Nomad (schooner)
The Nomad, a four-masted schooner of 565 tons, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1897 for their own account. She made a fast passage to China on her maiden voyage under Captain McAllep and went missing on the return trip. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 12, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nomad (schooner)
December 1897 Schooner, four masts, 565 tons, built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakeley in 1897. This beautiful ship went missing off the Columbia the same year she was built. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nomad (schooner)
The Nomad, a four-masted schooner of 565 tons, was built by Hall Bros. at Port Blakely in 1897 for their own account. She made a fast passage to China on her maiden voyage under Captain McAllep and went missing on the return trip. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 12, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nomad (schooner)
A tragic loss occurred offshore, probably some time in 1898, the evidence in the form of wreckage drifting ashore early in 1899. The fine four -masted schooner Nomad, one of the beautiful craft built by Hall Bros. Shipyard at Port Blakeley, had departed Tacoma for Shanghai on her maiden voyage September 18, 1897, lumber laden and commanded by Capt. J. W. McAllep, who was accompanied by his daughter Helen. His sons, Weston and George, were signed on as ship's carpenter and able seaman respectively. She delivered her cargo safely in the Orient and left Shanghai December 7, 1897, but on the return voyage was apparently abandoned at sea and all hands lost. On February 1, 1899 the derelict drifted ashore at Kohala Beach on the coast of Hawaii, but the only trace ever found of her crew was part of a man's body found in the wreckage, apparently partly eaten by sharks and unidentifiable. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 51.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library