Mountain Queen
Ran the Cascades on the Columbia River. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest II, p. 102.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mountain Queen (steamer)
The old steamer Mountain Queen was rebuilt as a sidewheeler at Portland, renamed the Sehome, and sent to Puget Sound, where she commenced running in the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company's service December 14th, in place of the North Pacific. The Sehome is one hundred and ninety-two feet four inches long, thirty-two feet two inches beam, and ten feet five inches hold. She ran for a short time on the Victoria route and subsequently to Bellingham Bay. When the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company suspended operations on the Sound, the steamer was tied up for some time, and early in 1895 was chartered by the Northern Pacific and used on the Victoria run in charge of Captain Clancy. Captains McAlpine, Stetson, O'Brien, Parker and Barrington have handled the steamer on the Sound, and Philip Van Tassell, Charles S. Follett and several other engineers have served with her. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1889, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 364.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mountain Queen (steamer)
The old steamer Mountain Queen was rebuilt as a sidewheeler at Portland, renamed the Sehome, and sent to Puget Sound, where she commenced running in the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company's service December 14th, in place of the North Pacific. The Sehome is one hundred and ninety-two feet four inches long, thirty-two feet two inches beam, and ten feet five inches hold. She ran for a short time on the Victoria route and subsequently to Bellingham Bay. When the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company suspended operations on the Sound, the steamer was tied up for some time, and early in 1895 was chartered by the Northern Pacific and used on the Victoria run in charge of Captain Clancy. Captains McAlpine, Stetson, O'Brien, Parker and Barrington have handled the steamer on the Sound, and Philip Van Tassell, Charles S. Follett and several other engineers have served with her. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New Yor
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mountain Queen (steamer)
The steamer Mountain Queen, in charge of Capt. J. W. Troup and Engineer De Huff, followed the Thompson to the lower river July 6, 1882, making the run in eleven minutes from the upper to the lower Cascades. The train on the Portage Railroad started at the same time, intending to beat the steamer, but was at least three hundred yards in the rear when they reached the lower Cascades. The barge Atlas was brought down the same day by Capt. Fred Wilson, who rigged her with a huge square sail, and she drifted down stern first, reaching the lower Cascades thirty-five minutes after leaving the wharf boat. The Atlas stood the trip well and was immediately towed to Portland and went into service alongside a ship the same day. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1882. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 292.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mountain Queen (steamer)
The loss of the splendid new steamer Daisy Ainsworth was seriously felt at this time, and, as speedily as possible, work was pushed on her successor, the Mountain Queen, which was launched at The Dalles, March 15, 1877. By a singular coincidence, the hull of the wrecked Daisy Ainsworth, which had been hanging to the rock where Martin Spelling had left her a few months before, floated off and went over the Cascades the same day that the Queen entered the water. The latter steamer was one hundred and seventy-six feet long, thirty-two feet beam, seven feet six inches hold, engines from the Daisy Ainsworth twenty by eighty-four inches. The Queen was put in commission on the middle river, in charge of Capt. John McNulty and Engineer Carroll, remaining there until 1882. Capt. Fred Wilson and Capt. James W. Troup also had charge of her at different times, the latter taking her over the Cascades, July 6, 1882. The run was made in eleven minutes, racing with a train from the upper to the lower landing, and beating it
Citation: Tacoma Public Library