Queen Of The Pacific
Queen of the Pacific lies on her side off the end of the wharf, Port Hanford, 1888. Gerald Best. Ships and Narrow Gauge Railways, p. 32.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of The Pacific (iron Steamer)
Three deck vessel with two masts, 2,727 tons 331.2 x 38.5 x 21.3 feet; 79 crew; 307 passengers; 13.7 knots. Built in 1882 in Philadelphia. Before 1916 operated by the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. 1916-1932, operated by the Admiral Line in the Alaskan trade. Sold to Japanese interests under her own power for scrapping in 1935. Gilbert Brown. Ships that sail no more Brought by Villard to Seattle. BNG, 221-3,240-6. Built as the Queen of the Pacific, renamed Queen, finally Queen Maru, The Marine Digest. March 23, 1985, p. 9.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of The Pacific (steamer)
American passenger steamship, 2,727 tons, stranded on Clatsop Spit, September 5, 1883. In an allout salvage effort utilizing the services of a fleet of tugs the liner was refloated. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of The Pacific (steamer)
Built at Philadelphia in 1882 as Queen of the Pacific, this iron single-screw steamer of 1,700 tons, was 330 feet in length, with a beam of 38.5, and was powered by a compound engine, 45 and 90 x 48. In September, 1883, while carrying a party of dignitaries to Portland on their way north to participate in the completion of the Northern Pacific Railway at Tacoma, she ran on Clatsop Spit during a period of heavy fog and smoke from forest fires inland (the latter being a frequent hazard to navigation in the Northwest during summer and fall months in early days). The tugs General Miles, Astoria, Pioneer, Columbia and Brenham finally succeeded in freeing her, being awarded $60,000 for their trouble. The Pacific Coast Steamship Co. also had to make good the value of several hundred tons of cargo jettisoned to lighten the stranded vessel. In the summer of 1901 she struck a rock in Alaskan waters, but again escaped with minor damage. Although the Columbia of the San Francisco-Portland service was the first American m
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of The Pacific (steamer)
The Pacific Coast Steamship Company added the Queen of the Pacific to their northern fleet in 1882, the steamer reaching Portland on ber first trip September 18th in charge of Capt. Ezekiel Alexander. She was built at Philadelphia, and was three hundred and thirty feet long, thirty-eight feet five inches beam, and twenty-one feet two inches depth of hold, 1,697 tons register, with engines forty-five and ninety by forty-eight inches. She continued running on the Portland route until December, 1883, when she was retired. In September, 1883, while en route to Portland with a large party of notables on their way north to witness the driving of the last spike on the Northern Pacific Railroad, she stranded on Clatsop Spit, and came very near proving a total wreck. The tugs Pioneer, Brenham, Astoria, Columbia and General Miles finally succeeded in floating her, receiving over $60,000 salvage. Heavy fog and smoke caused the accident, as the steamer was in charge of A. D. Wass, a pilot of unquestioned ability. She ha
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of The Pacific (steamer)
The new steamship Queen of the Pacific grounded on Clatsop Spit, September 5, 1883 and was compelled to throw over several hundred tons of cargo. At the following high tide the tugs Pioneer, Brenham, Columbia and Astoria, assisted by the General Miles, towed her off. The Queen had the narrowest escape of any vessel that ever grounded there. The tugboats, after considerable litigation, were awarded $65,000 for their services. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 315.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library