Almara
(Cannery Tender) - The 97-ton steam cannery tender and tug Almara, 76.4 x 18.5 x 7.3, was built at Tacoma for Marani Products Co. of Anacortes, passing to Canadian operation from White Rock (later becoming the Victoria-based Island Dispatcher). The 73-ton vessel was fitted with 145-horsepower compound (8,20 x 14) engine. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.243.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Amaranth
(Barkentine) - A four-masted barkentine of 1109 tons, carrying 1400 M feet, was built by Matthew Turner at Benicia in 1901 for his own account. She passed to his successors, Bowes & Andrews, in 1909, and was wrecked on Jarvis Island without loss of life on August 30, 1913, bound from Newcastle, Australia, to San Francisco with coal. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. February 15, 1941. p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chitose Mara (bulk Carrier)
A Japanese bulk carrier, collided with Danish freighter Made Skou, north of Neah Bay, September 20, 1967; was towed in, badly holed. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Executive Explorer (catamaran Cruise Vessel)
Stateroom equiped catamarn christened, The Marine Digest. June 28, 1986, p. 4. Four deck vessel, 104 length. 49 passengers with 25 staterooms. Built by Nichols Brothers Boat Builders on Whidbey Island.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glacier Express (catamaran)
Catamarans to join Washington Ferry system,The Marine Digest. September 13, 1986, p. 3+ Glacier Express to be made more pedestrian, The Marine Digest. September 20, 1986, p. 18. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Island Princess (catamaran Vessel)
Another interesting conversion of a considerably smaller vessel was that of the B.C. Ferry Authority's Island Princess, which was rebuilt from a single hull to a catamaran vessel at Burrard Dry Dock's North Vancouver yard. The ferry was sliced into four parts, two hulls were formed from the previous one and new sections added, greatly increasing her carrying capacity on the Kelsey Bayouter islands run (from 20 to 49 automobiles), and her measurements from 131 x 35 feet to 187 x 57 feet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kitty Moran (catamaran)
The Kitty Moran, a 12-ton catamaran excurion boat, 63 feet in length with twin 72-horsepower Wisconsin gas engines, at Portland for Willamette River use. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p.254.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Klondike (catamaran)
High speed catamaran built by Nichols Brothers Boat Builders in Freeland, Marine Digest. July 21, 1984, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marathon
The Aberdeen Line ship "Marathon" was built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1903, she was a 6,793 gross ton ship, length 138,43m x beam 16,79m (454.2ft x 55.1ft), clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. The "Marathon" and her sister ship "Miltiades" were the last two ships of any size to be built with a clipper stem and figurehead. Launched on 18/11/1903, she made her maiden voyage from London for Cape Town, Melbourne and Sydney on 27/1/1904. In 1912 was lengthened to 153,57m (504.1ft), and given a second (dummy) funnel, 7,848 gross tons and accommodation for 90-1st and 150-3rd class passengers. In 1915 she became a troop transport and started her only post war commercial sailing on 21/10/1920 when she left London for Cape Town, Sydney and Brisbane. In 1921 she was sold to Pacific Steam Navigation Co, renamed "Oruba" and commenced her first Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo, Valparaiso, Panama Canal and Liverpool voyage on 26/5/1921. She started her second and last voyage on this service on 6/10/1921 and was then laid up at Liverpool. In 1924 she was laid up at Dartmouth and was scrapped in Germany the same year. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber][South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 July 2998]
Marathon (fish Boat)
Burned on the North River in Pacific County, November 18, 1948. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marathon (fishboat)
American fish boat, 37 tons, burned one-fourth mile up the entrance to the North River, Pacific County, Washington, November 18, 1948. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marmara
See STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA.
Citation:
Spirit Of Alderbrook (catamaran)
Speedy catamaran carries human cargo to Alderbrook, The Tacoma News Tribune. August 5, 1984. Second Nicholas built catamaran christened; Wes Johnson family of Union, owner, The Marine Digest. October 13, 1984, p. 4.+ Seattle Harbor Tours operator of Spirit of Alderbrook and other vessels, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1986, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tamara Xii (grain Ship)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Victoria Clipper (catamaran)
Catamaran to link Seattle and Victoria, Marine Digest. March, 1986), p. 4. Pilot dispute may halt CVictoria Clipper. Regulations would required two thousand dolalrs a day pilot for coastwise shipping, The Marine Digest. June 28, 1986, p. 3. Twin suites filed against Victoria Clipper, bot in relation to pilotage controversy, The Marine Digest. July 5, 1986, p. 3. Compromise....for now,The Marine Digest. July 19, 1986, p. 3. Victoria Clipper has satisfying season, The Marine Digest. October 11, 1986, p. 4. Market murder on the Clipper; various marketing schemes include a murder mystery week-end in Victora, ski weekends, etc, The Marine Digest. November 1, 1986, p. 6. Victoria catamaran service is clipping along; traffice 42% higher May-August 1988 then in 1987, company plans for second vessel, The Marine Digest. October 15, 1988, p. 20.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library