Mary Woodruff (steamer)
The Mary Woodruff, built at Port Madison by John Swan, a logger, and Jay E. Smith of Steilacoom, was sixty-three feet long, fourteen feet beam, six feet hold, with machinery taken from the old Ranger, then on the beach, which Swan had purchased from the owners of the abandoned vessel. When completed she was put on the Whatcom route, where she was the pioneer steamer in the postal service, and the first which had ventured there since the bursting of the mining boom of 1858, after which event the steamships and small steamers which had been so plentiful gradually dropped off until none were left; and a short time prior to 1860 there was no communication whatever between Whatcom and the outside world. Humboldt Jack Cosgrove secured the mail contract about this time, and ran the sloop Maria for two years; but, as she was a poor substitute for the transportation facilities which they had once enjoyed, the people rejoiced when the Woodruff appeared. She ran from Seattle in command of her owner, Captain Swan, who
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Woodruff (steamer)
The steamer Mary Woodruff had her upper works completely destroyed by a boiler explosion July 31st, while towing a raft on the Sound, about eight miles from Utsalady. The captain, engineer and three Indians on board escaped without serious injury, but the vessel was so badly damaged that it was necessary to practically rebuild it. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.130.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library