City Of New York (1)
The "City of New York" was a 2,360 gross ton ship, built in 1861 by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow for the Inman Line. Her details were - length 336ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 158-cabin and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/4/1861, she sailed from Liverpool on 11/9/1861 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage started on 24/2/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York and on her homeward journey, when approaching Queenstown in the early morning of 29th March 1864, she struck the sunken reef known as Daunt's Rock, and became a total loss. There were no casualties. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,pps.224/240]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 January 1998]
City Of New York (2)
The second "City of New York" was a 2,642 gross ton ship built by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow in 1865. Length 321ft x beam 39.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched as the "Delaware" for Richardson, Spence & Co, Liverpool on 25/2/1865, she went to Inman Line the same year and was renamed "City of New York". On 7/6/1865 she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1871 she was rebuilt to a length of 375.2ft and 3,523 gross tons and on 4/4/1871 resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service. In September 1876 she was chartered to the American Line and completed three round voyages between Liverpool and Philadelphia, and the following year was fitted with compound engines. She was then chartered to the Guion Line and on 8/6/1878 commenced the first of 2 round voyages between Liverpool - Queenstown and New York. On 19/12/1882 she commenced her last voyage for the Inman Line when she left Liverpool for New York and in 1883 went to the Allan Line and was renamed "Norwegian". Fitted with new compound engines, she commenced Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 12/6/1884, Glasgow - New York sailings on 20/11/1891 and Glasgow - Boston sailings on 4/7/1896. Her last Glasgow - New York voyage commenced on 28/4/1900 and her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 23/5/1903. She was scrapped the same year in Holland. [ North Atlantic Seaway , by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.241] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 January 1998]
City Of New York (3)
The "City of New York" was an iron built, 3,019 gross ton, screw propulsion steamer with a speed of 14 knots. She was built in 1875 by Roach, Chester, PA for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co.and sailed on her first voyage from San Francisco to Kandavau (Fiji) and Sydney on 24th April 1876. On 26th October 1893 she was wrecked on Point Bonita, San Francisco Bay. The company ran a service between San Francisco, Fiji, Honolulu and Australia / New Zealand ports and from 1879, advertised in the London Times "An overland route from Britain to Australia, New Zealand, China, etc, via New York and San Francisco in connection with the Anchor Line from London or Glasgow to New York. Through tickets are available". [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 March 1998]
City Of New York (4)
See NEW YORK (2).
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City Of New York (steamer)
The Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) ordered the City of New York and the sister ships, the City of San Francisco and the City of Sydney, to inaugurate in 1875 a new PMSS route from San Francisco to Australia. The three ships were iron steamers with screws and compound engines but were smaller than the much larger City of Tokyo and City of Peking, which the PMSS operated between San Francisco and the Far East. The Australian route offered little cargo, and consequently PMSS shifted the City of San Francisco to the route between Panama and San Francisco. On 16 May 1877 the City of San Francisco was wrecked on Tartar Shoal, near Acapulco, Mexico, but without any loss of life. When PMSS abandoned the Australia service in 1885, it transferred the City of Sydney and the City of New York to its other routes. The former continued in service until it was laid up in 1910, but on 26 October 1893 the latter ran into the rocks of Point Bonita right inside San Francisco Bay. The captain did not want to delay his sail
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
New York (1)
The NEW YORK is pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 219, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. For additional information on the NEW YORK, including pictures, see the following works: 1. Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd, Bd. 1:1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991). 2. Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995).
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 November 1997]
New York (2)
The "New York" of 1913 was built by J & G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1888 for the Inman line as the "City of New York". She was a 10,499 gross ton vessel with a clipper stem, length 527.6ft x beam 63.2ft, three funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 540-1st, 200-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/3/1888, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 1/8/1888. In August 1892 she made a record crossing between Sandy Hook and Queenstown and on 8/2/1893 commenced her last Liverpool - New York voyage. On 22/2/1893 she went to the American Line and was put under the US flag. She was then renamed "New York" and her accommodation altered to carry 290-1st, 250-2nd and 725-3rd class passengers. On 25/2/1893 she sailed from New York on her first voyage to Southampton and commenced her last voyage on this service on 16/4/1898. She then became the US Armed Cruiser "Harvard" until 11/1/1899 when she resumed the New York - Southampton service as the "New York". On 14/1/1899 her starboard engine broke down and was repaired at Southampton and she resumed service from Southampton - New York on 25/3/1899. On 20/4/1901 she left Southampton for her last voyage to Cherbourg and New York before being rebuilt with new triple expansion engines, number of funnels reduced to two, and her size increased to 10,798 tons. On 15/4/1903 she resumed the New York - Cherbourg - Southampton service and in 1913, her first class passenger accommodation was downgraded to second class. Commenced her last voyage Southampton - Cherbourg - New York on 1/8/1914 and was transferred to the New York - Liverpool run on 14/8/1914. In April 1918 she made her last run from Liverpool to New York and then became the US Transport "Plattsburg". On 19/2/1920 she resumed the New York - Plymouth - Southampton service as the "New York" and her masts were reduced to two. On 2/11/1920 she made her last run from Southampton to Cherbourg and New York and in 1921 was sold to the Polish Navigation Co. who retained her name and used her for one round voyage New York - Antwerp - Danzig - Southampton - Cherbourg - Brest - New York. She was then seized for debt and sold. In 1922 she went to the Irish American Line and later the same year to the United Transatlantic Line. On 10/6/1922 she left New York for the last time for the American Black Sea Line on a voyage to Naples and Constantinople where she was sold at auction by order of the US government, and was scrapped at Genoa in 1923. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.244]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 October 1997]
New York (3)
(of 1955) See NEA HELLAS.
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New York (schooner)
The 45-foot Nome schooner New York was purchased by Capt. Alexander Allan, who had come out from the East in the Nome gold rush of 1900. He installed a gas engine and entered the Siberian ivory and whale bone trade, beginning a long career of Arctic navigation. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 77.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
New York (steamer)
Additions to the fleet on the Columbia River and vicinity were of but small importance in 1884. At Portland the propeller New York was constructed by a man named Crosswaite, who sold her to W. H. Foster, her new owner using her as a ferry between Portland and Albina. The New York was fifty-two feet long and nine feet beam, with an eight by nine inch engine. E.W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]. p. 320.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
New Yorker
The 361 x 52-foot roll on-roll off ship New Yorker of 4,684 gross tons, built at Baltimore in 1960 and formerly operated in the Puerto Rican service of Sea-Land Services, was converted at Willamette Shipyard, Portland, for feeder service to Alaskan outports under the new name Aleutian Developer. The twin-screw motor vessel was rebuilt to accommodate 90 containers as well as breakbulk cargo. Mechanical changes included the installation of a bow thruster to facilitate navigation through ice and provide increased operating efficiency in the high wind areas common to the Aleutian Chain. In addition to calling at Cordova and other ports previously served by the company's Summit, the Aleutian Developer extended her operations to numerous small outports along the Chain, operating in conjunction with the four large 360-container Sea-Land carriers which provide weekly service from Seattle to Kodiak. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.189.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ville De New York
See LA NORMANDIE.
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