Massachusetts
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Citation:
Massachusetts
May 9, 1849 U.S. troop transport of 750 tons, ship-rigged with a steam plant/Ericsson propeller. She was the heaviest vessel to cross over the bar up to that time. She carried 161 men of the First Artillery Battalion under the command of Brevet Major John S. Hathaway. Recognized as the first official U.S. troops in Oregon, they traveled to take over Fort Vancouver from the Hudson Bav Co., as per the newly-enacted treaty between the United States and England. Alexander Lattie was pilot aboard the Massachusetts when she went on the Tongue Point sand spit and was worked off with no damage. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 163-166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Massachusetts
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 69. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 62. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 160-61. Richards, p. 289-90. Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Indians of the Pacific Northwest, p. 153, 159. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 61, 68. Richard A. Seiber. Memoirs of Puget Sound and Early Seattle., p. 155, 167. Keith Murray. The Pig War, p. 30, 35045. August Kautz. Northwest Journals of August V. Kautz, 1857-61, p. 354, 356, 358. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., II, p. 461. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 69-70, 77, 436, 507-510. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., IV, p. 53, 64. Hazard Stevens, Life of General Isaac I. Stevens, p. 185, 252, 258. Attacked Indians near Port Gambl
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Massachusetts (steamer)
May 9, 1849 U.S. troop transport of 750 tons, ship-rigged with a steam plant/Ericsson propeller. She was the heaviest vessel to cross over the bar up to that time. She carried 161 men of the First Artillery Battalion under the command of Brevet Major John S. Hathaway. Recognized as the first official U.S. troops in Oregon, they traveled to take over Fort Vancouver from the Hudson Bav Co., as per the newly-enacted treaty between the United States and England. Alexander Lattie was pilot aboard the Massachusetts when she went on the Tongue Point sand spit and was worked off with no damage. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984. p. 163-65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Massachusetts (steamer)
The United States steamship Massachusetts was on the Sound the greater part of the year, and was borrowed for a few trips by Capt. J. M. Hunt while his own mail steamer was disabled. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company, Growth of British Columbia Marine Industries, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961, p.87.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Massachusetts (steamer)
The threatened Indian outbreak on Puget Sound in 1855 was the means of hastening several Government vessels to the scene of the expected hostilities. Among the fleet were the United States steamship Massachusetts, Captain Meade, the sloop-of-war Decatur, and the revenue cutter Jeff Davis. The Massachusetts, which in those days was regarded as an extensive piece of marine architecture, was one hundred and sixty-one feet long, thirty-one feet beam, twenty feet hold, and registered seven hundred and seventy-nine tons. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library