Nimbus
December 29, 1877 American ship, 1302 tons, built at Bath, Maine in 1869. Under Captain Leonard, the oak and pine ship left Astoria for Cork. She thumped heavily on the bar and began to leak. In spite of her pumps, the water rose and her crew was taken off by the Aberystwith Castle. The Nimbus went under at 12:55 a.m., 25 miles off the Columbia. On November 28, 1878, the Revenue Cutter Thomas Corwin investigated a bottom-up wreck floating off False Tillamook and determined that it was the Nimbus, her bursting cargo having forced the ship to surface. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland:Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 130-133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nimbus
American ship, 1,302 tons, struck the sands of the Columbia bar outward botind, and plunged to the bottom twenty-five miles northwest of the river, December 29, 1877. 'The vessel under pilot Thomas Doig, crossed the bar at 8:30 a.m. with a cargo of wheat from Portland valued at $92,500. Following the south channel, the ship scraped over the middle sands. When the pilot departed from the ship, Captain R. L. Leonard discovered his vessel was taking water at an alarming rate. The vessel was put about and headed for shore, but the wind died and she was becalmed. Leonard signalled the Aberystwith Castle and the Pilgrim to stand by. At 7 p.m. when the water reached the tween decks of the Nimbus. the crew abandoned and was picked up by the stand-by sailing vessels. The ship went down a few hours later. She was valued at $65,000, and had been built at Bath, Maine, in 1869. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nimbus
Stranded December 29, 1877 on the Columbia Bar. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 175.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nimbus
The American ship Nimbus, one of the Columbia River grain fleet, was lost off the mouth of the Columbia, December 29th. The vessel was taken over the bar at 8:45 A.M. by Pilot Doig, drawing twenty-two feet of water, and struck heavily in passing out, but was thought not to have sustained serious damage. Pilot Doig left her, and the captain squared away. At 10:30 the carpenter reported three feet of water in the hold, and at 12:00 o'clock there were six and one-half feet with all the pumps going. The vessel was then headed for the bar, but at 1:00 P.M. the wind died out and the Aberystwith Castle, which had passed out of the river a short distance behind the Nimbus, was signaled to lay to. At 5:00 P.M. the water had reached between decks, where at 7:00 P.M. it was twenty-one inches deep. The crew took to the boats and rowed to the Aberystwith Castle, which stood by until 12:55 A.M., when the Nimbus took a final plunge twenty-five miles off the mouth of the river. The vessel was built at Bath, Me., in 1869 and
Citation: Tacoma Public Library