City Of New York (steamer)
The Pacific Mail Steamship Company (PMSS) ordered the City of New York and the sister ships, the City of San Francisco and the City of Sydney, to inaugurate in 1875 a new PMSS route from San Francisco to Australia. The three ships were iron steamers with screws and compound engines but were smaller than the much larger City of Tokyo and City of Peking, which the PMSS operated between San Francisco and the Far East. The Australian route offered little cargo, and consequently PMSS shifted the City of San Francisco to the route between Panama and San Francisco. On 16 May 1877 the City of San Francisco was wrecked on Tartar Shoal, near Acapulco, Mexico, but without any loss of life. When PMSS abandoned the Australia service in 1885, it transferred the City of Sydney and the City of New York to its other routes. The former continued in service until it was laid up in 1910, but on 26 October 1893 the latter ran into the rocks of Point Bonita right inside San Francisco Bay. The captain did not want to delay his sail
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
New York (steamer)
Additions to the fleet on the Columbia River and vicinity were of but small importance in 1884. At Portland the propeller New York was constructed by a man named Crosswaite, who sold her to W. H. Foster, her new owner using her as a ferry between Portland and Albina. The New York was fifty-two feet long and nine feet beam, with an eight by nine inch engine. E.W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]. p. 320.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library