Moshulu (bark)
The four-masted bark Moshulu, one of the best-known of the later day sailing vessels in Northwest waters, having been used throughout the late war as a storage ship by the Germans, was sold to Swedish owners for further use as a grain storage barge . The Moshulu was owned throughout the war years by Gustaf Erikson of Mariehamn, Finland, the Germans taking her over following their conquest of Norway. Norwegian underground fighters sabotaged the warehouse where her masts and sails were stored. Unwilling to spend much money on his surviving windjammers Erikson sold Moshulu to an enterprising and ambitious German, who also bought Pamir and Passat and the five -masted topsau schooner Carl Vinnen. His plans to rerig Moshulu fell through and it was then that she was resold to the Swedes for a grain store ship with no masts above deck. Recently the hulk was sold to Finnish owners for more of the same kind of use. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Moshulu (bark)
The largest cargo to leave the Northwest under sail was loaded at the Long Bell Lumber Co. dock in Longview by the four-masted bark Moshulu in June of 1927, placed in active service by Charles Nelson & Co., who also activated the Monongahela and the wooden Monitor, Thistle and Fort Laramie. Moshulu, commanded by Capt. P. A. McDonald, delivered her cargo to Geelong, Australia and returned in ballast to layup. Monongahela, commanded by Capt. Marcus Asmussen, who had been master of the schooner Samar for 20 years, loaded a full cargo at Port Angeles in August for Adelaide and returned to join Moshulu in layup. Fort Laramie, Capt. Elriif, took a cargo from Aberdeen to Sydney in April, 1927 and returned to Puget Sound and layup. Thistle, Capt. Carl Moeller, the only Nelson salier to make a profit, sailed from Port Angeles in July for Sydney, returning early in 1928 for layup in Lake Union. Monitor, Capt. Beastings, also loaded on Puget Sound for Melbourne, joining Thistle in layup early in 1928. Of all the ships w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library