Jessie
Built at Ballard in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie (cabin Cruiser)
28 foot cabin cruiser, R. Geddes Large. Drums and Scalpel, p. 38.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie (pilot Schooner)
The Oregon pilots had, by 1900, regained their monopoly at the Columbia River entrance due, it was charged on the Washington side, to collusion between the Oregon and Washington pilot boards. The new Washington board of commissioners, appointed by Governor Rogers, consisted of a lawyer ttiia a saloon keeper from Ilwaco and, strangely enough, a resident of Astoria, Oregon. These maritime authorities refused to license the pilot schooner Jessie, formerly in use by the Washington pilots, on the grounds that her operators had sold the lead ballast out of her, replacing it with scrap iron, thus making her unsafe. The Washington board then granted a dual license to the Oregon pilot boat Joseph Pulitzer and the three or four remaining Washington pilots were permitted to work from her. The Jessie transferred to the Alaska fishery trade and did not survive the year. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie (steamer)
One of the mysteries of the gold rush was the disappearance of the expedition aboard the little steamer Jessi and the barge Minerva. A party of fourteen, the majority men from Kentucky and Tennessee departed from Seattle on May 31, 1898, bound for a combined gold seeking and trading expedition up the Kuskokwim River. They made the voyage to the mouth of the river aboard the steam schooner Lakme, which towed the barge. Admiral carrying the expeditions small steamer and barge. Passing through the Aleutian Islands a Moravian missionary, Rev. R. Webber, his wife and two children joined the party. The Lakme reached Kuskokwim Bay June 27 and discharged the passengers, steamer and barge. Next morning the Jessie took the barge in tow and the party started up the river. There seems no doubt that the two vessels very shortly swamped in the turbulent waters at the mouth of the river, but the subsequent fate of the 18 passengers remains uncertain. The Indians of the area insisted that all had been drowned in a violent so
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Jessie (two
masted schooner) - Reg. No. 111787 Owner: Arctic Fur Traders, 1008 Credit Fancier Bldg., Vancouver. Captain Joe Keegan, Mate Harry Slattery, Eng. C.E. Smith. Sailed Sept. 1, 1928. Pun down and sunk by unknown vessel 100 miles west of San Diego at night, Sept. 23, per note H. Slattery, January 8, 1929: The motor schooner Jessie of Vancouver, B.C. was lost with the loss of all ship's papers about 100 miles west of San Diego, Cal. on the 23rd of September 1928, in collision with an unknown vessel. This statement is made by me for Captain J. Keegan, Master of the Jessie who hasn't yet returned to Vancouver. -H. Slattery, Mate Sch. Jessie, 3726 West 34th Ave., Vancouver. Fraser Miles. Slow boat on Rum Row. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing Company, 1992.
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Jessie Banning (steamer)
The old Union Steamship Co. vessel rebuilt at Seattle as the Jessie Banning was placed in service briefly at Seattle by her new owner, Capt. Clinton, with Capt. Charles Wilson in command, but she was soon sold to the Colombian government, then in the process of combatting one of the periodic revolutions of that era, and was dispatched south in September as the gunboat Bogota. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 78.
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Jessie Harkins (steamer)
The Shaver Transportation Co. at Portland acquired the former freight and passenger steamer Jessie Harkins, removed her after deckhouse and fitted her out as a towboat, renaming her Pearl, after the sister of Capt. George W. Shaver, Pearl Hoyt. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 304.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie Harkins (steamer)
The 150-horsepower propeller passenger steamer Jessie Harkins, 88 tons, 88 feet in length, was bunt at Vancouver and placed in service between Portland, Camas and Washougal by the Harkins Transportation Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie Island No. 4 (motor Vessel)
Jessie Island No. 4, was a small Canadian motor vessel. Wrmk was found at Pacbena Bay. The vessel went missing en route to Port Alberni from Chemainus and was located by Bamfield Lifeboat after wide search. No sign of lost crewmen was ever found. She bad left port on December 26, 1926, but her wreckage was not discovered till January 5, 1927. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
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Jessie Minor (schooner)
Jessie Minor, a three-masted schooner of 261 tons and 300 M feet capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1883 by Bendixsen for William Whitney of San Francisco and Eureka. She was wrecked in 1911 in Nelson's Lagoon, Alaska, her owner then being W. S. E. Jorgensen, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941
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Jessie Minor (schooner)
Jessie Minor, a three-masted schooner of 261 tons and 300 M feet capacity, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1883 by Bendixsen for William Whitney of San Francisco and Eureka. She was wrecked in 1911 in Nelson's Lagoon, Alaska, her owner then being W. S. E. Jorgensen, San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie Minor (schooner)
The three-masted schooner Jessie Minor was lost in Nelsons Lagoon, Bristol Bay in June, having carried cannery supplies and fishing crews north from San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest..
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Jessie Minor (steamer)
The Jessie Minor, of 261 tons, was built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven, California in 1883. At the time of her loss she was owned by W. S. E. Jorgensen of San Francisco and had arrived at Bristol Bay June 10, 1911, having lost her foretopmast during her 58 day passage, the longest on record. She was anchored in 15 feet of water, grounded at low tide, opened her seams and became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie Nickerson
Fast passages made by the sailing fleet were those of the Jessie Nickerson, Captain Bonifield, ten days from the Hawaiian Islands to Humboldt. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.279.
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Jessie Nickerson (schooner)
The Jessie Nickerson, a two - masted schooner of 184 tons, was built at Port Ludlow by Hall Bros. in 1874 for Samuel Bonnifield and others of San Francisco. She drops from registry in 1888. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie Nickerson (schooner)
The Jessie Nickerson, a two - masted schooner of 184 tons, was built at Port Ludlow by Hall Bros. in 1874 for Samuel Bonnifield and others of San Francisco. She drops from registry in 1888. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. May 24, 1941.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jessie Nickerson (schooner)
American schooner, 184 tons, was wrecked at the entrance to Shoalwater Bay in 1880. The schooner was commanded and principally owned by Captain Samuel Bonnifield of San Francisco. No lives were reported lost in the wreck. The Nickerson was constructed by the Hall Brothers yard at Port Ludlow, Washington, in 1874, and shortly before her loss had a fine passage to her credit of ten days from Honolulu to Humboldt Bay, California. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
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Jessie Nickerson (schooner)
Wrecked at the entrance to Shoalwater Bay in 1880. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 171.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library