La Normandie
Further to the correspondence on the "La Normandie". She was the first ship of it's class and the only one built outside France. It was originally intended to name her "Ville de New York" but she was launched as the "Normandie". The prefix "La" was added to her name about four years later to bring her into line with the other mail steamers. When she ran her speed trials, she attained 17.25 knots - well in excess of the required speed. When she went into service, the harbour at Havre wasn't deep enough for her and she was specially fitted so that she could take on ballast aft while at sea to increase the efficiency of her screw. She ran without incident until January 1891 when she rammed and sank the Havre tug "Abeille" with the loss of six of the tug's crew. From 1900 - 1912 she was used on the West Indies service and in August 1912 was sold for L 22,500 to the Forth Shipbreaking Co. and broken up.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 August 1997]
Norma (schooner)
The Norma, a three -masted schooner of 326 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1883 by C. G. White for G. S. Hinsdale of that port. She was lost entering Ten Mile River, November 15, 1899. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 12, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Norma (schooner)
The Norma, a three -masted schooner of 326 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1883 by C. G. White for G. S. Hinsdale of that port. She was lost entering Ten Mile River, November 15, 1899. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 12, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Norma (steamer)
The Shoshone, completed near the headwaters of Snake River in 1866, had a successor twenty-five years later, when Jacob Kamm and J. D. Miller built the steamer Norma at Huntington, expecting to handle an extensive business in transporting the crowds of miners then going into the Seven Devils' country. The Norma's experience was similar to that of the Shoshone, and she never earned a dollar while there. In May, 1895, Capt. W. P. Gray brought her through to Lewiston in safety, and she will probably prove profitable in her new field. She has large carrying capacity on a light draught, and is equipped with engines sixteen by eighty-four inches. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Norma (steamer)
The remarkable trip of the Shoshone through the Snake River canons had remained for a quarter of a century without a parallel, but early in 1895 Jacob Kamm's steamer Norma repeated the performance in command of Capt. W. P. Gray. The experience of the Shoshone had demonstrated that it was practically impossible to get over Copper Ledge Falls without striking after passing, so Captain Gray built an extra bulkhead and filled the forward hold with cordwood to help withstand the shock. After leaving the landing above the falls, the steamer darted forward like an arrow and was carried down at such speed that she struck the cliff with great force but did not injure the bow seriously. She then bounded off, swung into midstream, and, like a racehorse, shot into Hell Canon, where the river winds like a serpent and the wall rocks tower to such a height that they almost shut out the sun. The torrent is so swift that the passage is always filled with mist. After passing the obstructions at the head of the run, the steamer
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Norma (sternwheeler)
1910 Sternwheeler, built at Huntington, Oregon in 1891 by J. D. Miller and Jacob Kamm. Captain W. P. Gray crammed the Norma full of staging lumber to ward off the blows of sharp rocks. He traversed down the Snake River in much the same fashion as the Shoshone and wrecked at the mouth of the Deschutes. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Norman Morrison
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 513. Barry M. Gough, The Royal Navy and the Northwest Coast, p. 90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Normandie (1)
The NORMANDIE was a three-masted, square-rigged sailing ship built in Hartford, Connecticut, by L. Smith, in 1833; 500 tons, 130 feet 6 inches x 29 feet x 14 feet 6 inches (length x beam x depth of hold); according to a contemporary account, her cabin was "in cream color, polished and ornamented with gold". From 1834 to 1837 she served in the Havre Old Line (later: Union Line) of New York-Le Havre packets, during which period her average westward passage was 37 days (shortest passage, 26 days; longest passage, 48 days). From 1837 onwards she was a transient, sailing between New York and New Orleans, and New York and Liverpool; she last arrived at New York out of Newcastle, England, in September 1844. In December 1844 she "went missing" on a journey from Liverpool to New York [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-Riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 97, 213-214, 284-285].
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
Normandie (2)
Further to the correspondence on the "La Normandie". She was the first ship of it's class and the only one built outside France. It was originally intended to name her "Ville de New York" but she was launched as the "Normandie". The prefix "La" was added to her name about four years later to bring her into line with the other mail steamers. When she ran her speed trials, she attained 17.25 knots - well in excess of the required speed. When she went into service, the harbour at Havre wasn't deep enough for her and she was specially fitted so that she could take on ballast aft while at sea to increase the efficiency of her screw. She ran without incident until January 1891 when she rammed and sank the Havre tug "Abeille" with the loss of six of the tug's crew. >From 1900 - 1912 she was used on the West Indies service and in August 1912 was sold for L22,500 to the Forth Shipbreaking Co. and broken up.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 August 1997]
Normandie (3)
NORMANDIE, 79,280 tons, maiden voyage in 1935, one of the outstanding ocean liners of all time, and the only French holder of the "Blue Riband". This vessel was laid up at New York in August 1939, at the beginning of World War II, and was seized by U.S. authorities when the U.S. entered the war in December 1941. She was gutted by fire and sank on 9 February 1942, as she was being outfitted, as the LAFAYETTE, for duties as a troop-carrier. She was eventually refloated, but in December 1946 was towed to Newark, New Jersey, and scrapped.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 August 1997]
Normannia
See AUGUSTA VICTORIA.
Citation: