Clara Nevada (steamer)
This passenger steamer, American, went missing after departing Dyea, Alaska. Her battered hull several days later ground up on the outcrops of Eldred Rock, showing traces of a fire, the entire ship's company having drowned, numbering more than I 00 passengers and crew. The tragedy occurred off Berners Bay on the night of February 5, 1898, in the throes of a gale.
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Nevada (steamer)
Of the accidents, in which a total of more than two hundred people, including Chinese, lost their lives, that occurred over the years, 90 percent were due to -racing.' California Steam frowned on racing but could not stop it. Powerful though it was, it never had a complete monopoly of the river business. From time to time strong independents appeared and formed opposition companies. The one that gave the Old Line the most trouble was the California Navigation and Improvement Company, headed by Captain G. W. Kidd, the pestiferous owner of the big Nevada and Washoe, both of which were involved in a string of accidents. They were always on the prowl for trouble, and they often found it. The speedy little Antelope was the Nevada's favorite target. Several times as the two boats were coming out of Benicia, northbound, she bore down on the Antelope with the obvious intention of raking her from stem to stern. But the Antelope was too fast for her, and she got away with no greater damage than a few feet of battered r
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Sierra Nevada (steamer)
Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 199, 275, 302. William D. Lyman. The Columbia River, p. 239.
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Sierra Nevada (steamer)
Owing to the heavy passenger travel on the ocean routes, the steamships made faster time than ever before. The Sierra Nevada, Captain Conner, accomplished the voyage from San Francisco to Portland, in April, 1862, in seventy-two hours, then claimed to be the fastest trip on record; but a few weeks later the Brother Jonathan totally eclipsed that performance by making the same run in sixty-nine hours and ten minutes. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.109.
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Sierra Nevada (steamer)
The steamship Sierra Nevada was built in New York in 1851 by Charles Morgan, who intended her for the Texas trade. She was afterward sold to Commodore Garrison, and made three trips to Chagres, then sailing from New York for San Francisco, December 12, 1852, in Command of Capt. J. D. Wilson, who died at Panama and was succeeded by Captain Tanner, who completed the voyage. Her first work on arrival was on the San Juan route, in charge of Captain Blethen. She was one of the fastest of the old line of steamships, and, while she might be considered a slow packet to-day, in 1862 she made a record from San Francisco to Portland of 72 hours, which was not beaten for several years. The steamer first came to Portland in charge of Dall, who was succeeded by Wakeman, Conner, Johnston, Williams, Huntingdon, Fauntleroy, and others, of whom Conner was longest in command. During his time the old steamer carried 500 and 600 passengers per trip. When Holladay started the California, Oregon & Mexican Steamship Company the Sier
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Sierra Nevada (steamer)
The steamship Sierra Nevada, an old-timer on the northern route during the Fraser excitement, struck a reef three miles north of Pedro Bianco while en route from San Francisco to San Luis Obispo in October, and twenty minutes later keeled over and filled and was pronounced a total loss. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.180.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library