Mary Moody
The Mary Moody, which was the first of the interior fleet, continued to run on Lake Pend'Oreille. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.183.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Moody (steamer)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 272. Could accomodate sixty mules and their packs. On Lake Pend d'Oreille, Winther, Oscar. Old Oregon Country., p. 198, 261. First steamer on Pend Oreille Lake. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 245.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Moody (steamer)
The new company built the Mary Moody, the first steamer to ply on the waters of Lake Pen d'Oreille, launched her on April, 1865, and operated her on a route from the lower end of the lake to the east side of Cabinet Mountains, a distance of about seventy miles. The steamer went to the foot of Cabinet Rapids and connected with the steamer Cabinet, constructed the same year by Abrams & Co., to run to Thompson Falls and there meet the Missoula, running to the mouth of the Jocko. The latter steamer was owned by Humason & Savage but afterward passed into the bands of the Oregon & Montana Transportation Company. The lumber used in the Mary Moody was whipsawed from timber cut on the ground near where she was launched, and the steamer was provided with the old engines from the Express. In describing the steamer and what was expected of her, a writer in Harrier's Monthly has the following: Four months after the first tree was felled for her she was afloat; fifteen days after that her steam whistle startled the echo o
Citation: Tacoma Public Library