in the summer he made the owners of the Falkenberg such a good offer that they turned the vessel over to him. She arrived at Portland the first time in command of her new owner September 29th, with 530 tons of freight, which, according to the Oregonian, was the largest cargo that had ever been brought to Oregon. The same paper also paid a glowing tribute to Captain Flavel for his enterprise and ability as a navigator. The barkentine Jane A. Falkenberg was built at New Bedford in 1854, and came
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Jane A. Falkenberg (steamer)
Among the fast passages of the Northwestern fleet were those of the Jane A. Falkenberg from Honolulu to Astoria in a few hours less than thirteen days. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.237.
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Jane A.falkenberg (barkentine)
American barkentine, 310 tons, stranded on Clatsop Spit in 1872. At first it was feared that she would be lost, but determined salvage efforts were rewarded, and the vessel was eventually refloated from her sandy perch. She was built at New Bedford in 1854, and came to the Pacific Coast the following year. She had clipper lines and seldom made a slow passage. Shortly after her arrival on the coast she was purchased by Captain George Flavel. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
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Jane A.falkenburg
1872 Aground on Clatsop Spit. Hauled off with no danger. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
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Jane Banks (schooner)
Harold Underhill, Masting and Rigging., p. 207.
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Jane Falkenburg (barkentine)
November, 1899 Barkentine,137'x29.7'x 11.9'. Built at New Bedford in 1854, she came west the following year. The trip took 115 days and gave the captain an idea as to how fast she really was. She made her first trip to Manila in 39 days, beating the famous clipper Flying Fish by 7 days. Captain Falkenburg was killed in San Francisco in February, 1856 and the ship was purchased by Captain George Flavel of Astoria. In 1861 he expertly guided her in a fantastic run of 31/2 days from Astoria to San Francisco. She collided once with the Brother Jonathan on that ship's last trip on the Columbia just prior to her loss. The Jane Falkenburg was a hard-working ship and a great money-maker. On her last voyage from Port Hadlock to San Francisco, the 45 year old vessel just had to give up and quietly slip forever into the encompassing arms of the sea. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
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Jane Gray
Schooner, passenger-cargo, American, foundered off Cape Flattery May 22, 1898, en route from Seattle to Kotzebue. She went down with 37 souls. Twenty-seven others survived.
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Jane Gray (bng, P. 283)
Schooner, passenger-cargo, American, foundered off Cape Flattery May 22, 1898, en route from Seattle to Kotzebue. She went down with 37 souls. Twenty-seven others survived.
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Jane Gray (schooner)
Schooner, passenger-cargo, American, foundered off Cape Flattery May 22, 1898, en route from Seattle to Kotzebue. She went down with 37 souls. Twenty-seven others survived.
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Jane Gray (schooner)
American Schooner, 112 tons, struck by a severe gale off of Cape Flattery en route from Seattle for the Bering Sea, May 1898. Badly battered, the wreck drifted northward and later sank off Vancouver Island. Twenty-seven got off in a launch before the vessel sank, but 37 others were lost. The vessel, which was carrying passengers to the Northland, was usually engaged in sealing. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
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Jane Gray (schooner)
On the morning of May 22, 1898, about two hours after midnight, the schooner Jane Gray, operated by MacDougall & Southwick Co. of Seattle and en route from Seattle for Kotzebue Sound, foundered at sea and 33 passengers and three of her crew were drowned. The remaining 27 of those aboard survived. The vessel, built for the whaling and sealing trade, was said to be a notoriously cranky ship. Passing out of the Strait of Juan de Fuca she encountered a brisk southeast wind and moderately heavy seas. During the night she was hove -to under a foresail and staysail, most of the passengers being extremely seasick. There was no indication of danger until about 2:00 a.m., when the mate and two seamen on watch found the schooner becoming sluggish and apparently waterlogged. As she began to take on a starboard list the alarm was sounded and within ten minutes only her topmasts were visible above the water. The passengers included a party orgariized for mining exploration and headed by Maj. E. S. Ingraham, former superint
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Jane L. Stanford (barkentine)
Jane L. Stanford, four-masted barkentine of 970 tons and 1200M feet, the largest sailing vessel built up to that time in California, was launched in 1892 by H. D. Bendixsen at Fairhaven, for J. J. Smith, San Francisco. Before the War she was owned by S. E. Slade, who sold her in 1917 to the Pacific Freighters Co. (Comyn & Mackall), and they in turn resold her to Robert Dollar in 1919. Her last passage under sail was from ChinWang-Tao to Cape Flattery in 40 days in 1920, under Capt. P. A. McDonald. In 1926 she was sold to become a fishing barge at Los Angeles and then Santa Barbara. She was run down by the steamer Humboldt in August 1929 and the wreck drifted to Santa Cruz Island where it was blown up by the Coast Guard. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
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Jane L. Stanford (barkentine)
Jane L. Stanford, four-masted barkentine of 970 tons and 1200M feet, the largest sailing vessel built up to that time in California, was launched in 1892 by H. D. Bendixsen at Fairhaven, for J. J. Smith, San Francisco. Before the War she was owned by S. E. Slade, who sold her in 1917 to the Pacific Freighters Co. (Comyn & Mackall), and they in turn resold her to Robert Dollar in 1919. Her last passage under sail was from ChinWang-Tao to Cape Flattery in 40 days in 1920, under Capt. P. A. McDonald. In 1926 she was sold to become a fishing barge at Los Angeles and then Santa Barbara. She was run down by the steamer Humboldt in August 1929 and the wreck drifted to Santa Cruz Island where it was blown up by the Coast Guard. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 17, 1941, p.2
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Jane Nettleton (steam Schooner)
The wooden steam schooner Jane Nettleton well-known in the Northwest lumber ports since the first World War period, and the Annie Christenson (ex-Shna Yak of 1907 and Charles Christenson) were beached at Point San Pablo, California as part of a breakwater for a yacht harbor, having been last operated by A. F. Mahony and Sudden & Christenson respectively. The Jane Nettleton was built by Charles E. Fulton at the Willmington Shipbuilding Co. yard, Wilmington, California, as the Lucinda Hanify, but was sold immediately to the French government for a half million dollars and renamed Utique. After the war she returned to the West Coast under her original name and was sold to Crowley & Mahony of San Francisco, who renamed her Thomas Crowley. She passed to A. F. Mahony as the Jane Nettleton in 1925. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
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Jane Nettleton (steam Schooner)
The wooden steam schooner Jane Nettleton well-known in the Northwest lumber ports since the first World War period, and the Annie Christenson (ex-Shna Yak of 1907 and Charles Christenson) were beached at Point San Pablo, California as part of a breakwater for a yacht harbor, having been last operated by A. F. Mahony and Sudden & Christenson respectively. The Jane Nettleton was built by Charles E. Fulton at the Willmington Shipbuilding Co. yard, Wilmington, California, as the Lucinda Hanify, but was sold immediately to the French government for a half million dollars and renamed Utique. After the war she returned to the West Coast under her original name and was sold to Crowley & Mahony of San Francisco, who renamed her Thomas Crowley. She passed to A. F. Mahony as the Jane Nettleton in 1925. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 458.
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Jane West (steamer)
The steamer Jane West, which had arisen from the ruins of the Eagle, made her appearance in April in command of Capt. Dean Blanchard, who afterward owned her and ran her for a number of years in connection with his lumbering interests. The steamer was less than fifty feet long, with thirteen feet beam. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.200-1.
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Jane West (steamer)
The steamer Jane West, which had arisen from the ruins of the Eagle, made her appearance in April in command of Capt. Dean Blanchard, who afterward owned her and ran her for a number of years in connection with his lumbering interests. The steamer was less than fifty feet long, with thirteen feet beam. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.200-1.
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Janet (bark)
154 ton vessel, built in Portland in 1845. Albert C. Church. Whale Ships and Whaling, 1938., p. 165.
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Janet (bark)
The English bark Janet, Captain Dring, master, came from Honolulu, returning again the following year from San Francisco, bringing as passengers Joe Lane and Joe Meek, who were en route home from the east with their appointments as Governor and United States Marshal, respectively. E.W. Wright, Lewis and Drydens Marine History.. p. 24.
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Janet Carruthers (schooner)
The Janet Carruthers, a 240 -foot wooden auxiliary five masted schooner built at the Wallace Shipyards, Vancouver, B. C. in 1917, maintained her unfortunate record as a hard luck ship, ending her short and troublesome career on the Grays Harbor beach late in January of 1920. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 311.
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Janet Cowan
British four-masted bark 2,497 tons, wrecked four miles east of Pachena Point, B. C., December 31, 1895. Vessel was 108 days out of Cape Town bound for Victoria. In a violent gale off Cape Flattery, she was driven northward in a strong southeaster and sought shelter at Barkley Sound. She was caught by inshore currents and forced ashore near Pachena point. Because it was too rough to lanch a boat, a volunteer seaman swam to shore with a line, by means of which 29 seafarers reached the beach safely. While awaiting rescue, however, seven died from exposure, including the ship's master Captain Thompson. Another seaman went insane and later died. The tug Tyee finally sighted the wreck and picked up 15 survivors. Seven others, who had found shelter at a nearby government survival cabin, were rescued by a Canadian vessel. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
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Janet Cowan
The British ship Janet Cowan was lost 12 miles west of Carmanah Point, on the west coast of Vancouver Island while enroute Capetown, South Africa, to Hastings Mill. December 31, 1895. Gordon Newell, Casualties, 1895, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. xiii
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Janet Cowan (bark)
Early in January a large four-masted bark was reported on the rocks 12 miles west of Carmanah Point, Vancouver Island. Capt. Libby of the Puget Sound Tug Boat Co. identified her as the British iron bark Janet Cowan, Capt. Thompson, 2,458 tons, 121 days out from Cape Town for Hastings Mill, Vancouver, B. C. The coastal telegraph line was down and the trail to the location of the wreck was clogged by several feet of snow, so it was not until the second week of January that the 14 survivors of the wreck were picked up by the tug Tyee, Capt. WUliam Gove, and landed at Port Townsend. It was learned that the Janet Cowan had made her landfall off Cape Flattery on the night of December 30, 1895, and entered the Strait before a southwest gale, being preceded by two or three other vessels. When abreat of Clallam Bay she put about and endeavored to beat to sea, but the gale and northerly currents carried the ship, which was in light ballast and high out of the water, toward the Vancouver Island shore where she struck. T
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Janet Dollar (bark)
The four- masted bark Janet Dollar was chartered by J. J. Moore & Co. to load lumber at Everett for Sydney, Australia, this being the only Dollar sailing vessel active in 1923. She was in layup in Lake Union by August of the same year. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 342.
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Janet Dollar (steamer)
On January 31 the Janet Dollar, Capt. Arnesen, which had been two months loading a lumber cargo at Dollarton, B. C., salied for Shanghai with an all -Chinese crew except for five Canadian and American officers and petty officers. After unloading her cargo to stock a new Dollar lumber yard at Tsingtao she was anchored for three years and finally hulked by Chinese buyers and used as a storage barge alongside a cement plant in the Yangtze River, where she was reported still afloat after World War II. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 349.
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Sandy Jane (towboat)
The 96 - ton Sandy Jane, a 75 - foot twin - screw river towboat was also built for operation in that area by the Yellowknife Transportation Co. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1946, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 532.
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