Nellie May (bark)
This American bark, 699 tons, foundered off Cape Flattery in January 1890. The vessel departed from Port Townsend with lumber for San Francisco and vanished with all hands, probably the victim of heavy seas. Her name board was picked up on May 4, off Cape Flattery, by the tug Lorne, and the wreckage of one of her boats was found by Indians at Clayoquot, B. C. The vessel was owned by Captain Axtel Austin; her skipper, W. P. Sayward of Port Madison, and E. M. Harrick of San Francisco. She was built at Newcastle, Maine, in 1867 and carried a crew of 13, including the captain. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan De Fuca Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nellie May (bark)
The bark 'Nellie May' started from Port Madison on January 23, 1890, for San Francisco with a cargo of lumber; and the only trace which has ever been found was some wreckage of one of her boats discovered by the Indians on Clayoquot Sound, and her name-board, which was picked up off Cape Flattery by the tug 'Lorne' on May 4th. She was owned by Captain Axtel Austin and W. P. Sayward of Port Madison, and E. M. Herrick of San Francisco. She was manned by Captain Austin and twelve others. (Lewis and Dryden, Marine History of the Northwest) Elsie F. Marriott Bainbridge through bifocals.Seattle: Gateway Printing Company, 1941, p. 183-202
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nellie May (bark)
The long list of vessels which have sailed to a mysterious fate received another addition early in 1890. The bark Nellie May started from Port Madison, January 23d, for San Francisco with a cargo of lumber, and the only trace which has ever been found was some wreckage of one of her boats discovered by the Indians on Clayoquot Sound, and her name-board, which was picked up off Cape Flattery by the tug Lorne, May 4th. The Nellie May was built at Newcastle, Me., in 1867, and owned by Capt. Axtel Austin and W. P. Sayward of Port Madison and E. M. Herrick of San Francisco. She was in charge of Captain Austin, with J. D. Wilson, first mate; C. Wright, second mate; J. E. Perkins, Edward White, G. Larson, Paul Ritters, Otto Nasch, P. Peterson, John Bowers and one other, seamen, and a cook and steward, whose names are unknown. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was w
Citation: Tacoma Public Library