Minnie A. Caine (schooner)
The Minnie A. Caine, a four-masted schooner of 880 tons and 1000 M feet capacity, was built at Seattle in 1900 by Moran Bros. for Charles Nelson of San Francisco. She is famous as the vessel described by Miss Joan Lowell in The Cradle of the Deep, that immortal classlc of the sea of 12 years ago. The schooner was laid up at San Francisco in 1926, until sold for a fishing barge in 1931. On September 24, 1939, she was blown ashore north of Santa Monica, and was burned for her metal in December. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Minnie A. Caine (schooner)
The Minnie A. Caine, a four-masted schooner of 880 tons and 1000 M feet capacity, was built at Seattle in 1900 by Moran Bros. for Charles Nelson of San Francisco. She is famous as the vessel described by Miss Joan Lowell in The Cradle of the Deep, that immortal classlc of the sea of 12 years ago. The schooner was laid up at San Francisco in 1926, until sold for a fishing barge in 1931. On September 24, 1939, she was blown ashore north of Santa Monica, and was burned for her metal in December. John Lyman, Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. June 28, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Minnie A. Caine (schooner)
The former four-masted schooner Minnie A. Caine of 1900, in use as a fishing barge off the California coast since 1931, was driven ashore by a storm on September 24 near Santa Monica, and was burned about three months later. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 476.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Minnie A. Caine (schooner)
The four masted schooner Minnie A. Caine launched in 1900 by Moran for Charles Nelson and Capt. Caine continued a -long -interrupted voyage in 1902. As she was being towed to sea by the tug Magic in December, 1901, the famous Christmas Storm of that year broke over tug and schooner with great fury. The tow line parted almost immediately, the Caine going ashore on Smith Island and the Magic running for shelter at Port Townsend. From the time of her grounding until early May a force of 40 men was employed in trying to refloat the big schooner. Three times she was raised on temporary ways ready for relaunching, but each time a storm came up and destroyed the efforts of weeks. During April the tides were too low for successful launching, but finally in May all was in readiness and the Tyee pulled her safely to deep water. The salvage operation was handled by Robert Moran. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 85.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library