Margaret
C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., p. 122, 124, 125, 131. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 81, 96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret (steamer)
Although construction began, and was subsequently rushed to completion, on a large fleet of river steamers in Alaska, many of them shipped north knocked down and assembled there, most of these did not get into service until the following year. The Margaret of the Alaska Commercial Co., 520 tons with dimensions of 140 x 33 x 7, with the 250 horse power engines from the old Arctic, and the Charles H. Hamilton of the North American Transportation & Trading Co., 595 tons, 190 x 38 x 5.5 and of similar power, were among the stern-wheel steamers to go into commission at St Michael that year. Although the Hamilton was somewhat underpowered and unwieldy, she was of great capacity, and the Margaret although lighter and handier, was also a good carrier, and both proceeded to reap the profitable harvest of early gold rush days on the Yukon. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret (transport Schooner)
The United States transport schooner Margaret was driven ashore on the coast of Alaska in March and became a total wreck. Captain Harrison and three men reached shore in safety, but narrowly escaped death at the hands of the Indians. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.222.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret (yacht)
The Lure of the Winged Craft, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. July 14, 1907, p. 35. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Ann (tug)
Western Transportation Company's 61-foot former Navy YTL tug Margaret Ann was thoroughly modernized at Portland with the installation of a new 500-horsepower Caterpillar diesel swinging a 72 x 44-inch Coolidge propeller, two new diesel generators and Sperry electric hydraulic steering system, Decca radar and 30-foot elevated wheelhouse to provide full visibility over covered barges. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, pXXII-XXIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Crockard (schooner)
Margaret Crockard, schooner, probably two-masted, of 169 tons, was built at Port Madison, Washington in 1870 by W. H. Bryant and had a short life dropping from the register in 1879. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Crockard (schooner)
Margaret Crockard, schooner, probably two-masted, of 169 tons, was built at Port Madison, Washington in 1870 by W. H. Bryant and had a short life dropping from the register in 1879. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Dollar (steamer)
In October the services operated by the Shipping Board from Portland to the Orient by the Columbia Pacific Shipping Co. and formerly designated the North China and South China Lines, were renamed the Oregon Oriental Line, the name becoming the property of the Shipping Board. The steamships Margaret Dollar and Diana Dollar arrived at Vancouver in November to institute a regular fortnightly service between New York and British Columbia by the Canadian Robert Dollar Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 348.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Dollar (steamer)
A weird sea tragedy was discovered off Cape Flattery on October 31, 1927 when the steamship Margaret Dollar, Capt. H. T. Payne, overhauled a derelict Japanese fishing vessel, the motor sampan Ryo Yei Maru, drifting and apparently deserted. A boat crew sent to investigate found the wooden hull encrusted with giant barnacles and trailing long wreaths of seaweed. Boarding the strange craft, they found the deck strewn with the bones of her dead crew and the partially mummilied body of her master in the cabin. The vessel's log showed that the fishing craft had left Misaki, Japan on December 5, 1926. A few days later her engine became disabled and on December 23 she was sighted by the steamship West Ison, whose master, Capt. Richard Healy, urged the Japanese fishermen to abandon ship. They refused, in hopes of repairing the engine or getting a tow back to Japan, but the disabled craft was not sighted again until almost a year later off Cape Flattery. During the long drift of over 5,000 les on the Japanese Current
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret F. Sterling (schooner)
The Victoria-built four-masted schooner Margaret F. Sterling (ex Vancouver), idle in Lake Union for nine years, was sold by the Alaska Reindeer Corporation and Mrs. H. Petterson to Captain Herbert F. Haines of Seattle. It was reported that he planned to install auxiliary engines and return her to service, but later in the year he sold her instead ot the Pan American Airways Company who renamed her Trade Wind. Fitted with diesel auxiliaries, she was taken to Kingman Atoll, 1,100 miles southeast of Honolulu, where she was used as a training ship in navigation and meterology for airline pilots. After subsequent service as a supply ship from Honolulu to company air fields at Wake and Midway she was laid up at Honolulu in 1939 and transferred to Panamanian registry the following year. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454-55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret F. Sterling (schooner)
The Victoria-built four-masted schooner Margaret F. Sterling (ex Vancouver), idle in Lake Union for nine years, was sold by the Alaska Reindeer Corporation and Mrs. H. Petterson to Captain Herbert F. Haines of Seattle. It was reported that he planned to install auxiliary engines and return her to service, but later in the year he sold her instead ot the Pan American Airways Company who renamed her Trade Wind. Fitted with diesel auxiliaries, she was taken to Kingman Atoll, 1,100 miles southeast of Honolulu, where she was used as a training ship in navigation and meterology for airline pilots. After subsequent service as a supply ship from Honolulu to company air fields at Wake and Midway she was laid up at Honolulu in 1939 and transferred to Panamanian registry the following year. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 454-55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret F. Sterling (schooner)
The schooner Margaret F. Sterling (ex - Vancouuer) was purchased at federal auction in Seattle for $ 4,300 by Burton J. Wheelan, a Seattle attorney. The six-masted schooner Helen B. Sterling was purchased by Capt. J. C. Brownfield of the Washington Tug & Barge Co. from the Schwabacher Hardware Co. and resold the same year to the Portland Pacific Export Lumber Co. of Portland. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (1) (tugboat)
The MARGARET FOSS, an ex-Army tug named SGT. JAMES A. BURZO during her military service, was one of a series of Army tug-passenger vessels with the class number TP99. The BURZO was a sister-tug to the PACIFIC, which later became the third EDITH FOSS. The BURZO operated solely on the West Coast during and after World War 11, including a number of years in Southeastern Alaska while based in Kodiak. She was declared surplus in June 1950 and at a Government sale in August at Fort Richardson, Alaska, Foss turned in the high bid of $7,678. She spent most of her career at Foss in Southeastern Alaska and in May of 1962 returned to Puget Sound and in December of that year was placed on the retired list. She was later sold and became the fishing vessel Baron and later the Royal Baron. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 171.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Margaret Foss (2) began her career in 1943 having been built at the Levingston Shipyard of Orange Texas as an ocean-class tug numbered ATA 126. After service in the Royal Navy as the tug Mindful she was returned to the United States. Later sold to the Moran Towing Company of New York she was renamed the Gay Moran and after two years was sold to the Redstack Towing Company of San Francisco and became the Sea Lion. Sold later on she became the Margaret Walsh and remained with that name until purchased by Foss where she was given the name Margaret Foss. After a long career with Foss she was laid up in Tacoma and later sold to Mexican Interests and on December 4, 1968 newly renamed as the CC#7 she left Tacoma for Ensenada, Mexico for work with the limestone industry there. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 250.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Margaret Foss (2) began her career in 1943 having been built at the Levingston Shipyard of Orange Texas as an ocean-class tug numbered ATA 126. After service in the Royal Navy as the tug Mindful she was returned to the United States. Later sold to the Moran Towing Company of New York she was renamed the Gay Moran and after two years was sold to the Redstack Towing Company of San Francisco and became the Sea Lion. Sold later on she became the Margaret Walsh and remained with that name until purchased by Foss where she was given the name Margaret Foss. After a long career with Foss she was laid up in Tacoma and later sold to Mexican Interests and on December 4, 1968 newly renamed as the CC#7 she left Tacoma for Ensenada, Mexico for work with the limestone industry there. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 250.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (3) (tugboat)
The Margaret Foss was built in 1963 at the Main Iron Works in Houma, Louisiana. The vessel is 100 feet long with a 25 foot beam. Known first as the Dennis W. Guidry at New Orleans she was purchased by Foss in August of 1974 for primary service on Puget Sound. The tug has also been used for work to and from Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss (3) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 286.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (fishing Dragger)
Numerous Pacific Northwest vessels, both large and small, were renovated, repowered or rebuilt, either to enter upon new activities or to more efficiently perform their regular functions. The replacement of older wooden tugs with new steel craft of higher power and increased efficiency resulted in numerous conversions of the surplus towing vessels to other uses such as yachts and commercial fisheries use. Among these were the former Foss tug Margaret Foss, purchased by Olaf Angel of Seattle and converted at Peterson Boat Building Company's Tacoma yard to a fishing dragger of 200-ton capacity with line drums on each side aft. The 96-foot vessel was built during the Second World War for the Army Transportation Service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (tug)
Trawler started out as a tug, The National Fisherman. July, 1987, p. 30. Built in 1944 in Stockton,California as a U.S. Army tug, SGT. JAMES A. BURZO, bought by the Foss Launch and Tug Company in 1950 and renamed Margaret Foss. Retired and kept at Tacoma between 1962 and 1966 then sold and converted into a trawler under the name Baron later called the Royal Baron.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Mckenzie (tug)
The crew of the veteran 53-foot tug Margaret McKenzie, built in 1924 as the C & S, had a narrow escape when their vessel caught fire in Malaspina Strait off Vancouver Island in January. The four men had only seconds to send a distress call and take to the lifeboat. The survivors, Capt. Dennis Hynes, George Feeney, mate, John Ursulescu, engineer, and deckhand Brian Carson were rescued by another Vancouver tug which took the burned-out hull of the Margaret McKenzie in tow. However, the hull filled and sank before it was possible to reach port. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Schafer
At the dock of the Northwestern Lumber Company, Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 82.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margarett (schooner)
138 ton vessel. Built in Essex in 1889. Albert C. Church. Whale Ships and Whaling, 1938., p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Margaret
Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w, p. 343.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Margaret (liner)
Two splendid three-funnel liners, Princess Margaret and Princess Irene, designed for the C. P. R. B. C. Coast Service, were completed in 1914 by the Denny yard at Dumbarton. The twin steamships of about 5,900 tons, with dimensions of 395 x 54 x 20 were driven by twin screws and geared turbines. Upon completion they were requisitioned by the Admiralty as mine planters and never entered the trade for which they were designed, the Irene being blown up in May 1915 in Sheerness harbor with loss of over 200 lives. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Margaret (liner)
Two splendid three-funnel liners, Princess Margaret and Princess Irene, designed for the C. P. R. B. C. Coast Service, were completed in 1914 by the Denny yard at Dumbarton. The twin steamships of about 5,900 tons, with dimensions of 395 x 54 x 20 were driven by twin screws and geared turbines. Upon completion they were requisitioned by the Admiralty as mine planters and never entered the trade for which they were designed, the Irene being blown up in May 1915 in Sheerness harbor with loss of over 200 lives. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Margaret (bark)
Harold Underhill, Masting and Rigging., p. 18, 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saint Margaret (steamer)
The steel steamship Saint Margaret, originally the Chieftain, operating to the Hebrides, was purchased in Scotland by Capt. D. Donald for the Canadian National Railways and was brought to Victoria as the Prince Charles to operate with the Prince John in the Queen Charlotte Islands - Prince Rupert trade. She had last been in the service of the North of Scotland, Orkney & Shetland Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library