Miami
Built at Olympia in 1890. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211. Formerly known as The Doctor.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Miami (steam Collier)
The big steam collier Miami, purchased only the previous year by the Pacific Coast Co., struck a submerged reef off Gabriola Island when orily seven miles out of Oyster Harbor (now Ladysmith), B. C. for San Francisco with 4,000 tons of coal from the Dunsmuir mine there. The steamer hung on the sharp -edged reef for eight hours; then broke squarely in two and sank in 50 fathoms, the loss of ship and cargo being in excess of $ 300,000. The mishap occurred without loss of life on January 25. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1900, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Miami (tug)
With the arrival of the four-masted schooner Susie M. Plummer at Tacoma in September, under charter to the Union Packing Co., word was received of the loss of the Puget Sound tug Miami June 10 on the Koggiung River above Bristol Bay; the tug, also in the service of the packing company, was dispatched down the river with a scow to pick up supplies from the Plummer upon her arrival in Bristol Bay. The Miami ran aground on the upward trip, and at 3 o'clock the next morning was struck by the incoming tidal bore from Bristol Bay, which rolls up the river at eleven miles an hour. Aboard the tug were Capt. Hogan, Engineer Jackson, the third mate of the Plummer, and three other men. Unable to get the anchor up as the bore hit the tug, the men jumped aboard the scow. The wall of water upended the little Miami, tore out her bottom and left her capsized, her machinery having fallen out through the deck. The scow broke loose and proceeded upstream at 11 miles an hour, passing the cannery and ending up, at slack water, fa
Citation: Tacoma Public Library