Mauna Ala (freighter)
December 10, 1941 Freighter, 6256 tons, 420'in length, owned by Matson Lines. Ordered to return due to the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the vessel ran aground on Clatsop just south of the old Peter Iredale. She was loaded with all kinds of Christmas goodies for the Hawaiian Islanders. The ship was a total loss, but is still fondly remembered by those people of Warrenton and surrounding communities who enjoved her cargo of turkey, chicken, butter and other good things including Christmas trees washed in from her wreck. Had the Mauna Ala not wrecked on Oregon shores, she no doubt would have fallen prey to Captain Megii Tagami's submarine I 25. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mauna Ala (freighter)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 55, 88, 163, 174. 6265 ton vessel stranded off Clatsop Beach on December 10, 1941, Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 173.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mauna Ala (freighter)
An indirect war loss of this early period was the Matson freighter Mauna Ala, which was enroute to Honolulu on December 7 with a cargo which included 30,000 Christmas trees and a number of new automobiles. Ordered by radio to turn back to the nearest United States port, she approached the mouth of the Columbia River on the night of December 10 just as all navigation lights were blacked out and all radio beacons silenced. The confused officers of the freighter picked up a partial blinker signal from an unidentified passing vessel which was interpreted as a message to halt, and speed was reduced to dead slow for a time, but as no further directions were received, regular speed was ordered resumed in the expectation of sighting the Columbia lightship momentarily. Shortly thereafter the Mauna Ala drove through the light surf and grounded 700 feet from shore on Clatsop Spit near where the bones of the bark Peter Iredale had been rusting for many years. Unlike the Iredale, the Mauna Ala disappeared under the shifti
Citation: Tacoma Public Library