Northern Pacific (steamer)
Steel steamer; 3 decks, 2 masts; 8,255 tons; 509.5 x 63.1 x 20.6 feet; 224 crew; 800 passengers; 23 knots. Sons, Pbiladelpbia. BeBuilt in 1914 by William Cramp and between 1915 and 1917, operated by the Great Northern Pacific Steamship Company between Portland and San Francisco with her sister ship, Great Northern. Purchased by the government for war service as troopship, 1917. Purchased by Admiral Line, February 6, 1922, for Pacific coastwise service but burned off Cape May, New Jersey, February 8, 1922. Giles T. Brown, Principal Vessels in the Pacific Coastwise Trade, Ships that sail no more , Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1966 p. 243-257
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Northern Pacific (steamer)
The important new vessels to reach the Pacific Northwest for regularly scheduled service in 1915 and, indeed, two of the finest coastal passenger steamships ever to fly the American flag, were the Great Northern and Northern Pacific of the Great Northern Pacific Steamship Company. The steamship company was jointly operated by the Great Northern and Northern Pacific Railways and was organized by James J. Hill to compete with the rail passenger traffic of the rival Southern Pacific between Portland and San Francisco. Hill had sought rail routes into California, but having been consistently baulked in his efforts, he was determined that his new steamships should equal or better the schedule of the rival line's crack Shasta Limited and share in the lucrative Panama-Pacific Exposition traffic to San Francisco. The result was the two fastest coastwise vessels ever built. These ships, identical in every respect, created a sensation in the shipping world when they were completed by William Cramp & Sons at Philadelphi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library