Milwaukee (tug)
Built in Seattle in 1913. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Milwaukee (tug)
Charles De Buse of Seattle was drowned when his 21 -foot troller, anchored on Puget Sound with the three -man crew asleep below, became entangled in the towline of a car barge being towed by the tug Milwaukee, was drawn against the barge and sunk. His son and another fisherman were rescued by the tug's crew. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 556.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Milwaukee (tug)
A first-class steel tug, the Milwaukee, was built at a cost of $100,000 by the Seattle Construction & Drydock Co. for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, being launched on January 22 by Miss Imogene Calkins, daughter of the railroad's Puget Sound traffic manager, R. M. Calkins. Originally designed to tow car barges between Seattle and the terminal of the Bellingham Bay & British Columbia Railway, a Milwaukee subsidiary, at Bellingham, she spent most of her 42-year career operating in car barge service between Seattle and Port Townsend. The Milwaukee, of 222 tons, 107 x 24 x 15.2, was equipped with a triple-expansion engine (15, 24, 38 x 24), with steam from a single-ended Scotch boiler at 150 pounds pressure, and developing 1,000 horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p 222-223.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library