Michigan
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 54.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan
Pat Winkler, Algerian rebels have no chance, The Tacoma News Tribune. April 1, 1962.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (1)
See SURREY .
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Michigan (1)
MICHIGAN (2) See WASHINGTON (4).
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Michigan (freighter)
The States Steamship Company -owned Michigan Capt. Birger Jacobsen was torpedoed April 20 while in convoy in the Mediterranean. There were no lives lost in this sinking. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 520.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steam Schooner)
The Michigan was an American steam schooner, 566 tons, wrecked near Pachena Point, B. C., January 21, 1893, while bound for Puget Sound from San Francisco to load lumber. She grounded near a creek which now bears her name, on the rugged Vancouver Island coast. All hands were rescued. The vessel was in command of Captain Graves and was owned by W. M. and Ceorge Colwell. She carried a full cargo of general mercbandise. Four days out of California ports, she encountered thick weather and a heavy westerly sea. Strong northerly currents carried the steamer to the rocks about 30 miles northwest of Bonilla Point at 10:50 p.m., January 21. Twenty-one crewmen and four passengers escaped. No contact could be made with Carmanah Lighthouse or Victoria, so Captain Graves and some of his men crossed the strait in a small boat to Neah Bay and contacted tugs. Three American tugs responded, along with the Victoria salvage ship Mascotte. Much of the cargo was saved, but little else. One crewman of the Michigan, delirious from
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steam Schooner)
The brief but exciting career of the unlucky steam schooner Michigan closed in January, 1893, when she left her bones in that well known marine cemetery on the west coast of Vancouver Island near Cape Beale. She was en route from San Francisco to Puget Sound in charge of Captain Graves with a full cargo of general merchandise. When four days out from the California port she encountered thick weather, with a heavy westerly sea and strong wind, which, with terrible northerly currents, sent her several miles out of her course, and at 10:50 P.M., January 21st, she struck the rocks about thirty miles north of Bonilla Point. The crew escaped in the boats and reached shore with their personal effects. Although the steamer was remarkably strongly constructed, the great force with which she struck, together with the weight of her cargo, rendered it impossible to save her. As she was unable to communicate with Victoria from Carmanah light, Captain Graves crossed to Neah Bay and telegraphed for a tug. The American tugs
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steamer)
The steamship Michigan caught fire at sea November 1, 1890, and after a fast run of seventy miles readied Astoria, where the fire was extinguished by the Astoria Fire Department. The loss was about ten thousand dollars, as her salmon cargo was badly damaged. She was in charge of Graves, captain, Adams, chief engineer, and F. M. Bucklin, purser. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1890, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]., p. 383.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steamer)
The steamer Michigan, completed at Portland in 1884, was sent to Puget Sound, Capt. W. H. Hobson and Engineer Oscar Wilson taking her around. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.348.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steamer)
The first mentioned was constructed at Skamockawa on the Columbia River for William M. and George L. Colwell, recent arrivals from the East. She was one hundred and fifty-eight feet three inches long and thirty-four feet beam, with engines eleven, fourteen, twenty and thirty-one by twenty-four inches. She was placed in charge of Captain Killman, who was succeeded by C. H. Lewis, and proved a very unlucky ship. She caught fire at sea in November, 1890, while en route from the Sound to Portland, and after a wild run down the coast reached Astoria all ablaze. The Astoria Fire Department pumped her full of water, the damage was repaired, and she again started out. She was seized soon afterward for smuggling and put under heavy bonds, and in January, 1893, was wrecked on Vancouver Island near Cape Beale (see wreck of Michigan, 1893). The steamer was built by L. Mortenson and was one of the most strongly constructed vessels of her class that ever floated. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland a
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steamer)
The steamship Michigan caught fire at sea November 1st, and after a fast run of seventy miles reached Astoria, where the fire was extinguished by the Astoria Fire Department. The loss was about ten thousand dollars, as her salmon cargo was badly damaged. She was in charge of Graves, captain, Adams, chief engineer, and F. M. Bucklin, purser. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.383.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Michigan (steamer)
William Crosswaite, who had built the New York the previous year, completed the propeller Michigan at Portland. She was sixty-two feet long, thirteen feet eight niches beam, six feet five inches hold. E.W. Wright, Marine business of 1885, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895.]., p. 330.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library