Multnomah (steam Schooner)
June 1929 Steam schooner, wood, 969 tons, built by McCormick at the St. Helens yard in October 1912 ... the first of 42 vessels to be constructed there during the next 15 years. The ship sent a distress call when she ran into difficulty on the Columbia bar on June 16, 1929. The Coast Guard had their hands full with the wreck of the Laurel, but managed to aid both vessels and removed fifteen passengers from the foundering Multnomah. Quick repairs kept the ship afloat while she was escorted over the bar to relative safety. The damage left her unfit for sea duty and she was moved upriver to St. Helens where she burned, whether by accident or design remains unknown. A wreck erroneously identified as the Multnomah reportedly lies at Lat. 46 degrees 53'00 1, Long. 124 degrees 20'00 in 180 feet of water. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Multnomah (steam Schooner)
American steam schooner, 969 tons, damaged beyond repair in heavy seas June 16, 1929. She sent out a call for the Coast Guard, after her loosing part of her deck load of lumber, but the Coast Guard was attending the wreck of the Laurel on Peacock Spit. Finally the Multnomah was escorted over the bar, but her condition left her no longer fit for sea duty. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Multnomah (steam Schooner)
969 ton American vessel damaged June 16, 1929. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Multnomah (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Multnomah, 969 tons, 205.5 feet in length, was launched in 1912 and completed in early 1913 by the St. Helens Shipbuilding Co. for the Charles R. McCormick fleet. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p221.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library