Napoleon Iii (1)
There were several vessels named NAPOLEON III during this time period. However, according to the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping, the only one with a County Durham connection is the bark NAPOLEON III, 297 tons, built under special survey in Sunderland in 1855: Master: 1856/57-1858/59 - A. Smith [owner]; 1859/60-1861/62 - A. Cameron; 1861/62 - Stodley. Owner: A. Smith & [Co]. Port of Registry: Sunderland. Port of Survey: Sunderland. Destined Voyage: 856/57-1861/62 - Mediterranean; 1861/62 - Black Sea. The vessel's entry in Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1861/62 is stamped "wrecked", an event which must have taken place sometime between February (the date she was last surveyed at Sunderland) and June (the month the 1862/63 volume of the Register was published) 1862. There is no reference to the wreck in the abstract returns of wrecks on the coasts of the United Kingdom for 1862 (Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons, 1863 [3216] lxiii.165), so the event most probably took place somewhere between Britanny and the Black Sea. For details on the wreck of the NAPOLEON III, contact the National Maritime Museum, Romney Road, Greenwich, London SE10 9NF, Great Britain, and ask the staff to check the Wreck Registers U.K., which begin in 1855. The National Maritime Museum is also the best location to search for a fuller description or pictorial representation of the vessel. As the NAPOLEON III was small, and was in service only six years, it is unlikely that a photograph of her survives. However, she was built under special survey, and it is therefore quite possible that the survey report survives among the Lloyd's Register of Shipping survey reports now deposited at the Museum. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 March 1998]
Napoleon Iii (2)
While she had been built as the NAPOLEON III, the vessel that sank in collision with the LOCH EARN was named VILLE DU HAVRE. She was built for the Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line) by Thames Ironworks, London (engines by Ravenshill & Salked, London), as a side-paddle steamer and was launched on 11 February 1865. Original configuration: 3,376 tons; 111,50 x 13,98 meters/365.9 x 45.9 feet (length x beam), straight bow, 2 funnels, 2 masts; iron construction, side-paddles, service speed 11 knots; passenger accommodation for 170 in 1st class, 100 in 2nd class, and 50 in steerage. 26 April 1866, maiden voyage, Havre-Brest-New York. Her lack of speed was a great disappointment to her owners, and she completed only 3 roundtrip voyages to New York in 1866, none in 1867, and 2 in 1868 (30 August 1868, last voyage, Havre-Brest-New York). She was then laid up until 1871. 16 September 1871, sailed Havre-Tyneside. 1871-72, lengthened to 128,52 meters (421.7 feet) by A. Leslie & Co, Hebburn-on-Tyne; 3,960 tons; converted to single-screw, compound egines, mizzen mast added; renamed VILLE DU HAVRE. 29 March 1873, resumed Havre-Brest-New York service. 22 November 1873, bound from New York for Havre, Capt. Marino Surmont, with a crew of 172 and 141 passengers, she sank 12 minutes after colliding with the iron sailing ship LOCH EARN, 1200 tons, of Glasgow, Capt. William Robertson, bound from London to New York in ballast with a crew of 30, at lat. 46.50 N, lon. 35 W, with the loss of 111 crew and 115 passengers. The survivors, 61 crew and 26 passengers, were at first taken aboard the LOCH EARN, but were transferred the next day fo the American vessel TREMONTAIN, Capt. Urquhart, and taken to Cardiff. Although badly damaged, the LOCH EARN proceeded on her voyage, but was abandoned on 28 November, her boats being later picked up by the BRITISH QUEEN, with no further loss of life [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 652; Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons, 1875 (Command 1260) lxx.353-354]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 March 1998]