Monticello
Built in January of 1907, Torger Birkeland. Echoes of Puget Sound., p. 74.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello
Built at Tacoma in 1906, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello
Built at Ballard in 1892. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello (1)
See CONTE GRANDE.
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Monticello (2)
See KAISER WILHELM II (2).
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Monticello (steamer)
Monticello, Puget Sound passenger steamer of 1906, sold by Otto Lorenz, who had operated her for a time on the Seattle -Port Ludlow route, to Capt. 0. Joyce and Seattle associates. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 448.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello (steamer)
Monticello, Puget Sound passenger steamer of 1906, sold by Otto Lorenz, who had operated her for a time on the Seattle -Port Ludlow route, to Capt. 0. Joyce and Seattle associates. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 448.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello (steamer)
The Puget Sound steamboat Monticello, operated for several years on the Seattle- Port Blakeley route by the Port Blakeley Mill Co. was taken over by the Kitsap County Transportation Co. as the first step in a cooperative arrangement between the two firms to provide a fast auto ferry service between Seattle and Bainbridge Island where the mill company, headed by D. E. Skinner and John W. Eddy, planned to open up some 1,600 acres of undeveloped land owned by the firm. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello (steamer)
The steamship Monticello of the United American Lines intercoastal service broke all records for lumber shipment by single vessel from a Northwest port, taking on 6,350,612 feet at Portland for delivery at New York. In July the record was again broken when the 10,662-ton steamship Lewis Luckenbach departed from Puget Sound with 7,500,000 feet of lumber for the East Coast, in addition to 500 tons of copper. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 350.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello (steamer)
Among the smaller steam vessels constructed on Puget Sound in 1906 was the Monticello, an extremely handsome propeller of 196 tons, 125.5 x 21 x 6.3, powered by a triple expansion engine 12, 19, 33 x 16, working at 250 pounds pressure. She was launched by Crawford & Reid at Tacoma for Moe Bros. as an opposition steamer to the Kitsap County Transportation Co. on the Seattle-Poulsbo route with the Advance. Late in the year the Monticello, in charge of Capt. Chris Moe, was involved in a collision with the Kitsap County Transportation Co. steamer Kitsap, Capt. Alf Hostmark. Both masters were censured by marine inspectors Whitney and Turner, and in January, 1907 the Moes sold both the Monticello and the Advance, which they were then operating between Seattle and the mill ports, to the Port Blakeley Mill Company. The Monticello remained on the Seattle Port Blakeley route until superseded by an automobile ferry, the Liberty, in 1922. In 1936 she was rebuilt as the diesel freighter Penaco.Gordon Newell, Maritime Even
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello (steamer)
The Monticello, a propeller one hundred and thirty feet long, with triple compound engines twelve, eighteen and twenty-eight and one-half by fourteen inches, for Z. J. Hatch & Brother by E. Sorensen. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.399.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monticello Victory (rag Carrier)
Soon afterward the American Rag carrier Monticello Victory, 736 x 102 feet and with a deadweight capacity of 49,300 tons, loaded wheat for Bangladesh at Pier 1, Astoria, becoming the largest vessel yet to call at that port. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1972, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.111.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library