Boobla Mary (tug)
The Boobla Mary, a 50 -foot steam tug (converted from a former Navy steam launch) sold by Delta V. Smyth of Olympia to the Ultican Tugboat Co. of Grays Harbor and renamed Richard Junior Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 374.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boobla Mary (tugboat)
Ex UNS Launch no. 823. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Highland Mary
Built in 1891 by Craig Taylor & Co, Stockton-on-Tees, this was a 2,989 gross ton ship, length 310ft x beam 41.2ft (94,49m x 12,55m), one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Completed in July 1891, she was employed Liverpool - River Plate until 1911, when she was sold to Blue Star Line and renamed "Brodland". On 20th Jan.1915 she was wrecked on Aberavon Beach, South Wales while on voyage Port Talbot - Punta Arenas.. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.5, Royal Mail Line & Nelson Line] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 October 1998]
Mary (richards, P. 292)
The 45 foot steel purse seiner Martini, recently completed by the Peterson Boat Building Company in Tacoma will soon leave for Southeast Alaska under command of Paul Babich of Gig Harbor. The Martini carries a crew of six men and will fish for the Columbia River Packers. The boat has a 165 hp General Motors diesel engine that will give the boat a nine knot crusing speed. (Marine Digest. XLI (June 22, 1963), p. 27.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary (schooner)
Halibut Schooner Mary, ALF, p. 73.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary (sidewheeler)
1854. Offered service between Portland, Monticello, The Cascades and The Dalles. Escaped from Indians. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 163-64. Columbia River vessel during the Indian Wars, Ross, p. 280. Part of Indian attack on The Dalles. Edgar I Stewart, Washington, Northwest Frontier., II, p. 11. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 130. Attack by Indians. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 605. Indian attack on Mill Creek. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 599-601. Columbia River Steamer. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 453-54, 460. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 480. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 235-37 Plympton Kelly. We were not summer soldiers. 1972., p. 28, 48, 99, 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary (steamer)
Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Indians of the Pacific Northwest, p. 155.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary (steamer)
On the middle Columbia, steamboating was a hazardous business for a few weeks. Swarms of hostile savages along the river fired on the passing steamers, making life decidedly unpleasant for those on board. The Mary, in command of Capt. Dan Baughman, met with the warmest reception at the hands of the redskins, and it was by the merest chance that she escaped falling into their hands (see steamer Mary, 1854). E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.61.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary (steamer)
The steamer Mary, the first to run on the Coquille, was built on that stream in 1871 by William E. Rackliff, one of the pioneers of the Umpqua. She was a diminutive craft, with an eight by eight inch engine, and ran between the mouth of the river and the forks of the Coquille. The Rackliffs operated the steamer for about a year and then removed the machinery and sold the hull. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary (steamer)
The steamer Mary, the first to run on the Coquille, was built on that stream in 1871 by William E. Rackliff, one of the pioneers of the Umpqua. She was a diminutive craft, with an eight by eight inch engine, and ran between the mouth of the river and the forks of the Coquille. The Rackliffs operated the steamer for about a year and then removed the machinery and sold the hull. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Adams (bng, P. 79)
The steamer Mary, the first to run on the Coquille, was built on that stream in 1871 by William E. Rackliff, one of the pioneers of the Umpqua. She was a diminutive craft, with an eight by eight inch engine, and ran between the mouth of the river and the forks of the Coquille. The Rackliffs operated the steamer for about a year and then removed the machinery and sold the hull. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary And Ida (schooner)
The Mary and Ida, a two-masted schooner of 183 tons, was built in San Francisco in 1882 by Dickie Bros., and owned in turn by B. H. Madison, J. C. Hawley, J. J. McKinnon, and the Alaska Codfish Co., all of that port. She was wrecked in the Bering Sea on February 23, 1904. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary And Ida (schooner)
The Mary and Ida, a two-masted schooner of 183 tons, was built in San Francisco in 1882 by Dickie Bros., and owned in turn by B. H. Madison, J. C. Hawley, J. J. McKinnon, and the Alaska Codfish Co., all of that port. She was wrecked in the Bering Sea on February 23, 1904. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary And John
In Charles Edward Banks, Planters of the Commonwealth, Boston, 1930, we find the following (abstracted verbatim, down to punctuation): p. 87: MARY AND JOHN, Thomas Chubb, Master. She sailed from Plymouth, England, March 20 [1630], with one hundred and forty passengers from the counties of Somerset, Dorset, and Devon under the patronage of the Reverend John White. She arrived at Nantasket May 30, and all the passengers settled at Mattapan which was renamed Dorchester. [Clapp: Memoirs.] There is no list of the emigrants. All settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts. [Banks: The Winthrop Fleet , pp. 100-05.] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Sharon Todtenbier - 13 March 1998]
Mary Ann (fishing Vessel)
The 51-foot fishing vessel Mary Ann attempted to enter the Umpqua River from Eureka on the evening of August 18, but the bar was too rough to permit her crossing. The next morning her wreckage was found scattered on shore with the body of one of her three crewmen. Although the boat was equipped with full radio and electronic equipment, no call for assistance was received by the Coast Guard or other vessels and the cause of her loss remains a mystery. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ann (tug)
The small gas tug Mary Ann of nine tons, built by Frank Low at Marshfield for towing on Coos Bay, was the only small craft built in that area in 1917. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966. p. 291.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ann (tugboat)
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary B Vi (supply Vessel)
The Mary B VI, a 171-foot offshore supply vessel, was completed by Star Shipyards at New Westminster as the first of three such workboats of advanced design under construction there for servicing drill rigs off Canada's Eastern Seaboard. Twin GM diesels of 1,640 horsepower each provide a speed of 14 knots. The vessels were fitted with diesel-powered towing winches as well as storage tanks for drilling water and dry cement or drilling mud, deck cargo area aft and accommodations for 34 persons in the forecastle and deckhouse forward. A feature which made the Mary B VI unique among offshore supply vessels was her highly sophisticated space age electronic and navigational equipment, including a computerized satellite navigation system making use of polar orbiting satellite for pinpoint positioning, and also incorporates a doppler sonar. A Sperry gyrocompass feeds into the navigation system, which is complete with a teleprinter. The second of the class, Nordic VI, was completed late in the year and is identical to
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Bell
The Mary Bell was sold by the United States marshal to Capt. R. N. Smith for $1,100, and in November appeared on the Cowlitz route. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Bell
The Mary Bell was sold by the United States marshal to Capt. R. N. Smith for $1,100, and in November appeared on the Cowlitz route. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Bell (steamer)
The steamer Mary Bell was bought by John Marshall, who ran her to Cathlamet and Oak Point. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.201.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Bell (steamer)
The steamer Mary Bell was bought by John Marshall, who ran her to Cathlamet and Oak Point. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.201.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Bell (steamer)
The Mary Bell, a steamer launched in 1869 by Capt. Robert C. Smith to run as an opposition boat on the Astoria route, was about one hundred feet long and eighteen feet beam, and was too slow and feeble to be remunerative. She fell into the hands of the United States marshal and was purchased in March, 1871, for $1,100 by N. R. Smith, who put her on the Cowlitz route in November. In 1872 she was running to Cathlamet and Oak Point from Portland in command of Capt. James Fisher, but was again sold, this time to John Marshall, who operated her as a towboat until the following year, when she became the property of George W. Hume, who used the hull for a wharf. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.177-8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Buhne (schooner)
The Mary Buhne, a two-masted schooner of 147 tons, was built at Eureka in 1876 by Bendixsen. She was owned in the '90's by Charles Nelson and was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2. Mr. Lyman wrote that the Buhne was sunk in a collision eight miles off the Humboldt Bar on December 18, 1903.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Buhne (schooner)
The Mary Buhne, a two-masted schooner of 147 tons, was built at Eureka in 1876 by Bendixsen. She was owned in the '90's by Charles Nelson and was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2. Mr. Lyman wrote that the Buhne was sunk in a collision eight miles off the Humboldt Bar on December 18, 1903.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (steam Tug)
New construction in the Pacific Northwest included the steam tugs Mary C., 3 71 feet, Decatur, Washington. Mary C. was in many ways typical of the colorful steam tugs which operated in Northwest waters in earlier days. Her detailed history is furnished by Albert W. Giles, who made many voyages on her under Capt Hugh Gilmore, who commanded her for 22 years: It has been said that Henry Cayou had the best in mind when he ordered a new tug built for the then booming salmon fisheries. In 1903 he ordered the Mary C., named after his wife, from the Reed Brothers yard at Decatur, Blakeley Island. He insisted upon and got wonderful construction, the stem being a natural crook that ran fifteen feet along the keel. The first five planks above the keel were said to be full length and edge drift bolted. The rest of her construction was of like quality and only the very best of materials went into her. Her Heffernan-built engine was a fore-and aft compound of 12 and 24 bore and 24 stroke, taking steam from a Fairhaven
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (tubgoat)
Scrapped in 1932 on the Everett jetty, the 92 ton tug Mary C. had already sunk before in 191 7, but was raised on that occasion and refitted (Newell 1966:90-91, Barnard 1984, Straub 1979, Gibbs 1955, Firemen's Insurance Company 1917).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (tug)
The 92 ton tug burned and sank west of Alki Point (Straub 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (tug)
Scrapped in 1932 on the Everett jetty, the 92 ton tug Mary C. had already sunk before in 191 7, but was raised on that occasion and refitted (Newell 1966:90-91, Barnard 1984, Straub 1979, Gibbs 1955, Firemen's Insurance Company 1917).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Clare (gas Scow)
In 1950, the 11 ton gas scow Mary Clare burned at the dock in southern Commencement Bay (Gibbs 1955:278, Straub 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D
Built in Tacoma in 1920 for Pacific American Fisheries. 4861 gross tons. 3802.feet length. #22054. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 62.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D (steamer)
1920. 4861 gross tons. 380.2 feet #220254. Pacific American Fisheries. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 62.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Hume
Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 586. The Mary D. Hume, now the oldest active commercial boat on the Pacific Coast, was built in 1881 at Eliensburg (now Gold Beach), Oregon. She was built as an Oregon coastal freighter and has had a varied life. In the early 1890's she passed to the Pacific Steam Whaling Co. of San Francisco as a tender to their Arcdc whaling fleet. In 1896 she was trapped in the Bering Sea with the fleet and spent the entire winter there. She wasn't fitted to try oil but could and did bring out the most valuable cargo of whale bone ever received at San Francisco. Her next ten years were in the service of the Northwest Canning Co. in Alaskan waters. In 1905 she was sunk by ice in the Nushagak River but was raised and brought to SeatUe where she was repaired and then sold to American Tug Boat Co., of Everett, for duty as a tug. In 1916 she was converted into a halibut fisherman, bu
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Hume
The Mary D. Hume, a veteran of the Arctic whaling grounds, was wrecked at Nushagak on July 5, and for a time listed as a total loss, but was subsequently repaired and placed back in service. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1904. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Hume (steam Tug)
Built at Ellensburg, Oregon, in 1881. Used as a steam tug. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211. Oldest working towboat at 95 years young, The Tacoma News Tribune. May 18, 1975,p. G-11. Crowley wants to donate the Mary D. Hume,Marine Digest. LVI (February 11, 1978), p. 11-13 Mary D. Hume home in Oregon after a hundred years, Marine Digest. LVII (October 7, 1978), p. 11. Celebrates 100th birthday. Launched January 1, 1881 at Ellensburg, Oregon, The Marine Digest. April 4, 1981, p. 11-14. Mary D. Hume sinks in a hauling accident at Gold Beach, Oregon, The Marine Digest. November 30, 1985, p. 23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Hume (steamer)
The Mary D. Hume was built at Ellensburg, Oregon, for the Coquille trade, and contained the engines from the Varzina, wrecked in 1880. Capt. James Caughell was in command. She was ninety-eight feet long, twenty-three feet beam, and ten feet hold. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 283.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Hume (tug)
The venerable Mary D. Hume of 1881, the oldest working tugboat on the Pacific Coast, was fitted with a supercharger designed to increase her horsepower from 650 to 875. However, her crew, who have a sentimental attachment to the grand old lady of the Northwest towing fleets, were annoyed by the high-pitched whining of the supercharger, which drowned out the stately chugging of her 1950's vintage Washington Iron Works diesel, her fourth engine, which replaced a steam engine from the old Columbia lightship. The noisy attachment kept inexplicably breaking down and her owners, American Tug, eventually gave up. At the age of 94, the Mary D. Hume continues to tow log booms from South Bay, near Olympia, to Everett, sounding the way a diesel tugboat Should. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.117-8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Hume (tug)
A well-known veteran of North Pacific waters, the steamer Mary D. Hume, was purchased in 1908 by the American Tug Boat Co. of Everett from the Northwestern Fisheries Co., and placed in towing service. A wooden vessel of 158 tons, 98.2 x 23 x 10, she was built by R. D. Hume at Ellensburg, Oregon in 1881 as a steam schooner serving his Rogue River fish cannery, passing in the late 1880's to the Pacific Steam Whaling Co., which employed her in the Arctic whaling trade for ten years before disposing of her to the fishing company, which used her as cannery tender in Alaskan waters. Her original compound steam engine was from the very early Sound steamer Varuna, which operated on the Olympia - Port Townsend-Victoria mail route with the Alida. She was given a second engine while in Northwest Fisheries Co. service, and a third, from the Columbia River lightship, in 1939. This was replaced by a 600-horsepower diesel, the venerable craft remaining as a unit of the Everett towing company's fleet and the oldest commercia
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Pomeroy (schooner)
Mary D. Pomeroy, two-masted schooner of 114 tons, was built at Little River, Calif., in 1879 by Peterson for Hobbs, Wall & Co., San Francisco. She was lost with all hands the winter of 1879-80, off Point Reyes. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D. Pomeroy (schooner)
Mary D. Pomeroy, two-masted schooner of 114 tons, was built at Little River, Calif., in 1879 by Peterson for Hobbs, Wall & Co., San Francisco. She was lost with all hands the winter of 1879-80, off Point Reyes. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary D.hume
The Mary D. Hume, since the scrapping of the Katy, the oldest commercial boat in use on the Pacific Coast, was rebuilt, repowered and otherwise modernized at Everett in 1953. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 586.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dacre (brig)
163 ton vessel, built in 1842 at Bridport, Dorset for Captain R. Dare. Purchased by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1846 and sold in 1854. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w p. 336. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., I, p. 14-15, 63-64, 112. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 15, 29. Arrivals and departures noted in Dr. Tolmie's journal Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 77. Joseph Thomas Heath. Memoris of Nisqually. Memoris of Nisqually., p. 157. Seized by customs. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 347-48. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 153, 188-191. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 43, 107. Brosnan, p. 35, 70. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 84. Wyeth's ship. Chittenden, p. 448, 452. LLOG, p. 158-164. Charles H. Carey. General History of O
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dodge (schooner)
The Mary Dodge, a three-masted schooner of 243 tons, was built at Eureka in 1882 by Murray for J. Kentfield, San Francisco, later passing to Charles Nelson. In the years before the first World War she was owned by W. J. Woodside, San Francisco, and about 1917 was sold to Peruvian owners. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dodge (schooner)
Information on the career of the schooner Mary Dodge has been obtained from Charles R. Pollock, insurance man, Ferry Dock, Seattle. As told last week, the three-masted, 243 ton schooner, was built at Eureka, California, in 1882. From Mr. Pollock it is learned that in 1912 the Mary Dodge voyaged from Seattle to Nome tinder charter to the Alaska Investment & Development Co., headed by J. H. Moore of Port Townsend. She carried the equipment and an engineerine staff for construction of hydraulic mining ditches and Mr. Pollock was one of the engineers. The schooner sailed from Seattle in June and arrived off Nome in July. A storm forced her to lie off Sledge Island for three days before she could unload. At the end of the season, she sailed from Nome on October 21, 1912, late in the year for a sailing vessel. It took her a week to get out of Bering Sea, due to three storms, but she finally got into the Pacific and sailed to San Pedro. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dodge (schooner)
Further information on the career of the schooner Mary Dodge was obtained from Thomas Hudin, now installation engineer at the Tacoma yard of the Seattle Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation. As told last week in a note, the vessel made a voyage to Nome in 1912. From Mr. Hudin, it is learned that in 1913 she installed two.50 horsepower Corliss diesel ensines at the Craig yard in Long Beach, California, and in the same year made another voyage to Nome. Following the Nome season, she spent the winter in the guano trade. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 5, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dodge (schooner)
The Mary Dodge, a three-masted schooner of 243 tons, was built at Eureka in 1882 by Murray for J. Kentfield, San Francisco, later passing to Charles Nelson. In the years before the first World War she was owned by W. J. Woodside, San Francisco, and about 1917 was sold to Peruvian owners. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dodge (schooner)
Information on the career of the schooner Mary Dodge has been obtained from Charles R. Pollock, insurance man, Ferry Dock, Seattle. As told last week, the three-masted, 243 ton schooner, was built at Eureka, California, in 1882. From Mr. Pollock it is learned that in 1912 the Mary Dodge voyaged from Seattle to Nome tinder charter to the Alaska Investment & Development Co., headed by J. H. Moore of Port Townsend. She carried the equipment and an engineerine staff for construction of hydraulic mining ditches and Mr. Pollock was one of the engineers. The schooner sailed from Seattle in June and arrived off Nome in July. A storm forced her to lie off Sledge Island for three days before she could unload. At the end of the season, she sailed from Nome on October 21, 1912, late in the year for a sailing vessel. It took her a week to get out of Bering Sea, due to three storms, but she finally got into the Pacific and sailed to San Pedro. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Dodge (schooner)
Further information on the career of the schooner Mary Dodge was obtained from Thomas Hudin, now installation engineer at the Tacoma yard of the Seattle Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation. As told last week in a note, the vessel made a voyage to Nome in 1912. From Mr. Hudin, it is learned that in 1913 she installed two.50 horsepower Corliss diesel ensines at the Craig yard in Long Beach, California, and in the same year made another voyage to Nome. Following the Nome season, she spent the winter in the guano trade. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 5, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Foster (schooner)
Mary E. Foster, two - masted schooner of 116 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1877 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners for inter island trading. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Foster (schooner)
The Mary E. Foster, a four -masted schooner of 950 tons and 1100 M lumber capacity was built at Port Blakely by Hall Bros. in 1898 for Allen & Robinson, Honolulu. The entire career of the schooner was Spent in the lumber trade to Hawaii. She was in a collision with the steamer Mauna Kea off Diamond Head on April 26, 1923, and was beached at Waikiki. Three days later the wreck was hauled off and taken to Honolulu, where the lumber cargo was discharged and the hull sold for a hundred dollars. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Foster (schooner)
Mary E. Foster, two - masted schooner of 116 tons, was built at Port Ludlow in 1877 by Hall Bros. for Hawaiian owners for inter island trading. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850- 1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Foster (schooner)
The Mary E. Foster, a four -masted schooner of 950 tons and 1100 M lumber capacity was built at Port Blakely by Hall Bros. in 1898 for Allen & Robinson, Honolulu. The entire career of the schooner was Spent in the lumber trade to Hawaii. She was in a collision with the steamer Mauna Kea off Diamond Head on April 26, 1923, and was beached at Waikiki. Three days later the wreck was hauled off and taken to Honolulu, where the lumber cargo was discharged and the hull sold for a hundred dollars. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Moore (steam Schooner)
February 23, 1927 Steam schooner, steel, 1783 gross tons, 221.5'x 40'x 22.5', built in 1913 at Long Beach, California as the Grace Dollar. She sank in heavy seas about the same spot where the Acme of the Moore Lumber Co. disappeared two years before. Capt. Karl Rosenblad and his 26 crewmen were rescued by the motor freighter Admiral Peary and taken to San Francisco. The ship and her 200 tons of general cargo lie about one mile beyond the breakwater of the Coquille. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Moore (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Mary E. Moore. formerly the Grace Dollar, built at Long Beach, California in 1913, bound from San Francisco for Bandon, foundered after losing her propeller and striking the CoqW]le River bar February 23. Capt. Karl Rosenblad and his 28 -man crew were picked up from two lifeboats by the motorship Admiral Peary, but the Mary E. Moore broke up rapidly in heavy seas about a nine offshore. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 389.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Petrich (tuna Clipper)
Craft launched from Northwest yards in 1949 included the following: Mary E. Petrich, 150 x 34-foot tuna clipper of 1, 600 - norsepower, built for the firm's own account by the Western Boat Building Co- at Tacoma, and said to be the world's largest tuna clipper. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Russ (schooner)
The Mary E. Russ, schooner, probably three-masted, of 235 tons, built at Eureka by Cousins in 1875 for Brock, Russ and others, San Francisco, was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E. Russ (schooner)
The Mary E. Russ, schooner, probably three-masted, of 235 tons, built at Eureka by Cousins in 1875 for Brock, Russ and others, San Francisco, was afloat in 1900. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary E.foster (schooner)
The four masted schooner Mary E. Foster of 1898 collided with the steamer Mauna Kea off Diamond Head April 26 and was beached at Waikiki. Three days later the wreck was towed to Honolulu, where it was sold for $100 following the discharge of the cargo.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 344.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ellen
The Mary Ellen was lost July 23d on Sand Point Reef before entering Bering Sea, and the wreck was sold for $150, the purchaser raising and selling her at a big advance to Jacobsen of Victoria. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.435.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ellen (cannery Tender)
Other transfers of ownership of Northwest vessels in 1933 included the following: Mary Ellen, 80-foot diesel cannery tender, from the Washington Iron Works by the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. for towing service in California waters. She was renamed Macray from H. W. McCurdy and Raymond J. Huff of the purchasing company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 422.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ellen (schooner)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 436.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ellen (schooner)
Efforts were made at Victoria in 1913 to burn three of the less seaworthy of the old sealing schooners which had been lying in a state of decay on the west shore of the harbor, but the brine and mildew of years so permeated the old timbers that it was impossible to completely destroy them. The old sealers were the Mary Ellen, Mascot and Walter L. Rich, all three of which made history in the glory days of the Victoria sealing fleet. The Mary Ellen had a particularly interesting career, having been commanded by Capt. Daniel McLean, brother of Capt. Alex McLean of Vancouver who also took the vessel out several times. In 1886 she took 4,268 skins, which was claimed as a world's record catch. The burning and sinking of the unsaleable schooners finally put an end to the last vestiges of the fleet which had once been a colorful part of the British Columbia maritime scene. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.232.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Gruff (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Perley
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211. Roland Carey, West Point collision of steamers, Marine Digest. May 19, 1984, p. 11+ (in collision with the City of Kingston on November 10, 1894.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Perley (steamer)
The old Puget Sound stern -wheel steamer Mary F. Perley was destroyed by fire while lying at Alki Point on September 15. A vessel of 184 tons, 104 feet in length, the Perley was built by Dean Bros. at Samish Island in 1888, being placed in service by them and Capt. Henry Perley to Samish Slough and Bellingham Bay points. Sold at a marshal's sale in 1891, she passed to Col. Haller, who sold her to Thomas Redding. After operating on a local run between Seattle and Tacoma she passed, in 1894, to W. T. Gaffner, who placed her on the Seattle -Navy Yard run. She was sold again in 1900 to Capt. C. W. Call and John Ericson, who kept her in the same service as an opposition boat to the Navy Yard Route steamers. The fire originated in the engine room at about midnight. The entire crew, except the watchman, was asleep, and Capt. Call and his men narrowly escaped with their lives. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1901, H.W. McCurdy, Marine HIstory of the Pacific Northwest, p. 72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Perley (steamer)
Perley and Dean of Samish were owners of the sternwheeler Mary F. Perley, which appeared in 1888. The steamer was one hundred and four feet long, twenty feet beam, and five feet five inches hold. She belongs at present to Thomas Redding and has recently been handled by Captain Benson and Engineer J. R. Drury. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Perley (sternwheeler)
Appearing on the Sound in 1888 the 104 ft sternwheeler was destroyed by fire in 1901 while lying at Alki Point (Newell 1966:72-76, Wright 1961:357).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Slade (bark)
The bark Mary F. Slade, which had been added to the Balch & Webber line of packets during the year, was wrecked near Cape Mendocino, September 6th. She was en route to San Francisco from Steilacoom with a cargo of lumber, and was thrown on the beach in thick weather by a tremendous swell. The crew escaped, but the vessel was a total loss. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Foss (2) (tugboat)
The MARY FOSS, another product of the McDermott Shipyard Group shipyards of Amelia, Louisiana was built in 1962 for the American Towing Company of Morgan City, Louisiana. They named her E.K. ROCKWELL and for many years she worked out of Morgan City and the Atchafalaya River in the Bayou country of Louisiana. After 1970 her name was changed to AMERICAN CHIEF, a better identifying name for the Company. In May of 1974 she was sold to Inlet Marine of Anchorage and they renamed her Gemini. Early in 1979 Inlet Marine was forced to liquidate and Foss purchased the tug on March 14, 1979 mostly for use on Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Mary Foss (2), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 299.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Frances (tug)
The Mary Frances was apparently built in Olympia in 1905. She was forty-four feet in length with a twelve foot beam. She served in the Seattle and Tacoma harbors. She was part of the Rouse Towing Company fleet when that organization became part of Foss in 1920. She was sold by Foss in the 1930s and worked for mill companies near the Canadian border. She was abandoned on the Snohomish River in the early 1950s. Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Frances (tug)
The little motor tug Mary Frances of 1905, converted from 50-horsepower Frisco Standard gas to diesel power and operated in recent years at Seattle by Capt. Bud McCarty, was sold to the Walton Mill Co. at Anacortes. The original Pierce-Arrow gasoline engine, installed in the tug at the time of her construction at Olympia, was still in use in a small log patrol tug operated by Lynn Campbell of Seattle. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 563.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Fraser (bark)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 32.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gail (tug)
Interest in the upper river barge traffic was heightened during the year when the Tidewater Transportation Co. tug Mary Gail, built the previous year, made a historic landing at The Dalles with a barge carrying the first load of gasoline for water delivery to upper Columbia points. Capt. Leppaluoto, who had been awaiting the completion of the channel dredging project begun in 1935, also had the Mystic and the 120-horsepower Ostrander of 1927 in barge service, pending completion of the Inland Chief. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gail (tug)
Interest in the upper river barge traffic was heightened during the year when the Tidewater Transportation Co. tug Mary Gail, built the previous year, made a historic landing at The Dalles with a barge carrying the first load of gasoline for water delivery to upper Columbia points. Capt. Leppaluoto, who had been awaiting the completion of the channel dredging project begun in 1935, also had the Mystic and the 120-horsepower Ostrander of 1927 in barge service, pending completion of the Inland Chief. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gail (tugboat)
The first diesel towboat built specifically for handling barge cargoes on the upper Columbia above Celilo, the twinscrew semi-tunnel-stern steel Mary Gail of 41 tons, 56.3 x 17.1 x 4.7, with twin 200-horsepower diesels, was completed at Maritime Shipyard, Seattle, for Kirk Thompson of Spokane, organizer of the Tidewater Transportation Co. This historic little vessel which set the pattern for important marine developments on the Columbia River system, was designed by H. C. Hanson, who supervised her construction, and that of a 100,000- gallon fuel oil barge (the first all-welded steel barge on the Pacific Coast) for operation with her. Capt. S. V. Winslow was first master of the Mary Gail upon her inauguration of the Portland-Attalia cargo barge route. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 447.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gail (tugboat)
The first diesel towboat built specifically for handling barge cargoes on the upper Columbia above Celilo, the twinscrew semi-tunnel-stern steel Mary Gail of 41 tons, 56.3 x 17.1 x 4.7, with twin 200-horsepower diesels, was completed at Maritime Shipyard, Seattle, for Kirk Thompson of Spokane, organizer of the Tidewater Transportation Co. This historic little vessel which set the pattern for important marine developments on the Columbia River system, was designed by H. C. Hanson, who supervised her construction, and that of a 100,000- gallon fuel oil barge (the first all-welded steel barge on the Pacific Coast) for operation with her. Capt. S. V. Winslow was first master of the Mary Gail upon her inauguration of the Portland-Attalia cargo barge route. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 447.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gibert (schooner)
The schooner Mary Gibert, Capt. J. W. Dodge, with a cargo of merchandise, was lost off the south head of Alsea Bay, December 17th. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.420.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gilbert (schooner)
December 17, 1894 Schooner. Captain J. W. Dodge. The ship carried general merchandise when she was totalled on the south head of Alsea Bay. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary H. Packer (steamer)
The small side- wheel steamer Mary H. Packer, 10 tons, 35 feet, was built for local service at Astoria, being later given gas engines and renamed Hazel & Helen, her final rebuilding in 1930 transforming her to a gasoline propeller. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 162.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Hanlon (lumber Carrier)
Montesano, located about 10 mues up the Chehalis River from the Grays Harbor port of Aberdeen, was visited by an ocean lumber carrier on June 7, the first time such a vessel had loaded there since 1912. The Mary Hanlon of the coastwise Chamberlin Line lifted 500,000 feet of lumber from the Schafer Bros. mills there, and was followed by other freighters of the company. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 350.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Hare (steamer)
Capt. M. Hare built the small steamer Mary Hare, which was used in jobbing around Victoria until 1895, when she was equipped for passenger service, and ran to and from the islands of the east coast of Vancouver Island in connection with the Victoria & Sydney Railroad. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.408.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Hein
See SILVER LAKE (3).
Citation:
Mary Kraft
Built in Seattle in 1890. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Kraft (steamer)
Capt. Charles Kraft built the fine twin-screw propeller Mary Kraft for the Lake Washington traffic. The steamer cost $13,000, but, after a successful career of a year, burned to the water's edge in September, 1891. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.375.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Kraft (steamer)
The handsome twin-screw propeller Mary Kraft met a similar end on Lake Washington near Yesler Avenue at 3:00 A.M., September 21st, Capt. John Anderson and Engineer Gus Neaher narrowly escaping with their lives. The steamer belonged to Captain Kraft and was valued at $13,000, with an insurance of $8,000. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.395.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Luckenbach (steamer. )
The largest cargo to be carried from the port of Newport was lifted by the intercoastal steamship Mary Luckenbach, which cleared with 4,750,000 feet of lumber. The first commercial pier was also constructed at Newport during the year, vessels having previously loaded from barges while moored to dolphins. The motorship Falkanger was the first to load at the new terminal. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 560.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Melville
Richard A. Seiber. Memoirs of Puget Sound and Early Seattle., p. 11, 60, 65-66, 67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Miller (steamer)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Moody
The Mary Moody, which was the first of the interior fleet, continued to run on Lake Pend'Oreille. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.183.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Moody (steamer)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 272. Could accomodate sixty mules and their packs. On Lake Pend d'Oreille, Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 198, 261. First steamer on Pend Oreille Lake. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 245.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Moody (steamer)
The new company built the Mary Moody, the first steamer to ply on the waters of Lake Pen d'Oreille, launched her on April, 1865, and operated her on a route from the lower end of the lake to the east side of Cabinet Mountains, a distance of about seventy miles. The steamer went to the foot of Cabinet Rapids and connected with the steamer Cabinet, constructed the same year by Abrams & Co., to run to Thompson Falls and there meet the Missoula, running to the mouth of the Jocko. The latter steamer was owned by Humason & Savage but afterward passed into the bands of the Oregon & Montana Transportation Company. The lumber used in the Mary Moody was whipsawed from timber cut on the ground near where she was launched, and the steamer was provided with the old engines from the Express. In describing the steamer and what was expected of her, a writer in Harrier's Monthly has the following: Four months after the first tree was felled for her she was afloat; fifteen days after that her steam whistle startled the echo o
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary N (motor Vessel)
This motor vessel was stranded October 21, 1950, in the Nitinat River, B.C. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Olson (lumber Carrier)
The coastwise lumber fleet of the Oliver J. Olson Co. was completely converted to packaged lumber carriers with the completion of work on the Mary Olson late in 1952. Conventional steam schooner cargo handling gear and masts were removed and replaced by unit cranes capable of handling full carrier loads of lumber. This eliminated piece-bypiece storage, cutting the time required for both loading and unloading. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 585.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Phillips
See HUDSON.
Citation:
Mary R (troller)
Mary R., 47 -foot otter trawler, struck the jetty near Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station in September, crew being rescued by the trawler Jennie F. Decker. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Rose Brusco (tug)
The 72-foot tug Mary Rose Brusco, designed for log towing on the Columbia River, was built by Albina at Portland for the nine-vessel Brusco Towboat Co. of Cathlamet, Washington. She was fitted with two 12-cylinder Detroit diesels, each developing 800 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1968, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.42.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary S (tugboat)
Rebuilt tug Mary S. joins Star Marine fleet at Port Townsend, The Marine Digest. October 26, 1985, p. 26.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Sachs (schooner)
The power schooner Mary Sachs, Capt. Peter Barnard, purchased at Nome for use by the Stefannson Arctic expedition, was also frozen in off the Arctic coast of Alaska and completely destroyed, the crew escaping safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Schowner (schooner)
The schooner Mary Schowner went down about 1876. Captain Alfred Machado and one other person survived the wreck on the Coquille Bar. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Swann (schooner)
Mary Swann, two - masted schooner of 143 tons, was built at Eureka in 1875 by Bendixsen. She was owned by her master, Captain H. R. Jacobsen and later by Andrew Anderson dropping from the registry in 1889. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Swann (schooner)
Mary Swann, two - masted schooner of 143 tons, was built at Eureka in 1875 by Bendixsen. She was owned by her master, Captain H. R. Jacobsen and later by Andrew Anderson dropping from the registry in 1889. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. June 21, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Taylor
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 99, 148, 153.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Taylor
The Mary Taylor, Captain Petit, tried a new experiment and sailed for the Galapagos Islands in the South Pacific, returning to Victoria, after a cruise of several thousand miles, with one skin, which was secured off Crescent City on the way down. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.435.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Taylor (pilot Boat)
Took passengers to Puget Sound. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 339.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Taylor (schooner)
Arthur Denny. Pioneer Days on Puget Sound.D, p. 44.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Taylor (tug)
The tug Mary Taylor was taken by Captain Keene to the Columbia, where Captain Wass assumed command and operated her as a tender in the construction of the Tillamook lighthouse. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.270.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Taylor (tug)
The tug Mary Taylor was dismantled, the machinery being used by Z. J. Hatch in the steamer Yaquina, and the hull was afterward sold to Capt- James Delgardno, who transformed it into a sealing schooner. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 287.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Tompkins (steamer)
Edward Huggins, Puget Sound pioneer vessels, The Washington Historical Magazine. I, (October 1893), p. 196-197.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Wilder (brig)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 48.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Winkelman (barkentine)
Mary Winkelman, a barkentine 522 tons, was built at Seabeck, by Hiram Doncaster in 1881. In the '90's she was owned in the Island trade by A. H. Paul, San Francisco, making the voyage from Honolulu to San Francisco in 11 days in 1893. Later she was acquired by the Charles Nelson Co., who retained ownership until November 13, 1923, when, leaving Pago-Pago for San Francisco, she drifted onto the reef. The 10-man crew were landed safely, but the barkentine could not be floated, and became a total loss. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Winkelman (barkentine)
Mary Winkelman, a barkentine 522 tons, was built at Seabeck, by Hiram Doncaster in 1881. In the '90's she was owned in the Island trade by A. H. Paul, San Francisco, making the voyage from Honolulu to San Francisco in 11 days in 1893. Later she was acquired by the Charles Nelson Co., who retained ownership until November 13, 1923, when, leaving Pago-Pago for San Francisco, she drifted onto the reef. The 10-man crew were landed safely, but the barkentine could not be floated, and became a total loss. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Winkelman (barkentine)
The three-masted barkentine Mary Winkelman of 522 tons, built by Hiram Doneaster at Seabeck in 1881, drifted on a reef November 13 while leaving Pago Pago and became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 344.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Woodruff (sidewheeler)
Built at Port Madison in 1863. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211. Began service on Puget Sound in 1863. Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Woodruff (steamer)
The Mary Woodruff, built at Port Madison by John Swan, a logger, and Jay E. Smith of Steilacoom, was sixty-three feet long, fourteen feet beam, six feet hold, with machinery taken from the old Ranger, then on the beach, which Swan had purchased from the owners of the abandoned vessel. When completed she was put on the Whatcom route, where she was the pioneer steamer in the postal service, and the first which had ventured there since the bursting of the mining boom of 1858, after which event the steamships and small steamers which had been so plentiful gradually dropped off until none were left; and a short time prior to 1860 there was no communication whatever between Whatcom and the outside world. Humboldt Jack Cosgrove secured the mail contract about this time, and ran the sloop Maria for two years; but, as she was a poor substitute for the transportation facilities which they had once enjoyed, the people rejoiced when the Woodruff appeared. She ran from Seattle in command of her owner, Captain Swan, who
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Woodruff (steamer)
The steamer Mary Woodruff had her upper works completely destroyed by a boiler explosion July 31st, while towing a raft on the Sound, about eight miles from Utsalady. The captain, engineer and three Indians on board escaped without serious injury, but the vessel was so badly damaged that it was necessary to practically rebuild it. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.130.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maryland
S.S. Maryland ( After my Home State) Flag : Danish 4895DWT ( Deadweight Tons) Torpedoed Feb. 15,1940 Lat. 57-09 North Longitude 12-00 West Torpedoed by German Sub. U50 Captain of sub named Bauer The S.S. Maryland departed Maderia on Feb.7,1940 for Copenhagen. She radioed her position on Feb. 10th.and was reported missing thereafter. One wrecked lifeboat was found at North Uist. Sorry I have no more information. My source is Axis Submarine Sucesses by Jurgen Rohwer...Naval Institute Press - Annapolis, Md -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Capt. C.J. Carroll - 20 March 1998]
Maryland (brig)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 29. Brosnan, p. 224. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, I, p. 221. Left G. W. LeBreton in Oregon, John H. Couch arrived on her. Horace Lyman. History of Oregon., III, p. 205, 258. Brought merchandise to the Willamette in 1840. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 324. Cornelius Brosnan. Jason Lee, Prophet of the New Oregon, p. 224
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maryland (schooner)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 22.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maryland (schooner)
The Shoalwater Bay fleet included the schooners Exact, Empire, Equity, Alfred Adams, Mary Taylor and Maryland, the last named meeting with an accident in December, by which the captain, F. P. Baker, and the cook, Morse, lost their lives; and the vessel was towed back to San Francisco dismasted. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.58.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Maryland (uss)
Lone E. Janson. The Copper Spike. 1975., p. 139-40.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Mary
The Princess Mary of 1910 was extensively rebuilt by Yarrow's yard at Esquimalt, her tonnage being increased from 1,697 to 2,155, and her dimensions from 210 x 39.7 x 16 to 248.4 x 40.1 x 14. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Mary
The Princess Mary of 1910 was extensively rebuilt by Yarrow's yard at Esquimalt, her tonnage being increased from 1,697 to 2,155, and her dimensions from 210 x 39.7 x 16 to 248.4 x 40.1 x 14. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Mary (steamer)
Built at Paisley Scotland in 1910. Foundered near Cape Decision on April 19, 1954 as Bulk Carrier # 2. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w, p. 342.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Princess Mary (steamer)
Princess Mary and Princess Victoria, C. P. R. coastal steamers, sold for dismantling and their hulls converted to cargo barges. The upperworks of the Princess Mary were moved ashore by the Island Tug & Barge Co. adjacent to their Victoria wharf and offices and converted into one of the Pacific Northwest's best known waterfront restaurants. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1952-53, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 588.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saint Marys (uss)
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 301, 305.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library