Chief Justic Marshall (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 532.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Marshall
James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait., p. 44. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 102. Took first cargo of piles and lumber from Port Townsend. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 339.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Marshall
The John Marshall was an American ship, overcome by a gale off Cape Flattery, November 10, 1860. Parts of the derelict later came ashore near Bonilla Point but the entire crew was lost without trace. Vessel was en route to Port Discovary, Washington, from San Francisco, in ballast. She was to have loaded lumber. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Marshall
The ship John Marshall, from San Francisco for Port Discovery, was caught in a storm off Cape Flattery, November 10th, and was lost with all on board. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Le Mars (tug)
Le Mars, 95.3 x 25-foot tug with twin 900-horsepower Deutz diesels, from Robert Allan design (similar to La Reine 1964), by Star Shipyard, New Westminster, for Vancouver Tug & Boat Company coastal paper mill service and ocean towing assignments. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXVII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lizzie Marshall (bark)
American bark, 434 tons, Captain Adolph Bergman, lost on Bonilla Point, B. C., February 22, 1884. The vessel was 14 days out from San Francisco when she first sighted Cape Flattery. Fog set in and the wind died, leaving the vessel little steerageway. With a heavy swell running and no foghorn blaring on Tatoosh, the vessel lost her bearings and was carried toward Vancouver Island. Both anchors were dropped in 20 fathoms on February 21, and a boat with four volunteers was sent to Neah Bay for help. When a southeast gale came up, the vessel parted her anchor chains and went broadside on the rocks. A German sailor attempting to retrieve personal effects was drowned. The after part of the vessel wedged tight in the rocks and afforded a means of escape for crewmen. The vessel was built on the Sacramento River in 1870. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lizzie Marshall (bark)
The year 1884 was a fortunate one for the Northwestern fleet, and wrecks were few. The only one of much importance was the American bark Lizzie Marshall, 434 tons, lost on Bonilla Point, Vancouver lsland, February 22d. The vessel was fourteen days out from San Francisco when she first sighted Cape Flattery, but was driven off shore twice. Coming in the third time the cape was sighted for a moment, but a fog set in and the witid died out, leaving the vessel without steerage way. No foghorii was going at Tatoosh, and a heavy swell running off the coast, together with the tide, set the vessel toward Boinilla Point. Both anchors were dropped in twenty fathoms of water on the morning of February 2ist and a boat with four men dispatched to Neah Bay for assistance. A heavy southwest gale started the vessel to dragging, and though the masts were cut away they could not save her. Both cables parted, and she struck broadside on and broke in pieces in a few minutes. The stern of the bark from the mizzenmast aft held tog
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marsala
The "Marsala" was built by A.Stephen & Son, Glasgow in 1882 for Sloman of Hamburg. She was a 2,397 gross ton ship, length 320.2ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3/5/1882, she was used on the Australia service until 1886 when the Union Line was formed and she commenced sailing for this new company. She started her first voyage from Hamburg for New York on 2/9/1886 and continued on this service until her last voyage commenced on 7/10/1897. In 1911 she was sold to Italian owners and on 2/7/1913 was sunk in collision with the Italian vessel "Campidano" off Gianutis. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1166]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 November 1997]
Marshall (us Destroyer)
USS Marshall wrote history in two oceans, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 10, 1964. Destroyer on tideflats, The Tacoma News Tribune. April 7, 1968. Destroyer's repairs still under study, The Tacoma News Tribune. February 11, 1969. Roland Lund, Fire damaged ship skipper in quandry, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 2, 1969, p. B-11. Change of command, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 16, 1969, p. A-2. USS Marshall to be repaired and replaced, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 17, 1969, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marshall Clark (carrier)
The 78,900 gross ton Liberian flag bulk carrier Marshall Clark, 820 x 130 feet, with a loaded draft of 41 feet, set a new size record for the Port of Longview in April, loading 20,000 tons of wheat for Pakistan there and an additional 55,000 tons at Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1966, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXVII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marshfield (rum Runner)
The Anza Trading Company used her for taking liquor to San Francisco during prohibition. Seized by a US marshal. Later used as a barge. Beached at Martinez, Calfornia. Emil R. Peterson. A century of Coos and Curry., p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W. H. Marston (schooner)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 35, 36, 167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W. H. Marston (schooner)
The five-masted schooner W H. Marston was sold by Matson Navigation Co. to H. E. Pennell of Portland, Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 202.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W.h. Marston (schooner)
The W. H. Marston, five-masted schooner of 1169 tons and 1400 M capacity, was built at San Francisco in 1901 by W. F. Stone & Son for the Island trade, being managed by Welch & Co., San Francisco. Their fleet was sold to tne Matson Line in 1908, and the schooner was resold to Charles Nelson, passing about 1912 to Portland, Ore., owners. In 1919 she was bought by J. M. Scott, Mobile, and foundered. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 13, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W.h. Marston (schooner)
The W. H. Marston, five-masted schooner of 1169 tons and 1400 M capacity, was built at San Francisco in 1901 by W. F. Stone & Son for the Island trade, being managed by Welch & Co., San Francisco. Their fleet was sold to tne Matson Line in 1908, and the schooner was resold to Charles Nelson, passing about 1912 to Portland, Ore., owners. In 1919 she was bought by J. M. Scott, Mobile, and foundered. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 13, 1941, p.2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library