Margaret (steamer)
Although construction began, and was subsequently rushed to completion, on a large fleet of river steamers in Alaska, many of them shipped north knocked down and assembled there, most of these did not get into service until the following year. The Margaret of the Alaska Commercial Co., 520 tons with dimensions of 140 x 33 x 7, with the 250 horse power engines from the old Arctic, and the Charles H. Hamilton of the North American Transportation & Trading Co., 595 tons, 190 x 38 x 5.5 and of similar power, were among the stern-wheel steamers to go into commission at St Michael that year. Although the Hamilton was somewhat underpowered and unwieldy, she was of great capacity, and the Margaret although lighter and handier, was also a good carrier, and both proceeded to reap the profitable harvest of early gold rush days on the Yukon. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saint Margaret (steamer)
The steel steamship Saint Margaret, originally the Chieftain, operating to the Hebrides, was purchased in Scotland by Capt. D. Donald for the Canadian National Railways and was brought to Victoria as the Prince Charles to operate with the Prince John in the Queen Charlotte Islands - Prince Rupert trade. She had last been in the service of the North of Scotland, Orkney & Shetland Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library