New World (steamer)
More refugees from the East Coast continued to steam into San Francisco Bay [during the opening of the California Gold Rush]. Biggest of the lot was the ornate 530-ton side-wheeler New World. Her stormy career began when, as other steamers had, she slipped out of New York harbor without clearance papers, after being attached for debt. A British frigate chased her into the harbor at Rio de Janeiro. Being without papers, she would have been a lawful prize. On his way ashore, Captain Edgar Wakeman, her master, managed to fall overboard from a small boat, and hoodwinked the American Consul into believing that he had thereby lost the boat's papers while in the water. Armed with proper clearance, the New World was coaled and proceeded on her way, leaving behind at Rio eighteen of her crew who had died with yellow fever. At Valparaiso she was ordered into quarantine for twenty days. But Wakeman protested so violently that at the end of eight days the boat was released. On reaching Callao, he was informed that news o
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
New World (steamer)
The New World, the finest steamer which had yet appeared on Puget Sound, arrived at Olympia from the Columbia River in February [1867] in charge of Capt. Charles Winsor, and a brief period of very warm competition was indulged in with the Eliza Anderson, which had been accumulating the sinews of war during several years of prosperity. The New World was much more expensive to run than the Josie McNear, for which she had been exchanged, and the owners of the Anderson had little difficulty in ending the contest. Captain Finch bought her in November and sent her back to California, where the California Steam Navigation Company promptly attached her for breach of contract, the conditions of the sale at the time of her purchase by the Oregon Steam Navigation Company providing that she should be kept out of California waters for ten years. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961
Citation: Tacoma Public Library