Lily (schooner)
The Lily, a two-masted schooner of 142 tons and 210 M lumber capacity, was built at San Francisco in 1882 by Dickie Brothers for J.C. Hawley of that port. About 1890 she came under the ownership of Joseph Knowland, later passing to the Gardiner Mill Company. She was in the offshore trade during the World War and sold to San Pedro owners in 1920. In the early 1930s she was wrecking on the hull of the Pacific Mail steamer Columbia and later turned up at San Pedro where she was bought in 1934 by Metro-Goldwyn Mayer and rebuilt as the Bounty for the production of the Mutiny on the Bounty. John Lyman, Pacific Coast built sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 7, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily (schooner)
American two-masted schooner, 142 tons, reported in trouble off Cape Flattery in 1897. Was towed in and repaired. The vessel, built in 1882, played the role of the Bounty in the motion picture, Mutiny on the Bounty (1934). Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily (schooner)
Gardiner Mill Ships, Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 96. BNG, p. 222.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily (schooner)
The Lily, a two-masted schooner of 142 tons and 210 M lumber ca- pacity, was built at San Francisco in 1882 by Dickie Brothers for J.C. Hawley of that port. About 1890 she came under the ownership of Joseph Knowland, later passing to the Gardiner Mill Company. She was in the offshore trade during the World War and sold to San Pedro owners in 1920. In the early 1930s she was wrecking on the hull of the Pacific Mail steamer Columbia and later turned up at San Pedro where she was bought in 1934 by Metro-Goldwyn Mayer and rebuilt as the Bounty for the production of the Mutiny on the Bounty. John Lyman, Pacific Coast built sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 7, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily (steamer)
The small sternwheeler Lily was set afloat at Seattle. She is seventy-three feet long, sixteen feet beam, and three feet hold, and is still in existence, with Daniel Benson last in command. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 288.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1881. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily Prima (tanker)
The Italian tanker, Lily Prima, 975 x 134 feet and of 134,000 deadweight tons, became the largest oil-carrier to call on Puget Sound when she arrived at the Cherry Point ARCO refinery to unload crude oil from the Persian Gulf. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.136.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Water Lily (steamer)
Following the Traveler on these waters came the Water Lily, a small sidewheeler built in San Francisco in 1853 and transported to the Sound on the deck of a ship. The Water Lily was only forty-nine feet long with eight feet beam and four feet hold, and was so slow and frail that she seldom wandered far from Steilacoom and Olympia, although her owners, Hunt & Scranton, had purchased the steamer for the route formerly traversed by the Major Tompkins. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library