Mascott
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 452.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mascotte (steamer)
This Canadian steamer (salvage vessel), totally destroyed by fire, August 16, 1893, while lying at anchor in Pachena Bay, B. C. She was skippered by Captain Edward McCoskrie. The Mascotte was only three years old and one of the best-equipped wreckers in Pacific Northwest waters. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mascotte (steamer)
The sternwheel steamer Mascotte, length one hundred and thirty-two feet, beam twenty-four feet, and depth of hold five feet five inches, with engines fifteen by sixty inches, was constructed at Portland for the Lewis and Lake rivers trade, where she has been steadily employed since completion. John Bonser was master until 1893 and was succeeded by A. W. Gray. For the past few years she has been owned by Jacob Kamm. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.380.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mascotte (steamer)
The steamer Mascotte, one of the best equipped wreckers in the Northwest, was totally destroyed by fire August 16th while lying at anchor in Pachena Bay between Cape Carmanah and San Juan. The vessel was in charge of Capt. Edward McCoskrie, and the fire was first discovered at 2:00 A.M., apparently coming from the galley, and spread so rapidly that the crew had hardly time to reach shore, many of them being compelled to leave their shoes and other wearing apparel. The Mascotte was about three years old, and owing to her great power and light draft had proved very profitable, working among wrecks on the west coast of Vancouver Island. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library