Novelty (schooner)
The Novelty, a four - masted schooner of 592 tons, was built at North Bend, Ore., -in 1886 by and for A. M. Simpson, the first of her rig on the Pacific, as well as the largest schooner built up to that time. Like the Louis, she was laid down as a s t e a m e r hull, the steam schooner coming into prominence in the lumber trade at that time; but as there was some doubt as to whether a steamer of that size would pay, she was given a bald headed schooner rig until it was decided whether to engine her. As it t u r n e d out, the Novelty remained a four-masted schooner to the end of her days, being wrecked 14 miles north of Cape Arago, Oregon, October 23, 1907. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 12, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Novelty (schooner)
September 20, 1907 Four mast schooner, 168' long, 584 tons, 39'wide and 13'deep, built at Coos Bay, by John Kruse. The vessel went on the rocks between Coos and Umpqua. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Novelty (schooner)
The Novelty, a four - masted schooner of 592 tons, was built at North Bend, Ore., -in 1886 by and for A. M. Simpson, the first of her rig on the Pacific, as well as the largest schooner built up to that time. Like the Louis, she was laid down as a s t e a m e r hull, the steam schooner coming into prominence in the lumber trade at that time; but as there was some doubt as to whether a steamer of that size would pay, she was given a bald headed schooner rig until it was decided whether to engine her. As it t u r n e d out, the Novelty remained a four-masted schooner to the end of her days, being wrecked 14 miles north of Cape Arago, Oregon, October 23, 1907. John Lyman,Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905,The Marine Digest. July 12, 1941, p. 2
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Novelty (schooner)
The four-masted schooner Novelty, 592 tons, built at Coos Bay in 1886 as the first Pacific Coast-built vessel of that rig, went ashore on the rocks between Coos Bay and the Umpqua River September 20. She was owned by the Simpson Lumber Company Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 135.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library