Charles Nelson
John Rosene's Alaska activities, Sea Chest. X (March, 1977).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles Nelson (schooner)
November 1903 Steam schooner. Foundered off Heceta Head. The derelict was later salvaged. 36 people saved. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles Nelson (schooner)
Charles Nelson, American steam schooner, laden with 750,000 feet of lumber, burned at Field's Landing, California, April 24, the hull being converted to a barge. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles Nelson (steam Schooner)
The steam schooner Charles Nelson which departed from Astoria on November 3, 1903, for San Francis became water logged off Hecata Head, two hundred miles down the coast, as a result of the working of her deck load of lumber in a heavy gale. The stanchions holding the deck load were carried away, opening up seams in the deck. Heavy seas washed over the vessel and her hold soon filled, the entire deckload going into the sea. The passengers and crew, numbering 36 persons, took to the boats and were picked up the following morning by the tug Sea Rover. The steam schooner Aurelia, Astoria for Monterey, later got a line aboard the derelict and succeeded in getting her to port, where she was salvaged. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 96.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles Nelson (steam Schooner)
The Charles Nelson, 219 x 32 feet, was chartered to the Blue Star Navigation Co., being fitted out to carry 435 first-class and 325 second-class passengers between Seattle and St. Michael. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1898, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 33.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Matha Nelson (schoooner)
The Matha Nelson, a three - masted schooner of 460 tons and 600 M capacity, was built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven in 1896 for the Charles Nelson Co., San Francisco. In March, 1911, she was bought by the Alaska Packers Association, San Francisco, to operate as a cold-storage vessel, bringing back fresh salmon from Alaska, but the state prohibited importation of such fish before she went into service, and the schooner was thereafter operated in connection with the canneries like the rest of the fleet. She made her last voyage in that trade in 1926; in 1928 she was chartered as a tender to the Cape San Lucas tuna fleet; and in 1930 was sold to the Fox Film Corp. They installed an auxiliary engine and used her in a picture or two, subsequently selling her for a yacht. In 1938 she made a voyage to the Galapagos and Cocos Islands, shark - fishing and treasure-hunting, some of the crew landing in Federal court on charges of mutiny. In 1939 she was rerigged as a three skysailed full-rigged ship of the period of 1830-40
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Matha Nelson (schoooner)
The Matha Nelson, a three - masted schooner of 460 tons and 600 M capacity, was built by Bendixsen at Fairhaven in 1896 for the Charles Nelson Co., San Francisco. In March, 1911, she was bought by the Alaska Packers Association, San Francisco, to operate as a cold-storage vessel, bringing back fresh salmon from Alaska, but the state prohibited importation of such fish before she went into service, and the schooner was thereafter operated in connection with the canneries like the rest of the fleet. She made her last voyage in that trade in 1926; in 1928 she was chartered as a tender to the Cape San Lucas tuna fleet; and in 1930 was sold to the Fox Film Corp. They installed an auxiliary engine and used her in a picture or two, subsequently selling her for a yacht. In 1938 she made a voyage to the Galapagos and Cocos Islands, shark - fishing and treasure-hunting, some of the crew landing in Federal court on charges of mutiny. In 1939 she was rerigged as a three skysailed full-rigged ship of the period of 1830-40
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nelson
Kootenai Lake Steamer. Nelson. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 392.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nelson (hms Battleship)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 99.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nelson (steamer)
The Nelson, the first sternwheeler on the Kootenai, and, with the exception of the Galena, the first passenger steamer on those waters, was completed at Bonner's Ferry by the contractors in charge of the construction of the Great Northern Railway. She was a well built steamer, with good speed and carrying capacity, and on the completion of the road, like the Spokane, was sold to the Columbia & Kootenai Steam Navigation Company, and is still in their service between Nelson and Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.391.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nelson (stern Wheeler)
Losses to inland vessels included the well-known old Kootenay Lake stern-wheeler Nelson, built at Nelson, B. C. in 1891 for the Columbia & Kootenay Steam Navigation Co. and later taken over by the C. P. R. The 496 -ton steamer, 134 feet in length, noted as the fastest vessel on the lake until the arrival of State of Idaho in 1893, was destroyed by fire while at her moorings. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 311.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library