Florence Nightingale
The 1943-44 Lloyd's Register of Shipping gives the following details : FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE ex. Mormacsun-1942. Call sign : WHLG. Official # : 240541. Rigging : 2 decks and shelter deck; decks electrically welded; longitudinal framing at bottom and at decks; cruiser stern; fitted for fuel oil; equipped with Direction Finder, Gyro-compass and Echo Sounding Device; water ballast. Tonnage : 7,773 tons gross and 4,585 tons net. Dimensions : 469 feet long, 69.6 foot beam and holds 29.2 feet deep. Forecastle 39 feet long. Built : in 1940 by Moore Dry Dock Co. in Oakland, CA. Propulsion : 2 steam turbine double reduction geared to a single screw shaft. Engine built by DeLaval Steam Turbines Co. in Trenton, NJ . Owners : Moore-McCormack Lines Inc. Port of registry : San Francisco Flag : U.S.A. -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 1 October 1998]
Nightingale
The Nightingale, which was the flagship, was designed by the United States naval constructor at Charlestown, Mass., as a model of American marine architecture. She registered 722 tons, and was built at Portsmouth, N. H., for exhibition at the World's Fair in London; but before completion a difficulty arose between the contractors and the men who backed the project, and the vessel was sold at auction to a Boston firm, and, after sailing around the world for several years in legitimate business, she turned up as a slaver and made fortunes for her owners before she was finally seized off the coast of Africa by the Jamestown, with nine hundred slaves aboard. She was condemned and bought by the United States Navy Department, and after the capture of New Orleans was stationed as a guard and store ship at the mouth of the Mississippi River for eighteen months. She was also in use at Pensacola and other points on the Gulf, and when the war closed was purchased for a song by a Boston house and subsequently passed into
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale (clipper Ship)
Yankee clipper ship, Currier and Ives drawing. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 30.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale (minesweeper)
December 26, 1941 Minesweeper. She struck a buoy and sank at the mouth of the Columbia, later raised. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nightingale (minesweeper)
(AMc 18) U. S. Navy minesweeper, 225 tons, sank after colliding with Columbia bar buoy No. 11, December 26, 1941. After she struck the buoy she was ran for the jetty sands to prevent her sinking in deep water. A big hole had been knocked in her side however and before the sands could be reached she sank. The CG-402 removed 9 men and the CG4315 rescued the remaining 7. There were no casualties. Only the tips of the Nightingale's masts remained above the water. Several weeks later, Capt. Loring Hyde, salvage master, raised the AMc type minesweeper, and the wreck was sold as surplus and rebuilt at Astoria. Cause of the disaster was listed as unknown. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library