Mariposa (liner)
1931-1947, and MONTEREY, 1932-1947. The success of the Malolo convinced William P. Roth, president of Matson Navigation Company, to order more ships for the tourist trade to Hawaii. The Mariposa entered service in 1931, and her sister ship, the Monterey, in 1932 under the operation of the Matson subsidiary, the Oceanic Steamship Company. Both ships at 632 feet were longer than the Malolo and had the slightly slower speed of twenty knots. The days of the 'millionaires' cruises were over, and although the ships had accommodations for 475 first-class passengers, they also had space for 230 persons in cabin class. To assure passengers for the ships during the whole year, Roth decided to extend the voyages to New Zealand and Australia, with stops in Fiji and other exotic spots. In this way the tourist traffic moving from the United States to Hawaii could be balanced with the Australian and New Zealander passengers wishing to reach England via the United States. The publicity campaign of Matson and the amenities a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mariposa (liner)
The Alaska Steamship Company liner Mariposa, while steaming north through the sharply winding channels at the upper end of Fitzhugh Sound, struck a rock ledge, tearing a hole in her bottom forward. She had departed Seattle in charge of Capt C. J. O'Brien with 95 passengers and a full cargo of freight for southeastern Alaska and Cook Inlet ports. The Border Line Transportation Company's passenger and freight steamer Despatch, Capt. S. B. Brunn, intercepted the Mariposa's distress call while passing north through Milbank Sound and was at the scene of the stranding, near the entrance to Lama Pass, within an hour and 45 minutes. Two minutes later her boats were over the side and on the way to the beach, where the passengers of the stranded liner had taken refuge. They were removed to the Despatch and landed at Ketchikan. The Esquimalt salvage steamer Saluor refloated the steamer, which had remained with her bow on the reef and her upperworks, from the funnel aft submerged at high tide, and she was drydocked at th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mariposa (liner)
The famous old liner Mariposa of the Alaska Steamship Co., southbound from southeastern Alaska ports on November 18 with 269 passengers and a full cargo of copper ore and canned salmon, struck on Strait Island, in Sumner Straits, Alaska. Although the Mariposa had survived more than her share of mishaps, this one proved fatal. Between the time of her striking, 4:50 p.m., and her sinking about six hours later, it was possible to remove all her passengers and crew safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966 p. 294.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mariposa (liner)
The Alaska Steamship Co. liner Mariposa, while steaming north through the sharply winding channels at the upper end of Fitzhugh Sound, struck a rock ledge, tearing a hole in her bottom forward. She had departed Seattle in charge of Capt. C. J. O'Brien with 95 passengers and a full cargo of freight for southeastern Alaska and Cook Inlet ports. The Border Line Transportation Company's passenger and freight steamer Despatch, Capt. S. B. Brunn, intercepted the Mariposa's distress call while passing north through Milbank Sound and was at the scene of the stranding, near the entrance to Lama Pass, within an hour and 45 minutes. Two minutes later her boats were over the side and on the way to the beach, where the passengers of the stranded liner had taken refuge. They were removed to the Despatch and landed at Ketchikan. The Esquimalt salvage steamer Salvor refloated the steamer, which had remained with her bow on the reef and her upperworks, from the funnel aft submerged at high tide, and she was drydocked at the S
Citation: Tacoma Public Library