Mikimiki (tug)
Although a small vessel compared to those previously listed, the tug Mikimiki, designed by L. H. Coolidge and built by the Ballard Marine Railway Co. for Young Bros. Towing Co. of Honolulu in 1929, was to have a major influence on the towing fleets of the coast. The excellent performance of the original Mikimiki led to the adoption of her basic design for a huge fleet of tugs produced in Pacific Coast yards for World War II service, and tugs of the so - called Miki class form a large segment of the present - day offshore towing fleets. The original Mikimiki, 125 x 28 x 16, was fitted with twin Fairbanks -Morse diesels developing 1, 120 horsepower, making her at that time the most powerful diesel tug in the world. Upon her completion she made the voyage to Hawaii towing the 140-foot steel barge YB-4 in 11 days, 16 hours and 10 minutes, for an average speed of 8.5 knots, and bettering the record of the earlier Seattle-built Mahoe by almost three days. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurd
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mikimiki (tug)
Mikimiki, prototype of a vast fleet of wooden oceangoing tugs dismantled and her hull beached at the mouth of Joe Ney Slough on Coos Bay. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1971, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.103.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library