Mckinley (steamer)
The Crawford & Reid yard at Tacoma built the trim little fishing steamers McKinley and Lincoln, 145 -ton vessels 80 feet in length, for Bushman, Thorp & Co., for use as tenders to the Petersberg cannery of that firm. The McKinley, in charge of Capt. Lonsdale, formerly of the Sound freighter LaConner, was also used to tow the company's recently purchased schooner Ralph J. Long in cannery freight and supply service. Both steamers were of wood construction and rifted with steeple-compound engines. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 81.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mckinley (steamer)
Conversions to motor power included the fishing steamer Mc Kinley, damaged by fire and the hull purchased by Capt. Charles Norton of Anacortes for conversion to the gasoline halibut schooner President. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mount Mckinley (steamer)
The Alaska Steamship Co. passenger steamship Mount McKinley stranded on Scotch Cap March 18 while on the Alaska run, Capt. Arthur Ryn- ing, his crew and passengers being removed safely, as was the mail and most of her cargo. It was hoped to salvage the vessel, which lay high and dry at low tide, but she was destroyed by storms and surf before she could be refloated. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 512.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library